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Frankenstein

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Junji Ito meets Mary Shelley! The master of horror manga bends all his skill into bringing the anguished and solitary monster — and the fouler beast who created him — to life with the brilliantly detailed chiaroscuro for which he is known. Also included are six tales of Oshikiri — a high school student who lives in a decaying mansion connected to a haunted parallel world. Un Junji Ito meets Mary Shelley! The master of horror manga bends all his skill into bringing the anguished and solitary monster — and the fouler beast who created him — to life with the brilliantly detailed chiaroscuro for which he is known. Also included are six tales of Oshikiri — a high school student who lives in a decaying mansion connected to a haunted parallel world. Uncanny doppelgängers, unfortunately murdered friends, and a whole lot more are in store for him. BONUS: The Ito family dog! Thrill to the adventures of Non-non Ito, an adorable Maltese!


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Junji Ito meets Mary Shelley! The master of horror manga bends all his skill into bringing the anguished and solitary monster — and the fouler beast who created him — to life with the brilliantly detailed chiaroscuro for which he is known. Also included are six tales of Oshikiri — a high school student who lives in a decaying mansion connected to a haunted parallel world. Un Junji Ito meets Mary Shelley! The master of horror manga bends all his skill into bringing the anguished and solitary monster — and the fouler beast who created him — to life with the brilliantly detailed chiaroscuro for which he is known. Also included are six tales of Oshikiri — a high school student who lives in a decaying mansion connected to a haunted parallel world. Uncanny doppelgängers, unfortunately murdered friends, and a whole lot more are in store for him. BONUS: The Ito family dog! Thrill to the adventures of Non-non Ito, an adorable Maltese!

30 review for Frankenstein

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Frankenstein collects horror manga-ka Ito's adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, a series of short stories about a school boy, Oshikiri, who keeps getting into various creepy situations, and a bunch of one-off short-shorts at the very end, including one in tribute to Ito’s dog. The Frankenstein story is the longest one, and it’s a (too) faithful adaptation of Mary Shelley's original. It turns out to be rather flat, compared to Ito’s own original work, and less than scary. Shelley’s story we Frankenstein collects horror manga-ka Ito's adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, a series of short stories about a school boy, Oshikiri, who keeps getting into various creepy situations, and a bunch of one-off short-shorts at the very end, including one in tribute to Ito’s dog. The Frankenstein story is the longest one, and it’s a (too) faithful adaptation of Mary Shelley's original. It turns out to be rather flat, compared to Ito’s own original work, and less than scary. Shelley’s story weaves in social commentary, but Ito lets that go to focus on the basic story, and this turns out to be a disappointing approach. What is terrific is Ito's line work, and yes, he only seems to be getting better as an artist. The second half of the book features loosely connected stories of Oshikiri, a short—this fact makes its way into every story in some way, yes—largely uninteresting and unpopular boy who is living alone in a large mansion which seems to feature an alternate dimension. These stories are the best part of the book by far, because they allow Ito to do what he does best, to go a little crazy with his art work in order to creep us out. The stories involve friends who get murdered in this parallel world, noises in the walls (reminded me of Poe’s “Tell Tale Heart”), shallow graves, and so on. * Some are ludicrous, such as “Neck Specter,” where Oshikiri seems to hallucinate his friend with an elongated neck. But the twist at the end from what we assumed was Oshikiri’s madness makes it turn successful creepier. Horror and the ludicrous are often wedded, but especially in Ito. Something that both Poe and Hitchcock fully understood. * "Bog of Living Spirits” involves a small lake where students disappear, including a very popular boy followed by a crowd of creepy girls; they force Oshikiri to swim into the bog to look for the cool guy's droned body, no luck; ghost orbs hover, an indication of all the drowned. * "Pen Pals” features a loner girl whom Oshikiri befriends who clearly is writing letters to herself, increasingly threatening letters leading to her violent suicide. Again, as with “Neck Specter,” we think we know what is going on, until (gulp), Oshikri himself begins to get threatening letters in his own handwriting. * In ”Intruders” Oshikiri hears footsteps in his house and invites some classmates in, where they discover the graves of their own dead selves, killed in another dimension. *”Hell of the Doll Funeral” is a short nightmare of children turned into dolls, and, well, then funerals. The translator calls this “dollification,” heh. I don’t like it when Ito writes about his own cats and dogs, as he does here at the end. Breaks the ghostly mood. Collect them elsewhere.. This is not in the greatness category of Ito's Uzumaki or Tomie; it’s, if you think mainly of the workmanlike Frankenstein adaptation, a three star book, but the improving artwork and some of the Oshikiri stories pushes this into the four star category for me. I thought this might also have been intended as an homage to nineteenth century horror beginning with the Shelley and then with some nods to Poe here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    The Artisan Geek

    16/7/20 This was great! I haven't read Frankenstein myself (yet), but regardless of that, I really enjoyed the story. There is something about Ito's work that has me both at times laughing and disgusted at the same time. I think it's the sharp contrast between the lack of personality in his characters and the horror he displays -- it just works perfectly! I was also pleasantly surprised to see that half of this book comprised of his short manga stories :) 16/7/20 Slowly but steadily working on comp 16/7/20 This was great! I haven't read Frankenstein myself (yet), but regardless of that, I really enjoyed the story. There is something about Ito's work that has me both at times laughing and disgusted at the same time. I think it's the sharp contrast between the lack of personality in his characters and the horror he displays -- it just works perfectly! I was also pleasantly surprised to see that half of this book comprised of his short manga stories :) 16/7/20 Slowly but steadily working on completing my Junji Ito collection :) You can find me on Youtube | Instagram | Twitter | Tumblr | Website | The Storygraph

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emm C²

    What, did you think there was actually a chance this would suck? Ha! This is the reigning god-emperor of visual monstrosity we're talking about here. Junji Ito could just draw nothing but shoestrings for four hundred pages and find a way to make something brilliant and disturbing out of it, somehow. This compilation includes Ito's adaptation of Frankenstein, as well as a handful of his signature short stories. I'm not honestly sure if it's that faithful of an adaptation as I've never read the ori What, did you think there was actually a chance this would suck? Ha! This is the reigning god-emperor of visual monstrosity we're talking about here. Junji Ito could just draw nothing but shoestrings for four hundred pages and find a way to make something brilliant and disturbing out of it, somehow. This compilation includes Ito's adaptation of Frankenstein, as well as a handful of his signature short stories. I'm not honestly sure if it's that faithful of an adaptation as I've never read the original. Shameful, I know, but Ito's reimagining is grotesque and beautiful nonetheless. You may not be able to substitute it for your English Lit. assignment, however, is what I'm saying. A slightly more in-depth review to come later, but just read it! It's wonderful. (*conspiratorial whisper* ...Secretly, I was hoping they'd reprint Flesh-Colored Horror or Hellstar Remina in English rather than Frankenstein, but all Ito is good Ito in my eyes. There are no complaints.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I figured from the title that Frankenstein would obviously take center stage, but I wasn't expecting it to take almost half of this 400 page book. Also, side note, I hated Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and I've never cared for the story or the monster so take that as you will. The second half mostly featured an alternate universe and the same kid and his friends and his empty house and honestly I didn't care much about any of them. I liked the more randomly selected collection of stories in Shiver: I figured from the title that Frankenstein would obviously take center stage, but I wasn't expecting it to take almost half of this 400 page book. Also, side note, I hated Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and I've never cared for the story or the monster so take that as you will. The second half mostly featured an alternate universe and the same kid and his friends and his empty house and honestly I didn't care much about any of them. I liked the more randomly selected collection of stories in Shiver: Selected Stories than I did this book. Nothing was scary either, or gross ... it was all just kind of disappointing. Oh well.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Kathryn Wright

    This was absolutely amazing, the art work was fantastic and the storytelling was great. I was kind of shocked by how short the Frankenstein story was but it did not need more because it was told and shown perfectly. And so the rest of the book was Junji Ito’s own short stories. These stories were so engaging and interesting, it was so easy to read. Junji Ito is becoming one of my favorite horror writers and might be my favorite manga author. I can’t wait to read more of his work because the art This was absolutely amazing, the art work was fantastic and the storytelling was great. I was kind of shocked by how short the Frankenstein story was but it did not need more because it was told and shown perfectly. And so the rest of the book was Junji Ito’s own short stories. These stories were so engaging and interesting, it was so easy to read. Junji Ito is becoming one of my favorite horror writers and might be my favorite manga author. I can’t wait to read more of his work because the art is so good and he knows how to draw readers in.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    I'm not the biggest Junji Ito fan, but I had the opportunity to check out his latest western-released collection of horror stories, so I did. It's October after all. This collects Ito's adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, a cycle of short stories about a school boy Oshikiri who keeps getting into various creepy situations, and a bunch of one-offs, including a couple about Ito's actual dog. The titular Frankenstein story is the longest of the collected here, and it's just okay. Mary Shelley I'm not the biggest Junji Ito fan, but I had the opportunity to check out his latest western-released collection of horror stories, so I did. It's October after all. This collects Ito's adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, a cycle of short stories about a school boy Oshikiri who keeps getting into various creepy situations, and a bunch of one-offs, including a couple about Ito's actual dog. The titular Frankenstein story is the longest of the collected here, and it's just okay. Mary Shelley's original story is almost 200 years old and it doesn't hold up to the modern standards of storytelling as much as people might expect. It takes forever to get going, it's not particularly scary or gripping and it doesn't really have any message about the nature of humanity or anything like that. The only redeeming feature of this segment of the book is Ito's fantastic artwork, particularly the incredibly unsettling design of the monster itself. Every time this guy shows up on the page, the story livens up. Ito may not be the best horror storyteller, but he is definitely a brilliant horror artist. The second half of the book is mostly taken up by the loosely connected stories of Oshikiri, a thoroughly unpleasant school student who constantly keeps getting tangled up in some awful situations. Accidentally murdered friends, doppelgangers from parallel worlds, evil spirits, all that jazz. These stories are by far the best part of the book. It's still Junji Ito though, so some of them do get too over the top and fall into the laughably silly territory instead of being actually scary, but other times Ito absolutely nails the tone, and in those moments I can definitely see why he is so highly regarded. And even the silliest of stories are still elevated by his sublime artwork, nobody draws horrifyingly messed up images like this guy. The last 50 or so pages are padded out with a couple of even shorter unconnected stories, and those are pretty good, too. Ito's tribute to his old dog who passed away in 1998 was sweet and pretty funny. Overall, this is a nice collection of generally pretty good horror stories, and I think this will be a great spooky October read for a lot of people. I am usually immune to Junji Ito's style of storytelling, and even I found some of these stories genuinely scary, or at least unsettling.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mindi

    Frankenstein is really well done in this one. Ito is truly the master of horror manga.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    3.0 Stars As a huge fan of Junji Ito's work, it pains me to give this collection a mediocre rating. My biggest issue was the retelling of Frankenstein, which did not hold my attention. I understand that it was a rather faithful adaptation, but unfortunately I have never enjoyed that classic tale. The rest of the stories in the collection were just okay. I liked the idea of alternative dimensions, but those related weren't particularly scary or memorable. My favourite story was a short one at the 3.0 Stars As a huge fan of Junji Ito's work, it pains me to give this collection a mediocre rating. My biggest issue was the retelling of Frankenstein, which did not hold my attention. I understand that it was a rather faithful adaptation, but unfortunately I have never enjoyed that classic tale. The rest of the stories in the collection were just okay. I liked the idea of alternative dimensions, but those related weren't particularly scary or memorable. My favourite story was a short one at the end of the book about children that are "dollifying". 

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    This collection is definitely not one of Junji Ito's better works, though Ito fans and completionists will be compelled to buy this hardcover anyway, because well, it's a Junji Ito work. His Frankenstein adaptation takes up more or less half of the book. Although I could see nothing wrong in the technical aspect of the narrative, (on the contrary, it has remained faithful to the original material), the story itself is way off with Ito's trademark manga elements. It doesn't have the usual bizarre This collection is definitely not one of Junji Ito's better works, though Ito fans and completionists will be compelled to buy this hardcover anyway, because well, it's a Junji Ito work. His Frankenstein adaptation takes up more or less half of the book. Although I could see nothing wrong in the technical aspect of the narrative, (on the contrary, it has remained faithful to the original material), the story itself is way off with Ito's trademark manga elements. It doesn't have the usual bizarre obsession over something that almost always spirals down to a horrific and grotesque end. The story does't call for such anyway. His take Frankenstein nonetheless can perhaps be considered as a better graphic adaptation of the novel. The next few short stories after Frankenstein returns to the classic Junji Ito feels that we are all familiar with. These stories too, unfortunately do not have enough of horrifying art details that give readers truly spine-tingling afterthoughts. Readers might be happy to see yet again another Junji Ito collection being translated, but will likely be disappointed with the lack of horror impact the author has delivered in many of his creations.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Krista Regester

    Perfect company for a lonely time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    In spite of the implications of its title, only about half of this latest Junji Ito volume from Viz Media is occupied by his (really quite good) adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The other half or so is made up of Ito's usual short supernatural pieces, most of them dealing with a student name Oshikiri who is sensitive about his short stature and lives in a strange mansion that might be connected to parallel dimensions. These stories involve murderous dopplegangers, extending necks, haun In spite of the implications of its title, only about half of this latest Junji Ito volume from Viz Media is occupied by his (really quite good) adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The other half or so is made up of Ito's usual short supernatural pieces, most of them dealing with a student name Oshikiri who is sensitive about his short stature and lives in a strange mansion that might be connected to parallel dimensions. These stories involve murderous dopplegangers, extending necks, haunted bogs, and many of the grotesqueries which we've all come to associate with Ito's work. There are also a couple of even shorter pieces, including two nonfiction pieces about the Ito family dog.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Ito's Frankenstein was good. Nothing amazing but a good attempt to portray the story in manga format. Had that been the entirety of the book I might have given it 4 stars. But the rest of the book is a collection of short stories. They aren't bad, but the setting of a kid living in a haunted mansion was annoying. Same kid, same place-different tales. It's weird having the same kid, having that same conversation with his cousin about not staying there and then, obviously, staying there and going Ito's Frankenstein was good. Nothing amazing but a good attempt to portray the story in manga format. Had that been the entirety of the book I might have given it 4 stars. But the rest of the book is a collection of short stories. They aren't bad, but the setting of a kid living in a haunted mansion was annoying. Same kid, same place-different tales. It's weird having the same kid, having that same conversation with his cousin about not staying there and then, obviously, staying there and going through weird shit. Come up with something a bit more original-at least vary out the weird kid. The only story that was rather cool was the story about the girl with the imaginary pen pals. Cool ending. The rest? Just ok. So a decent enough collection, but nothing amazing. It is an interesting horror manga but hardly amazing like his other work Uzumaki.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Junji Ito's work is always worth a look, even if the first half of this collection is yet another adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The monster is gruesome, even if he looks a bit like an extra from Attack on Titan, but the rest of the adaptation is rather pedestrian. The connected short stories in the back half of the book are more typical of Ito's creepiness, as an evil boy discovers his home is a gateway to alternate dimensions. Unfortunately, they are dark dimensions and his evil dop Junji Ito's work is always worth a look, even if the first half of this collection is yet another adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The monster is gruesome, even if he looks a bit like an extra from Attack on Titan, but the rest of the adaptation is rather pedestrian. The connected short stories in the back half of the book are more typical of Ito's creepiness, as an evil boy discovers his home is a gateway to alternate dimensions. Unfortunately, they are dark dimensions and his evil doppelgangers start using his house to dump bodies of people they have murdered and perpetrate other schemes. Ito dishes up plenty of the body horror for which he is notorious.

  14. 5 out of 5

    lobelyys (tired af)

    Slowly but surely Junji Ito is becoming one of my favourite manga artists. I already loved Frankestein by Mary Shelley, but after reading this manga, my love only has grown for this amazing story. The art is so raw and good, of course not many can bear his art, but if you love horror or gore as much as I do, this book is for you!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marc

    Image from "My Dear Ancestors" short story (not included in this book, but indicative of Ito's style and wonderful imagination) Ito's take on Frankenstein takes up a little less that half this volume, with the rest of the book consisting of 10 short stories. While his slant on Shelley's tale is well done and rather interesting (let's say 4 stars), the short stories that follow steal the show. The entire book excels on a number of levels--well-paced, tense, tales with wonderfully detailed, strikin Image from "My Dear Ancestors" short story (not included in this book, but indicative of Ito's style and wonderful imagination) Ito's take on Frankenstein takes up a little less that half this volume, with the rest of the book consisting of 10 short stories. While his slant on Shelley's tale is well done and rather interesting (let's say 4 stars), the short stories that follow steal the show. The entire book excels on a number of levels--well-paced, tense, tales with wonderfully detailed, striking black and white line art. I'm not a hardcore horror fan and I know little about horror manga, but it's clear why Ito is referred to as the Japanese "Master of Horror." It's not so much scary as it is fundamentally unsettling. And weird. In the best possible way. - From "The Hell of the Doll Funeral" - From Frankenstein

  16. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I'm never disappointed by Junji Ito's horror manga. For whatever reason I normally find manga to be much creepier than western comics. I've read some good American horror comics, but they rarely get under my skin like the Japanese comics. The adaptation of Frankenstein was very well done. It was really close the Shelly story with a little of "Bride of Frankenstein" worked in. But to me the best stories were the back up stories featuring Oshikiri. Weird tales of alternate dimensions and just skin I'm never disappointed by Junji Ito's horror manga. For whatever reason I normally find manga to be much creepier than western comics. I've read some good American horror comics, but they rarely get under my skin like the Japanese comics. The adaptation of Frankenstein was very well done. It was really close the Shelly story with a little of "Bride of Frankenstein" worked in. But to me the best stories were the back up stories featuring Oshikiri. Weird tales of alternate dimensions and just skin crawling weirdness. These stories are truly unsettling. There were a few stories about Ito's dog that I just didn't get. I think things may have been lost in translation with those stories. Overall a really strong, creepy horror collection that is sure to appeal to horror manga fans. Even if you're not a big Frankenstein fan, this is worth reading for the other stories alone. If you do like Frankenstein, you'll be doubly pleased.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    I never really cared to read this one previously. I’ve read Frankenstein, and I’m about hearing new stories, new concepts, etc. This may have been my favorite collection though. Frankenstein was great, but the stories about the haunted house and a portal to alternate dimensions were spectacular. This is my first Ito book in print so that may have influenced my experience. The last two stories though . . . what the?

  18. 4 out of 5

    James Dunphy

    Although Goodreads has this as just Frankenstein by Junji Ito, this is actually volume 16 of his Horror Comic Collection. It's also the first tale I've ever seen where Ito has adapted a European/Western horror tale instead of the usual eastern folklore. It's a relatively faithful adaptation of the Mary Shelley novel instead of the classic Universal monster film. It is however a little on the short side when compared to Shelley's novel, and many of the rich details of her book are left out in thi Although Goodreads has this as just Frankenstein by Junji Ito, this is actually volume 16 of his Horror Comic Collection. It's also the first tale I've ever seen where Ito has adapted a European/Western horror tale instead of the usual eastern folklore. It's a relatively faithful adaptation of the Mary Shelley novel instead of the classic Universal monster film. It is however a little on the short side when compared to Shelley's novel, and many of the rich details of her book are left out in this adaptation. That being said, all of the key players are in tact, the setting is accurate both in time and place, and Frankenstein's monster is as complex and tortured as his novel counterpart. While the dialogue is good, it can feel flat at times. Some of the conversations seem to be transcribed straight from the novel, and although I should give Ito props for that, it doesn't always work out within the limited span of manga text bubbles. His artwork has very detailed scenery, realistic character proportions, and a is generally beautiful to look at. It is always the hallmark of his titles and this is no exception. The monster is so grotesquely drawn, but it is his face that reveals the most horror as the creature struggles to find acceptance from humans. His eye depict pure woe and pain that is more hideous than all the corpses dug up and sewn together. It's the emotion in the art of the monster that separates this Frankenstein from most adaptations of the classic novel. While this isn't the best Ito work by far, or even the ultimate rendition of Frankenstein (just go read the actual novel if you wanted that), it is a very good, well drawn one-shot horror manga that fit in perfectly in my first week of October horror mania. 4 out of 5.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweiss This is my first Junji Ito manga, although I do also have a copy of Shiver from EW that I need to get to next, and it was definitely an enjoyable read. The adaptation part of the story is pretty straightforward and lifts most things straight from the original text, but the art is where this volume really shined through. It definitely has a nice creepy feel to it and I liked the design of the creature a lot. Definitely a fun little horror manga an I received an ARC copy of this book from Edelweiss This is my first Junji Ito manga, although I do also have a copy of Shiver from EW that I need to get to next, and it was definitely an enjoyable read. The adaptation part of the story is pretty straightforward and lifts most things straight from the original text, but the art is where this volume really shined through. It definitely has a nice creepy feel to it and I liked the design of the creature a lot. Definitely a fun little horror manga and I will be checking out more titles from this author. [Also just wanted to mention that the summary for this book says there are some bonus stories at the back, but mine was just the Frankenstein part of the book.]

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris Greensmith

    "Daddy, why are you so scared?" A retelling of Frankenstein, obviously, but I feel it could have been made his own more, it seemed very basic, the short stories were good and creepy but I feel that he wasted his opportunity with this classic story... "Daddy, why are you so scared?" A retelling of Frankenstein, obviously, but I feel it could have been made his own more, it seemed very basic, the short stories were good and creepy but I feel that he wasted his opportunity with this classic story...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Baal Of

    I thought this was a fairly faithful adaptation of the novel, and I especially liked Ito's portrayal of the monster more than pretty much any of the movie versions I've seen. The scene's with the companion monster were particularly gruesome. The loosely linked shorts were of mixed quality with "Bog Of Living Spirits" being the weakest, and "Neck Specter" and "Strange Tale..." being my favorites. Overall, this book is a lesser among Ito's collected works, but still worth having for me given my lov I thought this was a fairly faithful adaptation of the novel, and I especially liked Ito's portrayal of the monster more than pretty much any of the movie versions I've seen. The scene's with the companion monster were particularly gruesome. The loosely linked shorts were of mixed quality with "Bog Of Living Spirits" being the weakest, and "Neck Specter" and "Strange Tale..." being my favorites. Overall, this book is a lesser among Ito's collected works, but still worth having for me given my love of his work in general.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    This book is worth it for the artwork alone, I’m a huge fan of Junji Ito and I was not disappointed! This first half is an adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the second is half is mostly about a student named Oshikiri and the supernatural happenings that occur around him. Both parts we brilliant, the Frankenstein adaptation is great and is elevated by Ito’s art. The second half is a cleverly done collection of short stories with unsettling and gruesome artwork. New and old fans alike This book is worth it for the artwork alone, I’m a huge fan of Junji Ito and I was not disappointed! This first half is an adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and the second is half is mostly about a student named Oshikiri and the supernatural happenings that occur around him. Both parts we brilliant, the Frankenstein adaptation is great and is elevated by Ito’s art. The second half is a cleverly done collection of short stories with unsettling and gruesome artwork. New and old fans alike will love this, I highly recommend it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paisley Green

    I love Frankenstein, and this manga adaptation from Japanese horror auteur Junji Ito is a relatively faithful adaptation of the 1832 version. (I'll admit, being kind of a literary snob: the 1818 version is better, but it is what it is.) There are a few changes to the plot to streamline different elements and give higher dramatic tension/stakes to others, but they all fit nicely with the spirit of the original novel. Ito's signature art style serves this book so well: Frankenstein's monster is a I love Frankenstein, and this manga adaptation from Japanese horror auteur Junji Ito is a relatively faithful adaptation of the 1832 version. (I'll admit, being kind of a literary snob: the 1818 version is better, but it is what it is.) There are a few changes to the plot to streamline different elements and give higher dramatic tension/stakes to others, but they all fit nicely with the spirit of the original novel. Ito's signature art style serves this book so well: Frankenstein's monster is a grotesquerie of cobbled-together limbs and lidless, oozing eyes and grimacing teeth. Victor Frankenstein looks, appropriately, like the model of a Romantic-era heartthrob, swooning and all. So, if you like graphic novels/manga and enjoy Frankenstein, definitely check out this adaptation! (It's wild to me how many people in these reviews are like "I've never read the original Frankenstein, but it's kind of boring?" Yes, welcome to 19th-century philosophical novels.) Rather delightfully, the second half of this book is dedicated to a number of short stories set in the same haunted-by-alternate-dimension-doppelgänger universe, complete with a moody schoolboy and supernatural horror. I'm a little unclear about why the publisher put these two disparate things together, but I'm always down to read more of Ito's work. It gives me the same feelings that Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark did as a kid.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Solid collection, loved this. Penpal and Intruder were my favorites. I wish The Hell of the Doll Funeral was longer, that was nuts 😂

  25. 5 out of 5

    Madi

    I enjoyed the Frankenstein story but couldn't get into the other ones. Definitely want to explore what else Ito has done! I enjoyed the Frankenstein story but couldn't get into the other ones. Definitely want to explore what else Ito has done!

  26. 4 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    I really liked Doll's Hellish Funeral, but the others I could pass on. I can see the temptation to faithfully adapt Frankenstein, and it wasn't bad, but I'd reread the book recently, and the pacing is different than everything else the creator does, so it felt very draggy. I really liked Doll's Hellish Funeral, but the others I could pass on. I can see the temptation to faithfully adapt Frankenstein, and it wasn't bad, but I'd reread the book recently, and the pacing is different than everything else the creator does, so it felt very draggy.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I loved the short story situation after Frankenstein so much more than I thought i would!! Frankenstein is great but I never like classics quite as much as new content ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  28. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    Note: I received a copy of Frankenstein by Junji Ito via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. Don’t quote me on this — but, I’m under the impression that Frankenstein by Junji Ito will be released in a story collection. However, I only received the galley for the Frankenstein portion, so that’s all I will be reviewing. Junji Ito has been on my mind, ever since Jak wrote a news article on his manga-turned-anime series published on Cult Cryptic. I’m pretty disappointed that I’ve slept on Jun Note: I received a copy of Frankenstein by Junji Ito via Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. Don’t quote me on this — but, I’m under the impression that Frankenstein by Junji Ito will be released in a story collection. However, I only received the galley for the Frankenstein portion, so that’s all I will be reviewing. Junji Ito has been on my mind, ever since Jak wrote a news article on his manga-turned-anime series published on Cult Cryptic. I’m pretty disappointed that I’ve slept on Junji Ito for so long. He’s everything I could possibly want in life: very grotesque horror mixed with manga-style art? YES PLEASE. There have been multiple Frankenstein retellings — from the comedic film Young Frankenstein to Disney’s Frankenweenie; at this point, I feel like everyone has indulged in some sort of Frankenstein tale. Please, horror friends, don’t hate me for this next comment, but I’ve never been a huge fan of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. I have major respect for the story, but reading it was a total drag. So, upon seeing Junji Ito’s rendition of the classic, I had a pretty good inkling that he would not let me down. & alas, he did not! I read through this manga in about an hour (which, granted, wasn’t that difficult as it wasn’t very long). The story, basically, stayed true to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; there may have been minor differences that I can’t actually remember from the original. But, in general, this is the story that I know as Frankenstein. Honestly though, it’s not the story that makes Frankenstein by Junji Ito a good read. It’s the creepy artwork within the pages. I absolutely loved his imagery & the way that he visioned Frankenstein’s monster. Creepy vibes screamed through every single page. If you are a fan of horror, of Frankenstein, or of manga — I highly recommend that you pick up a copy of Frankenstein by Junji Ito.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A surprisingly faithful adaptation of Shelley's original, seldom seduced by its later Hollywood layers – which is to say, one that doesn't necessarily play to Junji Ito's skills. His creature is suitably horrific, and the terrible, lonely bind in which he's caught is powerfully evoked, but a lot of the rest of the time the story does consist of interchangeably good-looking and elegantly dressed people having emotions at each other, meaning it feels like the sort of more mainstream manga which te A surprisingly faithful adaptation of Shelley's original, seldom seduced by its later Hollywood layers – which is to say, one that doesn't necessarily play to Junji Ito's skills. His creature is suitably horrific, and the terrible, lonely bind in which he's caught is powerfully evoked, but a lot of the rest of the time the story does consist of interchangeably good-looking and elegantly dressed people having emotions at each other, meaning it feels like the sort of more mainstream manga which tends to leave me cold. Certainly no disaster, but as Frankensteins by comics artists go, unlikely to displace the unforgettable Bernie Wrightson version from its throne. That's only a little under half the book, though. The rest is taken up with short stories more along Ito's usual lines, stories of strange distortions, locations, and compulsions. Many of this batch take place at and around the same high school, or at any rate variations on it, with a lad named Oshikiri recurring as the protagonist even though they certainly can't be a chronological account of one person's adventures in one timeline. Maybe the poor bastard is the Japanese equivalent of South Park's Kenny? An explanation does come, which isn't always guaranteed with Ito, though it's not pleasant, which is more to be expected. That said, the book does close with two tales of an imperious small dog that are very nearly sweet.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This was much shorter than I had anticipated, and over half the book is short stories that were not as good as the Smashed collection by this guy.

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