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Al-kitaab Fii Ta'allum Al-Arabiyya: A Textbook for Arabic, part two

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This second edition includes one DVD bound into the book that feature contextualized vocabulary, cultural background and illustrations, and new listening comprehension materials with each lesson. Newly recorded colloquial audio and video materials also accompany each lesson and continue the story of Maha and Khalid and their travels to Cairo with brief explanatory vocabula This second edition includes one DVD bound into the book that feature contextualized vocabulary, cultural background and illustrations, and new listening comprehension materials with each lesson. Newly recorded colloquial audio and video materials also accompany each lesson and continue the story of Maha and Khalid and their travels to Cairo with brief explanatory vocabulary and notes provided in the text. The appendices include grammatical reference charts, an Arabic-English glossary, and a grammar index. The materials cover approximately 150 contact hours of instruction, and students who complete Part Two should reach advanced proficiency. Each lesson in Part Two centers on a text that deals with a social, historical, literary, or cultural issue. In addition to the main reading text, students will also find additional authentic texts for reading and listening comprehension, vocabulary and grammar exercises, close listening and speaking activities, and cultural background for the reading. The revised and repackaged Part Two has been restructured to reflect pedagogical developments over the last eight years, updated with new authentic reading and listening texts, and expanded with new video materials. In addition to the speaking, listening, and writing skills emphasized throughout each lesson, more time and emphasis is placed on activating vocabulary and structure with new activities for inside and outside the classroom. FEATURES: - Provides basic texts of printed media to help students connect the written and aural/oral aspects of Arabic - Features intensive reading that is focused on grammar and pronunciation - Contains substantial amounts of drills and exercises to help students memorize and gain active control of an expanded vocabulary - Explores the root and pattern system of Arabic grammar and complex sentence structure using vocabulary, complex texts, and translation exercises - Develops writing skills at the paragraph level to encourage synthesis of vocabulary and grammar - Provides explicit instructions to students and instructors on drills and activities, including recommendations on appropriate exercises for inside and outside the classroom - Interactive DVD contains reading comprehension texts with new material and new listening comprehension material - DVD presents cultural background with illustrations and continues the story of Maha and Khalid using both Egyptian Colloquial Arabic and Modern Standard Arabic


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This second edition includes one DVD bound into the book that feature contextualized vocabulary, cultural background and illustrations, and new listening comprehension materials with each lesson. Newly recorded colloquial audio and video materials also accompany each lesson and continue the story of Maha and Khalid and their travels to Cairo with brief explanatory vocabula This second edition includes one DVD bound into the book that feature contextualized vocabulary, cultural background and illustrations, and new listening comprehension materials with each lesson. Newly recorded colloquial audio and video materials also accompany each lesson and continue the story of Maha and Khalid and their travels to Cairo with brief explanatory vocabulary and notes provided in the text. The appendices include grammatical reference charts, an Arabic-English glossary, and a grammar index. The materials cover approximately 150 contact hours of instruction, and students who complete Part Two should reach advanced proficiency. Each lesson in Part Two centers on a text that deals with a social, historical, literary, or cultural issue. In addition to the main reading text, students will also find additional authentic texts for reading and listening comprehension, vocabulary and grammar exercises, close listening and speaking activities, and cultural background for the reading. The revised and repackaged Part Two has been restructured to reflect pedagogical developments over the last eight years, updated with new authentic reading and listening texts, and expanded with new video materials. In addition to the speaking, listening, and writing skills emphasized throughout each lesson, more time and emphasis is placed on activating vocabulary and structure with new activities for inside and outside the classroom. FEATURES: - Provides basic texts of printed media to help students connect the written and aural/oral aspects of Arabic - Features intensive reading that is focused on grammar and pronunciation - Contains substantial amounts of drills and exercises to help students memorize and gain active control of an expanded vocabulary - Explores the root and pattern system of Arabic grammar and complex sentence structure using vocabulary, complex texts, and translation exercises - Develops writing skills at the paragraph level to encourage synthesis of vocabulary and grammar - Provides explicit instructions to students and instructors on drills and activities, including recommendations on appropriate exercises for inside and outside the classroom - Interactive DVD contains reading comprehension texts with new material and new listening comprehension material - DVD presents cultural background with illustrations and continues the story of Maha and Khalid using both Egyptian Colloquial Arabic and Modern Standard Arabic

30 review for Al-kitaab Fii Ta'allum Al-Arabiyya: A Textbook for Arabic, part two

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zdenek Bares

    I have used this series as a main resource for studying Arabic and I must admit I have always been surprised by the bad reputation it gets on amazon and generally among learners. Alif baa and Part 1 are probably quite average books,but they did their job for me, but Part 2 is a great book that presents grammar and especially vocabulary in a very efficient manner that I enjoyed and found very innovative. Basically, words that were used before are used again against new vocabulary that shares the s I have used this series as a main resource for studying Arabic and I must admit I have always been surprised by the bad reputation it gets on amazon and generally among learners. Alif baa and Part 1 are probably quite average books,but they did their job for me, but Part 2 is a great book that presents grammar and especially vocabulary in a very efficient manner that I enjoyed and found very innovative. Basically, words that were used before are used again against new vocabulary that shares the same root. New vocabulary is then used in sample sentences, which are themselves a good workout for comprehension. Plenty of exercises then reinforce the vocabulary. After that it comes to introduction of culturally relevant vocabulary with explanation, progressively more in Arabic. The main text ensues and by then, one is usually ready to tackle it even without a teacher. A good teacher, though, makes work with this series much more enjoyable and can fill in the gaps, that necessarily appear. Overall, I would recommend this series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    One of the best books to learn Arabic from. Of course it's not good enough to allow you to learn it on your own without prior knowledge of the language, but when used together with class, it's great. It has excellent explanations of how to pronounce the various sounds, how to write the letters, and gives various lessons on cultures and the difference between dialects. FYI...It is Egyptian dialect. If you want to learn Arabic, classical is best. But Egyptian is the second most recognized dialects One of the best books to learn Arabic from. Of course it's not good enough to allow you to learn it on your own without prior knowledge of the language, but when used together with class, it's great. It has excellent explanations of how to pronounce the various sounds, how to write the letters, and gives various lessons on cultures and the difference between dialects. FYI...It is Egyptian dialect. If you want to learn Arabic, classical is best. But Egyptian is the second most recognized dialects since most of the Arab movies come from Egypt.

  3. 4 out of 5

    lixy

    Many students, teachers, and Amazon reviewers are not fans of Al Kitaab, the most widely-used book used (in English speaking countries, at least) for teaching/learning Arabic at an intermediate level. Initially I, too, was frustrated by its structure and methods--as well as by the fact that the CD menus are entirely in Arabic, and many of the chapter contents as well. I've come to increasingly appreciate this book as a *method* for teaching where each chapter builds on vocabulary and concepts pre Many students, teachers, and Amazon reviewers are not fans of Al Kitaab, the most widely-used book used (in English speaking countries, at least) for teaching/learning Arabic at an intermediate level. Initially I, too, was frustrated by its structure and methods--as well as by the fact that the CD menus are entirely in Arabic, and many of the chapter contents as well. I've come to increasingly appreciate this book as a *method* for teaching where each chapter builds on vocabulary and concepts previously discussed. It's very comprehensive and detailed, despite a few inaccuracies (according to native speaking teachers--I can't tell!) Trying to self-study with it, however, is very difficult, so the big caveat is THIS BOOK SHOULD BE USED IN CONJUCTION WITH A GOOD CLASS AND TEACHER! Given that when learning another language one inevitably comes across linguistic/grammatical concepts that one bridles at for being "illogical", a good teacher can explain these concepts more fully; the grammatical/stylistic explanations, though very detailed, are often confusing, It's also helpful to thoroughly learn (at least study!) the concepts and vocabulary in each chapter before moving on to the next one, since this book is structured very particularly, and the experience is definitely cumulative. Two negatives of Al-kitab are 1) is the CD which is near-IMPOSSIBLE to use on a Mac or PC! You can't rewind or stop without crashing the player, which is enormously frustrating, because it seems to have good audio and information, but I ended up not listening to much of it because the UI drove me crazy. 2) Many of the readings in each chapter are boring and dated--it really needs an update for more modern learners.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Irebel

    I used the whole Al-Kitaab series in college when studying Arabic. I have also studied French & am currently studying Japanese. The Al-kitaab series is organized in a manner unlike any other language textbook I have ever used - and not in a good way. Usually textbooks try to introduce words that are related to each other - for example, vocabulary related to grocery shopping & various foods. The Al-kitaab books, instead, will introduce a bunch of seemingly random words. Some are related, most are I used the whole Al-Kitaab series in college when studying Arabic. I have also studied French & am currently studying Japanese. The Al-kitaab series is organized in a manner unlike any other language textbook I have ever used - and not in a good way. Usually textbooks try to introduce words that are related to each other - for example, vocabulary related to grocery shopping & various foods. The Al-kitaab books, instead, will introduce a bunch of seemingly random words. Some are related, most are not. The vocabulary words they introduce in each chapter are from the main reading in each chapter, which, is great, but I was asking questions like, "if this is the word for 'left,' what is the word for 'right'?" I also found the reading sections a bit strange. You need a really good professor in order to really gain a good understanding of the Arabic language with these books. I don't recommend the series, but, they are the most widely used and from everything I've heard, they're the "best" series there is? Which is sad.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rahman Abdul

    I can't even open to read. I can't even open to read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aliya

    Not really sure about the rating, to be honest, considering I already know Arabic. It appears to be useful, but ultimately the benefits to be gleaned depend on the willingness of the student.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susan Ali

  8. 5 out of 5

    Martyn Cukier

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vf

  10. 5 out of 5

    Staretsi

  11. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Gregory

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Larrave

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Kelly

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  15. 4 out of 5

    Badrul Aini Sha'ari

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura لاورا

  17. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Thuesen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tess Davis

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Thomas

  21. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  22. 5 out of 5

    Faith

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

  24. 5 out of 5

    William

  25. 4 out of 5

    Summer Najjar

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ian Galloway

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sam Dignam

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jared

  29. 4 out of 5

    Francy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter West

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