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When Louis Leakey first heard about Jane Goodall’s discovery that chimps fashion and use tools, he sent her a telegram: “Now we must redefine tool, redefine man, or accept chimpanzees as human.” But when Goodall first presented her discoveries at a scientific conference, she was ridiculed by the powerful chairman, who warned one of his distinguished colleagues not to be mis When Louis Leakey first heard about Jane Goodall’s discovery that chimps fashion and use tools, he sent her a telegram: “Now we must redefine tool, redefine man, or accept chimpanzees as human.” But when Goodall first presented her discoveries at a scientific conference, she was ridiculed by the powerful chairman, who warned one of his distinguished colleagues not to be misled by her “glamour.” She was too young, too blond, too pretty to be a serious scientist, and worse yet, she still had virtually no formal scientific training. She had been a secretarial school graduate whom Leakey had sent out to study chimps only when he couldn’t find anyone better qualified to take the job. And he couldn’t tell her what to do once she was in the field— nobody could—because no one before had made such an intensive and long-term study of wild apes. Dale Peterson shows clearly and convincingly how truly remarkable Goodall’s accomplishments were and how unlikely it is that anyone else could have duplicated them. Peterson details not only how Jane Goodall revolutionized the study of primates, our closest relatives, but how she helped set radically new standards and a new intellectual style in the study of animal behavior. And he reveals the very private quest that led to another sharp turn in her life, from scientist to activist.


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When Louis Leakey first heard about Jane Goodall’s discovery that chimps fashion and use tools, he sent her a telegram: “Now we must redefine tool, redefine man, or accept chimpanzees as human.” But when Goodall first presented her discoveries at a scientific conference, she was ridiculed by the powerful chairman, who warned one of his distinguished colleagues not to be mis When Louis Leakey first heard about Jane Goodall’s discovery that chimps fashion and use tools, he sent her a telegram: “Now we must redefine tool, redefine man, or accept chimpanzees as human.” But when Goodall first presented her discoveries at a scientific conference, she was ridiculed by the powerful chairman, who warned one of his distinguished colleagues not to be misled by her “glamour.” She was too young, too blond, too pretty to be a serious scientist, and worse yet, she still had virtually no formal scientific training. She had been a secretarial school graduate whom Leakey had sent out to study chimps only when he couldn’t find anyone better qualified to take the job. And he couldn’t tell her what to do once she was in the field— nobody could—because no one before had made such an intensive and long-term study of wild apes. Dale Peterson shows clearly and convincingly how truly remarkable Goodall’s accomplishments were and how unlikely it is that anyone else could have duplicated them. Peterson details not only how Jane Goodall revolutionized the study of primates, our closest relatives, but how she helped set radically new standards and a new intellectual style in the study of animal behavior. And he reveals the very private quest that led to another sharp turn in her life, from scientist to activist.

30 review for Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I'm still plugging away at this hefty volume... on chapter 21, page 295, with only 390 pages, plus the Notes and --for crying out loud -- 8 pages of Works Cited! This biography is awfully thorough, beginning with Jane's grandparents! It is slightly redundant at times, explaining a situation then taking excerpts from letters Jane wrote to her family or entries from her research journals. At times it can be frustratingly thorough, the author takes you down paths and it is unclear WHY you are reading I'm still plugging away at this hefty volume... on chapter 21, page 295, with only 390 pages, plus the Notes and --for crying out loud -- 8 pages of Works Cited! This biography is awfully thorough, beginning with Jane's grandparents! It is slightly redundant at times, explaining a situation then taking excerpts from letters Jane wrote to her family or entries from her research journals. At times it can be frustratingly thorough, the author takes you down paths and it is unclear WHY you are reading six pages about the history of the four European founders of Ornithology, for example,.... however, it almost always links back up and connects to a meaningful vignette in Goodall's life and career... Yet a decent editor might have eliminated 1/3 of the details about her colleagues and acquaintances, and still conveyed the important situations Jane found herself in that moved her career forward. A chart of people's names at different locations/times in her life would have been helpful too, since it includes stories about Jane's nanny, friends of the family, friends, colleagues, scientists, etc. in exasperation-ally exquisite detail. That being said, some of the detailed accounts of the developing experts of Goodall's time are very insightful into the history of the study of animal behavior, anthropology and the 20th century process that humans endeavored to discover our archaeological ancestors. So while long-winded, the history puts Jane's evolution as one of the world's best known female scientists into perspective, and into context of the world of science, as it was then. It is truly amazing what she accomplished then, with merely a high school degree, and understanding that context is immeasurable. Worth the 700 pages, just takes a long time! Side note: Finally finished the last 50 pages, more than a year later. Other than covering her experiences publishing books, developing Roots and Shoots, and her being in NYC during 9/11... it was mostly just a list of awards she got and where she flew to receive them. Editing, editing, editing was needed. But I'm done. Phew.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Seeta Brar

    I picked up this book because I thought it would be fascinating to read. Oftentimes, the famous, our role models and those who influence history become idolized or mythized...given a saint like status. And, its always fascinating to learn about the experiences that moulded a person to change the world or challenge a belief or political system. Unfortunately, this overlong biography didn't teach me anything about Jane Goodall. In fact, while I was fighting insomnia, this was a great book to help I picked up this book because I thought it would be fascinating to read. Oftentimes, the famous, our role models and those who influence history become idolized or mythized...given a saint like status. And, its always fascinating to learn about the experiences that moulded a person to change the world or challenge a belief or political system. Unfortunately, this overlong biography didn't teach me anything about Jane Goodall. In fact, while I was fighting insomnia, this was a great book to help win the battle. I know there are many reviews that rave about the writing, stories and biography, but I found myself getting lost and confused with the over-descriptions! I'm giving up on this one, but I'm still interested in learning more about Jane Goodall and am going to look into one of the other biographies or maybe one of her own books (i.e. In the Shadow of Man).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sierra The Book Addict

    I love this book, Jane Goodall is such a super wonderful woman, and she just became this presence of woman power. She became the top woman of all thinks chimpanzee in the world. She went through much hardship but accomplished so much, and she is still thriving today. This book goes through every stage of her life and the people she meets and accumulated. But also the detailed notes and relationships with the chimps themselves, and how she watched them grown and progress before her very eyes. The I love this book, Jane Goodall is such a super wonderful woman, and she just became this presence of woman power. She became the top woman of all thinks chimpanzee in the world. She went through much hardship but accomplished so much, and she is still thriving today. This book goes through every stage of her life and the people she meets and accumulated. But also the detailed notes and relationships with the chimps themselves, and how she watched them grown and progress before her very eyes. Then many mentions of her many colleagues and their great successes as well was quite fascinating but did make the book very long. I recommend buckling down for a long haul for this book and have your patients with it. But a delightful book to read

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Kamens

    Never thought I would enjoy an almost 700 page book so much, but the story never dragged and the subject is fascinating. The last section felt rushed and out of sync with the rest of the book but it was still interesting to hear about Jane Goodall's transition from scientist to scientist/activist. Worth the time just to read about how she dealt with Louis Leakey hitting on her for a couple of years before he let her alone to do her amazing work. Never thought I would enjoy an almost 700 page book so much, but the story never dragged and the subject is fascinating. The last section felt rushed and out of sync with the rest of the book but it was still interesting to hear about Jane Goodall's transition from scientist to scientist/activist. Worth the time just to read about how she dealt with Louis Leakey hitting on her for a couple of years before he let her alone to do her amazing work.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clif

    We all get lucky breaks but few can do as much as a result of it as has Jane Goodall. Starting out as a secretary for Louis Leakey, a wonderful scientist with a fondness for inexperienced young women and a burning desire to send them off to study apes, Goodall found herself in the environment of African animals that she had dreamed of as a child. From her initial solo observations of chimpanzees, she proved her abilities as a researcher, scientist, author and humanitarian. This list of her accompl We all get lucky breaks but few can do as much as a result of it as has Jane Goodall. Starting out as a secretary for Louis Leakey, a wonderful scientist with a fondness for inexperienced young women and a burning desire to send them off to study apes, Goodall found herself in the environment of African animals that she had dreamed of as a child. From her initial solo observations of chimpanzees, she proved her abilities as a researcher, scientist, author and humanitarian. This list of her accomplishments and the amount of energy she has put into them are remarkable and admirable. I thought to myself as I read this book - what would the world be like if all humans though history had made the effort to communicate with other species that Goodall did? Native-Americans certainly had an understanding of the ways of animals, as did those who lived on farms. So perhaps this question only reveals my identity as a city-dweller and what Goodall discovered was only re-discovered after having been lost. Peterson has co-authored works with Goodall and this is a very friendly book for her. At times it reads like a mild novel but invariably Goodall comes up shining as one would expect from an admirer. This book isn't the place to look for the unexpected or a deep character analysis. It's a valuable account of her work and very attractive in the way it moves in and out of both chimp and human culture, building a strong case for sympathetic treatment of all animals. Goodall has had a series of good ideas that have continually expanded the work of her institute. No one should doubt this is a better world because she came along. People can be driven for various reasons. For many people money is the lure. For Jane Goodall, it has been a desire to improve the lot of all living things.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Dale Peterson provides a thorough and expert account of the life of Jane Goodall in this biography that left me feeling smarter, a little sadder, and ultimately inspired. The book starts off a bit sluggishly with stories about Jane's grandparents and parents, and focuses a bit too long on her childhood years, but the meat (for lack of a better term) of the book covers her time spent at Gombe researching chimp lifestyles and behaviors, and her subsequent catapult to stardom as a researcher. Peter Dale Peterson provides a thorough and expert account of the life of Jane Goodall in this biography that left me feeling smarter, a little sadder, and ultimately inspired. The book starts off a bit sluggishly with stories about Jane's grandparents and parents, and focuses a bit too long on her childhood years, but the meat (for lack of a better term) of the book covers her time spent at Gombe researching chimp lifestyles and behaviors, and her subsequent catapult to stardom as a researcher. Peterson provides just the right balance between Jane's research, her personal life, and the lives of the chimps she is studying. I really enjoyed following some of Jane's favorite chimps through life as I followed her on her parallel path. Writing a biography of a living person creates some obstacles, and I think a weakness of this one is the way it speeds through the years of Jane's life leading up to the publication of this book. I was fascinated by Jane's decisions to become a vegetarian, connect with animal rights and environmental organizations, and then begin lobbying for the chimps in research facilities to be given better living conditions. Unfortunately, the section of the book covering this chunk of her life feels a bit rushed - maybe because she is still living it. Overall, I highly recommend this bio for anyone interested in animal rights, scientific research, or Jane Goodall the public figure. The passion infusing her life is evident and contagious, even through the secondhand contact of a biography.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cwelshhans

    This book was a very detailed account of Jane Goodall's life, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. When finished, I felt like I was given real insight into who she was, why she cared so much for animals, and the importance of what she has accomplished in her life. The book was greatly aided by the fact that Goodall has always been a prolific letter-writer, so the book included a lot of Goodall's own thoughts and feelings. She also is a very delightful writer, so the tone of the book was very enjoyable. This book was a very detailed account of Jane Goodall's life, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. When finished, I felt like I was given real insight into who she was, why she cared so much for animals, and the importance of what she has accomplished in her life. The book was greatly aided by the fact that Goodall has always been a prolific letter-writer, so the book included a lot of Goodall's own thoughts and feelings. She also is a very delightful writer, so the tone of the book was very enjoyable. It left me wanting to go read more about Goodall, Dian Fossey, and other people in that vein.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    WONDERFULLY written biography. Completely void of cliches, Peterson chooses his words very carefully and knows when to skip around to provide the most understanding possible of certain events. Jane Goodall continues to amaze me. By the time she was my age... well, I don't want to think about how lazy she makes me feel. I didn't end up finishing this book, though. Once the attention turned away from the Gombe chimp site, I lost interest (my own fault). It did start to bug me after a while that the WONDERFULLY written biography. Completely void of cliches, Peterson chooses his words very carefully and knows when to skip around to provide the most understanding possible of certain events. Jane Goodall continues to amaze me. By the time she was my age... well, I don't want to think about how lazy she makes me feel. I didn't end up finishing this book, though. Once the attention turned away from the Gombe chimp site, I lost interest (my own fault). It did start to bug me after a while that the timeline jumped around so much, but I suppose that's impossible to avoid.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I've been anxious to read this book for a while. I've admired Dr. Goodall for a long time and even had the pleasure of hearing her speak and getting her autograph several years ago. She has most certainly been the inspiration and model for me for putting a more "personal face" on science, making it more accessible to non-scientists. This biography was very informational for me to see how she became the woman, scientist, and activist she is today. I feel like if I read it again, I would learn eve I've been anxious to read this book for a while. I've admired Dr. Goodall for a long time and even had the pleasure of hearing her speak and getting her autograph several years ago. She has most certainly been the inspiration and model for me for putting a more "personal face" on science, making it more accessible to non-scientists. This biography was very informational for me to see how she became the woman, scientist, and activist she is today. I feel like if I read it again, I would learn even more. Definitely a must-read for any lover of animals and the natural world.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Admittedly, I haven't read many biographies, so take this review with a grain of salt. At first, I loved the rich details the author included of everything going on in Goodall's life. But, after awhile, the details because cumbersome, making the book extremely heavy to read. While I love that I learned more of Goodall's life, I sometimes thought to myself, "I really didn't need to know that much." Perhaps I should stick to fiction... Admittedly, I haven't read many biographies, so take this review with a grain of salt. At first, I loved the rich details the author included of everything going on in Goodall's life. But, after awhile, the details because cumbersome, making the book extremely heavy to read. While I love that I learned more of Goodall's life, I sometimes thought to myself, "I really didn't need to know that much." Perhaps I should stick to fiction...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This was a really interesting book - I didn't know much about Jane Goodall before reading this, but as a big animal lover I enjoyed learning about her. It was also very readable and accessible, which is nice when you're reading such a long book! I did think that it was a bit overly detailed at times, and sometimes the organization felt a bit off. Overall though I really enjoyed reading this and I would recommend it to anybody looking for an interesting biography to read. This was a really interesting book - I didn't know much about Jane Goodall before reading this, but as a big animal lover I enjoyed learning about her. It was also very readable and accessible, which is nice when you're reading such a long book! I did think that it was a bit overly detailed at times, and sometimes the organization felt a bit off. Overall though I really enjoyed reading this and I would recommend it to anybody looking for an interesting biography to read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    I've given up on this book for now. It is very detailed, and I'm impatient with all the details about her childhood pets, riding lessons, etc. I'll try again later. If you want to know EVERYTHING about Jane Goodall, this is the book for you. I've given up on this book for now. It is very detailed, and I'm impatient with all the details about her childhood pets, riding lessons, etc. I'll try again later. If you want to know EVERYTHING about Jane Goodall, this is the book for you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Absolutely one of the best autobiographies I have ever read. And what perfect timing with the new chimpanzee movie coming out soon! I am so amazed at her and the life she has led. What a truly remarkable person!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emily Rosenbaum

    This book was exceptionally well-researched and thorough. Peterson clearly feels a great affection for Goodall and for her work. It took four months to read, but I ended up with a clear understanding of her work, her effect on the world, her life, and the nature of the chimps she loved.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ella A.

    Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man [Hardcover] is about a women scientist named Jane Goodall. Ms. Goodall, had no scientific experience whatsoever when she was sent to be a researcher in the jungles of Eastern Africa to study chimpanzees. But even without that experience, she became one of the world's greatest African researchers. Through sickness and trials, Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man tells the story of a young women who truly redefined the definition of man. Jane was born Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man [Hardcover] is about a women scientist named Jane Goodall. Ms. Goodall, had no scientific experience whatsoever when she was sent to be a researcher in the jungles of Eastern Africa to study chimpanzees. But even without that experience, she became one of the world's greatest African researchers. Through sickness and trials, Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man tells the story of a young women who truly redefined the definition of man. Jane was born in London, England in 1934. She was raised without any major science education. In her early 20's Jane traveled to Africa. While working at a museum, Jane met Dr. Luis Leakey. As a result of that meeting, Jane was sent to Africa to study chimpanzees. Since she had no experience whatsoever, after a few years, Dr. Leakey sent her to study at Cambridge University, to earn her Ph.D. This led to many more opportunities in the field of science. In my opinion, and Jane's, this was " a simply lovely book". Dale Peterson describes Jane's live in great detail. He includes quotes from diaries, field journals, and Jane herself. I only wish that Mr. Peterson would include Jane Goodall's other achievements.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marguerite

    Interesting, but excruciating in its detail. A term is introduced, defined, and a six-page history of the scientific movement follows. Every attack of malaria gets a paragraph or three. Every request for funds is parsed. This would have been a vastly better book had it been several hundred pages shorter. Favorite bit: "Figan was future alpha-male material. His only obvious weakness was what Jane considered a 'very highly strung nature.' He was sensitive. During times of raging social excitement, Interesting, but excruciating in its detail. A term is introduced, defined, and a six-page history of the scientific movement follows. Every attack of malaria gets a paragraph or three. Every request for funds is parsed. This would have been a vastly better book had it been several hundred pages shorter. Favorite bit: "Figan was future alpha-male material. His only obvious weakness was what Jane considered a 'very highly strung nature.' He was sensitive. During times of raging social excitement, for example, he would occasionally rush off in a panic, screaming, clutching his scrotum, running to nearby chimps for a reassuring hug."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Amirault

    An interesting book especially the early years - how Jane gets involved with chimps and the research she made famous. Learning about her family, early social life, and her marriage was also fascinating. However the book was often very slow as it described her day to day activities. I find some biographies do that and it’s okay if you are researching or writing a thesis but not if you just want to learn about someone’s life. But I’m more of a Jane Goodall fan now than before as I understand and a An interesting book especially the early years - how Jane gets involved with chimps and the research she made famous. Learning about her family, early social life, and her marriage was also fascinating. However the book was often very slow as it described her day to day activities. I find some biographies do that and it’s okay if you are researching or writing a thesis but not if you just want to learn about someone’s life. But I’m more of a Jane Goodall fan now than before as I understand and appreciate many if the difficulties she faced compiling the research. She’s a remarkable scientist and we have her to thank for much information about these startling creatures.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    This biography presents Jane Goodall's life in three parts: the Naturalist, the Scientist, and the Activist. The narrative focuses on her professional life without more personal insight. primarily her work, unfolding as happy synergy starting with her relationship with Louis Leakey. But there were challenges as well, especially in securing funding but again focused on her work. There is a Prologue, a section of Notes, Works Cited, Acknowledgements, and an Index. There is a nice collection of phot This biography presents Jane Goodall's life in three parts: the Naturalist, the Scientist, and the Activist. The narrative focuses on her professional life without more personal insight. primarily her work, unfolding as happy synergy starting with her relationship with Louis Leakey. But there were challenges as well, especially in securing funding but again focused on her work. There is a Prologue, a section of Notes, Works Cited, Acknowledgements, and an Index. There is a nice collection of photos in the center of the book. Highly recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    5-star life; 4-star bio. Parts of the bio are fascinating, but some parts are too focussed on uninteresting minutiae - we don't need to know about every stop along another speaking tour to get the idea of her busy life, and hearing about the mundane details fo Grub's infant development is unnecessary. All in all, however, an inspirational story of an indomitable human spirit. 5-star life; 4-star bio. Parts of the bio are fascinating, but some parts are too focussed on uninteresting minutiae - we don't need to know about every stop along another speaking tour to get the idea of her busy life, and hearing about the mundane details fo Grub's infant development is unnecessary. All in all, however, an inspirational story of an indomitable human spirit.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Fascinating story about a fascinating lady. The book is very long and extremely thorough. I would enjoy it more if it were 350 pages rather than 700+. We read the book for our Women in STEM book club and had some good discussions over the barriers that Jane had to overcome to be the world's most recognizable behavioral scientest. Fascinating story about a fascinating lady. The book is very long and extremely thorough. I would enjoy it more if it were 350 pages rather than 700+. We read the book for our Women in STEM book club and had some good discussions over the barriers that Jane had to overcome to be the world's most recognizable behavioral scientest.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tia

    I'm ashamed to say, but I didn't know much about her life other than her work with monkeys. I found this biography really enlightening. I'm ashamed to say, but I didn't know much about her life other than her work with monkeys. I found this biography really enlightening.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I have always been interested in the work of Jane Goodall and this book was very informative. It's a chunker. I have always been interested in the work of Jane Goodall and this book was very informative. It's a chunker.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    A very informative, readable book of a woman to be greatly admired! Long (685 pages) but well worth it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Interested in fearless women? Here is one for you on the life of Dame Jane Morris Goodall (primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist and UN Messenger of Peace and the world's foremost expert on chimpanzees). And what a life she has led...now 81 she is still traveling 300 days a year fighting for chimpanzees, animal welfare issues and conservation. Much of the book is heartbreaking reading about her beloved chimps contracting polio from humans and the description of their suffering. Also her pass Interested in fearless women? Here is one for you on the life of Dame Jane Morris Goodall (primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist and UN Messenger of Peace and the world's foremost expert on chimpanzees). And what a life she has led...now 81 she is still traveling 300 days a year fighting for chimpanzees, animal welfare issues and conservation. Much of the book is heartbreaking reading about her beloved chimps contracting polio from humans and the description of their suffering. Also her passion for the on-going fight for better conditions for chimps and all animals involved in lab testing. This woman is a gift not only to chimps but to mankind.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

    One of the best biographies I have ever read. Peterson does a great job of stating facts without going into his own personal tangents about the subject's life, choices, etc. Jane Goodall has done so much in her lifetime, it is almost exhausting to read about...and she is still going! It was great to learn about the more recent years since Goodall's book "In the Shadow of Man" was written in the 1970s. So much has happened since then. I would recommend this to all my fellow scientistas, and also One of the best biographies I have ever read. Peterson does a great job of stating facts without going into his own personal tangents about the subject's life, choices, etc. Jane Goodall has done so much in her lifetime, it is almost exhausting to read about...and she is still going! It was great to learn about the more recent years since Goodall's book "In the Shadow of Man" was written in the 1970s. So much has happened since then. I would recommend this to all my fellow scientistas, and also anyone who is at all interested in Jane Goodall, Ethology, Philanthropy or Africa.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Annabel

    Am currently reading this very detailed book, had to return to the library as I keep getting distracted! So far, I think that a list of all co-workerers/people and what they did or do would be very useful! As there are so many people to remember and some of them you start off not knowing why you are reading about them. But the end result is very useful. Jane Goodall is an inspiring woman to all and I respect her greatly.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    A very thorough book about a brilliant woman. I found it fascinating to learn the details of Jane's early beginnings at Gombe, Louis Leakey, the Goodall family, and the development of the Roots and Shoots clubs. Very well written and readable - despite its' length, I found myself reading 100 or so pages at a time. Definitely recommend. A very thorough book about a brilliant woman. I found it fascinating to learn the details of Jane's early beginnings at Gombe, Louis Leakey, the Goodall family, and the development of the Roots and Shoots clubs. Very well written and readable - despite its' length, I found myself reading 100 or so pages at a time. Definitely recommend.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    It's a thick book! Very detailed acount of her life, which is indeed interesting. It makes me want to read her own writings. I've put it down for the time being with a bookmark stuck in the center, but will pick it back up one of these days. It's a thick book! Very detailed acount of her life, which is indeed interesting. It makes me want to read her own writings. I've put it down for the time being with a bookmark stuck in the center, but will pick it back up one of these days.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    very well written and well developed biography. The subject matter is extrememly interesting on its own but I was happy to see that the author did a great job of moving the book along and without skipping over anything important.

  30. 4 out of 5

    anne s.

    This is by far one of the most interesting biographies I've read. It helps that the author has actually met goodall, but as a subject she's just endlessly fascinating, and a role model of independence and fearlessness. This is by far one of the most interesting biographies I've read. It helps that the author has actually met goodall, but as a subject she's just endlessly fascinating, and a role model of independence and fearlessness.

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