web site hit counter Hannibal Rising - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Hannibal Rising

Availability: Ready to download

HE IS ONE OF THE MOST HAUNTING CHARACTERS IN ALL OF LITERATURE. AT LAST THE EVOLUTION OF HIS EVIL IS REVEALED. Hannibal Lecter emerges from the nightmare of the Eastern Front, a boy in the snow, mute, with a chain around his neck. He seems utterly alone, but he has brought his demons with him. Hannibal’s uncle, a noted painter, finds him in a Soviet orphanage and brings him to HE IS ONE OF THE MOST HAUNTING CHARACTERS IN ALL OF LITERATURE. AT LAST THE EVOLUTION OF HIS EVIL IS REVEALED. Hannibal Lecter emerges from the nightmare of the Eastern Front, a boy in the snow, mute, with a chain around his neck. He seems utterly alone, but he has brought his demons with him. Hannibal’s uncle, a noted painter, finds him in a Soviet orphanage and brings him to France, where Hannibal will live with his uncle and his uncle’s beautiful and exotic wife, Lady Murasaki. Lady Murasaki helps Hannibal to heal. With her help he flourishes, becoming the youngest person ever admitted to medical school in France. But Hannibal’s demons visit him and torment him. When he is old enough, he visits them in turn. He discovers he has gifts beyond the academic, and in that epiphany, Hannibal Lecter becomes death’s prodigy.


Compare

HE IS ONE OF THE MOST HAUNTING CHARACTERS IN ALL OF LITERATURE. AT LAST THE EVOLUTION OF HIS EVIL IS REVEALED. Hannibal Lecter emerges from the nightmare of the Eastern Front, a boy in the snow, mute, with a chain around his neck. He seems utterly alone, but he has brought his demons with him. Hannibal’s uncle, a noted painter, finds him in a Soviet orphanage and brings him to HE IS ONE OF THE MOST HAUNTING CHARACTERS IN ALL OF LITERATURE. AT LAST THE EVOLUTION OF HIS EVIL IS REVEALED. Hannibal Lecter emerges from the nightmare of the Eastern Front, a boy in the snow, mute, with a chain around his neck. He seems utterly alone, but he has brought his demons with him. Hannibal’s uncle, a noted painter, finds him in a Soviet orphanage and brings him to France, where Hannibal will live with his uncle and his uncle’s beautiful and exotic wife, Lady Murasaki. Lady Murasaki helps Hannibal to heal. With her help he flourishes, becoming the youngest person ever admitted to medical school in France. But Hannibal’s demons visit him and torment him. When he is old enough, he visits them in turn. He discovers he has gifts beyond the academic, and in that epiphany, Hannibal Lecter becomes death’s prodigy.

30 review for Hannibal Rising

  1. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I have nothing against making money. Money is important and I don't begrudge anyone their coin. That said.... Why Oh Why??? Did Thomas Harris write this lifeless drivel? I respect a money grab, the studio wanted a Hannibal prequel so Thomas Harris decided to write it. But is this the best he could do? I have a better back story for Hannibal in my head right now and its better than this. I didn't even recognize the Hannibal Lecter I've come to know and love over 3 novels, 2 movies(I still haven't I have nothing against making money. Money is important and I don't begrudge anyone their coin. That said.... Why Oh Why??? Did Thomas Harris write this lifeless drivel? I respect a money grab, the studio wanted a Hannibal prequel so Thomas Harris decided to write it. But is this the best he could do? I have a better back story for Hannibal in my head right now and its better than this. I didn't even recognize the Hannibal Lecter I've come to know and love over 3 novels, 2 movies(I still haven't watched the movie Hannibal) and a deeply underated tv show. The young Hannibal in this book is pedestrian. Not charming, not scary, not a genius just meh. What an awful and disappointing end to an amazing series. PLEASE DON'T READ THIS BOOK! Hooked On Books May Read-A-Thon Around the Year in 52 Books: A Book With An Antagonist/Villain Point of View

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Hannibal Rising (Hannibal Lecter #4), Thomas Harris Hannibal Rising is a novel by American author Thomas Harris, published in 2006. It is a prequel to his three previous books featuring his most famous character, the cannibalistic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter. Opening in Lithuania during 1941, Hannibal Lecter is eight years old and living in a castle with his parents and sister, Mischa. With the castle located near the eastern front of World War II, the Lecter family escapes to their lodge t Hannibal Rising (Hannibal Lecter #4), Thomas Harris Hannibal Rising is a novel by American author Thomas Harris, published in 2006. It is a prequel to his three previous books featuring his most famous character, the cannibalistic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter. Opening in Lithuania during 1941, Hannibal Lecter is eight years old and living in a castle with his parents and sister, Mischa. With the castle located near the eastern front of World War II, the Lecter family escapes to their lodge to elude the advancing German troops. With the castle abandoned, it is soon raided by Germans and civilians aiding them, their hidden art collection among the stolen loot. Three years later, an advancing Soviet tank stops at the Lecter family's lodge looking for water, only to be bombed by a German Stuka, the explosion killing all but the children. Surviving in the lodge, Hannibal and Mischa are captured when six deserters appear: Vladis Grutas, Zigmas Milko, Bronys Grentz, Enrikas Dortlich, Petras Kolnas and Kazys Porvik. Storming and looting the lodge, they lock the Lecters in the barn. Running low on supplies, the soldiers soon take Mischa; realizing they intend to cannibalize her, Hannibal tries to stop them, only to have his arm broken before he blacks out. Hannibal is later spotted by a Soviet tank crew, wearing shackles and rendered mute. Returned to Lecter Castle, now a Soviet orphanage, Hannibal is found to be irreparably traumatized by the ordeal. Removed from the orphanage by his uncle Robert Lecter, Hannibal goes to live with him in France with his aunt, Lady Murasaki. Visiting a marketplace with his aunt, Lecter assaults butcher Paul Momund when he insults Murasaki. Count Lecter, learning of the slight against his wife, violently confronts the butcher and collapses and subsequently dies from a heart attack. Losing most of the Count's estate to death duties, Lecter and Murasaki move across France, and Lecter flourishes as a medical student, assisting by preparing cadavers for lessons. ... Books of Hannibal Lecter series: Red Dragon, The Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal, Hannibal Rising. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: نوزدهم ماه دسامبر سال 2012میلادی عنوان: پرونده هانیبال (طلوع هانیبال): کتاب چهارم از سری هانیبال لکتر؛ نویسنده: توماس هریس؛ مترجم: مجید نوریان؛ تهران، چکاوک،1389، چاپ بعدی 1390؛ در 366ص؛ شابک 9789648957242؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی سده 21م عنوان: ظهور هانیبال: کتاب چهارم از سری هانیبال لکتر؛ نویسنده: توماس هریس؛ مترجم: اصغر اندرودی؛ تهران، نشر دایره، 1397؛ در 364ص؛ شابک 9786005722499؛ دکتر لکتر یک آدمخوار است که بارها دیگران را وادار به کارهایی همچون بلعیدن زبان خود یا کندن پوست صورت خود کرده است؛ این داستان چگونگی پیدایش «هانیبال لکتر» را پی میگیرد تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 03/08/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jess☺️

    Hannibal Rising by Thomas Harris is the 4th and final book in the series, but being honest I feel I need a Hannibal Rising part 2 as this book only takes you from Hannibal being a child in the war untill 18 and pumped up on revenge which to be honest I understand ( He's like a murderous James Bond 🔪) It's then a leap to when we meet him in red dragon I would like the story in between please as I personally can't really understand the jump from revenge to the next step eating people 🤢 But putting t Hannibal Rising by Thomas Harris is the 4th and final book in the series, but being honest I feel I need a Hannibal Rising part 2 as this book only takes you from Hannibal being a child in the war untill 18 and pumped up on revenge which to be honest I understand ( He's like a murderous James Bond 🔪) It's then a leap to when we meet him in red dragon I would like the story in between please as I personally can't really understand the jump from revenge to the next step eating people 🤢 But putting that aside it's still Hannibal bloody, nerve tingling, and a little sad and heart breaking. I would definitely recommend this whole series if dark,gory and bloody thrilling and a little twisted is your thing.📖

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Ok, this is another book I had to read before I saw the movie. I cannot believe I wasted money on it. I even bought it in hardcover! Sometimes I can be such a dunce. This has to be the worst pre-quel-sequel ever! There is no reason to read this book, or see the movie! But if you are a fan, like I am, don't feel guilty, do what you want. This is my least favorite of Harris's "Hannibal Saga." His reasoning for Lecter's particular "taste" is, get this, REVENGE. How lame! It doesn't seem like any real Ok, this is another book I had to read before I saw the movie. I cannot believe I wasted money on it. I even bought it in hardcover! Sometimes I can be such a dunce. This has to be the worst pre-quel-sequel ever! There is no reason to read this book, or see the movie! But if you are a fan, like I am, don't feel guilty, do what you want. This is my least favorite of Harris's "Hannibal Saga." His reasoning for Lecter's particular "taste" is, get this, REVENGE. How lame! It doesn't seem like any real serial killer would start their rampage to seek revenge, although in his case, his childhood was emotionally disturbing. As of still, I was not impressed, not to mention, a subplot involving an underground network of profiteering World War II criminals (Lecter's enemies), specializing in stolen artwork...come on! Oh, by the way, they didn't include this in the film. Everything about Harris's "young" Lecter seemed too far fetched, from his "medical studies" and re-illustrations for anatomy texts, to his Japanese geisha-like aunt/love-interest who lives in Paris. Even the concept that the-then-child Hannibal had to run and hide from the Nazis did not seem fathomable. I read somewhere that Harris had "gone gay" for Lecter after turning out the "disappointing" last installment called merely, Hannibal. Which kind of offends me, but not for their use of illustrating an author's relationship with their character as homosexual, but that that novel was not disappointing. [Juilanne Moore as Clarice is another story.] Hannibal, if I must say, is a truly better piece of fiction and more true to the Lecter that we all learned to love in The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon. Why can't Dr. Lecter be the cannibalizing psychiatrist who helps out the FBI every once in a while? This book has forever ruined that image for me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    This book did it's job in relaying the younger years of the infamous Hannibal Lecter, but it never really went beyond that. Whilst it goes some way towards providing an understanding of how he became the serial killer of previous books in this series, it only covered a small selection of years. It felt like this series needed a second prequel to bridge the gap between the cold-blooded revenge sought out here and the cannibalism and anarchy later in his life. Also, I found that much of the high s This book did it's job in relaying the younger years of the infamous Hannibal Lecter, but it never really went beyond that. Whilst it goes some way towards providing an understanding of how he became the serial killer of previous books in this series, it only covered a small selection of years. It felt like this series needed a second prequel to bridge the gap between the cold-blooded revenge sought out here and the cannibalism and anarchy later in his life. Also, I found that much of the high stakes tension was removed, with the perspective being so closely linked to Lecter himself. This was enjoyable enough, but felt like an entirely different read when compared to the chills and thrills previously experienced from this character.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jamieson

    Right off, I have to say that I love this book. I have been waiting, along with many others, for years to find out how Hannibal Lecter became what he became. I wanted to know what caused his transformation into one of the most frightening killers in literature (and the movies) known to man. I was thrilled beyond words to hear that Harris was writing a new book and that a new movie based on the book was in production. I knew that Harris was writing the screenplay. Aside from that, I knew nothing. I Right off, I have to say that I love this book. I have been waiting, along with many others, for years to find out how Hannibal Lecter became what he became. I wanted to know what caused his transformation into one of the most frightening killers in literature (and the movies) known to man. I was thrilled beyond words to hear that Harris was writing a new book and that a new movie based on the book was in production. I knew that Harris was writing the screenplay. Aside from that, I knew nothing. I wanted, needed to know more. Now that I do, what can I say except that knowledge is power. Despite bad reviews (of the movie and the book), I loved HANNIBAL RISING. It’s a beautiful haunting work that stays with you long after you have read it. It’s not just a simple tale of revenge, but one of lust and wanting, of judgement and secrets that is beautifully written. Harris uses quick short sentences to instill images into your mind, to show you the change Hannibal goes through to become what he is. Personally, I think others are none to pleased with Hannibal Rising mostly because they were expecting another Silence of the Lambs. Hannibal Rising is really historical fiction, seeing as how most of it is set right after the second world war. I knew that there couuld be no book like Silence of the Lambs, that Hannibal would probably be a quieter, subtler book. I was half right. There is beauty in the blood here; the harrowing images of death are subdued and gorgesouly written but most shocking is that you feel empathy towards Hannibal Lecter. Knowing what I know now of his character, is it any wonder why he became a monster? Judgement and revenge come in many forms. I think that’s what puts most people off about the novel. You feel sorry for him, sorry for Hannibal Lecter. You come away wondering if you would have done the same, had someone eaten your little sister. You come away wondering if you have a monster waiting to rise up. Even mosnters have feelings, no matter how inhuman they may seem. HANNIBAL RISING is probably one of the most beautiful books I have ever read. Hannibal Lecter will stay with me for a long time and I can’t wait to read the tale of his beginning all over again.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    I’m right in the middle with this one. I didn’t love it but I didn’t hate it either. Some parts I thoroughly enjoyed and couldn’t get enough of, while others quite nearly bored me to tears. I was a little disappointed because the previous three books are just so damn good and this one lacks the spark the others had. And I was expecting this to pick up where the last book left off so when I discovered it was about Hannibal’s origins I was a tad let down. Don’t get me wrong, it was interesting to I’m right in the middle with this one. I didn’t love it but I didn’t hate it either. Some parts I thoroughly enjoyed and couldn’t get enough of, while others quite nearly bored me to tears. I was a little disappointed because the previous three books are just so damn good and this one lacks the spark the others had. And I was expecting this to pick up where the last book left off so when I discovered it was about Hannibal’s origins I was a tad let down. Don’t get me wrong, it was interesting to learn about his past and what made him into what he is but it’s just not what I was expecting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael Munkvold

    "Nothing happened to me, Officer Starling. I happened. You can't reduce me to a set of influences. You've given up good and evil for behaviorism... nothing is ever anybody's fault. Look at me Officer Starling. Can you stand to say I'm evil?" - Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs Hannibal Lecter is the bogeyman - a dark and terrible figure from a child's nightmares who lurks in the shadows, waiting to pounce. A big part of what makes him scary is his mystery, the fact that you don't really know "Nothing happened to me, Officer Starling. I happened. You can't reduce me to a set of influences. You've given up good and evil for behaviorism... nothing is ever anybody's fault. Look at me Officer Starling. Can you stand to say I'm evil?" - Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs Hannibal Lecter is the bogeyman - a dark and terrible figure from a child's nightmares who lurks in the shadows, waiting to pounce. A big part of what makes him scary is his mystery, the fact that you don't really know who or what he is. He owes us no explanation for why he kills and eats people - he just does it. He simply is. In the first three books in the Lecter series - Red Dragon, The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal - he is as powerful and unknowable as nature, a force of primal evil. Hannibal Rising, a prequel that portrays Lecter's evolution into the cannibal serial killer we all know and love, mucks it all up by trying - and failing miserably - to humanize him. It reduces one of literature's great monsters to a run-of-the-mill victim of a lousy childhood. Explaining him diminishes him. I don't want to know what makes Lecter tick, I just want to watch him go. Harris doesn't seem to understand this, and so reading Hannibal Rising is kind of like reading a Psychology 101 term paper with gratuitously bloody murder scenes. A grand guignol character like Lecter is bound to be over-the-top, but Hannibal Rising's lurid theatrics make him downright corny. The son of nobility, poor widdle Hannibal loses his parents in a Nazi airstrike and watches as a group of deserters kill and eat his beloved sister Mischa. He spends the next few years as the ward of a Dickensian orphanage, until he is adopted by his Japanese step-aunt, Lady Murasaki. He has a quasi-incestuous crush on her, but that doesn't stop him from tracking down each of his sister's killers with implausible ease and executing them in operatic fashion. It's all so melodramatic that it's a wonder Harris didn't end it with Lecter finding out he'd been switched at birth. All the melodrama would be fine if Lecter still had the sinister, snake-like charm of the earlier books, but the Lecter of Hannibal Rising is a stereotypical angry young man whining about the hardness of the world, like a flesh-eating Holden Caulfield. In the other Lecter books, I couldn't stop reading about him; in this one, I couldn't wait to be done with him. Harris was reportedly strong-armed into writing Hannibal Rising by Dino de Laurentiis, the producer of the film series, and it's obvious that his heart isn't in it. The story doesn't go anywhere worth going: Lecter kills some people while spouting seventh grade-level poetics ("I miss you every day - you will be avenged!"), and that's about it. In contrast with Lecter's fascinating pseudo-romance with Clarice Starling, the pseudo-romance between Lecter and Murasaki is just... icky. Finally, the conclusion - Hannibal Lecter goes to college! - is flat and unsatisfying, making the whole book a waste of time. Hannibal Rising is hardly the first bad sequel novel - Psycho II, anyone? - but it's the first one I can remember that I found depressing to read. The whole Lecter series is now tainted, and that's a damn shame. One of the greatest villains in the history of literature has been declawed, his otherwordly evil reduced to a mere set of influences. He deserves better, and so do we.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This book is so fucking abysmal that I can’t finish it. It’s a very rare thing for me not to get through a book even if it’s a struggle. I’ll torture myself to get to the end because I get this feeling like I’m cheating myself and the author if I don’t. If someone else gets through the 323 pages of wasted paper god bless you. Every word reads like an exercise in how to bilk the public out of a couple of more dollars with a character that accidentally became famous. Hannibal Lechter is one of the This book is so fucking abysmal that I can’t finish it. It’s a very rare thing for me not to get through a book even if it’s a struggle. I’ll torture myself to get to the end because I get this feeling like I’m cheating myself and the author if I don’t. If someone else gets through the 323 pages of wasted paper god bless you. Every word reads like an exercise in how to bilk the public out of a couple of more dollars with a character that accidentally became famous. Hannibal Lechter is one of the great evil characters of modern American writing and cinema and the book “Hannibal Rising” does it’s very best to destroy all of his appeal. The whole draw of Hannibal Lechter is that he exudes menace and villainy while still showing a wholly respectable exterior. The vile behavior bubbling underneath only peeks out and seemingly has no basis for its existence. Lechter seems to be evil for no other reason then that he is. In “Hannibal Rising”, Thomas Harris gives us some reasoning for his malevolence. Hannibal goes mad because he is forced to watch some bad guys eat his little sister while trapped and starving in a cabin during the winter after the Nazis slaughter the rest of his family. So instead of being the ultimate bad guy himself, Harris makes Lechter someone to sort of sympathize with. Thus ruining one of the great evils of the last 20 years or so. Despite the total absurdity of the story itself you would be able to forgive Harris the mistake of writing this book. After all, it is a character he created and perhaps he felt like there was more to the story that he needed to tell. Unfortunately it doesn’t read that way at all. It reads like the novel was written to be a screenplay from the minute he put pen to page (or finger to keyboard as it more likely was). The dialogue is brittle and unimpressive and the description and narrative are sorely lacking. It’s all like it was written with the intention to touch it up later. Every word that passed by my eyes made it seem more and more like there’s no other interest here then in stealing my money. I’m going to do my best to forget that both the book and the movie “Hannibal Rising” ever existed so I can go back to loving Hannibal Lechter.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Number 4 in the Hannibal Lecter series. Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Hannibal the Cannibal) is one of fiction most iconic and revered psychopaths. How does one become a psychopath? Is it born in us? Is it our early environment that dictated who we become? In this book you may not find the clinical answers to these questions but you will find out just why Hannibal the Cannibal is what he is and what drives him. There are quite a few negative reviews out there but this is not one of them. Maybe I’m just anot Number 4 in the Hannibal Lecter series. Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Hannibal the Cannibal) is one of fiction most iconic and revered psychopaths. How does one become a psychopath? Is it born in us? Is it our early environment that dictated who we become? In this book you may not find the clinical answers to these questions but you will find out just why Hannibal the Cannibal is what he is and what drives him. There are quite a few negative reviews out there but this is not one of them. Maybe I’m just another closeted psychopath but I can’t help feeling a bit of empathy for Dr. Lecter. The book starts near the end of the 2nd World War and recounts the early life of Hannibal with his parents and his much loved younger sister Mischa. As the war draws closer to its inevitable end the acts of atrocities grow beyond belief. No more so than the horrors that Hannibal and his sister are subjected to. Horrors so unimaginable that when Hannibal is found wandering near death by some soviet soldiers, not only, can’t he remember what has happened but he no longer speaks. Eventually Hannibal’s uncle, who lives in Paris, tracks him down and takes his mute nephew back to Paris with him. The uncle’s wife The Lady Murasaki takes Hannibal under her wing and with much love, care and understanding Hannibal learns to talk once again. As the years go by The Lady Murasaki become the only shinning light in Hannibal’s world. A light that Hannibal can’t do with out and will go to any length to make sure it continues to burn, no matter what extremes he has to go to. Little by little Hannibal recall the horror that ended Mischa’s, his sister, life and with that memory comes the burning need for revenge. Revenge on the men that are responsible for all the pain done to both Mischa and himself. This then is what shaped Hannibal to become the monster we all know. Unlike some other review I found this book absolutely riveting. Hannibal Lecter is so enigmatic, discovering his origins were a must for me. A fabulous prequel to all that went before. Awesome 4/5 stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    It wasn't anything that I thought it was going to be, which was surprising. This was a true prequel to the character of Hannibal, and I was rather wishing we could have a continuation of him as an adult, post-Clarise, but it just wasn't to be. That being said, it was fine as a novel and psychological thriller, but not so much as a continuation of a franchise. It might have been more enjoyable had it been a character of a different name. You know how us readers can get. We want what we want and get It wasn't anything that I thought it was going to be, which was surprising. This was a true prequel to the character of Hannibal, and I was rather wishing we could have a continuation of him as an adult, post-Clarise, but it just wasn't to be. That being said, it was fine as a novel and psychological thriller, but not so much as a continuation of a franchise. It might have been more enjoyable had it been a character of a different name. You know how us readers can get. We want what we want and get pissy when we're thwarted. I know I am, but fundamentally I found it enjoyable.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    Had it been not Hannibal Lecter, I would have given this book 3 stars, for it is a reasonably entertaining tale of revenge. But as an explanation for how the monster Hannibal the Cannibal came into being, it is a woefully inadequate explanation. We go back to Hannibal's childhood in Lithuania and the inhuman treatment he was subjected to by itinerant looters during Stalin's advance into East Europe. To be fair, the tale is horrific enough - but what actually happened is hinted at over and over ag Had it been not Hannibal Lecter, I would have given this book 3 stars, for it is a reasonably entertaining tale of revenge. But as an explanation for how the monster Hannibal the Cannibal came into being, it is a woefully inadequate explanation. We go back to Hannibal's childhood in Lithuania and the inhuman treatment he was subjected to by itinerant looters during Stalin's advance into East Europe. To be fair, the tale is horrific enough - but what actually happened is hinted at over and over again so that any possible suspense is negated. And moreover, it doesn't actually explain how Hannibal developed a taste for human meat, even though it provides a reason for him going mad. And it's also puzzling how Hannibal was able to remain a mystery man in the US. A simple phone call to France would have brought up his back story. A occupational hazard of writing prequels, I guess.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Yates

    A must-read for the fans of Hannibal Lecter. I almost felt ready to give up on this one until I was about a quarter of the way through. Harris is telling the story of Hannibal's childhood/formative years through the veil of Hannibal's actual memories. Earlier memories are fragmented and as a result, the earlier part of the book is also very fragmented. It rambles a bit here and there, but once the memories become more fleshed out, the book does as well and greatly grows in appeal. Not that the ear A must-read for the fans of Hannibal Lecter. I almost felt ready to give up on this one until I was about a quarter of the way through. Harris is telling the story of Hannibal's childhood/formative years through the veil of Hannibal's actual memories. Earlier memories are fragmented and as a result, the earlier part of the book is also very fragmented. It rambles a bit here and there, but once the memories become more fleshed out, the book does as well and greatly grows in appeal. Not that the early part of the book is dull, it just doesn't flow too well for my reading style. Overall, I found Hannibal Rising to be a very engaging book that enlightens the reader to a large part of how Hannibal Lecter became one of the most fearsome villains in all of literature. I also found the historical aspect of the novel to be very interesting. As the story progresses, we see a glimpse of the lives of the survivors of the Second World War and get some idea of what life in Europe during those hard times was like. A fascinating novel and one that I'd heartily recommend to those that have enjoyed the previous books in the "series." I'd also say that if you've only seen the films, you'd be fine reading this novel without having actually read the previous ones

  14. 4 out of 5

    Branwen Sedai *of the Brown Ajah*

    "Do you think God intended to eat Isaac, and that's why he told Abraham to kill him?" "No, Hannibal, of course not. The angel intervenes in time." "Not always," Hannibal said. In this book, we follow the infamous Hannibal Lecter through his childhood and adolescence. We witness the unspeakable act of deranged cruelty that had forever changed him and made him into the person he would eventually become. We see him begin to grow sane again in the home of his Uncle and step-aunt. We watch as he kills f "Do you think God intended to eat Isaac, and that's why he told Abraham to kill him?" "No, Hannibal, of course not. The angel intervenes in time." "Not always," Hannibal said. In this book, we follow the infamous Hannibal Lecter through his childhood and adolescence. We witness the unspeakable act of deranged cruelty that had forever changed him and made him into the person he would eventually become. We see him begin to grow sane again in the home of his Uncle and step-aunt. We watch as he kills for the first time, in vengeance, and then learns that he actually enjoys it, which sets him on his current path. This book was absolutely so fascinating I had a hard time putting it down! I loved every second of it and didn't even want it to end! Despite the fact that at times, it was very brutal and sad, it continuously carried that sense of human nature, and that hope exists in every situation, no matter how bleak. It was fantastic to see that Hannibal was not always the monster he ended up becoming. There were scenes of violence and scenes of beauty. Moments of truth and moments of tragedy. Yet through it all, Hannibal was a survivor. And no matter what sort of crime he committed, you have to respect him for never giving up.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    3.5 My interest level fluctuated with the story. At times Harris seemed too impersonal and dry with his writing style, while other times it flowed well and I wondered why I questioned his style before. When in the head of Hannibal, the story is at its most intriguing, not just because the character is done so well (he is), but because it seems Harris finds firmer footing. There's not much head hopping, yet it still feels a bit disconnected, especially when the author tells too much, explaining in 3.5 My interest level fluctuated with the story. At times Harris seemed too impersonal and dry with his writing style, while other times it flowed well and I wondered why I questioned his style before. When in the head of Hannibal, the story is at its most intriguing, not just because the character is done so well (he is), but because it seems Harris finds firmer footing. There's not much head hopping, yet it still feels a bit disconnected, especially when the author tells too much, explaining in lines to the reader what should be shown instead. With the nightmarish events, I can see how someone like Hannibal could die inside as a child to emerge as an intellectual shell later on. His connection with his stepmother is just bizarre, but fascinating and somehow fitting. Lots explained about how Hannibal earned his nickname later on, his experiences and development of skills and medical knowledge. Even with the trauma, surely he had in him somewhere already something that could emerge a monster. We all have capacity for evil, but I doubt we all have the capacity to have this level of apathy and emptiness. Overall the author filled in the past of Hannibal that he'd sketched in later events. Silence of the Lambs stands as better because of the mystery and psychological warfare, and Hannibal followed those events by a manhunt and wow of an ending, but this slower unraveling fits into the collection well, even if it's not quite as exciting a read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    I just re-read this novel and ended up adding a star. The best way to approach this novel is as a stand-alone. Pretend you never read any of the other books or saw the movies. You never heard of Clarice Starling. Now, start all over and read this for the delicately crafted characterizations and storyline. Hannibal Lecter is no longer an overworked, over-the-top villain that fans love to hate. He's now a three-dimensional and very human young man who must find his way in post-war Europe. He survi I just re-read this novel and ended up adding a star. The best way to approach this novel is as a stand-alone. Pretend you never read any of the other books or saw the movies. You never heard of Clarice Starling. Now, start all over and read this for the delicately crafted characterizations and storyline. Hannibal Lecter is no longer an overworked, over-the-top villain that fans love to hate. He's now a three-dimensional and very human young man who must find his way in post-war Europe. He survives a horrific episode in childhood and traverses "the bridge of dreams" into adulthood where he consciously rejects powerlessness. Even in the face of his first true love, he keeps his resolve. I enjoyed getting to know this young Hannibal Lecter, seeing him in a rare moment of looking "scruffy." I am sure to re-read Thomas Harris' other Hannibal Lecter books and value the opportunity to peer beneath the doctor's seasoned veneer to the youth who guards his secrets.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Chung

    Hannibal Rising book 4 of the Hannibal Lecter series or the story of Hannibal as a child and what made him the way he is "today". I started off not really invested in this book. The first four chapters are pretty depressing and I hated them. After that the book was pretty good. 4 stars. Hannibal Lecter is the last of his line. They hail from Lithuania. Hannibal was raised at the Lecter Castle that was built five hundred years before by Hannibal the Grim. At eight, Hannibal was an avid student. It Hannibal Rising book 4 of the Hannibal Lecter series or the story of Hannibal as a child and what made him the way he is "today". I started off not really invested in this book. The first four chapters are pretty depressing and I hated them. After that the book was pretty good. 4 stars. Hannibal Lecter is the last of his line. They hail from Lithuania. Hannibal was raised at the Lecter Castle that was built five hundred years before by Hannibal the Grim. At eight, Hannibal was an avid student. It got to a point that his father Count Robert Lecter had to bring in a tutor, Mr. Jacov, for Hannibal since he was so advanced in reading and mathematics. Lecter has a sister Mischa. When we start this story, it is the second day of Operation Barbarossa. Hitler's sweep through Eastern Europe to Russia. Chapters 1 through 4 are dedicated to the slaughter of the family and servants of the castle from German soldiers, traitors and looters. I found this part of the book to be hard to read. I hate reading about suffering. Of course we know Hannibal lived through this ordeal because there are three books that have come before this one. This book is about the aftermath of the war. Hannibal remembers the faces of his enemies. Those that hurt his family. Their faces and words have been captured outside Hannibal's Memory Palace. Hannibal reminds me a little of Arya Stark. He has a death list. After the war, at the age of 13, Hannibal goes to live with his Uncle (his father's brother) in France with his Japanese wife, Lady Murasaki. With her guidance, Hannibal grows to become a man. I found myself rooting for Hannibal throughout this book and reflecting on the other three books in this series. Hannibal has many reasons to be who he is today. Everything just made more sense. I liked that we got to go with him through his journey. His experiences made him strong. He might have come out a bit wicked, but wouldn't we all? "You either get busy living, or get busy dying!" in Hannibal's case it was all about the living.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Arun Divakar

    Except for a very few well written oddities, a prequel/sequel at times serves to trample underfoot the well written work that gave birth to it. Hannibal Rising probably made a bit of mockery at Hannibal Lecter, the genius of a cannibalistic serial killer. For all the finesse displayed by Anthony Hopkins in the movie version, the novel reads like a half hearted attempt to probe into the past of this amazing character. To state it bluntly, this reads like a screenplay disguised as a novel. There is Except for a very few well written oddities, a prequel/sequel at times serves to trample underfoot the well written work that gave birth to it. Hannibal Rising probably made a bit of mockery at Hannibal Lecter, the genius of a cannibalistic serial killer. For all the finesse displayed by Anthony Hopkins in the movie version, the novel reads like a half hearted attempt to probe into the past of this amazing character. To state it bluntly, this reads like a screenplay disguised as a novel. There is very little exertion you need to put in to visualize what happens for all is described as good as on film. Dr.Lecter was an enigma in the previous novels and movies with his acts as random and unpredictable as they come. Thomas Harris tries to put a past behind the character and cooks up a concoction which is quite mind boggling. For all who ever wondered the roots of cannibalism in the good doctor, the answer is REVENGE !!! Absolute Bollocks if you were to ask me !!! The author tries to put up a tale of war crimes, art thieves, a geisha-esque female lead and so many other things to propel the tale on and rushes to a fit-for-hollywood finale. If you were to keep aside the fact that you do not know Hannibal Lecter and none of his traits, then you might enjoy this read. A very light and fast one with not much imaginative faculty to be put to use. Something I picked up were some little three lines from this book : Night Heron revealed By the rising harvest moon - Which is lovelier ?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Rodgers

    When Dino De Laurentiis threatened to go ahead and make a Lecter prequel without Thomas Harris, Mr. Harris responded the best way he knew how. He pulled a remarkable con on Dino, and the public, by destroying Dr. Hannibal Lecter as effectively as possible. Really, how else to explain ? By introducing a nonsensical, ham-fisted backstory, rife with deliberate continuity errors and an implausible denouement at odds with the previous Lecter tales, Harris demythologized his best-known creation and de When Dino De Laurentiis threatened to go ahead and make a Lecter prequel without Thomas Harris, Mr. Harris responded the best way he knew how. He pulled a remarkable con on Dino, and the public, by destroying Dr. Hannibal Lecter as effectively as possible. Really, how else to explain ? By introducing a nonsensical, ham-fisted backstory, rife with deliberate continuity errors and an implausible denouement at odds with the previous Lecter tales, Harris demythologized his best-known creation and demolished the not-so-good doctor's mystique and (once) frightfully vague past. Harris had assured us before that Lecter couldn't be reduced to psychoanalytical influences; the doctor himself mocked anyone who attempted to quantify or pigeonhole him, sometimes with grisly results. By reducing Hannibal Lecter to an angry French student with a lust for revenge hunting the least sympathetic villains imaginable, Harris managed to defang the notorious psychiatrist while making a tidy profit in the meantime. While there are fragments of baroque brilliance in this hopefully last Lecter tale, the story is too contrived and too absurd to be anything but the product of an author who's finally tired of his pet monster's larger-than-life status.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Jones

    A fine novel. My favorite work from Thomas Harris by far. I first met Hannibal Lecter as a monster in Silence of the Lambs. This book falls back and allows readers to learn how Lecter became the monster in the first place. To this I say bravo Mr. Harris as I was rooting for the monster Lecter throughout the book as he tracked down the scum that killed and ate his baby sister. I especially appreciated the creation of the mind palace and how Hannibal enjoys total recall on his memories with the ex A fine novel. My favorite work from Thomas Harris by far. I first met Hannibal Lecter as a monster in Silence of the Lambs. This book falls back and allows readers to learn how Lecter became the monster in the first place. To this I say bravo Mr. Harris as I was rooting for the monster Lecter throughout the book as he tracked down the scum that killed and ate his baby sister. I especially appreciated the creation of the mind palace and how Hannibal enjoys total recall on his memories with the exception of the scorched memories too painful to access. How awful it was for young Lecter to lose his family during the war only to be orphaned and forced share his home, Lecter Castel as an institution for orphaned boys. I was delighted Creaser the family horse survived the war to serve Hannibal once more. The tale was well crafted and presented like a platter of delicacies delicious in every way. I give it 5 stars!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Hicks

    I'm so sorry I can't give this book more than 5 stars. This book gets 100 from me! OMG, Thomas has done it again. He has shown us how Hannibal came to be in this book, and I'm so proud that I sort of figured that I had Hannibal pegged all along. Like I mentioned in the review of Hannibal, I never hated the character, I always respected him and what he does. Because if you think about it, Hannibal kills those that need to be killed. Whether that's right or wrong, that's not for me to decide, but I'm so sorry I can't give this book more than 5 stars. This book gets 100 from me! OMG, Thomas has done it again. He has shown us how Hannibal came to be in this book, and I'm so proud that I sort of figured that I had Hannibal pegged all along. Like I mentioned in the review of Hannibal, I never hated the character, I always respected him and what he does. Because if you think about it, Hannibal kills those that need to be killed. Whether that's right or wrong, that's not for me to decide, but as a fictional character, I love the way Hannibal thinks, and this book gives you intricate details into the life and background of how Hannibal came to be. He's not so bad afterall! The movie was great, but once again, there are details the movie leaves out. YOU really need to read this to understand Hannibal! I'm a fan of Thomas Harris for Life! I don't think he can ever write a bad novel! ahahahahaa

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matt Tandy

    The origins of literatures most famous serial killer ultimately turns out to be a dud. Poorly written, completely uninteresting, lacking severely in character development, Hannibal Rising seems to want to be fan service rather than a seriously written novel. Sometimes it’s better not to know the background of a villain, allowing the insanity to simply be part of the character itself, no explanation necessary. In this case, it’s difficult to feel any empathy for Hannibal as we know what he’s to b The origins of literatures most famous serial killer ultimately turns out to be a dud. Poorly written, completely uninteresting, lacking severely in character development, Hannibal Rising seems to want to be fan service rather than a seriously written novel. Sometimes it’s better not to know the background of a villain, allowing the insanity to simply be part of the character itself, no explanation necessary. In this case, it’s difficult to feel any empathy for Hannibal as we know what he’s to become. His motivations for the initial kills makes sense in a twisted way, yet there’s no real insight as to how he continues beyond the revenge narrative. By the end of the book, there’s no clear picture as to how we meet the good doctor in Red Dragon. Un satisfying to say the least, Hannibal Rising fails to live up to the lofty expectations set by Harris’ earlier books. In a rare instance, the film is far surperior to the book, fleshing out each character much more convincingly.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Love of Hopeless Causes

    I don't know why you'd go through all that effort to write an excellent origin story for Cobra Commander and then Find and Replace the name to Hannibal Lecter. Too many details that never pay off. Interesting structural use of withholding. Harris is a gifted writer, but this didn't work for me. On the one hand, the choice of details makes it feel like it was written for the author and not the audience. On the other, it feels like a tired revenge plot stolen from a Hollywood sock drawer, "Hello, I don't know why you'd go through all that effort to write an excellent origin story for Cobra Commander and then Find and Replace the name to Hannibal Lecter. Too many details that never pay off. Interesting structural use of withholding. Harris is a gifted writer, but this didn't work for me. On the one hand, the choice of details makes it feel like it was written for the author and not the audience. On the other, it feels like a tired revenge plot stolen from a Hollywood sock drawer, "Hello, I'm the Sympathetic Bad Guy Sock Puppet. Don't blink or you'll miss my Save the Kitten moment!" Stephen King says they quit talking to you after awhile. That's gotta suck. Take 2: audiobook not recommended, voice is Country fried when it should be European. I thought I may have been mistaken, but this book still rubs me the wrong way.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    1.0 to 1.5 stars. Okay, after not liking Hannibal, it was an example of pure, unadulterated optimism that I picked up thus book hoping to return to the magic of the first two books of this series. I was wrong, the book was horrible and I learned my lesson. 1.0 to 1.5 stars. Okay, after not liking Hannibal, it was an example of pure, unadulterated optimism that I picked up thus book hoping to return to the magic of the first two books of this series. I was wrong, the book was horrible and I learned my lesson.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ksenia Anske

    The grim and poetic closure to the Hannibal books. A portrait of a child coming to grips with grief, becoming a man you wouldn't want to interest with your scent lest you want to end up in his stomach, albeit elegantly garnished. Hold on to your cheeks, the tastiest morsels of every creature. The grim and poetic closure to the Hannibal books. A portrait of a child coming to grips with grief, becoming a man you wouldn't want to interest with your scent lest you want to end up in his stomach, albeit elegantly garnished. Hold on to your cheeks, the tastiest morsels of every creature.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Miglė

    3.5 stars. I have read the previous parts of this sequel and I really did love them. So there was no "but" if to read this book or not. Plus, there were parts in this book where the action took place in Lithuania, my native country, and that happens so rarely when your country is so small and foreigners barely know it, that this is basically a miracle! So I had to read this. I just had. But... but. It was not what I expected. Well, not entirely, I should say. First of all, the previous books were c 3.5 stars. I have read the previous parts of this sequel and I really did love them. So there was no "but" if to read this book or not. Plus, there were parts in this book where the action took place in Lithuania, my native country, and that happens so rarely when your country is so small and foreigners barely know it, that this is basically a miracle! So I had to read this. I just had. But... but. It was not what I expected. Well, not entirely, I should say. First of all, the previous books were clearly detectives. This one is for sure not. It's more like a historical novel. Many facts about history, military weapons, historical figures... and I'm not really good at history. So sometimes I really wouldn't know what the author meant. And the descriptions of weapons disturbed me, because I couldn't really imagine what they looked like or what they did. Yes, I know. I'm really dumb. Secondly, this book wasn't as frightening as the others. Maybe it's because I watched the movie based on it not even once, but for a few times. And maybe it was because the movie seemed even more scary than the book. When in other books, I was frightened of what kind of terrifying things the author would come up with next. It was just scarier. Plus, this book just leaked action. Everything just went on and on and on, and it felt like Hannibal would feel no struggle going through the hardest parts of his life. But again... maybe it's because I have seen the movie before reading the book. So I could say that Hannibal rising dissapointed me a little bit. But it wasn't really bad. Just.. average. Howeover, I still recommend reading it to all Hannibal Lecter series fans. Just to know how everything started. Especially to those who have not seen the movie yet. Just read it. NOW. And only THEN watch the movie.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nelly Aghabekyan

    I know now why nearly nobody likes this book, the last one in Hannibal Lecter series. It feels rushed, inconsistent with the image of Hannibal we've grown used to from previous novels. Every now and then, I had to stop reading only to remind myself that this is not about the same character as in The Silence of Lambs, not yet. The younger, vengeful version of Hannibal was supposed to draw compassion.. and yet I sympathized with him far less than when he was an established, monstrous villain in hi I know now why nearly nobody likes this book, the last one in Hannibal Lecter series. It feels rushed, inconsistent with the image of Hannibal we've grown used to from previous novels. Every now and then, I had to stop reading only to remind myself that this is not about the same character as in The Silence of Lambs, not yet. The younger, vengeful version of Hannibal was supposed to draw compassion.. and yet I sympathized with him far less than when he was an established, monstrous villain in his older years. I didn't mind reading Hannibal's flashbacks to his childhood experiences in "Hannibal", the third book in series, yet here everything felt.. exaggerated, and a lot less appealing. It's true what most of the critics say - we don't need to know what happened to Hannibal Lecter that resulted in him becoming the monster we see. The unknown is far more intriguing and mesmerizing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    ✨Bean's Books✨

    So, I don't understand why this book is met with such furious hatred among most fans. It was a good story, engaging, likable characters, plot twists as well as the same writing style as the other 3 books. I guess perhaps (at least for me) that the lack of a real climactic ending really puts a damper on the story of Hannibal Lector in its entirety. Or perhaps it's that the origin story read in this book doesn't seem to fit the unforgettable and infamous Dr. Hannibal "the Cannibal" Lector. I don't So, I don't understand why this book is met with such furious hatred among most fans. It was a good story, engaging, likable characters, plot twists as well as the same writing style as the other 3 books. I guess perhaps (at least for me) that the lack of a real climactic ending really puts a damper on the story of Hannibal Lector in its entirety. Or perhaps it's that the origin story read in this book doesn't seem to fit the unforgettable and infamous Dr. Hannibal "the Cannibal" Lector. I don't know but I felt rather let down when I finished this book. Perhaps (especially when dealing with characters of this magnitude) it would be better if the reader never knew what made them a monster.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed R. Rashwan

    Sigh... What can I say... The most prevailing feeling I have is a genuine relief that it is finally all over. I was perhaps expecting more from the legend that is Hannibal. The novel in itself is not all too bad, and the writing was of somewhat acceptable quality, but the inconsistencies encountered throughout the series made the novel devoid of any sort of consistent entertainment. The book and plot read perfectly for an action movie, complete with its organised crime, revengeful mission and ex Sigh... What can I say... The most prevailing feeling I have is a genuine relief that it is finally all over. I was perhaps expecting more from the legend that is Hannibal. The novel in itself is not all too bad, and the writing was of somewhat acceptable quality, but the inconsistencies encountered throughout the series made the novel devoid of any sort of consistent entertainment. The book and plot read perfectly for an action movie, complete with its organised crime, revengeful mission and explosions shooting out in the air behind our action-filled protagonist; the fact the Hannibal series evolved from an intensely thrilling mystery genre to this Hollywood action genre was very disturbing for me. I really wanted to absolutely love this, and I cannot deny that it was generally a good book, but here I am again left with the empty feeling of missed opportunities. The backstory Thomas Harris has created for Hannibal completely ruins his essence and does not in any way explain why he became a cannibalistic serial killer. It seemed like he was too bent on revenge. I'm aware that Hannibal does not really fit neatly into your stereotypical definition of a sociopath who is devoid of emotions and feelings, and that he did exhibit some sort of "revengeful" behaviour, specifically in the Silence of the Lambs but it was completely out of character that Hannibal would go so out of his way to murder everyone that had to do with his past. Speaking of pasts, it would be an incredible, if not miraculous, feat to escape any sort of decent authority for years with a past such as his! Did it not go down in records? That he was suspected of murder, more than once? (view spoiler)[Could the FBI or any authority for that matter really not link him, his past and the cannibalistic nature of his crimes with the direct crack down on cannibalistic slave traders that died in an explosion that clearly was somehow related to him? I mean at some point of the novel there were riots shouting "Free Hannibal" outside the French police station! Hannibal wasn't exactly "off the grid" or radar for him to have so elusively cannibalise several people without being caught! (hide spoiler)] That just seems highly unlikely. It was entertaining, it was suspenseful. But the plot seemed forced and empty. I needed more than what was provided and offered here. This does not live up to Hannibal standards in any shape or form. Sorry Thomas Harris, try again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephen the Librarian

    While not as satisfying as Red Dragon, Silence of the Lambs, or (to a lesser extent) Hannibal, Thomas Harris manages to cook up a decadent appetizer to an already loaded three-course meal. It's hard not to see Hannibal Rising as a last-ditch effort to revive an ailing franchise by further developing one of the most complex characters of modern fiction. By offering a traumatic origin story as explanation for how a human being could become Dr. Lecter, Harris walks a dangerous tightrope in making h While not as satisfying as Red Dragon, Silence of the Lambs, or (to a lesser extent) Hannibal, Thomas Harris manages to cook up a decadent appetizer to an already loaded three-course meal. It's hard not to see Hannibal Rising as a last-ditch effort to revive an ailing franchise by further developing one of the most complex characters of modern fiction. By offering a traumatic origin story as explanation for how a human being could become Dr. Lecter, Harris walks a dangerous tightrope in making his magnificent creation a less-fascinating avatar of evil. What this novel gives readers is a sumptuous look at Hannibal's youth, the plot of which is not much more than a thrilling story of grisly vengeance. A young Lithuanian aristocrat loses his parents and darling sister, Mischa, in the final desperate days of World War II. Hannibal is forced to watch as little Mischa is devoured by callous Nazi-sympathizing ruffians whom Hannibal later tracks down and gruesomely dispatches in the natural course of the novel. By the end of Hannibal Rising, the reader is left with a better understanding of the epicurean psychiatrist, even if the book doesn't exactly conclude with the satisfaction one would wish from an examination of Lecter's tenebrous beginnings. The action is swift and often fleeting, and the chapters brief (often only four pages), and the sentences are, for the most part, simplistic and lacking the eloquence found in Harris's preceding works. The dialogue is occasionally stilted and the character of Lady Murasaki, who sensually introduces the impressionable teenage Hannibal to a rarified world of Japanese art and poetry, exists only to be beautiful. Thankfully, Hannibal Lecter remains a preeminent literary icon, a dominant fictional boogeyman, and that's primarily due to Anthony Hopkins's unforgettable screen incarnation. Hannibal Rising reads like the novelization of a screenplay; not surprisingly Thomas Harris wrote the screenplay in the course of writing this novel. That isn't to say the book is a complete loss, for even after so many years since writing Red Dragon and Silence, Harris still possesses a keen aptitude for depicting the animal nature that lurks beneath mankind's veneer of civilization.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.