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La Bible au féminin, Tome 2 : Tsippora Audiobook PACK [Book + 1 CD MP3]

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From the internationally bestselling author of Sarah comes the riveting story of the remarkable woman who walked beside Moses. Although she is a Cushite by birth—one of the people of the lands to the south—Zipporah grew up as the beloved daughter of Jethro, high priest and sage of the Midianites. But the color of Zipporah’s skin sets her apart, making her an outsider to th From the internationally bestselling author of Sarah comes the riveting story of the remarkable woman who walked beside Moses. Although she is a Cushite by birth—one of the people of the lands to the south—Zipporah grew up as the beloved daughter of Jethro, high priest and sage of the Midianites. But the color of Zipporah’s skin sets her apart, making her an outsider to the men of her adopted tribe, who do not want her as a wife. Then one day while drawing water from a well, she meets a handsome young stranger. Like her, he is an outsider. A Hebrew raised in the house of the Egyptian Pharaoh, Moses is a fugitive, forced to flee his homeland. Zipporah realizes that this man will be the husband and partner she never thought she would have. Moses wants nothing more than a peaceful life with the Midianites, but Zipporah won’t let Moses forget his past—or turn away from his true destiny. She refuses to marry him until he returns to Egypt to free his people. When God reveals himself to Moses in a burning bush, his words echo Zipporah’s, and Moses returns to Egypt with his passionate and generous wife by his side. A woman ahead of her time, Zipporah leaps from the pages of this remarkable novel. Bold, independent, and a true survivor, she is a captivating heroine, and her world of deserts, temples, and ancient wonders is a fitting backdrop to an epic tale. Look for the Reader’s Group Guide at the back of this book. Also available as an ebook


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From the internationally bestselling author of Sarah comes the riveting story of the remarkable woman who walked beside Moses. Although she is a Cushite by birth—one of the people of the lands to the south—Zipporah grew up as the beloved daughter of Jethro, high priest and sage of the Midianites. But the color of Zipporah’s skin sets her apart, making her an outsider to th From the internationally bestselling author of Sarah comes the riveting story of the remarkable woman who walked beside Moses. Although she is a Cushite by birth—one of the people of the lands to the south—Zipporah grew up as the beloved daughter of Jethro, high priest and sage of the Midianites. But the color of Zipporah’s skin sets her apart, making her an outsider to the men of her adopted tribe, who do not want her as a wife. Then one day while drawing water from a well, she meets a handsome young stranger. Like her, he is an outsider. A Hebrew raised in the house of the Egyptian Pharaoh, Moses is a fugitive, forced to flee his homeland. Zipporah realizes that this man will be the husband and partner she never thought she would have. Moses wants nothing more than a peaceful life with the Midianites, but Zipporah won’t let Moses forget his past—or turn away from his true destiny. She refuses to marry him until he returns to Egypt to free his people. When God reveals himself to Moses in a burning bush, his words echo Zipporah’s, and Moses returns to Egypt with his passionate and generous wife by his side. A woman ahead of her time, Zipporah leaps from the pages of this remarkable novel. Bold, independent, and a true survivor, she is a captivating heroine, and her world of deserts, temples, and ancient wonders is a fitting backdrop to an epic tale. Look for the Reader’s Group Guide at the back of this book. Also available as an ebook

30 review for La Bible au féminin, Tome 2 : Tsippora Audiobook PACK [Book + 1 CD MP3]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    "You are my garden, my myrrh and honey, my nightly tonic, my black dove. Oh Zipporah, you are my love and the words that save me." A wonderful story of blind love, romance, passion and destiny's bittersweet fulfillment. This is only the second book I've read by author Marek Halter and I must say, I'm extremely impressed. What an artful and romantic way he has with words. The mention of Moses wife Zipporah in the Bible is actually so few I think it can be counted on one hand. Of course, the His "You are my garden, my myrrh and honey, my nightly tonic, my black dove. Oh Zipporah, you are my love and the words that save me." A wonderful story of blind love, romance, passion and destiny's bittersweet fulfillment. This is only the second book I've read by author Marek Halter and I must say, I'm extremely impressed. What an artful and romantic way he has with words. The mention of Moses wife Zipporah in the Bible is actually so few I think it can be counted on one hand. Of course, the Historical Fiction addict that I am, I had to do a little research. I read all of those limited verses. I also read through the entire account of the Moses story to re-familiarize myself in preparation for the reading of this book. What I confirmed was exactly what I thought. There is not much written about Zipporah and what is, is so limited that one must get extremely imaginative in order to create a whole novel around her. Thus is the skilled art of Marek Halter. What we do know is this. She is his wife. They have two sons together: Gershom and Eliezer one of which she circumcises on the way to Egypt. We know she is the daughter of Jethro a Midianite wise man who gives her in marriage to Moses a stranger in their land. Moses meets her at a well near Midian where she lives with her father Jethro yet she is described as Cushite and having dark skin. (Researchers dispute that ancient Cush could be modern day Somalia or Ethiopia, nevertheless, it seems as if she's being distinguished by this title.) We know she is with him at some point when he goes to Egypt and then at a later point we see her with her father once the people are free, going to meet him, therefore, giving the assumption that at some point she left and is rejoining her husband. That's it. If you think I just gave you spoilers, please go pick up a Bible and read the story. Those are the facts and the rest are a beautiful tale of romance that could only be brought into existence by the fancy of Marek Halter. "I am Zipporah the Black, the Cushite, who came here from beyond the Sea of Reeds, and I have had a dream." This is the story of a burning passionate love that was always meant to be. Zipporah, always a stranger in every circle dreamed of a stranger coming into her life who would fulfill her destiny and their love, their lives were destined. It was a dream until it finally manifested one day while her and her sisters were at the well at Irmana. Moses became her dream come true. Her passion realized. She became his strength, his burning desire, his encouragement. Zipporah was the quintessential example of the appearance of a strong man only being possible because of the upholding strength of a supportive stronger woman. "I've said it before and I'll say it again, Without Zipporah, Moses wouldn't be Moses. Her thoughts are my thoughts. That's why she became my wife." This is the inside story of the great woman who was called to stand behind her great man. God called Moses for the task of leading the people of Israel out of Egypt but he also called Zipporah to lead Moses to Him and then stand firm behind him when no one including his own feet were not sure of his own destiny. Only a love so pure and true could be so unselfish and giving. On so many levels this was such a luscious passionate, romantic love story. "When you see me, Zipporah the Cushite, the adopted daughter of Jethro, you see a stranger. A black woman who isn't a daughter of Abraham, or Jacob, or Joseph. All of that is true. But I'm not a creature of Pharoah. I'm not your enemy. I'm your brother's wife!" However, on so many other levels, this was also the account of struggle for Zipporah to be accepted and not prejudiced by the color of her skin. To many it set her apart. But to those who accepted her it was a testament to love that knows no boundaries for those who saw the beautiful wise woman that she was inside and out. Of course knowing that this is Biblically based fiction, one knows generally what this book is going to be about. But I can't say enough about the delivery of this author. He is truly now one of my favorites. Such stirring romance and passion. His descriptions of a young Moses will have the ladies not thinking of the old white haired paintings or made for T.V. renditions but put in mind of the curly haired Eric Bana avatar from the Troy movie. Holding his staff and wearing his pleated Egyptian loincloth, Marek Halter makes you think Moses was kinda hot. Yes, my Zipporah, Wife of Moses movie stars Eric Bana as Moses and the regal looking Lupita Nyong'o as the lovely Zipporah. I would love to see this as a film. I think it would be a hit. I found myself glued to every page. I found myself stopping to smile, sigh and re-read romantic scenes. I rolled my eyes at stubbornness. I felt akin to the husbandly and wifely support they gave to each other until the bitter end. I shed a tear at the bittersweet end. Marek does it again for me. 5 stars. I enjoyed every bit. Engrossing, addictive, seductive and so much more. This second novel in the series I do believe is better than the first. Maybe they just get better and better. We shall see with book #3. I do recommend to Historical fiction readers, Romance readers and Biblical fiction readers who can deal with it. By that I mean, that understand only one individual in the Bible stories was "divinely" impregnated. Everyone else made love and there is some of that in this book. Very sweet and beautiful. I love this view of the Moses story with the inclusion of his wife Zipporah. I enjoy the way these stories are told as not these solitary men but with their wives and loves it shows them as more rounded characters. More real. Lastly, for those who might stray away for fear that it might be too "religious" this second book is not as heavily as the first book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annika

    I was hoping this book would be more like "The Red Tent" by Anita Diamont, who took a few lines from the Bible about Dinah (the only daughter of Jacob) and created an entire fiction story about her, using the known culture and traditions of that time. I loved that book. But this book...I didn't even finish it. I felt the author was showing me a story, instead of telling me a story. I felt the blurb written in the jacket told me more than the author did, and with more emotion. What relationships b I was hoping this book would be more like "The Red Tent" by Anita Diamont, who took a few lines from the Bible about Dinah (the only daughter of Jacob) and created an entire fiction story about her, using the known culture and traditions of that time. I loved that book. But this book...I didn't even finish it. I felt the author was showing me a story, instead of telling me a story. I felt the blurb written in the jacket told me more than the author did, and with more emotion. What relationships between the sisters? Why was Jethro such a good father, since the daughters constantly dropped hints of how good and kind he was. I like the idea: take a little known person in the Bible and write a story about them. I just feel this one didn't own up.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jean Marie

    Really 4 1/2 stars. I have a soft spot for anything Moses related, which I blame on my being raised on the yearly television showing of The Ten Commandments which I've always loved for it's pagentry and drama, and there really isn't anything more beautiful than old school technicolor. I read Halter's first book of the Canaan Trilogy, Sarah, about a year ago and really enjoyed it. Halter has a great way of saying just enough which is probably why his novels are rather short but completely satisfy Really 4 1/2 stars. I have a soft spot for anything Moses related, which I blame on my being raised on the yearly television showing of The Ten Commandments which I've always loved for it's pagentry and drama, and there really isn't anything more beautiful than old school technicolor. I read Halter's first book of the Canaan Trilogy, Sarah, about a year ago and really enjoyed it. Halter has a great way of saying just enough which is probably why his novels are rather short but completely satisfying. This is the story of Moses' wife, Zipporah, as the title suggests. And it's quite a cleverly elaborated story that draws you in. Zipporah is Moses' pilar of strength and intelligence, which gives a different view of the man himself. The majority of the novel is written in third person, the end is in Zipporah's voice, which is a clever but smooth change. My only reason for not giving it a full five stars is I wish it was longer, as always. I thoroughly enjoyed this quick read and will certainly read the third and final novel of the trilogy. And I would definitely recommend it to anyone who enjoys proper bibilical historical fiction or has a soft spot for those Ten Commandments.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A fictionalized account of Zipporah's life. For me, it was just OK. I knew it was fiction, but it still bothered me when the author took liberties with Biblical (read historical) text. In terms of imagining what life would have been like for these nomadic people, it was fairly interesting. The writing was a bit awkward, and very repetitive. For instance, after the author establishes that Zipporah is a Cushite woman, and black, I think it would be OK for it to be assumed and not brought up nearly A fictionalized account of Zipporah's life. For me, it was just OK. I knew it was fiction, but it still bothered me when the author took liberties with Biblical (read historical) text. In terms of imagining what life would have been like for these nomadic people, it was fairly interesting. The writing was a bit awkward, and very repetitive. For instance, after the author establishes that Zipporah is a Cushite woman, and black, I think it would be OK for it to be assumed and not brought up nearly every time Zipporah is mentioned. After all, that's going to be a lot in this story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Loraine

    Rating 3.5 This is the story of Moses wife, Zipporath, a black Cushite whom he married before beginning his service to God and bringing out the Hebrew people from Egypt in the Exodus. Zipporah is only mentioned once in Exodus that Moses married her and had a son named Gershom. So we know nothing about her. Halter fills out the story with both Biblical and historical history as well as speculating what Zipporah may have been like. This is the second book I have read about Zipporah, and both gave d Rating 3.5 This is the story of Moses wife, Zipporath, a black Cushite whom he married before beginning his service to God and bringing out the Hebrew people from Egypt in the Exodus. Zipporah is only mentioned once in Exodus that Moses married her and had a son named Gershom. So we know nothing about her. Halter fills out the story with both Biblical and historical history as well as speculating what Zipporah may have been like. This is the second book I have read about Zipporah, and both gave differing pictures of what Moses' wife may have been like. The first depicted her as a somewhat cantankerous woman who was never happy with Moses or her life. This one pictured her as a wise supportive woman who felt alone when Moses was gone so much of the time and was unloved by Moses' family due to her skin color and the fact that she wasn't a Hebrew. The main thought I took away from both of these books was: how lonely it must be to be the wife of a man of God whether it be a prophet, pastor, or evangelist. If their spouse is truly dedicated to their calling they must spend a lot of time separate from their spouse; and in some cases, become the head of the household as their spouse serves. It had to be hard for Zipporah and women like Ruth Graham, yet they also had to be strong supporters of their spouses. They must learn to lean on God for their support when their husbands are directed elsewhere. I had to lower this particular book's rating due to a couple of too detailed intimacy scenes and also the overly repetitive use of Black Cushite whenever Halter talked about Zipphorah. I felt like I knew that at the end of the first chapter. I would still recommend this book as an interesting view of Moses' wife.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Meh! Every now and then, I get in the mood for a bit of independent bible study. And I love that there are books in the biblical fiction genre that I can use as companion reads when, for instance, I want to re-read Exodus. So, I fell for the cover art on this book and decided to give it a go. This imaginative story of Zipporah, the woman who became the wife of Moses, is not exactly what I expected. It deviates a great deal from scripture but not necessarily in a good way. I realize there is not Meh! Every now and then, I get in the mood for a bit of independent bible study. And I love that there are books in the biblical fiction genre that I can use as companion reads when, for instance, I want to re-read Exodus. So, I fell for the cover art on this book and decided to give it a go. This imaginative story of Zipporah, the woman who became the wife of Moses, is not exactly what I expected. It deviates a great deal from scripture but not necessarily in a good way. I realize there is not much to go on in The Old Testament. She isn't mentioned all that much. I knew there would have to be some fiction inserted in order to piece together a portrait of her. However, I cannot account for Jethro's indifference when his daughter shacks up with Moses and births two illegitimate sons in defiance of the moral values and traditions of the time. I guess she couldn't resist the temptation of Moses' hot bod. (Saucy little minx!) By the way, if you are into steamy love scenes that revolve around your favorite biblical heroes this book is for you! (Personally, I felt kind of uncomfortable, I mean this is Moses!) But the ending is what pulled me out of the three star camp. I don't want to be overly critical but I think I can contradict the part where the sons of Moses are trampled to death by stampeding Hebrews in the desert. (There is after all, some mention in 1 Chronicles 23:14-16 of the SONS of Moses the man of God, and THEIR descendants. I looked it up.) Like I said, this story is inventive and imaginative. There is more bad news at the end of this book but after this bit, I felt a little numb. Having said that, I plan to keep reading this genre because it brings these historical people to life and gives me insight into their daily lives. All silliness aside, Zipporah truly amazed me with her courage and her faith. Even though I find this book to be flawed, I am glad I read it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dora Okeyo

    I liked: Zipporah's determination to see Moses fulfill his quest. I did not like: How much Miriam and Aaron treated her like she was not one of them, yet she had brought Moses to them with the hope of saving the Israelites from Egypt. I admired: Jethro's (Zipporah's Father) courage and wisdon. He had three daughters and Zipporah was adopted and dark skinned, but he loved her most and treated them equally and stood by her even when her most cruel sister-Orma did not want anything to do with her. Sto I liked: Zipporah's determination to see Moses fulfill his quest. I did not like: How much Miriam and Aaron treated her like she was not one of them, yet she had brought Moses to them with the hope of saving the Israelites from Egypt. I admired: Jethro's (Zipporah's Father) courage and wisdon. He had three daughters and Zipporah was adopted and dark skinned, but he loved her most and treated them equally and stood by her even when her most cruel sister-Orma did not want anything to do with her. Story: Flows well. You cannot put it down. Historical basis: Well researched if you ask me. Award: 3 Stars Reason: It left me hanging big time wondering why Zipporah would be doomed to roam the desert with Moses after her own sister, then the Queen of Sheba refused to help them

  8. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Thompson Arcangel

    I listened to the audio edition of this book, narrated by Bernadette Dunne. This story held my attention better than "Sarah", the first book in "The Canaan Trilogy". I liked the characters better too, especially Jethro. One flaw that had me complaining out loud to myself - every two or three minutes I was reminded that Ziporrah had dark or black skin, and that this was a problem for her. It was so annoying for the author to constantly bring this up! Did Mr. Halter never notice the dark skin and I listened to the audio edition of this book, narrated by Bernadette Dunne. This story held my attention better than "Sarah", the first book in "The Canaan Trilogy". I liked the characters better too, especially Jethro. One flaw that had me complaining out loud to myself - every two or three minutes I was reminded that Ziporrah had dark or black skin, and that this was a problem for her. It was so annoying for the author to constantly bring this up! Did Mr. Halter never notice the dark skin and African features on the paintings and statues of ancient Egyptians? I hardly think a Nubian or Cushite woman would've been so exotic that her skin color would need to be mentioned throughout the story. This went on until the very end.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Therese

    $1.99 If you read the Bible, you will know that very little is known about Zipporah, the wife of Moses, but I have no doubt that she played a major role in his life. This is a wondering about what her life may have been like. I have read other books like this and this is okay, but I don't think I'm going to read anymore by this author. Something is missing but I don't regret reading it. $1.99 If you read the Bible, you will know that very little is known about Zipporah, the wife of Moses, but I have no doubt that she played a major role in his life. This is a wondering about what her life may have been like. I have read other books like this and this is okay, but I don't think I'm going to read anymore by this author. Something is missing but I don't regret reading it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Cooprider

    What an interesting perspective - I would have given this book 4 stars, but I felt the author could have been a little more thorough, or perhaps included more of the biblical perspective in Zipporah's story. However, this book is strictly about Zipporah, so I understand why Halter did what he did...it just felt like there could have been more to her story... So, basically we know very little about Zipporah from the Bible. Sadly, the Holy Bible does not tell us much about women, which is a tragedy What an interesting perspective - I would have given this book 4 stars, but I felt the author could have been a little more thorough, or perhaps included more of the biblical perspective in Zipporah's story. However, this book is strictly about Zipporah, so I understand why Halter did what he did...it just felt like there could have been more to her story... So, basically we know very little about Zipporah from the Bible. Sadly, the Holy Bible does not tell us much about women, which is a tragedy in and of itself. However, she must have been worth mentioning, or else she would not have been put in the Bible at all. She was a "Cushite", which apparently means she had black skin. Not surprisingly, the Hebrews (at least Aaron and Miriam, as well as some of the elders) are portrayed as racist and xenophobic. If one really thinks about it, that description is probably accurate. The text of the Bible talks about the Hebrews being "chosen" by God, and only certain people were chosen...God's love (or more specifically, Yahweh) was not for ALL, but for the people of Israel, namely Abraham and Jacob's descendants. Even Jesus, when he first came to save the world, told a Gentile woman that he didn't come for her, he came for the Jews. She told Jesus she would be willing for "the scraps from the table" (using an interesting metaphor), and Jesus healed her on account of her faith. It wasn't until later (after the resurrection, perhaps?) that the message of Jesus was shared for all, not just the Israelites. Okay, I digress. Zipporah was an outsider her whole life. How (and why?) did she and her mother end up in Midian? This is never really explained. However, we know that her father, Jethro, adopted her and accepted her, even though she was a foreigner and had black skin. However, some of her adopted sisters and other family members did not accept her, either. Such is her life...she was always an outsider and never thought she would find love. Enter Moses - they were drawn together from the beginning. I loved watching how their love grew, and thoroughly enjoyed the implication that Zipporah pushed Moses to his destiny. Moses, by all accounts, did not seem worthy. It was also interesting how the author implied that Moses's siblings were weary of Zipporah...one can understand a little of where they were coming from, given the time. However, with our 21st century lens, it's hard to imagine such blatant racism and mistrust. After Moses and Zipporah, along with their children, travel to Egypt, her story is basically over. Upon entering Egypt, Zipporah's story is mostly about how the Israelites mistrust her. She leaves Egypt before Moses approaches Pharaoh...we hear about the wonders and plagues performed by Yahweh second hand (word of mouth by merchants). How I wish Moses would have listened to the wise words of Jethro after escaping Egypt, but alas he didn't. The story ends a little anti-climatically after Moses travels to the top of Mount Horeb (which I believe is another name for Mount Sinai), and the people of Israel, losing faith, make a golden calf. The author's assertion that the people were delirious from hunger was interesting, and more than likely true. It was also interesting hearing Jethro explain why the former slaves were having such a hard time with freedom...it's easy for us to understand their behavior several millennia after the fact; however, I've never heard it quite so well and simply explained. (Well done, Jethro!) Simply put, Zipporah was a very interesting and intriguing woman who, like too many people, was unfairly judged simply because she had black skin. Moses, Joshua, and Jethro are portrayed in a positive light, as is Moses's birth mother. Most of the other famous biblical characters are portrayed badly, but there is truth where they are concerned. If you enjoy historical fiction, or like reading stories from the Bible (and don't mind if they don't support what you've been taught), you will enjoy this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    Old Testament women certainly deserve biographies, but with information so scanty their stories will have to be imagined in fiction. Marek Halter makes a good try. He speculates that as adoptees, Zipporah and Moses were attracted, or maybe fated. He also poses that Jethro, Zipporah's father belies the patrifocal stereotypes of desert patriarchs. Halter illustrates Jethro's caring for his blood and adopted daughters by Jethro's allowing them to chose their husbands and a lack of any mention of payi Old Testament women certainly deserve biographies, but with information so scanty their stories will have to be imagined in fiction. Marek Halter makes a good try. He speculates that as adoptees, Zipporah and Moses were attracted, or maybe fated. He also poses that Jethro, Zipporah's father belies the patrifocal stereotypes of desert patriarchs. Halter illustrates Jethro's caring for his blood and adopted daughters by Jethro's allowing them to chose their husbands and a lack of any mention of paying another family to take them (i.e. dowery). If a suitor is a king, Jethro accepts a daughter's saying no. It may be his love/respect for his daughters, and this lack of pressure on them to leave, that gives Zipporah the strength to resist marriage until Moses commits to returning to Egypt as she feels he must do. Once in Egypt, Zipporah maintains her dignity, perhaps because her adoptive father respected her in a way that Aron and Miriam (siblings to Moses)never could. Once Moses leads the slaves to freedom, Halter gives practical examples of their ingrained slave mentality. They cannot manage the details of their lives and come to Moses for the petty grievances against each other. They can be an unruly mob... so unruly that they can trample the weak. I don't know the accuracy of this account of the death of Zipporah and their sons. She and the sons do disappear from the texts. Halter gives a plausible story as to how it may have happened. There is a lot of potential to this book. It is heavy in dialog, which I felt was stilted, but then, how else to frame the speech of such hallowed Biblical figures? The unrealistic dialog could be an artifact of what might be a second language for the author.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    This is a biblical, historical novel that brings to life the story of Zipporah, a black skinned Cushite woman who became the wife of Moses, the Israelite. I realize that the author has taken liberties of filling in the gaps in the story of Moses from the Bible. I think that is O.K. in order to bring new meaning and understanding to some of the old stories of faith. Halter portrays Zipporah as a very strong and supportive wife to Moses and encourages and even pushes him to listen to Yahweh's direc This is a biblical, historical novel that brings to life the story of Zipporah, a black skinned Cushite woman who became the wife of Moses, the Israelite. I realize that the author has taken liberties of filling in the gaps in the story of Moses from the Bible. I think that is O.K. in order to bring new meaning and understanding to some of the old stories of faith. Halter portrays Zipporah as a very strong and supportive wife to Moses and encourages and even pushes him to listen to Yahweh's directives for his life. We do know from the Bible that Moses felt himself "timid" or incapable of convincing the Pharoah to allow the Israelites to leave Egypt and the oppression they were under. It made me realize anew just how difficult life was for this group of people. O.K., I can't really understand how difficult it was - I have never known such suffering and abuse. But, it struck me how even after Pharoah let them go, and they were free from the work of slaves and the beatings, they still complained about how awful life in the desert was. They "roamed" the desert for 40 years, were without a place they could call home. Why did Yahweh let them dispair for so long? And then, in the end, Moses wasn't even allowed to see the land "flowing of milk and honey" which they were promised. It would be interesting to read a novel on this same story in the perspective of Moses. There was romance weaved into this book, which kept the story interesting too! Moses was shown as a very "hot" looking guy! The ending was very sad and perhaps disappointing. I will have to read from the Bible to see if there is anything mentioned about the end of Zipporah's life.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This book was much better than Sarah, the first book in the Canaan Trilogy. Zipporah was a much more sympathetic character than Sarah, and Moses more so than Abraham. Zipporah was a proud woman who knew her destiny with a defiant certainty. She knew her role besides Moses, even before they had met. Their courtship is passionate (apparently Moses was a sexy thing) and Moses is accepted into Zipporah's family with great trust and love. Her father, Jethro, is a wise and influential figure throughou This book was much better than Sarah, the first book in the Canaan Trilogy. Zipporah was a much more sympathetic character than Sarah, and Moses more so than Abraham. Zipporah was a proud woman who knew her destiny with a defiant certainty. She knew her role besides Moses, even before they had met. Their courtship is passionate (apparently Moses was a sexy thing) and Moses is accepted into Zipporah's family with great trust and love. Her father, Jethro, is a wise and influential figure throughout the novel. It is easy to see where Zipporah gets her wisdom and patience. When Moses realizes his mission to free the Hebrews, Zipporah is his most trusted advisor, his strength and encouragement, though no one would accept her as anything other than a stranger because of her dark skin. She bears the weight of Moses' doubts, his troubled past, and his lack of confidence. Moses becomes the hero he is because of Zipporah's love and trust in Yahweh. However, the Hebrews will always be slaves in their hearts, and once they are free they cannot accept their lives or Zipporah's influence. It is a tragic conclusion to what should have been a glorious liberation. This novel was much more emotional and well-written than Sarah, and I'm looking forward to the next in the series, in hopes that Halter's momentum continues. To see my opinion of the entire trilogy, view my review of Lilah.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alpha

    "This is the second novel in the Canaan Trilogy by Marek Halter and it delivers to the extent of what it is supposed to be but is not as magical per se compared to the first novel written by Halter when it comes to this trilogy. Despite the little bit of the loss on magic, this novel is still good and goes through the story of Zipporah, the wife of Moses who was an outcast in the world she lived in. She is a member of the Cush tribe which were darker women but she nevertheless delivered her purp "This is the second novel in the Canaan Trilogy by Marek Halter and it delivers to the extent of what it is supposed to be but is not as magical per se compared to the first novel written by Halter when it comes to this trilogy. Despite the little bit of the loss on magic, this novel is still good and goes through the story of Zipporah, the wife of Moses who was an outcast in the world she lived in. She is a member of the Cush tribe which were darker women but she nevertheless delivered her purpose as a strong woman who also gave strength to Moses in her own way. I however have to say I can relate more to this novel than on the first because of the topic behind it. Since Zipporah was an outcast I was able to relate because I too am an outcast in this world. I really don't fit anywhere but I do know people who are willing to understand me more than most and thus why they become my friends or even the loves of my life. This is why God states you be loving to the outcasts which are usually based around the ""Good Samaritan"" view. All in all this novel was awesome for the read and got almost a perfect score if the story would have been told a bit more differently as in a better relational to the reader for me. I have to admit that the relational part of empathy is what went with this novel and I would suggest this novel to anyone who is misunderstood - especially all those in the negative end of society."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Phair

    A quick read. Not one of the best biblical bio-novels I've read. It felt a little on the simplistic/shallow side as far as the writing & structure goes. I did learn aspects of the Moses story that were new to me. Can't recall actually knowing about Moses having a black (Cushite) wife. Interesting. And guess I wasn't up on current thinking re the pharaoh of the exodus and the idea that Moses' foster mother might, in fact, have been Hatshepsut. Must now read the newish biography of same The Woman A quick read. Not one of the best biblical bio-novels I've read. It felt a little on the simplistic/shallow side as far as the writing & structure goes. I did learn aspects of the Moses story that were new to me. Can't recall actually knowing about Moses having a black (Cushite) wife. Interesting. And guess I wasn't up on current thinking re the pharaoh of the exodus and the idea that Moses' foster mother might, in fact, have been Hatshepsut. Must now read the newish biography of same The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut's Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt. Things I did not like about the book: Why, when the story describes Zipporah as very dark-skinned would the publishers opt for cover art showing a fairly light-skinned woman?? Seems somehow disrespectful of the subject. Second gripe- if you include a map in a book let it at least show SOME of the place names mentioned in the book! The included map was useless in following any of the movements in the book and served no purpose. How hard can it be to draw a simple, USEFUL, map. At least this book made me want to explore its topic more and it fulfilled the Z in an a-z challenge.

  16. 5 out of 5

    kim

    Good book.....disappointing ending. I enjoyed this book, though at times it 'dragged' a little. Obviously it is only very loosely based on the Bible. It is an imaginative work. I'd read the other reviews before I read the book and went in expecting to be disappointed. It is true that I did not find it as good as Sarah, but it was still an enjoyable book for me. Though there was some 'racism' in the book, I didn't find this to be as large a factor in the book as I'd been led to believe by the revi Good book.....disappointing ending. I enjoyed this book, though at times it 'dragged' a little. Obviously it is only very loosely based on the Bible. It is an imaginative work. I'd read the other reviews before I read the book and went in expecting to be disappointed. It is true that I did not find it as good as Sarah, but it was still an enjoyable book for me. Though there was some 'racism' in the book, I didn't find this to be as large a factor in the book as I'd been led to believe by the reviews. Zipporah was treated as an outsider by her inlaws, with much jealously displayed, and this was attributed to race, but the bottom line was her sister-in-law and her sister didn't like her; were jealous of her; and racism was as good an excuse as any. They would have found another reason if this one weren't so convenient. The one thing I didn't like in this was how Moses' sibs came off as so petty. Having said that, I DID enjoy the book right up until the end. It ended much too abrubtly. Not wanting to give away the end,I will only say I found it disappointing. In general, if I don't like the way a book ends, I won't like the book, but I still found this one to be worth reading.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cwinter

    This is the story of Moses' wife as extrapolated from the gaps in the biblical/Torah story. as is the case in all stories about women in the bible - and most cases of the men - real personal details are sparse, giving a great eal of room for imagination. he weaves a believable tale of a strong woman, he has thinned out Moses in order to do that. I am not a staunch defender of biblical heroes, but I find it thin when authors need to make men paler and weaker in order to make the women they are in This is the story of Moses' wife as extrapolated from the gaps in the biblical/Torah story. as is the case in all stories about women in the bible - and most cases of the men - real personal details are sparse, giving a great eal of room for imagination. he weaves a believable tale of a strong woman, he has thinned out Moses in order to do that. I am not a staunch defender of biblical heroes, but I find it thin when authors need to make men paler and weaker in order to make the women they are involved with stronger. Aaron becomes an egotistical power hungry man; Miriam is seen as bigted, and harsh. I am not attached to their stories, but , they also are lesser humans than the heroine. Stronger stories are built with many strong characters woven together to create a fabric. This book weaves too many thin threads in amongst the strong. It is still a good read and helped me place some of the biblical stories I tend to get all confused together. The Red Tent was brillian in a way that this is not though.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    OK, I am a big fan of historical fiction but not a big fan of the bible (or religion for that matter) and I don't mean to offend anyone but I am agnostic by choice and I gotta admit, I did really enjoy this story. It is what the title is. It is about the wife of Moses and her journey in being his wife along with her journey with him to Egypt. It was very intriguing and I read it only because I needed a Z book to finish off my ABC title challenge. I never would have read this book but I am glad I OK, I am a big fan of historical fiction but not a big fan of the bible (or religion for that matter) and I don't mean to offend anyone but I am agnostic by choice and I gotta admit, I did really enjoy this story. It is what the title is. It is about the wife of Moses and her journey in being his wife along with her journey with him to Egypt. It was very intriguing and I read it only because I needed a Z book to finish off my ABC title challenge. I never would have read this book but I am glad I did. I don't know how much of it actually ties in to the Bible but it creates a good read none the less. I was always a big reader and when I was younger my uncle always that if I ever wanted to read the "best book ever" I was to read the Bible and I did make that attempt when I was a teenager but never went back. Now I am too engulfed in my challenges and life in general that it may be some time before I try it out again. But don't think I will change how I feel about religion. I am still going to stay agnostic.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adrienna

    I may not believe all his biblical/historical accounts with this story, however, the writing is brilliant and keeps me reading in one to two sittings. I love this line, "She is the seed of my future life." I take the sentences and phrases seriously (maybe because I am a writer). I enjoy reading historical/romance fiction when it gives the reader modern terms and speeches that was a time before Christ. I would love to tackle on such a style of writing that also requires research and flow of chara I may not believe all his biblical/historical accounts with this story, however, the writing is brilliant and keeps me reading in one to two sittings. I love this line, "She is the seed of my future life." I take the sentences and phrases seriously (maybe because I am a writer). I enjoy reading historical/romance fiction when it gives the reader modern terms and speeches that was a time before Christ. I would love to tackle on such a style of writing that also requires research and flow of characters, incidents, and events. I will read his other books! I love the women of the Bible. Another book that was even better read is the "The Shadow Women" by a female author, Angela Elwell Hunt. Notes: p. 201, Yokeved greets Moses as her "firstborn" when I believe it was Aaron and then his sister, Miriam are older than Moses. This is an error in the storyline. The cover also does not represent the skin-tone of Zipporah as mentioned in the book numerous times. Why does the author have to state this so many times, we got it the first one or two times?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elyndrical

    I like Marek Halter's Canaan series precisely because he doesn't go down the most expected path. For some people this might be a disappointment, but I enjoyed how these figures were humanised. Zipporah is no exception; the majority of the book explores the relationship betweeen Moses and Zipporah, not Moses' mission to Egypt. I enjoy Halter's writing style, I find it calm but not dull. The detail is enough to envisage the scene but not dull the imagination. I enjoyed the character of Zipporah, st I like Marek Halter's Canaan series precisely because he doesn't go down the most expected path. For some people this might be a disappointment, but I enjoyed how these figures were humanised. Zipporah is no exception; the majority of the book explores the relationship betweeen Moses and Zipporah, not Moses' mission to Egypt. I enjoy Halter's writing style, I find it calm but not dull. The detail is enough to envisage the scene but not dull the imagination. I enjoyed the character of Zipporah, strong and calm, she sticks to her convictions. I disliked how her sister Orma was depicted, she was too one dimensional, vain and concerned with power, it didn't seem like she had any positives, other than being Zipporah's sister. I felt like the book could have been longer and more in depth and could have explored the minor characters more. The way the book ended was unexpected and not in a good way. It was a nice read but nothing exceptional 3.5 stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Klein

    I read this book for a second time, which I rarely do (how can you--there is always so much new to read!). I enjoyed it both times. It is essentially a modern Midrash, a Biblical commentary, told from the point of view of Moses's Cushite wife Zipporah. It is in the style of The Red Tent. This book is imaginative and well researched, although I think I would enjoy a novel with footnotes! I reread this book because I am fascinated with the character of Zipporah. She is this black adopted daughter I read this book for a second time, which I rarely do (how can you--there is always so much new to read!). I enjoyed it both times. It is essentially a modern Midrash, a Biblical commentary, told from the point of view of Moses's Cushite wife Zipporah. It is in the style of The Red Tent. This book is imaginative and well researched, although I think I would enjoy a novel with footnotes! I reread this book because I am fascinated with the character of Zipporah. She is this black adopted daughter of Jethro, a Midinite priest and she winds up marrying Moses. Moses's sister complains that he married outside the faith. However, it is Zipporah who circumcised Moses's son--preserving the covenant. What role does she play when we look at Jews by choice. What role does the non-Israelite play today in terms of raising Jewish children: driving to Hebrew School, keeping a Jewish house, helping with Bar/Bat Mitzvah preparation. How can we or should we reclaim Zipporah as a model for our times?

  22. 5 out of 5

    karen reyes

    Interesting story about Cush wife of Moses, Zipporah. I like stories like this one because they give me a gleam into what life was like thousands of years ago, and how humanity dealt with pain, tradition, love and family. This particular story emphasizes the power of one woman, Zipporah. She was a critical force in Moses' life, encouraging him to travel to his people in Egypt, to begin the exodus of the Jewish slaves. Zipporah is a black gentile who uses what she knows about challenge and oppres Interesting story about Cush wife of Moses, Zipporah. I like stories like this one because they give me a gleam into what life was like thousands of years ago, and how humanity dealt with pain, tradition, love and family. This particular story emphasizes the power of one woman, Zipporah. She was a critical force in Moses' life, encouraging him to travel to his people in Egypt, to begin the exodus of the Jewish slaves. Zipporah is a black gentile who uses what she knows about challenge and oppresion to connect with Moses, who is also made to feel like an outsider, not really fitting in with any one group of people. The two of them are followed through their journey of love, exclusion, pain and forgiveness.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Overall, I rather enjoyed this book. The writing style was appropriate and the characters were real and believable. On the down side, the racial representations seemed too modern. Also, some of the details didn't line up. This is a story based on very few pieces of information and while the filling-in-the-gaps is imaginative and feels authentic, the known details are misrepresented from the biblical account. While some aspects of the Bible are of course open to interpretation, some things, such Overall, I rather enjoyed this book. The writing style was appropriate and the characters were real and believable. On the down side, the racial representations seemed too modern. Also, some of the details didn't line up. This is a story based on very few pieces of information and while the filling-in-the-gaps is imaginative and feels authentic, the known details are misrepresented from the biblical account. While some aspects of the Bible are of course open to interpretation, some things, such as sibling order, seem like they should be taken at face value. Changing these details undermines the authenticity of the story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sera

    I didn't realize that this is the second book in the series, Sarah: A Novel is actually the first, but I don't think that the order matters here. Interesting re-creation of the story of Moses through the eyes of his wife Zipporah, who served as the inspiration for him to follow the word of God and to free the Hebrews in Egypt. I enjoyed this book, but I would have liked to have read more insight into Moses. I didn't realize that this is the second book in the series, Sarah: A Novel is actually the first, but I don't think that the order matters here. Interesting re-creation of the story of Moses through the eyes of his wife Zipporah, who served as the inspiration for him to follow the word of God and to free the Hebrews in Egypt. I enjoyed this book, but I would have liked to have read more insight into Moses.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    The second book in Marek Halter's Canaan Trilogy,Zipporah, Wife of Moses rings with the same themes as the other books: a strong female character. I, again, enjoyed his strong sense of sensory detail and visual depictions. However, I was disappointed with the plot overall. Certain things pertaining to the Pharaoh and the ending didn't make sense and were outlandish at times. The literary quality is lacking, from a writer's point of view it's shallow when it comes to explanations and consistency. The second book in Marek Halter's Canaan Trilogy,Zipporah, Wife of Moses rings with the same themes as the other books: a strong female character. I, again, enjoyed his strong sense of sensory detail and visual depictions. However, I was disappointed with the plot overall. Certain things pertaining to the Pharaoh and the ending didn't make sense and were outlandish at times. The literary quality is lacking, from a writer's point of view it's shallow when it comes to explanations and consistency.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Belinda M Kennedy

    Doesn't Follow the Bibls This story was interesting and showed prejudices against black people. I have read the Bible several times and have never picked up on this concept. God told the Israelites to remove pagan nations because of their evil gods not because of their skin color. The Bible doesn't state that Zipporah withheld her marriage to Moses until she did what he said. I could go on and on. A good historical novel should at least follow the know facts. This is nowhere close to the Bible sto Doesn't Follow the Bibls This story was interesting and showed prejudices against black people. I have read the Bible several times and have never picked up on this concept. God told the Israelites to remove pagan nations because of their evil gods not because of their skin color. The Bible doesn't state that Zipporah withheld her marriage to Moses until she did what he said. I could go on and on. A good historical novel should at least follow the know facts. This is nowhere close to the Bible story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This was an interesting look at a highly unexplored character in Biblical realms. Zipporah has always interested me because she is mentioned in the Bible but her story is never explored or explained. I can't say that I believe that everything that is found in this book is the truth but I appreciate the attempt to fill in the blanks. This book was okay but it's probably not one that I'll read again. This was an interesting look at a highly unexplored character in Biblical realms. Zipporah has always interested me because she is mentioned in the Bible but her story is never explored or explained. I can't say that I believe that everything that is found in this book is the truth but I appreciate the attempt to fill in the blanks. This book was okay but it's probably not one that I'll read again.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nay Denise

    Initially I wanted to give this a 4.5-star rating but after some thought and processing I’m going with a 4 star. This was an interesting book that had me feeling things I never thought I’d feel. I loved the writing of this book and wish it was a longer story. Zipporah is a Cushite by birth, but is adopted by Jethro and lives among the Midianites. She a black girl that many people choose not to acknowledge. She an outcast among her people and looked at with hate. Zipporah is a strong woman. She de Initially I wanted to give this a 4.5-star rating but after some thought and processing I’m going with a 4 star. This was an interesting book that had me feeling things I never thought I’d feel. I loved the writing of this book and wish it was a longer story. Zipporah is a Cushite by birth, but is adopted by Jethro and lives among the Midianites. She a black girl that many people choose not to acknowledge. She an outcast among her people and looked at with hate. Zipporah is a strong woman. She dealt with hate among many people, but kept pushing forward in life. She was full of wisdom, but had her moments of stupidity. Majority of this book I adored her and the heart that she had. She was kind, thoughtful, loving, supportive, respectful and determined. I loved her. Moses was interesting to read about. Knowing him from the Bible and seeing him in the light of biblical fiction was interesting to me. I loved see him deal with identity issues. He grew up believing he was an Egyptian prince, but now battles with realizing that he’s Hebrew and has to come to terms with it. Moses was given a “realness” to him. He was a man who dealt with real issues that many could relate to. I loved seeing the “famous” moments of Moses brought to life as well. The romance between Zipporah and Moses was interesting to say the least. I think they were the cutest thing ever. However, I got annoyed with Zipporah playing this cat & mouse game. I was OVER her. I loved seeing them battle with their relationship issues without trying to overpower the other. There were three sex scenes involved in this book and though it didn’t bother me at all (I’m a romance reader), it did bring to mind if there is a “limit” to how far you go in biblical fiction. Jethro was an amazing father to Zipporah and a man of wisdom. He was a laid-back guy. He was loving to all his children – may not with Orma though for reasons. He was a man loved and respected by his people. He never pushed his own beliefs on others. He wasn’t judgmental. He never pushed people away. He was like a big old grandpa. Sefoba was the big sister I wish I had. She was sweet, loving and downright HILARIOUS. I loved how supportive she was of Zipporah. She always spoke her mind and didn’t hold back her words. Orma, Miriam and Aaron were the WORSE siblings ever. Jealousy. Judgmental. Straight out rude. They all irritated the mess out of me. I thought I disliked Orma, but that ending made me hate her. Miriam was just the worse and got on my damn never. Aaron was just a fool. Overall, this was a pretty good biblical fiction on Moses and Zipporah. I think it would appeal to many, but I also think some people would be bothered by the sex scenes. I enjoyed it enough and can’t wait to read Sarah (book 1) and Lilah (book 3).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nay Denise

    Initially I wanted to give this a 4.5-star rating but after some thought and processing I’m going with a 4 star. This was an interesting book that had me feeling things I never thought I’d feel. I loved the writing of this book and wish it was a longer story. Zipporah is a Cushite by birth, but is adopted by Jethro and lives among the Midianites. She a black girl that many people choose not to acknowledge. She an outcast among her people and looked at with hate. Zipporah is a strong woman. She de Initially I wanted to give this a 4.5-star rating but after some thought and processing I’m going with a 4 star. This was an interesting book that had me feeling things I never thought I’d feel. I loved the writing of this book and wish it was a longer story. Zipporah is a Cushite by birth, but is adopted by Jethro and lives among the Midianites. She a black girl that many people choose not to acknowledge. She an outcast among her people and looked at with hate. Zipporah is a strong woman. She dealt with hate among many people, but kept pushing forward in life. She was full of wisdom, but had her moments of stupidity. Majority of this book I adored her and the heart that she had. She was kind, thoughtful, loving, supportive, respectful and determined. I loved her. Moses was interesting to read about. Knowing him from the Bible and seeing him in the light of biblical fiction was interesting to me. I loved see him deal with identity issues. He grew up believing he was an Egyptian prince, but now battles with realizing that he’s Hebrew and has to come to terms with it. Moses was given a “realness” to him. He was a man who dealt with real issues that many could relate to. I loved seeing the “famous” moments of Moses brought to life as well. The romance between Zipporah and Moses was interesting to say the least. I think they were the cutest thing ever. However, I got annoyed with Zipporah playing this cat & mouse game. I was OVER her. I loved seeing them battle with their relationship issues without trying to overpower the other. There were three sex scenes involved in this book and though it didn’t bother me at all (I’m a romance reader), it did bring to mind if there is a “limit” to how far you go in biblical fiction. Jethro was an amazing father to Zipporah and a man of wisdom. He was a laid-back guy. He was loving to all his children – may not with Orma though for reasons. He was a man loved and respected by his people. He never pushed his own beliefs on others. He wasn’t judgmental. He never pushed people away. He was like a big old grandpa. Sefoba was the big sister I wish I had. She was sweet, loving and downright HILARIOUS. I loved how supportive she was of Zipporah. She always spoke her mind and didn’t hold back her words. Orma, Miriam and Aaron were the WORSE siblings ever. Jealousy. Judgmental. Straight out rude. They all irritated the mess out of me. I thought I disliked Orma, but that ending made me hate her. Miriam was just the worse and got on my damn never. Aaron was just a fool. Overall, this was a pretty good biblical fiction on Moses and Zipporah. I think it would appeal to many, but I also think some people would be bothered by the sex scenes. I enjoyed it enough and can’t wait to read Sarah (book 1) and Lilah (book 3).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Yeah, didn’t really like this follow up in the Canaan series. It was a whole lot of “oh I’m just a poor black woman and I have no worth but to make Moses’ baby and encourage him and make him amazing and build him up while his family and friends diss me on a regular basis.” I get that the Cushites aren’t exactly respected but Moses would have been NOTHING without Zipporah and this book gives her a miserable ending that makes me angry and sad for her. I know this is biblically accurate but come on Yeah, didn’t really like this follow up in the Canaan series. It was a whole lot of “oh I’m just a poor black woman and I have no worth but to make Moses’ baby and encourage him and make him amazing and build him up while his family and friends diss me on a regular basis.” I get that the Cushites aren’t exactly respected but Moses would have been NOTHING without Zipporah and this book gives her a miserable ending that makes me angry and sad for her. I know this is biblically accurate but come on, Yahweh couldn’t have given her some true happiness and blessings for being a real ride or die? Smh. Anyways, Halter is a good writer, but the story really didn’t need to be rehashed out, she’s an understated bible character, yes, but she also just needs to Rest In Peace. I would REALLY like a follow up story on the crappy Queen of Sheba, I want to know how she became the way she is. I also didn’t like the story because it was basically just Moses flying into rage and being the ultimate fu**boy, by being indecisive and a horrible baby daddy.

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