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Glory in the Ordinary: Why Your Work in the Home Matters to God

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For stay-at-home moms, it's easy to view other people's work as more valuable to God, dismissing the significance of seemingly mind-numbing, everyday tasks. In this life-giving book, Courtney Reissig encourages moms with the truth about God's perspective on their work: what the world sees as mundane, he sees as magnificent. Discussing the changing nature of stay-at-home wo For stay-at-home moms, it's easy to view other people's work as more valuable to God, dismissing the significance of seemingly mind-numbing, everyday tasks. In this life-giving book, Courtney Reissig encourages moms with the truth about God's perspective on their work: what the world sees as mundane, he sees as magnificent. Discussing the changing nature of stay-at-home work and the ultimate meaning of our identity as image bearers, Reissig combats common misunderstandings about the significance of at-home work—helping us see how Christ infuses purpose into every facet of the ordinary.


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For stay-at-home moms, it's easy to view other people's work as more valuable to God, dismissing the significance of seemingly mind-numbing, everyday tasks. In this life-giving book, Courtney Reissig encourages moms with the truth about God's perspective on their work: what the world sees as mundane, he sees as magnificent. Discussing the changing nature of stay-at-home wo For stay-at-home moms, it's easy to view other people's work as more valuable to God, dismissing the significance of seemingly mind-numbing, everyday tasks. In this life-giving book, Courtney Reissig encourages moms with the truth about God's perspective on their work: what the world sees as mundane, he sees as magnificent. Discussing the changing nature of stay-at-home work and the ultimate meaning of our identity as image bearers, Reissig combats common misunderstandings about the significance of at-home work—helping us see how Christ infuses purpose into every facet of the ordinary.

30 review for Glory in the Ordinary: Why Your Work in the Home Matters to God

  1. 4 out of 5

    Deon

    Does working in the home matter, when tomorrow you are going to have to do it again? Does it matter to God? "Our work isn’t giving us any points with God, but it is telling the world about the God we worship. It’s telling what we value most. It’s telling what we hope in even when it is hard. Courtney is honest in her own struggles. And yet always bring it back to God, and what He thinks about our work. She shows you how to find joy in the work. "Our work is preparing us to rule and reign with Chri Does working in the home matter, when tomorrow you are going to have to do it again? Does it matter to God? "Our work isn’t giving us any points with God, but it is telling the world about the God we worship. It’s telling what we value most. It’s telling what we hope in even when it is hard. Courtney is honest in her own struggles. And yet always bring it back to God, and what He thinks about our work. She shows you how to find joy in the work. "Our work is preparing us to rule and reign with Christ in a new earth, where the curse is gone, and we will work for God’s glory, always." This book was encouraging to me and I would recommend it to any mom who is struggling to see how cleaning.up. this.mess.for.the.100th.time can be the plan that God has and how can she find joy in it. "You also image him when you care for the details of your home. As God cares for the seemingly mundane details of creation, so you care for the seemingly mundane details of a home that needs to be kept in order." The book is about 140 pages, making it a nice size book to read during naptimes. *This is an ARC from the publisher via Netgalley. No review, positive or otherwise, was required—all opinions are my own.* Quotes: -Being supermom isn’t the fast track to heaven or the “good parent list.” But faithfulness in the ordinary, even when it is hard, is true greatness. -The point of knowing how your work serves the world is driven home by knowing the work you are called to and knowing how your work matters in the grand scheme of things. Everyone has different gifts, capacities, and seasons, so there is no point in trying to fit at-home work into any one box.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Niki Shirkman

    If you find yourself looking at the daily routine of life, wondering if what you're doing matters or even specifically how and why it matters, please read this book. I found myself devouring the words on these pages, pointed to Jesus and refreshed in my role as a wife and stay-at-home mom. Reissig does an amazing job of going through the many facets of homemaking and motherhood (even a history on how it's evolved through the years that I found fascinating), in a way that frees you from unnecessa If you find yourself looking at the daily routine of life, wondering if what you're doing matters or even specifically how and why it matters, please read this book. I found myself devouring the words on these pages, pointed to Jesus and refreshed in my role as a wife and stay-at-home mom. Reissig does an amazing job of going through the many facets of homemaking and motherhood (even a history on how it's evolved through the years that I found fascinating), in a way that frees you from unnecessary guilt and comparison, but challenges and convicts you in areas of complacency or faulty thinking. I absolutely loved this book, especially the chapter on rest and work: "Miles to Go before I Sleep". Read it, talk about it with your spouse and other mom friends, and pass it along to others.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeanie

    The work of the home is nothing to be ashamed of. It is valuable, important work. It is necessary work. It is work that God sees as integral to his work in this world. In fact, because you bear his image, you are imaging him with every task you accomplish in your home on any given day. There is glory in the mundane however, we live in a world that always questions, does not value stay at home mothers, pits stay at home mothers with mothers that work, pits mothers that work with stay at home moth The work of the home is nothing to be ashamed of. It is valuable, important work. It is necessary work. It is work that God sees as integral to his work in this world. In fact, because you bear his image, you are imaging him with every task you accomplish in your home on any given day. There is glory in the mundane however, we live in a world that always questions, does not value stay at home mothers, pits stay at home mothers with mothers that work, pits mothers that work with stay at home mothers. No wonder we question the good work of being home for our families. Myself did both and to be honest I was pulled into the work force for many different reasons. What was sad is the lack of support to stay home. This is not to put blame on others, but to shed light on the turmoil that women go through. This text starts with the turmoil between staying home and going back to work. It is not a guilt trip but a longing of what is right and good. The text defines the competition of work and making a way for yourself, what is success and how competition produces money and care produces people. The work of caregiving in the home is valuable to the ones that God has called you to love. We may desire for our family to come first but the reality maybe that our loved comes last. We only have 24 hours to a day and 8 of those we need sleep, and after sleep, our 24 hours comes down to single digits very quickly. Even with all my children now gone having children of their own, I have a new insight of what home is. A place of refuge, less chaos, and a place to wind down. It is not the job of one, but of the whole family. Where a job well done reflects well in a community. It is time that we do value the work of home and the security it can bring. A Special Thank You to Crossway and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ulrike Kruger

    "When you feed your husband and children, you tangibly remind them that we have a God who meets all of our physical needs (Matt 6:26). When you open your home to others, those you know and those you don't, you show guests that God is a God who welcomes people into his home (John 14:2-3). When you take out the trash, you declare with your actions that the curse may rise up all around you, but it will one day be defeated once and for all (1 Cor 15:57). These things may feel routine, as they are at "When you feed your husband and children, you tangibly remind them that we have a God who meets all of our physical needs (Matt 6:26). When you open your home to others, those you know and those you don't, you show guests that God is a God who welcomes people into his home (John 14:2-3). When you take out the trash, you declare with your actions that the curse may rise up all around you, but it will one day be defeated once and for all (1 Cor 15:57). These things may feel routine, as they are at times, but they are important; they allow others to see that God is involved in even the routine details of the world that he had made." Courtney Reissig not only reminds the reader that the work of the home is important, necessary work, but that all of it ultimately points to God. She brings in many of her own ideas and borrows from others to bring the point across. I found it especially fitting that she not only quoted well known authors, but also ordinary ladies from her church. A timely book in an age where being a full-time mom and homemaker is seen as an inferior, outdated occupation. A timely book for me personally, as I have recently traded my work clothes for mom jeans.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Micaela Rojas

    "our work isn't giving us any points with God but it is telling the world about the God we worship." Engaging, helpful and encouraging book from someone who gets what it's like to be in the trenches. Thoroughly enjoyed it. "our work isn't giving us any points with God but it is telling the world about the God we worship." Engaging, helpful and encouraging book from someone who gets what it's like to be in the trenches. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Miller

    Helpful, practical, and loaded with counter-cultural (biblical) perspective. I’m personally thankful for the way she addresses 1) guilt (whether false or real), especially when you work all day and don’t always have anything tangible to show from it and, 2) rest, particularly when you work from home or in the home and cannot physically separate your job from where you are supposed to rest. I will be reading this again and, should the Lord give us children, I know this will be a dear companion du Helpful, practical, and loaded with counter-cultural (biblical) perspective. I’m personally thankful for the way she addresses 1) guilt (whether false or real), especially when you work all day and don’t always have anything tangible to show from it and, 2) rest, particularly when you work from home or in the home and cannot physically separate your job from where you are supposed to rest. I will be reading this again and, should the Lord give us children, I know this will be a dear companion during that season.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michele Morin

    "Laundry Is My Overflowing Inbox": Working within the Home Stuffing a ratty t-shirt into the washer’s maw, I try not to think about the fact that it was only yesterday that I hung this very same t-shirt on the clothesline. The laundry is never done — even though we are down to a family of four these days. How in the world did I survive eleven years of cloth diapers? Apparently, somewhere along the way I have discovered that there is Glory in the Ordinary, that there is meaning to all the mundane "Laundry Is My Overflowing Inbox": Working within the Home Stuffing a ratty t-shirt into the washer’s maw, I try not to think about the fact that it was only yesterday that I hung this very same t-shirt on the clothesline. The laundry is never done — even though we are down to a family of four these days. How in the world did I survive eleven years of cloth diapers? Apparently, somewhere along the way I have discovered that there is Glory in the Ordinary, that there is meaning to all the mundane tasks that are stuck on replay in this mothering life. So when Courtney Reissig compared her laundry hamper to her husband’s overflowing inbox at work, I stopped and underlined, and nodded, “yes and amen.” My soul resonated, too, when she argued that in our ordinary chores and in the act of corralling chaos into order, we image God. “You and I were created to work because God Himself works. It is a function of being image bearers.” Organizing a cluttered closet, mucking out a nasty refrigerator mess, distributing clean and folded laundry to the four corners of the house — these are all as quietly mundane as the work God does in our time to water His trees with rain or, in history, to arrange for the Exodus 16 manna that faithfully fed a generation of Israelites. Go Back to the Purpose Courtney’s personal illustrations and the vignettes shared from the lives of her friends encourage me to lift my eyes from the all-consuming “what” of my daily list and from the pervasive “how” (as in “how am I going to get all this done?”), and to fix my eyes on the one beautiful question: “Why?” Why do I do what I do every day in my home? To love God and to love my neighbor. And sometimes the hardest “neighbors” to love are the ones that share my last name and my DNA. While Martin Luther made it clear that the works of our hands are not meritorious for our salvation, he wrote decisively that “one ought to live, speak, act, hear, suffer, and die in love and service for another, even one’s enemies.” (Kindle Location 871) Loving others in our homes is more than a feeling, and it is likely to include the inconvenience of vacuuming the mud from their shoes, replacing the groceries they consume, and washing the dishes and the bedding they besmirch. Mother’s Little Helpers The whole family is invited to experience the “glory in the ordinary” that comes with the work of home — not only because of the “many hands make light work” principle, but because of the soul-shaping nature of chores and collaborative effort. With sweet reasonableness, Courtney shares this gracious logic (Kindle Location 923): “The home we all live in is for us all, and therefore, requires that we all contribute to it.” She traces the history of housework through the the subtle transition in terminology from “housewife” to “stay-at-home mum,” and examines the impact of cultural context on the believer’s theology of work. For instance, missionary and author Gloria Furman is a mum and keeper at home in a middle-eastern, community-oriented culture, while those of us in the West tend to have a go-it-alone mentality which can lead to the isolation, loneliness, and burn out that has given motherhood a bad reputation. Toward a Sound Theology of Home Since God is relational Himself, and since He ordained (Genesis 2:18) that his creatures would fare better in company with others, even the introverts of the world (I’m looking in the mirror here), need to consider what part community should be playing in our work at home. Hannah Anderson says it well: “God did not intend for families to be islands; they are part of the continent. This is why multi-generational communities are so important to the work of home.” I enjoy covering the nursery in church these days so that young mums can get a break from little children, but I am on the receiving end when a dear friend in her eighties washes all my dishes whenever she attends a big gathering in my home. “Home here on earth is a microcosm of the heavenly reality that awaits us, [and] so is the church.” (Kindle Location 1134-1143) Good theology and its practical application should lead to a connectivity and a “my life for yours” mentality as we serve one another. This glorious truth gets lived out whenever Titus 2-truth sees daylight in a discipleship relationship between older and younger women or whenever men and women of “grandparent age” step into a situation where are there are no grandparents nearby to help and encourage. “Community done among women commends the gospel to a world that breathes isolation and loneliness.” (Kindle Location 1151) The God-Designed Gift of Rest If God rested (and He did), if Adam and Eve in their perfect prelapsarian bodies needed rest, it stands to reason that my own post-Genesis 3 life will be better if I submit to a pattern of work followed by Sabbath. J.I. Packer speaks wisdom into this subject (Kindle Location 1276): We need to be aware of our limitations and to let this awareness work in us humility and self-distrust, and a realization of our helplessness on our own. Thus we may learn our need to depend on Christ, our Savior and Lord, at every turn of the road . . .” Our prideful rearing up against the rest we need and the fact that work exhausts, depletes, and frustrates us are both factors attributable to our fallen-ness. So is the idolatry that makes work into a god and permits it to supersede in importance even the people we are called to love and to serve. When my children were all small (in the pre-homeschooling days), I gave myself the weekend off from cooking by preparing meals ahead every Friday. Courtney shares an idea from a friend who depends on leftovers and PB&J for the weekend. Regardless of how we accomplish it, we ensure that the Sabbath is honored in our homes by “working hard at rest,” investing the effort up front and employing some carefully chosen “no’s.” Enter into the Joy The job description driving the work of home is an unwieldy thing, shifting daily and expanding and changing as our families grow. While this is unavoidable, we can lighten our own load with some purposeful choices and a Christ-shaped mindset such as steering clear of comparison; resisting the urge to audition for the role of Super Mum; and encouraging our husbands to fulfill their own God-ordained roles as workers at home — without feeling threatened or “less than” because we are unable to shoulder the work of two single-handed. Mired in the here and now, we forget that the work of home is the work of spreading God’s glory throughout the world. By entering into the reality of that today, we leave a mark on those we serve and prepare our hearts for a future of greater work and greater joy when we will see that there has never been a mundane task without purpose in God’s incredible universe in which nothing goes to waste. Every little task, every intentional act of service points back to the God who made us and forward to an eternity in which the connection between worship and work will be forever eliminated. // This book was provided by Crossway in exchange for my review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christa Blakey

    “He is not just a God of big moments (like speaking the entire universe into existence or bringing dead people back to life). He is also a God of little moments (like protecting you from illness, providing unexpected income and giving you food to sustain you). This should encourage us as we work in the seemingly mundane moments of working in our homes. God is working in the little moments, too.” p. 26-27 This book encouraged me with fresh perspective to seek to love God with all that I am, in eve “He is not just a God of big moments (like speaking the entire universe into existence or bringing dead people back to life). He is also a God of little moments (like protecting you from illness, providing unexpected income and giving you food to sustain you). This should encourage us as we work in the seemingly mundane moments of working in our homes. God is working in the little moments, too.” p. 26-27 This book encouraged me with fresh perspective to seek to love God with all that I am, in every way possible! The main theme is that we, as image bearers of God, have been tasked with loving fellow image bearers through ordinary, faithful work. She explains this in easy-to-read, compelling and Biblical ways. I appreciated that Reissig devoted whole sections to concepts like properly understanding work and rest from Scripture, the value of the family and community, as well as giving a detailed history on homemaking and how it has greatly changed over the years. One element I had to push past throughout the book was an overall tone of negativity about at-home work. The author seems to be continually commiserating with us about how awful laundry is, how universally unpleasant the tasks of cleaning up after a family are and how tiring wiping toddler noses becomes and how her kitchen sink as a full of dirty dishes as everyone else’s. Physical exhaustion and general chaos in the home are repeatedly bemoaned. I realize this may have been an effort to relate to her readers and address those precise attitudes with the goal of correcting them, but it lessened the impact of some of her points because it felt as if she was trying to whine about it and correct it in the same sentence. I would recommend this book to any Christian woman to help give practical consideration to her role in the home!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kreader

    This book is not intended for mothers who stay at home and raise their own children. The author spends a lot of the book complaining about the things that must be done in order to care for a family and the what she considers drudgery of repetition stuck in four walls with needy little people. Que the Disney musical number featuring the girl wondering “what’s out there? What’s my real purpose and destiny.” It was amazing to me that the entire premise of the book was to show the value of at-home w This book is not intended for mothers who stay at home and raise their own children. The author spends a lot of the book complaining about the things that must be done in order to care for a family and the what she considers drudgery of repetition stuck in four walls with needy little people. Que the Disney musical number featuring the girl wondering “what’s out there? What’s my real purpose and destiny.” It was amazing to me that the entire premise of the book was to show the value of at-home work, but have such a sad view of domesticity, especially vocational domesticity. She did make the case that at-home work is not seen as valuable in the world, which is very true! She also seeks, like many current Evangelical thought leaders, to push back against women prioritizing the home. There is a current movement popular among leaders over-correcting the thought that “a woman’s place is the home” - an unbiblical notion for sure. Conflating gender roles will only create disordered and dysfunctional homes, it will not cure a woman’s heart issue of discontentment and envy. I urge any woman who read this or thinks about reading this to know that we are asked to be hospitable without grumbling, how much more should be joyfully serving our own families! I am convinced that this book was written to for women who work primarily outside of the home, outsource their little children, who still want to consider themselves complimentarian, and who struggle to see the value in domesticity. For example, a young mother who is miserable on maternity leave, itching to get back to work would find this book helpful. I would not recommend this book to a young woman who is seeking to keep the home a priority in her life, whatever that may look like. It is much more agenda driven to change the view of womanhood, rather than to actually encourage women.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    The mundane matters. That’s the phrase I would use to sum up Glory in the Ordinary. This book is not only full of encouragement but it’s full of convicting biblical advice on a woman’s role in the home. Courtney Reissig does such a great job really explaining why everything we do at home matters in light of eternity. This was a very good read for particularly stay at home moms but it’s definitely just as applicable to moms who work outside the home.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hawkins

    I’m glad this book exists and that it was written. And I would totally recommend it to husbands and wives alike. There is a lot of biblical soundness and wisdom within. That being said, I also think it was lacking in a few areas a bit. — As for its strengths: Reissig is the type of Christian women writers we as the Evangelical church have desperately have needed. Clear, deep, Reformed, not-watery. A breath of fresh air. So just to have another book by her is refreshing. As with Accidental Feminist I’m glad this book exists and that it was written. And I would totally recommend it to husbands and wives alike. There is a lot of biblical soundness and wisdom within. That being said, I also think it was lacking in a few areas a bit. — As for its strengths: Reissig is the type of Christian women writers we as the Evangelical church have desperately have needed. Clear, deep, Reformed, not-watery. A breath of fresh air. So just to have another book by her is refreshing. As with Accidental Feminist (which I read last year and enjoyed more than this one), you can tell she knows her theology, she is all about the glory of God, and she takes the Bible seriously. Again, a joy for her and the others like her to be rising up and writing needed books like this. The biggest strength of the book is how she shows how the ‘ordinary’ things really do matter to God. In this way, the title is perfect. She shows how there is true, divine, God-pleasing glory in the ordinary. This is littered throughout the book, and she really explains it well. She shows how our ideas of what is valuable, important, or pleasing to God can be so wrong. She also does a good job explaining the history of women in the home in the first chapter. This was insightful, tracing it from olden days to the housewife era, to the mommy wars, to today. I also thought her ideas on the ‘chores’ were overall good. She has three categories for things in the home: cleaning/organizing; food; and decorating/beautifying. Her idea that everyone in your home is your ‘neighbor’ was good. In this way, she showed how so much of it fit into the category of loving your neighbor. Her idea that everyone in the home is a contributor to the home was good for husband/wife relationship, as well as for parenting. Her thoughts about rest were needed, albeit maybe not as practical as they could be. Her point about not comparing yourself to other women was great, and this could’ve I think been a whole chapter. Finally, her final chapter giving the work in the home a more eternal perspective was good (although I think she was missing some important aspects, see below). —— As for things that probably could’ve been a bit better, and maybe could be improved upon in the next book like this: I was talking to my wife who read the book and she pointed out that Jesus and his conversation with Mary and Martha, about Mary choosing the better portion was never mentioned! As my wife pointed out, this is surprising since this is one of the only explicit Bible passages about home work! But to my wife’s point, Reissig really should have spent more time I think giving this ‘better-portion’ perspective to home work. Meaning, she could’ve kept all she wrote, but added the important chapter that women shouldn’t choose homework or children or husbands ever over Jesus and sitting at his word. Maybe she thought this was a given, but it needed to be said and explained in such a book as this. Along with that, my wife also pointed out that this clearly sounds like it was written to a more wealthy upper class woman. The ideas about chores, decorating, and temptations to compare more just sounded more middle-upper class. That’s okay, but i think it showed. Her chapter about community and collaboration was okay, but sort of vague in terms of how to accomplish it. It sounded more like she assumed women were part of a strong Christian church group that would do all these selfless things for each other. In reality, it is messier than that and people often then expect things from you, etc. I think this should’ve been focused on more. Instead, she spent more time explaining how we were made for community. I think less needed to be said on that, and more needed to be explained concerning how to actually do it. Finally, in her last chapter, I think she really missed the weightiness of raising individual people who can grow up and know God though your parenting. Instead, she focuses in how everything good will contribute to the new heavens and new earth—great and true—but she only has a mere sentence about the fact that your kids will know their God and possible spend forever with him largely due to parenting. It gives parenting/housemaking a weightiness and privilege she didn’t emphasize. — As I said above, I would recommend it. It was overall very good. But I think she there were some things missing or overlooked. I enjoyed it though! Thankful it exists.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rose Elliott

    Courtney Ressig is a good writer. Her book is short (142 pages) and the brevity makes it an easy, encouraging read. I am not her primary audience in this book (moms), but I was still able to glean a lot from her writing. She focuses on work at home (raising children, tending the home, being in community, etc) as being both vital and worshipful. She doesn't place undue burdens on women and speaks to all parenting situations from moms who work full time to moms who don't bring in any money and eve Courtney Ressig is a good writer. Her book is short (142 pages) and the brevity makes it an easy, encouraging read. I am not her primary audience in this book (moms), but I was still able to glean a lot from her writing. She focuses on work at home (raising children, tending the home, being in community, etc) as being both vital and worshipful. She doesn't place undue burdens on women and speaks to all parenting situations from moms who work full time to moms who don't bring in any money and even gives mention to families with dads who stay home or only work part time. She does a great job of placing identity where it should be (in God and his creation of us as Imago Dei) and isn't prescriptive in a way that goes beyond what Scripture prescribes. She doesn't lift up one particular home situation over another. I was personally especially encouraged by her chapter on rest. It gave some helpful wisdom on balancing work and rest, something I struggle with a lot. She did quote an author that I personally do not recommend, and I was surprised by the quotations. They were relatively harmless quotes, but the use of the quoted book as a resource (and later a suggested reading) took me by surprise, as I think the heart of Courtney's message differs greatly from the heart of the quoted author's message. This quotation overall does not have huge bearing on my opinion of Courtney's book or the message she's trying to get across. Courtney also gives evidence of her collaboration with and reading of women like Jen Wilkin and Hannah Anderson who have a lot of great wisdom to give. Courtney writes beautifully and with great humility, leaning in to the wise counsel of those who have gone before her. Overall, Glory in the Ordinary was well written and helpful. It's a great book for anyone who is slogging through the mundane, whatever the mundane may be for you.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Ray

    Book 56 of 2020. Work on the home is often undervalued. After all, the regular tasks of laundry, cooking, cleaning and caring for children are often repetitive, dull and thankless. Yet, every household needs these vital tasks for care and survival. In this book, Reissig makes the argument that these tasks should matter and should be done with pride because the little tasks in the home are important to God. As a homemaker, this book was a shot of encouragement to me. I was culturally raised to bel Book 56 of 2020. Work on the home is often undervalued. After all, the regular tasks of laundry, cooking, cleaning and caring for children are often repetitive, dull and thankless. Yet, every household needs these vital tasks for care and survival. In this book, Reissig makes the argument that these tasks should matter and should be done with pride because the little tasks in the home are important to God. As a homemaker, this book was a shot of encouragement to me. I was culturally raised to believe that being a wife and a mother was a waste or time and talent, and I do not know how many times in my life I’ve answered the question, “What do you do?” with “I’m just a stay-at-home mom.” It was a reminder that my work matters and that my care of my home and the people in it is important. Although Reissig purports to write to all women (and there are insights all women can glean), the target of her book is really moms, especially homemakers or those who work from home. In that spirit, this book would make a great gift to a young mom who has decision to step down to part-time work or stay at home with her children. It will help her find value and motivation when the days seem hard or boring. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ #books #bookstagram #bookreview #gloryintheordinary #theunreadshelfproject2020

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Okeefe

    This is not a perfect book. At times I found myself falling into the trap of envying the author's ability to talk about rest and community in a way that showed how much more attainable they are for her than for me. I suppose that is my flaw rather than hers, but it did keep me from fully appreciating all of her message. Overall, however, this is an encouraging book. Reissig speaks to both women who find discouragement in the mundane nature of work at home, as well as those (like me!) who struggl This is not a perfect book. At times I found myself falling into the trap of envying the author's ability to talk about rest and community in a way that showed how much more attainable they are for her than for me. I suppose that is my flaw rather than hers, but it did keep me from fully appreciating all of her message. Overall, however, this is an encouraging book. Reissig speaks to both women who find discouragement in the mundane nature of work at home, as well as those (like me!) who struggle with constant guilt over not being the perfect Proverbs 31 wife. Either way, our calling in at-home work is to love our neighbors, and to ultimately glorify our Creator by doing the work he ordained.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Law

    A helpful read for seeing the Gospel displayed in the home and in loving care for others. Reissig mainly frames the book in the context of marriage/motherhood, but I also found it helpful for nannies and caretakers. As a recent college grad and full time nanny with no kids of my own, this book was really helpful in reminding me of the meaningfulness and impact of seemingly ordinary work in the home.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Renee

    When I opened this book and read the description of it, I came with this in my mind. What is Courtney have in store for me and does my work really matter at home? Within the first chapter, my attention was grasped especially after she makes the point that God our Father doesn't just work in the big moments but he is also at work "...in the little moments, too" (Reissig, chap. 1). Often times, I think we as mom forget this. We get so caught up with this picture in our heads of the perfect mom or s When I opened this book and read the description of it, I came with this in my mind. What is Courtney have in store for me and does my work really matter at home? Within the first chapter, my attention was grasped especially after she makes the point that God our Father doesn't just work in the big moments but he is also at work "...in the little moments, too" (Reissig, chap. 1). Often times, I think we as mom forget this. We get so caught up with this picture in our heads of the perfect mom or super-mom, that we forget the true purpose we live for. As Reissig says, "Your daily work matters, friend. Whether it feels like meaningful work or not, I assure you it is." (Reissig, chap. 2). I truly enjoyed this book, as I struggle with seeing my purpose in the home. At times it feels so mundane, but this book encourages us moms who feel that way. One of the things that I found most helpful, is how she pulls things back to the gospel. The purpose for our work, how we are image-bearers and also the importance of community.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Kwan

    I was a bit disappointed that the majority of the women she mentioned (herself included) found value/self-worth in things outside of the home. They either had part time jobs or were career women. There's nothing wrong with working, but for me, it kind of didn't provide a strong argument for her point that being a SAHM in itself is a worthy cause. I did listen to this as an audiobook, so perhaps I missed the part where she was really able to drive that point home? I was a bit disappointed that the majority of the women she mentioned (herself included) found value/self-worth in things outside of the home. They either had part time jobs or were career women. There's nothing wrong with working, but for me, it kind of didn't provide a strong argument for her point that being a SAHM in itself is a worthy cause. I did listen to this as an audiobook, so perhaps I missed the part where she was really able to drive that point home?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This book suggests that motherhood and staying at home is a burden. Even as service for others and to glorify God, its still this massive burden. But some people enjoy the repetition and the discipline 🙋🏼. This book was just not for me. I didnt find it encouraging. This may be a hang up for me, but I really get annoyed when an author says "ill address this in the next chaper" "in the next chapter" "in this chapter weve covered.." Yes. I know. I can read This book suggests that motherhood and staying at home is a burden. Even as service for others and to glorify God, its still this massive burden. But some people enjoy the repetition and the discipline 🙋🏼. This book was just not for me. I didnt find it encouraging. This may be a hang up for me, but I really get annoyed when an author says "ill address this in the next chaper" "in the next chapter" "in this chapter weve covered.." Yes. I know. I can read

  19. 4 out of 5

    Callie

    On somewhat of a whim I decided to grab the audiobook of Glory In The Ordinary recently. The subtitle caught my eye, "Why Your Work In The Home Matters To God". As someone who has struggled with my identity, especially after I quit working as a hygienist, I thought this book sounded helpful. This book was so refreshing to me, because I find so much of Christian non-fiction that is directed toward women to be...fluffy. This book was not fluffy! It was packed full of Scripture references to support On somewhat of a whim I decided to grab the audiobook of Glory In The Ordinary recently. The subtitle caught my eye, "Why Your Work In The Home Matters To God". As someone who has struggled with my identity, especially after I quit working as a hygienist, I thought this book sounded helpful. This book was so refreshing to me, because I find so much of Christian non-fiction that is directed toward women to be...fluffy. This book was not fluffy! It was packed full of Scripture references to support her points, and focused on the biblical view of work. The author writes to stay-at-home-moms and working moms, because both groups are also working at home. As a mom, I could relate to so much of this book. I struggled for a while to find my "purpose", my meaning in working at home, because so much of the work it is mundane. Kriessig writes about how our work in the home brings order out of chaos and loves and ministers to those God has given us, and that brings Him glory. She emphasizes how work in the home is not only valuable to God, but this very work is preparing us for the work God will have for us in eternity. The narrator of this book did an excellent job, I thought. Her voice inflections differentiated the sections well, and she made it easy to follow along with what the author was saying in audio format. I got so much out of this book, and I wish I had come across it a couple years ago when I was really struggling in this area! However, even now when I have settled in and feel more content with my work at home, I found this book so challenging and encouraging. I think it will be a re-listen for me! I highly recommend it to all wives and mothers - no matter your stage or time constraints or style of homemaking, I think you'll be encouraged too! Note: I received a copy of this audiobook for free from christianaudio, in exchange for this review. This is my honest opinion.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jatina

    Sometimes I find myself greatly encouraged by a book that tells me what I already know. That's what I expected from Glory in the Ordinary. Having been a housewife/at-home mom for 24 years, I am driven to my mundane tasks by a strong sense of purpose that I am serving God by serving my family. I thought this book would reinforce that feeling and provide motivation to not be weary in well-doing. And to some extent, it did. The author offers sound advice, solidly based on scripture. She reminds us t Sometimes I find myself greatly encouraged by a book that tells me what I already know. That's what I expected from Glory in the Ordinary. Having been a housewife/at-home mom for 24 years, I am driven to my mundane tasks by a strong sense of purpose that I am serving God by serving my family. I thought this book would reinforce that feeling and provide motivation to not be weary in well-doing. And to some extent, it did. The author offers sound advice, solidly based on scripture. She reminds us that not only child care, but also housework, has great value as it is tied into caring for others, and that we can glorify God in this faithful service. But I found myself losing patience with the author. For someone who is trying to point out the value of at-home work, she devoted a surprisingly large percentage of the book to the negative aspects of it: why we look down on the work and how hard and boring it is. She repeatedly reminds the reader how difficult her own at-home work is "at the time of writing this book." I found myself discouraged and slightly annoyed. BUT I am clearly out of the age-range of the intended reader, as most of my children are teens now. If I would have read this book when my kids were little, I may have connected more with the in-the-trenches tone. From my current perspective, it seemed like she was trying very hard to convince HERSELF that her work is important. And it IS! So, much grace and appreciation to her for writing about an extremely important yet overlooked topic. I highly recommend it for young moms and think it has value for us older moms, too.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chantel

    I loved a good 90% of this book. The only issue I had with it was that she focused a good bit of her time saying we shouldn't have to do it all. That even the proverbs 31 mom had servants. BUT I think it's less about having responsibilities and more about the expectations we base our lives on based off of Pinterest and Social Media (which is also why we don't have enough time to get all of our responsibilities finished). I may be old school, but I believe my husband shouldn't be coming home from I loved a good 90% of this book. The only issue I had with it was that she focused a good bit of her time saying we shouldn't have to do it all. That even the proverbs 31 mom had servants. BUT I think it's less about having responsibilities and more about the expectations we base our lives on based off of Pinterest and Social Media (which is also why we don't have enough time to get all of our responsibilities finished). I may be old school, but I believe my husband shouldn't be coming home from working all day to need to help me out. I should focus on my God first, my husband second, and my children third. Part of focusing on my husband is maintaining the home in a way that glorifies God and serves him best. That being stated - the book in every other aspect was amazing. The reminders that my mundane moments are glorifying for God if I'm doing it with the right heart. Such great reminders that it will remain on my shelf for those days I'm feeling run down, stuck in Groundhog Day mode... A book I will recommend to all my mommy friends with the above qualification.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Nowlin

    I enjoyed this book. The author really got me thinking about if I put my identity behind my work at home, she has good points on how we struggle both with idleness and making the work an idol. She does a good job showing everyone is part the work at home,and how we weren't designed to "go it alone"( and how that is just another way pride rears its head). She makes some very beautiful points on why the work at home is important to and glorifies God and gives a few practical examples. She tries no I enjoyed this book. The author really got me thinking about if I put my identity behind my work at home, she has good points on how we struggle both with idleness and making the work an idol. She does a good job showing everyone is part the work at home,and how we weren't designed to "go it alone"( and how that is just another way pride rears its head). She makes some very beautiful points on why the work at home is important to and glorifies God and gives a few practical examples. She tries not to be bias on if one should "fully" stay at home and talks about how valueing the work at home applies to working parents too,but I still felt like it was more directed at those currently staying at home full time. I think it would have been helpful to her readers to broaden her applications and examples a little, since many times both parents have to work and can and do glorify God with their work at home too.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ginelle

    Reissig seeks to reclaim the honor of housework. Our society seems to value work around the home as less-than when compared to 'bread winning' work that is done outside the home, despite all the necessary aspects of it. She has a lot of good quotes and Biblical values brought up as she makes the overall statement that, as Christians we are supposed to reflect God to the world, and that we do this through out work, in the home or out of it. This would be a great read for any homemaker/ stay-at-hom Reissig seeks to reclaim the honor of housework. Our society seems to value work around the home as less-than when compared to 'bread winning' work that is done outside the home, despite all the necessary aspects of it. She has a lot of good quotes and Biblical values brought up as she makes the overall statement that, as Christians we are supposed to reflect God to the world, and that we do this through out work, in the home or out of it. This would be a great read for any homemaker/ stay-at-home parent who is feeling less-than because of the line of work that they are in, whether by choice or necessity. It is a great Christian stance on doing all you do for God's glory (though there are a few times that I feel like she's reaching to make a deep connection). For those who have no conflicting emotions about their work in the home, it gets a little redundant.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Breanna Schmidt

    This book could have very easily been another faux-mom-encouragement manifesto in an over saturated genre. Instead, it was theologically rich and thought provoking. Courtney makes a very thoughtful case on man's relationship to work and the meaning we can glean from it. She states that God lovingly designed us to work as his way to care for creation. She rebukes the common individualistic attitude towards vocation and gives a vision for a distinctively Christian work ethic. This book really rock This book could have very easily been another faux-mom-encouragement manifesto in an over saturated genre. Instead, it was theologically rich and thought provoking. Courtney makes a very thoughtful case on man's relationship to work and the meaning we can glean from it. She states that God lovingly designed us to work as his way to care for creation. She rebukes the common individualistic attitude towards vocation and gives a vision for a distinctively Christian work ethic. This book really rocked my world. It described much of what God has shown me in my own walk while going exponentially further than I could have gone on my own. If you feel fragmented by the dissonance between work that feels meaningless and the people it impacts this book will help you immensely.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erica Gore

    This had a lot of good nuggets of wisdom and truth, and some good reminders of why we work and for whom we work and how we work. I was pretty bummed, however, at the way she described motherhood as mindless, frazzled, disorganized, and harried. While motherhood can of course be this some days, I think she misses driving home the point that God wants us to bring order, peace, calm, and rule over our homes. I think she tries to justify the way that motherhood often looks in our fast pace, tech dri This had a lot of good nuggets of wisdom and truth, and some good reminders of why we work and for whom we work and how we work. I was pretty bummed, however, at the way she described motherhood as mindless, frazzled, disorganized, and harried. While motherhood can of course be this some days, I think she misses driving home the point that God wants us to bring order, peace, calm, and rule over our homes. I think she tries to justify the way that motherhood often looks in our fast pace, tech driven lifestyle rather than confronting the reality that there are areas we need to bring under Christ’s rule when our lives begin to look and feel constantly unruly. The book is also quite redundant which is unfortunate.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura Weir

    This book was a great read as a mom with a toddler and baby. There are plenty of messages out there for young moms, but so much is fluff and humanistic. Reissig, on the contrary, gives the big picture that we need when it feels like our current stage will never end and we have so much we don't like about it... She talks about loving our "neighbors" who live in our home, how our work and rest is not about us but it's about others, how rest might not mean time alone doing your favorite things but This book was a great read as a mom with a toddler and baby. There are plenty of messages out there for young moms, but so much is fluff and humanistic. Reissig, on the contrary, gives the big picture that we need when it feels like our current stage will never end and we have so much we don't like about it... She talks about loving our "neighbors" who live in our home, how our work and rest is not about us but it's about others, how rest might not mean time alone doing your favorite things but instead being intentional about enjoying your family, etc. It's not super long, and I felt it wasn't too repetitive or too heady. It was thought-provoking, encouraging, honest, and practical.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lexi Zuo

    Interesting read. I particularly enjoyed learning about how attitudes towards the home and family have changed and morphed throughout history. I've loved hearing Courtney speak or do podcasts, but I sometimes feel like her writing is all over the place. She has good thoughts, but it feels hard to follow them at times. I would second other reviewers that discernment is needed with this book. It would be easy to take the relatively good thoughts here and go to extremes with them. Interesting read. I particularly enjoyed learning about how attitudes towards the home and family have changed and morphed throughout history. I've loved hearing Courtney speak or do podcasts, but I sometimes feel like her writing is all over the place. She has good thoughts, but it feels hard to follow them at times. I would second other reviewers that discernment is needed with this book. It would be easy to take the relatively good thoughts here and go to extremes with them.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alana

    If you're a Christian mum, you'll find this helpful and encouraging. Highlights for me were: understanding how I 'image' God as a mum. this now gives me such purpose everyday reading the quote from Martin Luther that was addressed to husbands/fathers downsides: I'm not american and sometimes I just get tired of reading books from a Christian perspective where the 'us' and 'our culture' is America. But that is its primary audience I guess. If you're a Christian mum, you'll find this helpful and encouraging. Highlights for me were: understanding how I 'image' God as a mum. this now gives me such purpose everyday reading the quote from Martin Luther that was addressed to husbands/fathers downsides: I'm not american and sometimes I just get tired of reading books from a Christian perspective where the 'us' and 'our culture' is America. But that is its primary audience I guess.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Especially with all the time I have spent at home this past year...this book was encouraging and timely. It was helpful to think about how my work in the home glorifies God and blesses my neighbor. “The point of all of our work is to reflect the God who created us, to display his glory to a watching world, and to draw others to see it too.” “Our work isn’t giving us any points with God, but it is telling the world about the God we worship.”

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I liked that she addressed work for all types of women not just "stay-at-home" moms. This allows her to talk about work in the bigger picture and helps alleviate some of the tension between sides of the "mommy wars." She discusses the importance of family and creating a good theology of work at home as you disciple children. I liked that she addressed work for all types of women not just "stay-at-home" moms. This allows her to talk about work in the bigger picture and helps alleviate some of the tension between sides of the "mommy wars." She discusses the importance of family and creating a good theology of work at home as you disciple children.

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