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The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch: Now First Completely Translated Into English Verse (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch: Now First Completely Translated Into English Verse The plan of the present volume has been to select from all the known versions those most distinguished for fidelity and rhythm. Of the more favourite poems, as many as three or four are occasionally given; while of others, and those by no means few, it has bee Excerpt from The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch: Now First Completely Translated Into English Verse The plan of the present volume has been to select from all the known versions those most distinguished for fidelity and rhythm. Of the more favourite poems, as many as three or four are occasionally given; while of others, and those by no means few, it has been difficult to find even one. Indeed, many must have' remained entirely un represented but for the spirited efforts of Major Mac gregor, who has recently translated nearly the whole, and that with great closeness both as to matter and form. To this gentleman we have to return our especial thanks for his liberal permission to make free use of his labours. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


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Excerpt from The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch: Now First Completely Translated Into English Verse The plan of the present volume has been to select from all the known versions those most distinguished for fidelity and rhythm. Of the more favourite poems, as many as three or four are occasionally given; while of others, and those by no means few, it has bee Excerpt from The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch: Now First Completely Translated Into English Verse The plan of the present volume has been to select from all the known versions those most distinguished for fidelity and rhythm. Of the more favourite poems, as many as three or four are occasionally given; while of others, and those by no means few, it has been difficult to find even one. Indeed, many must have' remained entirely un represented but for the spirited efforts of Major Mac gregor, who has recently translated nearly the whole, and that with great closeness both as to matter and form. To this gentleman we have to return our especial thanks for his liberal permission to make free use of his labours. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

30 review for The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch: Now First Completely Translated Into English Verse (Classic Reprint)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    This is the sequence Petrarch gave to his book The Great Triumphs: TRIUMPH OF LOVE (Jacopo Del Sellaio:Triumph of Love, inspired by Triumphs by Petrarch 1304-74) TRIUMPH OF CHASTITY TRIUMPH OF DEATH TRIUMPH OF FAME TRIUMPH OF TIME TRIUMPH OF ETERNITY (Jacopo Del Sellaio:Triumph of Eternity, inspired by Triumphs by Petrarch 1304-74) ---- (Petrarch Fates) Some sparse notes I collected from the thoughts of Julia Butinya* and Roxana Recio**. JB thinks Petrarch, Dante and Boccacio form a This is the sequence Petrarch gave to his book The Great Triumphs: TRIUMPH OF LOVE (Jacopo Del Sellaio:Triumph of Love, inspired by Triumphs by Petrarch 1304-74) TRIUMPH OF CHASTITY TRIUMPH OF DEATH TRIUMPH OF FAME TRIUMPH OF TIME TRIUMPH OF ETERNITY (Jacopo Del Sellaio:Triumph of Eternity, inspired by Triumphs by Petrarch 1304-74) ---- (Petrarch Fates) Some sparse notes I collected from the thoughts of Julia Butinya* and Roxana Recio**. JB thinks Petrarch, Dante and Boccacio form a grand trio. They shared the spirit of their time. The Triumphs’ “tercetos”; they are in form like Dante’s. But, the narrative form (allegorical) through dream marks a difference, as well as a “more humanized hell”. RR points to the fact that there are 3 Triumphs in Barcelona, and 3 Triumphs in Paris. Roxana notices a “love for introspection” …not present in Dante. She thinks The Triumphs characters are less “bobos” (clown-like/sort of stupid), as they are in the sentimental novel. An “emancipation of feelings” has occurred. The pain suffered is worth, is virtuous. It’s the humanism: the entire human person; the creative man as center. The human emancipated from the divine. The Catalan humanism (more political) is approached by these Spaniard scholars, it is deemed different from the Aragon court’s. On a biographical note it’s recalled that: Petrarch was born in the 14th century, in Toscana; a time when the Aragon kingdom fought against the Naples kingdom. Petrarch’s father a notary, belonging to the Guelph party, had to leave for Avignon. So, Petrarch had studies in the humanities; developed a passion for classic literature: namely Cicero; but preserved the Christian values (Saint Francis is important). So the Triumphs are a “large, Christian, narrative poem.” -- * L'Humanisme a la Corona d'Arago. ** Petrarca en la Península Ibérica

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    https://archive.org/details/sonnetstr... https://archive.org/details/sonnetstr...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Italo Italophiles

    Sonnets to Laura, also called Il Canzoniere, were written by Francesco Petrarca (b.1304–d.1374), Italian poet and humanist, one of the great figures of Italian literature. In English we call him simply Petrarch (pron. Pe-trark). His love poems defined true emotions and described a real woman. He perfected the sonnet form and is considered by many to be the first modern poet. There are 366 sonnets that some say were written for a year of love poetry for his Laura. But in reality, the poems were wr Sonnets to Laura, also called Il Canzoniere, were written by Francesco Petrarca (b.1304–d.1374), Italian poet and humanist, one of the great figures of Italian literature. In English we call him simply Petrarch (pron. Pe-trark). His love poems defined true emotions and described a real woman. He perfected the sonnet form and is considered by many to be the first modern poet. There are 366 sonnets that some say were written for a year of love poetry for his Laura. But in reality, the poems were written over a period of at least 20 years, if not much of Petrarch's life, and many were written long after Laura had passed away. During that time Petrarch passed through many phases in his love for Laura and in his own life, each expressed in his sonnets. Please see my full and illustrated review at Italophile Book Reviews http://italophilebookreviews.blogspot...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carissa

    Petrarch himself deserves five stars, of course, but some of the translations in this collection leave much to be desired. The translations in this collection are from the Victorian period and before, and I think they are inferior to some more recent translations. The language often seems stilted. Also, the final 20 pages are in Italian, which seems silly since the rest of the book is translated into English!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I love the sonnet form, and it was studying Petrarch that led me to this love. I must say I prefer the Browning and Shakespearean collections to his though! I must admit to skimming and skipping many in this collection of all his poetry, not just the sonnets. Maybe it was the translation, as some of the other reviews suggest

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Kass

    Not the greatest translation for Petrarca's masterful work, but since it is available for free - its worth reading. Not the greatest translation for Petrarca's masterful work, but since it is available for free - its worth reading.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Steven Godin

    Poor Edition, stay well clear.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Liss (geminireads___)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Iris

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dana

  11. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trev

  13. 4 out of 5

    dan potter

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Sandberg

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jake Darcy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  17. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  18. 5 out of 5

    Beata

  19. 5 out of 5

    John

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason Huff

  21. 4 out of 5

    Warren

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Sienkiewicz

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elena

  24. 4 out of 5

    Holly

  25. 5 out of 5

    Samira

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jim Mckenna

  27. 5 out of 5

    Crossmage

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ron

  29. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lea Garfias

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