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As a beleaguered galaxy fights its way back from the brink of destruction, the Jedi’s most fearsome enemy plots to end the war–and claim victory–with a final act of domination. . . . The troubles for the embattled living planet Zonama Sekot have just begun. As Luke Skywalker and Jacen Solo negotiate its place in the galactic struggle against the Yuuzhan Vong, one of its As a beleaguered galaxy fights its way back from the brink of destruction, the Jedi’s most fearsome enemy plots to end the war–and claim victory–with a final act of domination. . . . The troubles for the embattled living planet Zonama Sekot have just begun. As Luke Skywalker and Jacen Solo negotiate its place in the galactic struggle against the Yuuzhan Vong, one of its organic ships is taken by the alien invaders. Scientist Nen Yim is ordered to use the captive to find weak spots in Zonama Sekot’s technology. But what Nen Yim discovers about the planet and its mysteries shocks her to the core. Clearly her people have gone terribly astray. For the peace-loving planet harbors not only the key to its own destruction, but the long-forgotten secrets of the Yuuzhan Vong themselves. Meanwhile, General Wedge Antilles, commanding one fleet in a three-pronged campaign to retake the Bilbringi system, is suddenly stranded deep in Yuuzhan Vong space, cut off from all contact. Wedge and his ships must rely on trickery and brilliant battle tactics if they are to survive long enough to ensure the success of one of the deadliest and most crucial missions the Galactic Alliance forces have ever seen. . . . Features a bonus section following the novel that includes a primer on the Star Wars expanded universe, and over half a dozen excerpts from some of the most popular Star Wars books of the last thirty years!


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As a beleaguered galaxy fights its way back from the brink of destruction, the Jedi’s most fearsome enemy plots to end the war–and claim victory–with a final act of domination. . . . The troubles for the embattled living planet Zonama Sekot have just begun. As Luke Skywalker and Jacen Solo negotiate its place in the galactic struggle against the Yuuzhan Vong, one of its As a beleaguered galaxy fights its way back from the brink of destruction, the Jedi’s most fearsome enemy plots to end the war–and claim victory–with a final act of domination. . . . The troubles for the embattled living planet Zonama Sekot have just begun. As Luke Skywalker and Jacen Solo negotiate its place in the galactic struggle against the Yuuzhan Vong, one of its organic ships is taken by the alien invaders. Scientist Nen Yim is ordered to use the captive to find weak spots in Zonama Sekot’s technology. But what Nen Yim discovers about the planet and its mysteries shocks her to the core. Clearly her people have gone terribly astray. For the peace-loving planet harbors not only the key to its own destruction, but the long-forgotten secrets of the Yuuzhan Vong themselves. Meanwhile, General Wedge Antilles, commanding one fleet in a three-pronged campaign to retake the Bilbringi system, is suddenly stranded deep in Yuuzhan Vong space, cut off from all contact. Wedge and his ships must rely on trickery and brilliant battle tactics if they are to survive long enough to ensure the success of one of the deadliest and most crucial missions the Galactic Alliance forces have ever seen. . . . Features a bonus section following the novel that includes a primer on the Star Wars expanded universe, and over half a dozen excerpts from some of the most popular Star Wars books of the last thirty years!

30 review for The Final Prophecy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The Final Prophecy is one of the penultimate books of the New Jedi Order series. This book makes me wish the author wrote the entire series, especially the Force Heretic three book miniseries (a lackluster attempt at entertainment). Not a verbose novel, this story is focused and entertaining. The storytelling has depth and the writing smooth. Taking into account the trials occurring around the galaxy, Final Prophecy omits the mundane unnecessary details, assuming you have already read the 17 oth The Final Prophecy is one of the penultimate books of the New Jedi Order series. This book makes me wish the author wrote the entire series, especially the Force Heretic three book miniseries (a lackluster attempt at entertainment). Not a verbose novel, this story is focused and entertaining. The storytelling has depth and the writing smooth. Taking into account the trials occurring around the galaxy, Final Prophecy omits the mundane unnecessary details, assuming you have already read the 17 other books leading up to this one. Okay, so a refresher isn’t inherently bad, but please don’t review the entire Vong-campaign when opening every novel in the series. Tahiri is fantastic, the character depth is wonderfully done and interactions with her fellow Jedi and friends is spot on. The paradox of her new self is more fully realized and subplots are tied up from when she was captured and shaped on Yavin 4. To me, Tahiri and Jania are the superstars of the New Jedi Order books. Without them the entire series would decompose to a pile of dust. The Vong aren’t one big happy family, and that is also explored in this book. I’m impressed with the development of the alien race and potential for additional clarity to be revealed in the final book. Alluding to the overarching conflict, this focused and enjoyable story really proves there are plenty of ways to tell a story in the Star Wars universe without constantly jumping from one dual filled with parries and juking and jinking. A smart approach to a world with much potential for story development.

  2. 5 out of 5

    M Hamed

    i have exams i don't have time for this and by the way where are the Mandalorian in all of this ? i have exams i don't have time for this and by the way where are the Mandalorian in all of this ?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    The end is in sight and I can't wait to get there! Tahiri is on Dagobah when she meets a Shamed One that tells her of the heresy and of a prophecy: that a Living World (Zonoma Sekot) promises redemption to the Shamed Ones. This seems to be nothing, but then Nom Anor, in his disguise as the Prophet, asks the Jedi to take him, Harrar, and Nen Yim to this place. So Tahiri and Corran swing on by to Yuuzhan'Tar and the unlikely quest begins. NOTE: Based on audiobook and novel. Frak, was this a good book The end is in sight and I can't wait to get there! Tahiri is on Dagobah when she meets a Shamed One that tells her of the heresy and of a prophecy: that a Living World (Zonoma Sekot) promises redemption to the Shamed Ones. This seems to be nothing, but then Nom Anor, in his disguise as the Prophet, asks the Jedi to take him, Harrar, and Nen Yim to this place. So Tahiri and Corran swing on by to Yuuzhan'Tar and the unlikely quest begins. NOTE: Based on audiobook and novel. Frak, was this a good book! I can't emphasize enough how much I loved this book, how it kept me on the edge of my seat, how I loved the characters, the plot, the avalanche of answers to questions, and just about everything in the novel. So, just to give you a hint, I'll try to make a list. 1. Characters. Ah, it's so nice to read characters that are REAL and actually GROW instead of reverting back to the status quo with each book (yes, I am looking at you, Jacen!). Plus, Keyes works magic when he writes Corran Horn (LOVE how he explodes and goofs up in this book!), Tahiri (LOVE how he advances her "split" personality), Nen Yim (LOVE the "Man of Science, Man of Faith" thing going on), Harrar (LOVE how he has become a heretic), and Nom Anor (LOVE how he is back to being somewhat powerful and a REAL enemy). The characters grow, learn, and generally are a pleasure to read about. 2. Plot. What the frak is Zonoma Sekot's importance? Well, you get a pretty damn good idea in this book, lemme tell you. While the full answers are coming in "The Unifying Force", Keyes takes the time to actually USE the damn planet we spent THREE books looking for (still upset about that, can't you tell?). I enjoyed how Corran and Tahiri had to team up with mortal enemies to find Zonoma Sekot and to learn what it was all about. 3. Philosophy. This book tackles a lot of questions like science vs. faith, the Force and the Yuuzhan Vong, what is Zonoma Sekot, why is it similar to the Yuuzhan Vong, and more. In some ways, it's like "Traitor": it answers a LOT of the burning questions you've been mulling over the last 18 books. 4. Action. Yeah, there's some talking (a lot, in places), but don't think this is just a boring book. Nuh uh, there are plenty of action scenes for us junkies: Corran and Tahiri escaping Yuuzan'Tar in a Sekotan ship (totally awesome), dealing with an Imperial interdictor and more. 5. Writing. Keyes writes in a way that I find VERY enjoyable and VERY interesting, not boring or dull in the slightest. It's quick paced, which works perfectly for the type of novel this is, and yet does have some really good flourishes (such as when Tahiri finds out who Riina was and during a certain character's death). I don't really think I need to say much more, or I am going to look like a squeeing fan girl. I suppose this book wasn't as good as "Conquest", but damn, I wouldn't want to live off the difference. Let me just say, if the Force Heretic series scared you away, please reconsider coming back. This book is 314% better.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    This is the second-to-last book in the Star Wars New Jedi Order series, and, while it has been a long haul (20 books total in the series), with only a few that I would call less-than-stellar, most of the books in the series have been excellent. Greg Keyes's "The Final Prophecy" is one of the better ones. Keyes wrote one of my favorite books in his NJO Edge of Victory duology, "Conquest", which introduced many themes and events that had have had a significant impact on the direction in which the s This is the second-to-last book in the Star Wars New Jedi Order series, and, while it has been a long haul (20 books total in the series), with only a few that I would call less-than-stellar, most of the books in the series have been excellent. Greg Keyes's "The Final Prophecy" is one of the better ones. Keyes wrote one of my favorite books in his NJO Edge of Victory duology, "Conquest", which introduced many themes and events that had have had a significant impact on the direction in which the series has taken since. Many of those themes are explored more fully in "The Final Prophecy". Young Jedi Knight (and love interest for the late Anakin Solo) Tahiri is dealing with her new-found personality, a result of a Yuuzhan Vong experiment that attempted to meld a Yuuzhan Vong mind with her own. (One of the significant events in "Conquest"). After Anakin saved her life, she has been suffering from a highly volatile case of multiple personality disorder. It was only recently that she and her Yuuzhn Vong personality, Riina, came to the conclusion that the only way to survive was to completely meld both personalities into one new one, which is what they did. At the start of "The Final Prophecy", Tahiri is doing soul-searching on Dagobah, when she runs into a platoon of Yuuzhan Vong warriors. She rescues a Shamed One, who tells her about the Prophet's vision of a living planet that will bring the Jedi and save the other Shamed Ones. She makes a promise to return to Coruscant and tell the Prophet about Zonoma Sekot. No one knows that the Prophet is actually the manipulative Nom Anor, who is using the Shamed Ones to eventually get back into the good graces of Warlord Shimrra. Tahiri and Jedi Corran Horn make a daring run to Coruscant to spread the good word and escape with a shaper, a Yuuzhan Vong priest, and Nom Anor. From there, they travel to Zonoma Sekot. Tahiri soon realizes that the shaper, Nen Yim, is the same shaper who experimented on her. Indeed, the implanted memories of Riina are, in fact, Nen Yim's. Nen Yim and Harrar, the priest, begin to gradually understand the importance of Zonoma Sekot and its history with the Yuuzhan Vong. Unfortunately, Nom Anor plans on destroying Zonoma Sekot---which he sees as a threat to the existence of the Yuuzhan Vong---as a way to win favor with Shimrra. Along with the action and suspense, Keyes takes up the fascinating spiritual themes he introduced in "Conquest", especially in regards to the Force and its relationship to the Yuuzhan Vong. Why and how is the Yuuzhan Vong completely absent of the Force? If all living things are a part of the Force, what does that say about the Yuuzhan Vong? What does it have to say about the Force? I love the spiritual/philosophical aspect that Keyes incorporates into these novels. It adds that much more to an already superb book and series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jerry

    The Good: This penultimate volume in the New Jedi Order series features the same action, drama, and heroism that we've come to expect. The epilogue is appropriately dramatic, and sets the stage for what is hopefully an explosive conclusion. After reading the series in its entirety up to this point--well, minus the e-book short stories, anyway--I'm curious to see how it finishes. The Bad: As good as this was, it still felt a little lackluster; maybe that's because the fireworks won't begin until t The Good: This penultimate volume in the New Jedi Order series features the same action, drama, and heroism that we've come to expect. The epilogue is appropriately dramatic, and sets the stage for what is hopefully an explosive conclusion. After reading the series in its entirety up to this point--well, minus the e-book short stories, anyway--I'm curious to see how it finishes. The Bad: As good as this was, it still felt a little lackluster; maybe that's because the fireworks won't begin until the final book. Content Concerns: • Sex: A reference to an illicit affair. 4/5 • Nudity: None. 5/5 • Language: Occasional usage of euphemisms (i.e., "Sithspawn!") and the British profanity "bloody". 4/5 • Violence: Sci-fi action throughout, as you'd expect from this series. 3/5 • Drugs: None. 5/5 • Frightening/Intense Scenes: The Yuzhaan Vong are scary, as usual. 4/5 • Other: The usual flaky Force theology that has been present in this franchise from day one. 4/5 Score: 4/5

  6. 5 out of 5

    Darryl Dobbs

    This story gives the lead-in trilogy (Force Heretic) purpose. And while the aforementioned trilogy I found to be plodding at times, The Final Prophecy didn't really have that drawback. Then again, they didn't try to stretch The Final Prophecy into two or three novels. The main plot line surrounded Tahiri and Corran as they, along with three Yuuzhan Vong (Nen Yim - the shaper, Harrar - the priest, and The Prophet - who was really Nom Anor) head to Zenoma Sekot. The tentative alliance was an intere This story gives the lead-in trilogy (Force Heretic) purpose. And while the aforementioned trilogy I found to be plodding at times, The Final Prophecy didn't really have that drawback. Then again, they didn't try to stretch The Final Prophecy into two or three novels. The main plot line surrounded Tahiri and Corran as they, along with three Yuuzhan Vong (Nen Yim - the shaper, Harrar - the priest, and The Prophet - who was really Nom Anor) head to Zenoma Sekot. The tentative alliance was an interesting one, and the hatred-turned-friendship between Nen Yim and Tahiri was a relationship that drove the book. A good read, though I did have a problem with Nom Anor's ability to prevail in one-on-one battles and his ridiculously constant good fortune. I also struggled with Sekot's lack of ability to find and confront these new 'invaders', because in prior novels Sekot seemed to be able to do pretty much anything and was aware of pretty much everything. Inconsistencies such as those prevented this from five stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Nice lead-up to the finale, and got the story back on track after the boring Force Heretic Trilogy. A few secondary characters got some love in this book, which is always a nice change of pace from the constant Skywalker/Solo-fest. A short, easy read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris The Lizard from Planet X

    Star Wars: The Final Prophecy by Greg Keyes is the eighteenth book in a nineteen volume “New Jedi Order” saga taking place more than two decades following the destruction of the second Death Star at Endor. In ‘The Final Prophecy.' Keyes' novel shifts the focus of the story away from the most familiar characters in the Star Wars universe and places it in the hands of some lesser knowns. The result makes for an excellent read. The story features Tahiri and Corran Horn. Tahiri is still integrating Star Wars: The Final Prophecy by Greg Keyes is the eighteenth book in a nineteen volume “New Jedi Order” saga taking place more than two decades following the destruction of the second Death Star at Endor. In ‘The Final Prophecy.' Keyes' novel shifts the focus of the story away from the most familiar characters in the Star Wars universe and places it in the hands of some lesser knowns. The result makes for an excellent read. The story features Tahiri and Corran Horn. Tahiri is still integrating her two personalities: her old self, the Jedi student, and a Yuuzhan Vong personality engrafted into her by the shapers of the invading Yuuzhan Vong race. Tahiri has become one of the most interesting, if not the most interesting, characters of the NJO. She is not a cliched Jedi character. Many revelations into her character are made over the course of the novel. Corran Horn is familiar to most readers of Star Wars novels. He has played a part in many of the best novels to date. He agrees to lead a mission to Coruscant to retrieve the shaper Nem Yin and the Prophet of the Shamed Ones of the Yuuzhan Vong, and to take them to the planet of prophecy--Zenoma Sekot. Tahiri joins him primarily because she made a promise to a dying shamed one that she would find the planet, and because her Vong abilities and knowledge would be of particular use on the mission. The relationship between Tahiri and Corran Horn is classic Star Wars. There is a sense of mistrust at the beginning of the novel, but the two characters settle into a mentor/student relationship nicely. Keyes' ability to write a novel that feels like Star Wars without relying heavily on the classic characters of Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, or Princess Leia speaks well of his abilities. The interaction between the Jedi is one of the great strengths of the novel. Another strength is the action sequecnes. Keyes does a superb job with both the hand-to-hand, or light saber to amphistaff, combat as well as the detailing the fight between General Antilles' fleet and that of the Vong in space. Clocking in at 300 pages, “The Final Prophecy” is a brisk and purposeful story. Here, most of the pages are spent following Tahiri, Corran and their Vong fellow travelers to Zonama Sekot, and it’s surprising that we don’t check in with Luke, Jacen and company as soon as they arrive at the planet. We also get a thread where Wedge leads a battle at Bilbringi that goes sour when the Vong knock out the HoloNet. Keyes delivers acceptable battle writing – and there’s a good side yarn where Jaina gets waylaid — but this thread pales next to Tahiri’s adventure, and I lost track of the point of the Bilbringi engagement anyway. Also, it’s odd that our heroes reinstated communications to the Unknown Regions on Esfandia in “Reunion,” and now communications are down again because of the Vong’s off-page development of drone voids that eat HoloNet relays. As such, the Esfandia mission meant nothing; it’s not the “NJO’s” tightest example of plotting. Overall, I highly recommend this novel. Star Wars fans will enjoy it. Those that prefer reading about the classic characters would be better off reading a different novel. I'd still recommend reading the NJO from the beginning, which is R.A. Salvatore's 'Vector Prime,' and I'd recommend reading 'Rogue Planet' in order to understand the prequel era tie-in. However, this novel could be read without leaving a new reader too confused.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katrin von Martin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After the slightly less than satisfactory Force Heretic trilogy, the future of the New Jedi Order series looked rather bleak. I feared the few remaining books would be lacking in quality, serving merely to drag the series out longer than it needed to be. However, The Final Prophecy proved to be a decisive, significant novel that began to answer questions posed earlier and bringing the long series to a close. This review does contain spoilers. The Final Prophecy actually seems to suffer from the After the slightly less than satisfactory Force Heretic trilogy, the future of the New Jedi Order series looked rather bleak. I feared the few remaining books would be lacking in quality, serving merely to drag the series out longer than it needed to be. However, The Final Prophecy proved to be a decisive, significant novel that began to answer questions posed earlier and bringing the long series to a close. This review does contain spoilers. The Final Prophecy actually seems to suffer from the exact opposite problem that plagued the Force Heretic trilogy. Whereas the trilogy took three books to accomplish very little, this book accomplishes in one what could have easily spanned over two or even three novels. Not to say that the book was bad...far from it...it just could have been that little bit better had there not been so much crammed into one 305 page novel. Then again, that appears to be Keyes's style. The Edge of Victory duology was comprised of two of the shortest books in the NJO (292 pages each), but it contained some of the most significant content in the series on a character building level (Anakin Solo), a cultural level (Vua Rapuung, the shapers, etc), and a story level (the birth of Ben Skywalker). The Final Prophecy stayed true to Keyes's style in that it was short, sweet, and to the point without the bogging effect of filler material. One thing I greatly admire is Keyes's specific focus on several characters rather than a broad focus on many characters. Time was definitely taken to better flesh out the characters of Tahiri, Nen Yim, and Nom Anor (to name a few), which was a refreshing change from the shoddy characterization in recent books. As for the story, the book contained two plots running side by side. The first is what I like to consider the main story. The Jedi from a loose alliance of sorts with the "Prophet" (really Nom Anor in disguise) and devise a plan to "kidnap" Nen Yim and travel to Zonama Sekot, where they hope to have various questions regarding the Yuuzhan Vong and ending the war answered. It was everything the last three books in the NJO weren't: exciting, well planned, fast paced, and significant. In one relatively short novel, Keyes managed to answer questions about Zonama Sekot that were posed back in Destiny's Way, reveal Nom Anor's plan that started in Force Heretic I: Remnant, and fully cover the effects the joining of Tahiri's two personalities (one Vong, one Jedi) had on the young Jedi. Tahiri's portrayal in the Force Heretic trilogy was rather basic and simple, not really taking the opportunity to dive into the character's personality until the very end (and even then, it wasn't that great). Keyes did a fine job in picking up where Williams and Dix left off. Tahiri has, once again, gone from being a background character to being in the spotlight. Her struggle with her new personality was believable and her constant fight to placate and deal with her two sides was certainly interesting. For once, she felt like an individual, important character instead of just being "Anakin's little friend who was more than a friend and was devastated by his death". Tahiri developed into a more complex character in this book, discovering the source of her new Vong memories, resisting the temptation of the dark side (which has become stronger thanks to the Riina personality), and making potentially life changing decisions. It was also nice to see the familiar face of Nen Yim once again. Other authors have portrayed her well in the past, but it is Keyes, her original creator who really breathes life into the character. She plays a vital role here and meets a rather unfortunate end in doing so. Her memory connections with Tahiri were certainly interesting and added a new dimension to her character. It was a shame to see how her end came about. The only disappointing aspect of this Zonama Sekot plot line is that the secret of Zonama Sekot was never revealed. Nen Yim claimed to have found it, but was stopped from revealing it by Nom Anor. It was rather frustrating to reach the end of the book and not learn why the planet is so important to everyone, including Overlord Shimrra. It was, however, revealed that Zonama Sekot was the Yuuzhan Vong home world, and hopefully that will play a role in ending the war. The second story line, while not as important as the Zonama Sekot plot, still held some important events and, if nothing else, some exciting space battles. The Galactic Alliance has finally started to put the Yuuzhan Vong on the defense. Han and Leia got some of the space fighting action they're so fond of and Jaina got yet another opportunity to prove her competence as a colonel. The Yuuzhan Vong developed a new weapon that jams the HoloNet and makes long range communication virtually impossible. Thankfully for the Galactic Alliance, this was getting sorted out at the end of the novel. There isn't really a lot to say about this plot line, as it was just the basic space battle scene...only this time, the Galactic Alliance won instead of the Yuuzhan Vong. Keyes doesn't seem to have a problem with throwing in random little surprises and shock factors at the end of chapters. For example, Nen Yim and Harrar are disposed of relatively quickly. I actually had to go back and reread Nen Yim's demise because I simply couldn't believe the author could so easily kill off a character the reader has grown attached to since her appearance in Edge of Victory 1: Conquest. There is also a brief surprise regarding a possible family member of Pallaeon. The author has no problem with extinguishing well-loved characters and casually throwing in little shocks, which is hardly a bad thing, but it does make for some interesting surprises. The Final Prophecy was a great comeback from the Force Heretic trilogy. Things are finally beginning to come to a close and loose ends are finding resolutions. This book was fast paced and to the point with practically every event, every sentence holding some significance. My only complaint is that it wasn't longer. This review is also posted on Amazon.com

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This fucking guy nom anor.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zan

    Review/Thoughts on Twitter https://twitter.com/serswjm/status/12... (Spoilers) Review/Thoughts on Twitter https://twitter.com/serswjm/status/12... (Spoilers)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This is not the kind of novel that's going to set the world on fire. What it is, though, is the penultimate book in the New Jedi Order series, which means it's in charge of making sure that all of the pieces are properly in place for the finale. And that, I have to say, it does fairly well. The plot: The Jedi are contacted by those within the Vong who would challenge Shimmra; Tahiri and Corran Horn are conscripted to take Nom Amor and Nem Yim to the living planet of Zonama Sekot to try to advance This is not the kind of novel that's going to set the world on fire. What it is, though, is the penultimate book in the New Jedi Order series, which means it's in charge of making sure that all of the pieces are properly in place for the finale. And that, I have to say, it does fairly well. The plot: The Jedi are contacted by those within the Vong who would challenge Shimmra; Tahiri and Corran Horn are conscripted to take Nom Amor and Nem Yim to the living planet of Zonama Sekot to try to advance the cause of peace, while Wedge Antilles and Jaina start another push against the Vong's military presence in an effort to win back the galaxy. There was a lot in here for me to like: Corran's one of my favourite Jedi, I'm really fond of Zonama Sekot as a setting, and I really like how they've allowed the new generation of Jedi to take centre stage. I would have enjoyed it a lot more, though, if it felt like it was an essential part of the story, rather than just filler moving everything in place for Luceno's The Unifying Force, which will (thankfully) see the end of the Yuuhzan Vong invasion story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Sell

    One of the better novels in the NJO series. This did a great job of setting up storylines to be resolved in the finale. I enjoyed the more narrow focus on some of the awesome side characters of the series as well. Overall a great penultimate novel

  14. 5 out of 5

    Malkhai

    Original review: https://myshelfbooks.wordpress.com/20... Almost there.. almost there. One more book and I will finish this saga that I started when I was 22 or 23-years-old. I’m 36 right now, so I have taken my sweet time to tackle some of the best stories that have happened in that far galaxy I love. I hope I can read the last one this year. There is nothing that should divert me from that goal… except shiny books that catch my eye every week. Oh, well… let’s get down to business! The war agains Original review: https://myshelfbooks.wordpress.com/20... Almost there.. almost there. One more book and I will finish this saga that I started when I was 22 or 23-years-old. I’m 36 right now, so I have taken my sweet time to tackle some of the best stories that have happened in that far galaxy I love. I hope I can read the last one this year. There is nothing that should divert me from that goal… except shiny books that catch my eye every week. Oh, well… let’s get down to business! The war against the Yuuzhan Vong has reached a boiling point. After several victories in a row, the Galactic Alliance is puffing its chest and wants to strike the evil invaders out of existance once and for all. While Wedge Antilles and his newly minted Imperial friends set a trap for the remaning of the Vong forces, Corran Horn teams up with Tahiri to infiltrate Coruscant and rescue a possible Yuuzhan Vong ally. But traps and trust are blind bullets, so… This book is pure Expanded Universe magic: space battles, cloak and dagger missions, revelations… Its main strength is the crazy pace with non-stop action since almost the beginning. It may start a bit slow, but that is just to warm up, because the ride will leave you breathles. It is pretty obvious we are almost reaching the end of this huge story and still it is not clear who is in the winning side. Both armies have taken more hits than they want to admit, but both of them keep biting and kicking as if they were as fresh as the first day. I’m quite nervous, if I’m honest. It doesn’t look promising at all for the good guys, even though I’m sure they are going to win this fight. But with only one book left… they must have an epic trick under their sleeve to pull it off. I have also enjoyed the closer look to the Yuuzhan Vongs we have been gifted with this book. Until know, all the invaders were just cruel fanatics that were blinded by their faith un ruthless leaders. But in this story some of them have been allowed to show another face. A face that makes them much more capable of signing some kind of peace treaty with the Galactic Alliance and Empire. We have seen a shaper showing more emotion than simple hatred or a priest trying to understand the infidels in a sincere way. Too bad there are not more like them. Even though I would love to, I don’t know how peace and understanding can be reached between such different factions in just one more book. Something really big must happen for something like that to make sense. I’m also glad that this author has decided to take the main action away from the usual characters. I needed a breather from Skywalkers and Solos after several books with them as the main heroes. Corran Horn and Tahiri as a team have been an unexpected blast. At first I was a bit sad about Corran being so cold with the poor girl (understandbly so, but still…), but reading how little by little the trust grows between them has been highly entertaining. Corran is not your typical Jedi, that is for sure. Also the group of Yuuzhan Vongs that joins them is very colourful and interesting. Besides, when Nom Anor is involved, you know you won’t be disappointed. Writing this review has taken me more than I was expecting. I live in Spain and, for obvious reasons, I’ve been working from home since Monday and I will keep doing so until it is again safe for everyone to lead a normal life. I’m a bit tired of looking at my own screen, so I’ve been lazy about writing reviews. Funny that due to my work at home and the mandatory order of not going outside if it is not vital I’m reading faster than usual, so more reviews need to be written. I have decided to take it slow and I’ll write them when I write them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark Oppenlander

    Greg Keyes returns to give us the penultimate chapter of the New Jedi Order series, and in doing so writes one of the tighter and more focused installments of the whole series. He takes on the challenge of setting up the endgame with aplomb. There are two story lines. In the main thread, Tahiri Veila and Corran Horn are contacted by The Prophet of the Yuuzhan Vong (Nom Anor in disguise), who indicates that he wants to defect. The two Jedi agree to a stealth mission to Yuuzhan'tar to extract The P Greg Keyes returns to give us the penultimate chapter of the New Jedi Order series, and in doing so writes one of the tighter and more focused installments of the whole series. He takes on the challenge of setting up the endgame with aplomb. There are two story lines. In the main thread, Tahiri Veila and Corran Horn are contacted by The Prophet of the Yuuzhan Vong (Nom Anor in disguise), who indicates that he wants to defect. The two Jedi agree to a stealth mission to Yuuzhan'tar to extract The Prophet, along with the shaper Nen Yim and the priest Harrar. The group then travels to the living planet Zonama Sekot. Nen Yim and Harrar hope to unlock the secrets of Zonama Sekot and find out what it has to do with the Yuuzhan Vong. But Nom Anor has other motives, thinking that if he can sabotage the planet that his leader fears, he can make his way back into Shimrra's good graces. Meanwhile General Wedge Antilles leads an attack on the Bilbringi system that goes horribly awry when communications are taken out by new Vong biotech. Jaina Solo winds up (view spoiler)[kidnapped by pirates (hide spoiler)] and the whole effort looks like it might lead to an Alliance slaughter. The main story line here proves to be quite entertaining. The cloak and dagger material is decent, but once the whole group gets to Zonama Sekot, things become far more interesting. And once Tahiri and Corran realize who Nom Anor really is, the pace quickens considerably. The last third of the book becomes a breathless cat and mouse game. And the wary relationship between Tahiri and Corran feels well developed. The secondary plot around the Bilbringi offensive was OK, but not particularly memorable. It simply feels too much like every other space battle in this series. And I have the distinct impression that no one really knows what to do with Jaina as a character, other than to get her in some sort of trouble and then find some way for her to rescue herself. But who is she internally? What motivates her? Other than the dumb Dark Journey novel, that idea hasn't been explored very much and I feel like Jaina deserves better. In this book at least, Tahiri comes across as a far more fully realized character. Overall though, I like the fact that Keyes keeps the action moving, and the story progressing. Coming in at just over 300 pages, it's one of the shorter volumes in the NJO series and that's not a bad thing. Too many of the books in this series have felt unnecessarily long. This one feels almost breathless in comparison . . . and in reading it, I momentarily flashed back to the sense of wonder I had as a seven-year-old child watching my very first Star Wars movie.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    The more of these books I read...well the more underwhelmed I become...maybe picking up these books as seen whenever I chance upon them hasn't been the best idea...maybe instead I should have checked out reviews of the non canonical works and just read what is considered the essential stuff. Certainly I feel a expanded universe fatigue coming in and I still have a number of books on my 'to be read' file... Anyhow what's good about this book first is ...it doesn't just focus on the 'classic' chara The more of these books I read...well the more underwhelmed I become...maybe picking up these books as seen whenever I chance upon them hasn't been the best idea...maybe instead I should have checked out reviews of the non canonical works and just read what is considered the essential stuff. Certainly I feel a expanded universe fatigue coming in and I still have a number of books on my 'to be read' file... Anyhow what's good about this book first is ...it doesn't just focus on the 'classic' characters...I'm fact many of them only make brief cameos in this take which does at least give room for other voices to shine. I think you need to have been introduced to the Yuuzhan Vong tales before as these post empire tales do have a bewildering amount of characters and plot lines...I do however feel the machinations and conspiracy in this book prodded a tad however and although the author himself can write..well the book ultimately underwhelmed.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bernard

    Well done, Mr. Keyes! This penultimate installment of the New Jedi Order series was fast-paced, brought back a few fan favorite characters and dogfight action, and helped set up the finale of the storyline. Personally, I love Tahiri’s character. I have been quite depressed at her arc during NJO given all the crap that has happened to her and the people she loves. Given I’ve followed her from her pre-teen days as a friend and Jedi Academy classmate of Anakin Solo in the Junior Jedi Knights, and gi Well done, Mr. Keyes! This penultimate installment of the New Jedi Order series was fast-paced, brought back a few fan favorite characters and dogfight action, and helped set up the finale of the storyline. Personally, I love Tahiri’s character. I have been quite depressed at her arc during NJO given all the crap that has happened to her and the people she loves. Given I’ve followed her from her pre-teen days as a friend and Jedi Academy classmate of Anakin Solo in the Junior Jedi Knights, and given I believe she’s the only character left alive from that kids’ series, I’m quite protective of her. I’m bristling to find out her fate in The Unifying Force. And I’m definitely going to check out Keyes’ Briar King series now that I’ve had a taste of his writing with this, the third of his Star Wars novels.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nom Chompsky

    While I don't want to outright agree that the Solo children are valueless and boring, Tahiri really does provide a much more compelling Jedi character to follow, and embodies some of the lite-deconstruction ('bad guys are just like us') motif that's arisen since Luke got lectured (and humbled) by Vergere earlier in the series. The book was well-paced, a welcome relief from the seemingly stretched-thin plot of the trilogy immediately prior. I wish there had been more opportunities in the series f While I don't want to outright agree that the Solo children are valueless and boring, Tahiri really does provide a much more compelling Jedi character to follow, and embodies some of the lite-deconstruction ('bad guys are just like us') motif that's arisen since Luke got lectured (and humbled) by Vergere earlier in the series. The book was well-paced, a welcome relief from the seemingly stretched-thin plot of the trilogy immediately prior. I wish there had been more opportunities in the series for uncertain allegiances to bring together Vong and Jedi like the voyage to the living planet in this novel. I am so excited for the finale of NJO coming up, and the long journey to it is finally starting to feel worth it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Loved it! I'm so close to the end of the NJO and I'm dying for the secret! Of course, we can suspect what said revelation will be but omg I'm so excited! I only wish I'd started reading the NJO 15 years ago when my husband first asked me to. Loved it! I'm so close to the end of the NJO and I'm dying for the secret! Of course, we can suspect what said revelation will be but omg I'm so excited! I only wish I'd started reading the NJO 15 years ago when my husband first asked me to.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jeni

    Not my favorite book in the series though still good and leading to the wrap up. My favorite part was both Horn and Solo feeling nostalgic/romantic when it was the Imperials who pulled them out of space just like old times.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    A nice brisk adventure, competently written, great entertainment, great characters, yet doesn't feel like the penultimate to such a massive series. Kind of wish Keyes wrote the preceeding trilogy himself. 3 1/2 A nice brisk adventure, competently written, great entertainment, great characters, yet doesn't feel like the penultimate to such a massive series. Kind of wish Keyes wrote the preceeding trilogy himself. 3 1/2

  22. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    Definitely times where the writing lacked, but the plot moved and only one more left.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    This is another great book in an ongoing series I like. This is a Good Read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael Wiggins

    I think two Jedi should have been smarter, and cut Nom Anor in half about midway through this book, no dark side powers needed. I am hoping that the series ends on a higher note than this.

  25. 4 out of 5

    carolyn m markley

    Good story i like Tahiti she seem to resolve her vong side.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matt Bergevin

    This pen ultimate book was a bit lack luster. It still felt like a standalone story within the bigger story, and didn’t feel like it set things up for a conclusion.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    One of the best in the series. I’m ready for the end now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Quick, easy read. The plot keeps moving with minimal shenanigans. Greg Keyes has written some of my favorite entries in this series!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    This is a very good book, and Greg Keyes yet again shows an understanding of the characters, even those established before the NJO. I feel like he almost channels Stackpole and Allston when writing Wedge and Corran. I also really like how this is written (as compared to the FH trilogy): A few chapters are dedicated to one group's point-of-view, though the character framework changes. It allows for continuity and intrigue as Nen Yim first seeks out Harrar and then the Prophet. Nen Yim and other sha This is a very good book, and Greg Keyes yet again shows an understanding of the characters, even those established before the NJO. I feel like he almost channels Stackpole and Allston when writing Wedge and Corran. I also really like how this is written (as compared to the FH trilogy): A few chapters are dedicated to one group's point-of-view, though the character framework changes. It allows for continuity and intrigue as Nen Yim first seeks out Harrar and then the Prophet. Nen Yim and other shapers are mentioned as important characters, which makes sense because this book focuses a lot on Tahiri. Also, Nen Yim learns of secrets of Zonoma Sekot, a planet that is actually incorporated into Yuuzhan Vong beliefs, through a living ship that had been brought to Shimrra. It's so very interesting to see how Shimrra commands and knows of the heresy (both Nen Yim's and the Shamed Ones'), but still acts as if neither exists. He talks that way too. Onimi is very, very creepy with Nen Yim. Wedge and Corran are in the Dramatis Personae as well, though the latter is definitely more prevalent, as he goes to Yuuzhan'tar with Tahiri. Still, Wedge commands a Fleet in the Duros system and then more into Yuuzhan Vong territory. It's horrid to see the repercussions of people who don't bloody follow orders. Alema Rar is in Twin Suns? Tahiri on Dagobah makes sense, as is the fact that the Force is a key to understanding the Yuuzhan Vong. It's really what the past few books have been hinting at. To paraphrase from the first chapter: it's not enough to know what's wrong with them, but then things must be made right. It's eye-opening that Nas Choka agrees with Zhat Lah that running away from a battle to save the lives of warriors is necessary now, and that change is needed. Choka's plan for the Holonet relay stations is good, from their stance. And then the NR fleets are cut off from each other when the plan is put into action, which is quite scary. And then the Jedi and Shamed Ones come together - Tahiri & Corran, and Nen Yim & Nom Anor, all together again. Tahiri has truly grown a lot, and my heart breaks for Han's reaction to her leaving on a mission. She truly is his and Leia's daughter in all but name. I love seeing Han and Corran both take a fatherly stance with her though. And that Corran recognizes Tahiri's abilities. He's bloody hilarious with Nen Yim. I really like that Tahiri considers 3PO a friend, but I'm answering her question to Corran - the droid is NOT real. I almost love that Nen Yim and Tahiri can talk to each other, and end up learning from each other. Nen Yim even all but redeems herself [in my eyes], and it's actually quite beautiful. It's almost cute how Imperial Captain Devis is a fan of Han's. Devis is awesome. Harrar grows on me. He commands respect and is never ashamed to recognize it in others. The ecology and biology and information in general about Zenoma Sekot is fascinating. The ending made me laugh, then almost made me cry, then was just intense.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    A priest, two Jedi, a false prophet, and a shaper walk into a bar. I mean a ship... As campy as that sounds, that's pretty much what happens in this book, and it is *awesome*. I'm not even being sarcastic. This book was a lot of fun (particularly after the last several New Jedi Order books, which have dragged more and more). There's not much bad to complain about. Some of the stuff felt a little too simple or easy. There was a slight deus ex machina at the end, and getting the aforementioned group A priest, two Jedi, a false prophet, and a shaper walk into a bar. I mean a ship... As campy as that sounds, that's pretty much what happens in this book, and it is *awesome*. I'm not even being sarcastic. This book was a lot of fun (particularly after the last several New Jedi Order books, which have dragged more and more). There's not much bad to complain about. Some of the stuff felt a little too simple or easy. There was a slight deus ex machina at the end, and getting the aforementioned group together felt a little shoehorned (but honestly, who cares? It was fun!). I was slightly disappointed at a certain turn of events ((view spoiler)[Nen Yim and Harrar's deaths (hide spoiler)] ), but that was part of the story, not necessarily lack of skill at writing. The other story with Wedge and Jaina seems tacked on, but I'm willing to let that slide too--things have to be put in place for the next, final book. The good: lots here! I'll try to be brief. Essentially, the pacing has picked back up considerably. Keyes' contributions to NJO have been some of the wildest rides in the series, and this is no exception. Zonoma Sekot features heavily in this story, as one would expect at this point, and we finally get a glimpse of some really cool revelations (not entirely unpredictable revelations, but still cool, leaving us wanting to know how things work out). Tahiri and Corran are back! Keyes does a great job with Corran (who started off as a Mary Sue for Michael Stackpole, another author), and even fits in some character development as all sorts of crazy stuff explodes. Tahiri has been really fun to follow lately. Also, Nen Yim pops up again, finally! One of the most interesting of the Yuuzhan Vong for sure. What I love most about this book? The optimism. Putting three Yuuzhan Vong and two human Jedi aboard a ship make for some hilarious and touching moments. This is what I wanted out of this series. I wanted conflict that has to be resolved by working out differences... not just blowing things up (blowing stuff up is cool too, but everything in moderation). Nen Yim and Harrar are my favorite Yuuzhan Vong, and seeing them butt heads with each other AND Corran/Tahiri, only to discover what they have in common as well... it's just great. (Not a spoiler, by the way, it's pretty predictable. The fun is in how it plays out.) In short, The Final Prophecy touches on much of what made the original Star Wars trilogy great. It's not the Thrawn trilogy by any means, but it's a worthy entry in the massive Expanded Universe.

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