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Meeting God at the Shack: A Journey Into Spiritual Recovery

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How can wounded people come to believe that God deeply loves them? Many have enjoyed William Young's "The Shack," even if they puzzled over the book's actual meaning and theology. While some were quick to dismiss it as fiction, "The Shack" isn't really fiction at all. It's a modern day parable. "Meeting God at The Shack" shows hurting people how to read this story with p How can wounded people come to believe that God deeply loves them? Many have enjoyed William Young's "The Shack," even if they puzzled over the book's actual meaning and theology. While some were quick to dismiss it as fiction, "The Shack" isn't really fiction at all. It's a modern day parable. "Meeting God at The Shack" shows hurting people how to read this story with pro t and come to know God more fully.


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How can wounded people come to believe that God deeply loves them? Many have enjoyed William Young's "The Shack," even if they puzzled over the book's actual meaning and theology. While some were quick to dismiss it as fiction, "The Shack" isn't really fiction at all. It's a modern day parable. "Meeting God at The Shack" shows hurting people how to read this story with p How can wounded people come to believe that God deeply loves them? Many have enjoyed William Young's "The Shack," even if they puzzled over the book's actual meaning and theology. While some were quick to dismiss it as fiction, "The Shack" isn't really fiction at all. It's a modern day parable. "Meeting God at The Shack" shows hurting people how to read this story with pro t and come to know God more fully.

30 review for Meeting God at the Shack: A Journey Into Spiritual Recovery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Fike

    I read The Shack soon after it was first released. I was going through the difficult process of coming to grips with an addiction, and found the book very helpful. John Mark Hicks, in Meeting God at The Shack tells his story of his spiritual recovery and the role The Shack played in this process. In an open and vulnerable manner Hicks exposes his own pain and woundedness. It was in a particularly low time that he too read The Shack and was profoundly affected by it. For those who are wounded and I read The Shack soon after it was first released. I was going through the difficult process of coming to grips with an addiction, and found the book very helpful. John Mark Hicks, in Meeting God at The Shack tells his story of his spiritual recovery and the role The Shack played in this process. In an open and vulnerable manner Hicks exposes his own pain and woundedness. It was in a particularly low time that he too read The Shack and was profoundly affected by it. For those who are wounded and seeking guidance this book would be a great start; followed by reading The Shack. In Hicks and Young (author of The Shack) strugglers will find kindred souls to guide them on their journey to recovery. Highly recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Dobbs

    This is an excellent companion to William Paul Young's The Shack, which has experienced a revival of interest since the release of the movie edition. Hicks goes beyond the themes of The Shack into published interviews with William Paul Young to explore the original author's intended themes and the background to the story. This excellent resource can be used privately or in groups, reading the book in community. Various themes and imagery are explored that give deeper meaning to The Shack without This is an excellent companion to William Paul Young's The Shack, which has experienced a revival of interest since the release of the movie edition. Hicks goes beyond the themes of The Shack into published interviews with William Paul Young to explore the original author's intended themes and the background to the story. This excellent resource can be used privately or in groups, reading the book in community. Various themes and imagery are explored that give deeper meaning to The Shack without spending a lot of time on the controversial aspects of the book (although some of those themes are addressed). Dr. Hicks, a professor of Theology at Lipscomb University, is academically qualified but also experientially qualified to write this book. He is very open and honest about the losses of his first wife and his son Joshua as well as other life challenges. Because of his vulnerability in telling these stories, the book is warm and inviting to the reader, helping them to explore their own pains and losses and to find comfort in the arms of God.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I checked this book out from the library but intend to buy my own copy so I can reread and reread and mark it up and make it my own. Each chapter pertains not only to your personal relationship with God but also to the church in general. A must read for anyone wanting to be closer to the Lord.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bob Cooling

    "The Shack" Unpacked If you loved the theme or tone of The Shack, you should read this book to find out why you did!! "The Shack" Unpacked If you loved the theme or tone of The Shack, you should read this book to find out why you did!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Graham Bates

    John Mark Hicks provides a great followup to The Shack by analyzing it not for theological accuracy but to understand William Paul Young's purpose for writing. Hicks considers The Shack a modern-day parable, not to be taken literal but as a foray into a larger idea. This parable summarizes 10 years of recovery for Young into a three-day experience with God for Mack. Writing with a balance of personal history and theology/theory, Hicks provides a great companion to those who either love The Shack John Mark Hicks provides a great followup to The Shack by analyzing it not for theological accuracy but to understand William Paul Young's purpose for writing. Hicks considers The Shack a modern-day parable, not to be taken literal but as a foray into a larger idea. This parable summarizes 10 years of recovery for Young into a three-day experience with God for Mack. Writing with a balance of personal history and theology/theory, Hicks provides a great companion to those who either love The Shack or don't know what to think about it. He deals with some of the controversies but in a "let's get to the deeper meaning" manner, rather than "let's see book/chapter/verse." In this way he helps readers get to the heart of the matter. A great, short (~= 200 pages) read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ron Nevill

  7. 4 out of 5

    Van Robarts

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hazel Bridge

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katherine C Maddex

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  11. 5 out of 5

    Judy Schroeder

  12. 5 out of 5

    Craig Nordaker

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lita

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ruth McGrath

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mrs I Lacy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dale Milford

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim Diffley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lillian Robles

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fay

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mildred Orr

  23. 5 out of 5

    roger clark

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Daniels

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sue Diffenderffer

  26. 4 out of 5

    headleysb227

  27. 5 out of 5

    theresa collier

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hiatt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Graham

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