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You Ask Me to Talk about the Interior

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Poetry. YOU ASK ME TO TALK ABOUT THE INTERIOR emerges out of the ontological shock and double- bind of there being a world (rather than nothing at all), and inhabiting this world that "depends on violence." Still, Carolina Ebeid writes "I have wanted / to make you something / beautiful." Drawing on influences such as Barthes's notion of the punctum (the photographic detail Poetry. YOU ASK ME TO TALK ABOUT THE INTERIOR emerges out of the ontological shock and double- bind of there being a world (rather than nothing at all), and inhabiting this world that "depends on violence." Still, Carolina Ebeid writes "I have wanted / to make you something / beautiful." Drawing on influences such as Barthes's notion of the punctum (the photographic detail that pierces the viewer) to the repertoire of circles and twirls the veronicas bullfighters make with the red cape to attract the bull, Ebeid explores a poetics that is at once intricate and intimate. The poems in this book move by way of metaphors and poetic turns that reveal and wound; they cover territories ranging from personal confession and diagnosis to political catastrophes such as war and exile. Witnessing again to the lyric as art of ethical reckoning, each poem in YOU ASK ME TO TALK ABOUT THE INTERIOR is an ardent fathoming of our most interior selves, each poem in Ebeid's long-awaited first collection is a momentary "allegory for the soul."


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Poetry. YOU ASK ME TO TALK ABOUT THE INTERIOR emerges out of the ontological shock and double- bind of there being a world (rather than nothing at all), and inhabiting this world that "depends on violence." Still, Carolina Ebeid writes "I have wanted / to make you something / beautiful." Drawing on influences such as Barthes's notion of the punctum (the photographic detail Poetry. YOU ASK ME TO TALK ABOUT THE INTERIOR emerges out of the ontological shock and double- bind of there being a world (rather than nothing at all), and inhabiting this world that "depends on violence." Still, Carolina Ebeid writes "I have wanted / to make you something / beautiful." Drawing on influences such as Barthes's notion of the punctum (the photographic detail that pierces the viewer) to the repertoire of circles and twirls the veronicas bullfighters make with the red cape to attract the bull, Ebeid explores a poetics that is at once intricate and intimate. The poems in this book move by way of metaphors and poetic turns that reveal and wound; they cover territories ranging from personal confession and diagnosis to political catastrophes such as war and exile. Witnessing again to the lyric as art of ethical reckoning, each poem in YOU ASK ME TO TALK ABOUT THE INTERIOR is an ardent fathoming of our most interior selves, each poem in Ebeid's long-awaited first collection is a momentary "allegory for the soul."

30 review for You Ask Me to Talk about the Interior

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Favorites: “Albeit,” “Veronicas of a Matador,” “Lead,” “Dear Bystander,” “All Those Gorgeous Feelings,” and “M. Marina”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sara Sams

    *I need to update review w/notes, but, briefly: -- a stunning collection; Carolina Ebeid poems offer language and images up like small gifts, even while admitting their uselessness. I will never forget the image of a spirit like a pineapple, in Punctum / Sawing a Woman in Half. or "Sea of hair breaking on the brush" <3 Glad I read this alongside *Reality Is Not What It Seems,* as I've already been thinking a lot about how interaction and language make an object (given that, apprently, objects don *I need to update review w/notes, but, briefly: -- a stunning collection; Carolina Ebeid poems offer language and images up like small gifts, even while admitting their uselessness. I will never forget the image of a spirit like a pineapple, in Punctum / Sawing a Woman in Half. or "Sea of hair breaking on the brush" <3 Glad I read this alongside *Reality Is Not What It Seems,* as I've already been thinking a lot about how interaction and language make an object (given that, apprently, objects don't... really exist like we think they do).

  3. 4 out of 5

    James

    I came into this with reservations. I tend to think of "the interior" and "interiority" as language-poetry buzzwords. Gladly, my prejudices melted away as I read the poems, which are sometimes heady but always full of heart, often difficult to describe but always considerate of the reader. Diction might be what matters most to me in poetry: a wide range of surprising, delightful words. And the diction in this book is amazingly rich. I love this retelling of Noah's Ark in "Archive": From the blac I came into this with reservations. I tend to think of "the interior" and "interiority" as language-poetry buzzwords. Gladly, my prejudices melted away as I read the poems, which are sometimes heady but always full of heart, often difficult to describe but always considerate of the reader. Diction might be what matters most to me in poetry: a wide range of surprising, delightful words. And the diction in this book is amazingly rich. I love this retelling of Noah's Ark in "Archive": From the blackpitched larynx of the ark, the raven flew newly out, a birthpang wailing: we are failed & small-willed, lifting arms against our flowering which wastes ever in the darkest part of the house. Take here, another possibility, Thou Reconciler who mums the word. Every poem has a surprising word or two in it, whether it's the kennings here or the larynx of the boat, or the veronicas in the book's 13-poem sequence on, among other things, a son's autism. There are imagos and a panda and a hamza. There is zythum (an ancient beer) and mercurochrome and ausculation. And yet all this far-flung vocab is never garish; it all feels called for. Best of all, there is a kindness in the speaker's voice, a reaching-out to the reader that makes the book a sort of collaboration. I'll leave off with the last five lines, which illustrate the conversational tone I'm hinting at: reader, will my heaven look anything like yours? there will even be a term for realism there: music as a field of chicory by her own hand, they call it

  4. 4 out of 5

    Avery Guess

    I really enjoyed the lyric quality of these poems that echo with making and undoing, with being a mother and a daughter, with living in a world "that depends on violence." I particularly liked the "Punctum" poems that were threaded throughout the collection as well as the poem sequence "Veronicas of a Matador." I really enjoyed the lyric quality of these poems that echo with making and undoing, with being a mother and a daughter, with living in a world "that depends on violence." I particularly liked the "Punctum" poems that were threaded throughout the collection as well as the poem sequence "Veronicas of a Matador."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sara Saab

    Ebeid’s poet who’s unafraid to mine beauty from abstraction. These poems are homing missiles keyed to look for a moment of aperture or confrontation. Not all of them find their target—but the ones that do detonate in a shower of petals and myrrh.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carly Miller

    This book leads you through metamorphosis--of self, of duty as mother, wife, and citizen. I was so entranced with the lyricism and syntax of these poems, and where the poems led. Whether interior to exterior, exterior to interior, these poems held me through and through.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    These were beautiful poems.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Warren

    "a beaten hide a skeleton sweetening to glowing fluids & the bee born out & the grist of them born glistening as coins" "We live in a copy of Eden, a copy that depends on violence." "a beaten hide a skeleton sweetening to glowing fluids & the bee born out & the grist of them born glistening as coins" "We live in a copy of Eden, a copy that depends on violence."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    "what is this art if not the hunt for meat, the animal lanced & hauled across the tundra of the notebook reader, will my heaven look anything like yours?" —from "M, Marina" "what is this art if not the hunt for meat, the animal lanced & hauled across the tundra of the notebook reader, will my heaven look anything like yours?" —from "M, Marina"

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chase!

    A radical approach to metaphor, to myth, to nature, to violence, to beauty. The speaker of one poem late in the book says “I continue to believe that poetry contains revolutionary power.” I agree.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily Pérez

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Jueds

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cherree

  16. 4 out of 5

    kate

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  18. 4 out of 5

    A

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Lauve

  20. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

  21. 5 out of 5

    alex wesley moore

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Rodriguez

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lindz

  26. 4 out of 5

    secondwomn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bojan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lyd Havens

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Vivid and elusive, playful yet profound, these excellent poems are well worth your time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tanner

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