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Novels, Tales, Journeys: The Complete Prose of Alexander Pushkin

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From the award-winning translators: the complete prose narratives of the most acclaimed Russian writer of the Romantic era and one of the world's greatest storytellers. The father of Russian literature, Pushkin is beloved not only for his poetry but also for his brilliant stories, which range from dramatic tales of love, obsession, and betrayal to dark fables and sparkling From the award-winning translators: the complete prose narratives of the most acclaimed Russian writer of the Romantic era and one of the world's greatest storytellers. The father of Russian literature, Pushkin is beloved not only for his poetry but also for his brilliant stories, which range from dramatic tales of love, obsession, and betrayal to dark fables and sparkling comic masterpieces, from satirical epistolary tales and romantic adventures in the manner of Sir Walter Scott to imaginative historical fiction and the haunting dreamworld of "The Queen of Spades." The five short stories of The Late Tales of Ivan Petrovich Belkin are lightly humorous and yet reveal astonishing human depths, and his short novel, The Captain's Daughter, has been called the most perfect book in Russian literature. From the Hardcover edition.


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From the award-winning translators: the complete prose narratives of the most acclaimed Russian writer of the Romantic era and one of the world's greatest storytellers. The father of Russian literature, Pushkin is beloved not only for his poetry but also for his brilliant stories, which range from dramatic tales of love, obsession, and betrayal to dark fables and sparkling From the award-winning translators: the complete prose narratives of the most acclaimed Russian writer of the Romantic era and one of the world's greatest storytellers. The father of Russian literature, Pushkin is beloved not only for his poetry but also for his brilliant stories, which range from dramatic tales of love, obsession, and betrayal to dark fables and sparkling comic masterpieces, from satirical epistolary tales and romantic adventures in the manner of Sir Walter Scott to imaginative historical fiction and the haunting dreamworld of "The Queen of Spades." The five short stories of The Late Tales of Ivan Petrovich Belkin are lightly humorous and yet reveal astonishing human depths, and his short novel, The Captain's Daughter, has been called the most perfect book in Russian literature. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for Novels, Tales, Journeys: The Complete Prose of Alexander Pushkin

  1. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

    3.5 ★★★☆☆ «[…] the multifarious receptivity he had come to admire in Shakespeare—his “negative capability,” as Keats called it. Sinyavsky intensifies Keats’s paradox: “Emptiness is Pushkin’s content. Without it he would not be full, he would not be, just as there is no fire without air, no breathing in without breathing out.” Impersonality, openness, and lightness are the essential qualities of his prose.» Novels, Tales, Journeys… is an English-translated anthology of the complete prose works 3.5 ★★★☆☆ «[…] the multifarious receptivity he had come to admire in Shakespeare—his “negative capability,” as Keats called it. Sinyavsky intensifies Keats’s paradox: “Emptiness is Pushkin’s content. Without it he would not be full, he would not be, just as there is no fire without air, no breathing in without breathing out.” Impersonality, openness, and lightness are the essential qualities of his prose.» Novels, Tales, Journeys… is an English-translated anthology of the complete prose works of Russian writer Alexander Pushkin, broadly recognised as the greatest Russian poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. As being an anthology, I found tricky how to rate and review it accordingly: I have read it in just one month and some fragments didn’t captivate me at all (like Kirdjali or Journey to Arzrum), while others were simply perfect (The History of the Village of Goryukhino, Roslavlev, or Queen of Spades, among others*) and I discovered some new favourite themes and archetypes (like the Robin Hood/antihero from Dubrovsky, or the female characters from A Novel in Letters and At the Corner of a Little Square, that will later appear in great novels like Anna Karenina) within Russian literature. My only advice to fully enjoy this worth-translated edition is that if you are interested in reading it, do it slowly or/and read first the novels/short stories that appeal you the most. And if it would be your first approach to Pushkin’s works, I think it is better to search for an anthology of Russian tales before reading this volume. «People believe only in fame and do not understand that there might be among them some Napoleon, who has never commanded a single company of chasseurs, or another Descartes, who has not published a single line in the Moscow Telegraph. However, our respect for fame may well come from vanity: our own voice, too, goes into the making of fame.» - - - - * Complete list of the works read and their ratings: The Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin (five short stories, 1831) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Roslavlev (unfinished novel, 1836) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The History of the Village of Goryukhino (unfinished short story, 1837) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Egyptian Nights (unfinished short story, 1837) ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Queen of Spades (short story, 1834) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Moor of Peter the Great (unfinished novel, 1824) ⭐️⭐️ Kirdjali (short story, 1834) ⭐️ Journey to Arzrum (travel sketches, non-fic, 1836) ⭐️ Dubrovsky (unfinished novel, 1841) ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Captain’s Daughter (novel, 1836) ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Fragments and Sketches: The Guests Were Arriving at the Dacha ⭐️⭐️⭐️ A Novel in Letters ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ At the Corner of a Little Square ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Notes of a Young Man ⭐️⭐️ My Fate is Decided. I Am Getting Married… ⭐️⭐️ A Romance at the Caucasian Waters ⭐️⭐️⭐️ A Russian Pelham ⭐️⭐️ We Were Spending the Evening at the Dacha ⭐️⭐️⭐️ A Story from Roman Life ⭐️ Maria Schoning ⭐️⭐️ - - - - Read for the two-month period dedicated to Alexander Pushkin from the #téconrusos reading challenge organised on bookstagram by @téconlibros.

  2. 4 out of 5

    J.M. Hushour

    Although Pushkin will always be revered more for his poetry, and rightfully so, his fiction is hardly anything to sniff at. He has a refreshing folksy-simplicity and a startling lack of metaphor. Most of the stories are straight-forward and ever-hurtling, born by a momentum that's almost Brothers Grimmian. Of them all, the "Tales of Belkin" and "The Captain's Daughter" stand out, though the others, especially the weird "Queen of Spades" aren't shoddy in the slightest. There's something almost Lo Although Pushkin will always be revered more for his poetry, and rightfully so, his fiction is hardly anything to sniff at. He has a refreshing folksy-simplicity and a startling lack of metaphor. Most of the stories are straight-forward and ever-hurtling, born by a momentum that's almost Brothers Grimmian. Of them all, the "Tales of Belkin" and "The Captain's Daughter" stand out, though the others, especially the weird "Queen of Spades" aren't shoddy in the slightest. There's something almost Londonian or Hemingwayan to his direct, spiteless prose, which makes it nice to read, stripped as it is of the pretensions of the imagination.

  3. 4 out of 5

    M.J.

    Fantastic collection of Pushkin's prose and the translation is so accessible! Favorite stories were 'The Moor of Peter the Great' - a fictionalized story of his great grandfather originally from Africa, who is part of French and Russian aristocratic society, yet constantly feels like an outsider (still a very relevant experience of people of color in certain circles today!) Other favorite stories include 'Dubrovsky', sort of a Count of Monte Cristo-esque storyline, and 'The Captain's Daughter,' a Fantastic collection of Pushkin's prose and the translation is so accessible! Favorite stories were 'The Moor of Peter the Great' - a fictionalized story of his great grandfather originally from Africa, who is part of French and Russian aristocratic society, yet constantly feels like an outsider (still a very relevant experience of people of color in certain circles today!) Other favorite stories include 'Dubrovsky', sort of a Count of Monte Cristo-esque storyline, and 'The Captain's Daughter,' a very inventive and epic tale. Honor, fate, karma, and love were all strong themes throughout many of the stories included and I was constantly fascinated by how well Pushkin described the inner most thoughts and intentions of both his female and male characters. Traveling throughout the post-Soviet Union, Ukraine, Moldova, Russia, etc. I saw many tributes to Pushkin....street names, statues, museums, and rightly so. He truly is, as they say, the father of Russian literature. And bravo to the translators for helping to bring the stories alive from Russian and French to English!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Thompson

    A really great collection. I always tend to enjoy the longer stories – in this case the Captain’s Daughter and Dubrovsky were my favorites. But the short story The Queen of Spades is a gem, and probably the best of the poet Pushkin’s prose works.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Moon Rose

    I must admit that my memory isn't good. It is no longer as sharp as before. Details would usually fly away from my mind like a pile of dust scattered by the wind. I may not remember the names, places and incidents anymore, no particulars for that matter, but nevertheless what it leaves is engraved and imprinted in my heart, an indelible impression, usually associated with a feeling that mere expression could not convey. Without words, they are marked in seeming eternity like a word written in st I must admit that my memory isn't good. It is no longer as sharp as before. Details would usually fly away from my mind like a pile of dust scattered by the wind. I may not remember the names, places and incidents anymore, no particulars for that matter, but nevertheless what it leaves is engraved and imprinted in my heart, an indelible impression, usually associated with a feeling that mere expression could not convey. Without words, they are marked in seeming eternity like a word written in stone. And no other form has given me such lasting impressions than the 19th century Russian Literature. From the epic narratives of whirling ideas of Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy, incomparable masters, who can raise the soul from an indefinite stupor. From the beautifully written prose of Chekhov to the sarcastic humor of Gogol, from Turgenev and the likes, they all seemed to have something in common, which make them at par from all their contemporary writers at that time as the Russian writer of the 19th century seemed an adept in exploring the subtleties of the human heart. Alexander Pushkin, on the other hand, is a complete surprise. Since he was well known more as a poet than a novelist, or an author who preferred writing in verse, I never had an inkling to read his works as stories for me is better suited to be read in prose. This book, Novels, Tales, Journeys: The Complete Prose of Alexander Pushkin as translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky is as remarkable as its successors. The collection on its own can be deemed as an achievement in proclaiming the authority of the Russians, whatever it is they possessed in truly telling a very good story. It is a precursor, a peek to the great predecessors to come that will not just emulate the elements already present in Pushkin's style, but will enrich and enliven it with their own profound and insightful conjectures as Pushkin's talent appears like a burning torch with a brightness that has been passed down and spreads like a vicious virus that contaminated the Russian intelligentsia as in a wildfire. Even just a whiff of this can also invade an avid reader's imagination with intoxication and a feeling that is insurmountable by any words of description. The novellas and the short stories, though less in magnitude, often terse in texture and no philosophical digressions, are also flowing with the same captivation as a full length Russian novel, drowning the unknowing reader in the deep pool of pure narration. From The Captain's Daughter, to The Queen of Spades, to The Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin, which comprises the most wonderful short stories like my favorites the poignant The Station Master and the playful The Young Lady Peasant, even the unfinished The Moor of Peter the Great and Dubrovsky, are all impregnated with the same unadulterated form of storytelling that churns with suspenseful anticipation, forcing the reader to unconsciously keep turning the pages with utter breathlessness... This impression brought by this personal immersion in Pushkin's world is already etched in my memory. I may soon forget all its details, but the meaning will never be lost as I know that the feeling associated with the wisdom garnered by reading him will always remain, forever untouched by the frailty of the human mind.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Putnam

    Feels a little wrong to give Pushkin only four stars, but this is mainly a reaction to the anthology rather than to Pushkin's prose. I would not, myself, have gathered all of this stuff for translation. Most of it is fragmentary--abandoned work. Therefore, neither meant for nor ready for prime time. Of interest to scholars, of course, but scholars working on Pushkin at this level would/should be fluent in Russian and not in need of translations. A shorter anthology including the Travels to Arzru Feels a little wrong to give Pushkin only four stars, but this is mainly a reaction to the anthology rather than to Pushkin's prose. I would not, myself, have gathered all of this stuff for translation. Most of it is fragmentary--abandoned work. Therefore, neither meant for nor ready for prime time. Of interest to scholars, of course, but scholars working on Pushkin at this level would/should be fluent in Russian and not in need of translations. A shorter anthology including the Travels to Arzrum, Captain's Daughter, Dobrovsky (although considered unfinished, the piece ends in a place that IMO does work), and the Belkin pieces, I think. Otherwise, the rest is frustrating--intriguing openings that fizzle out just as we are hooked. In contrast to the memoir, the fiction provides a marvelous look at what Pevear characterizes as the invisibility of Pushkin's personality in the prose. Sometimes a narrator intrudes, but it isn't Pushkin. You also get a ringside look at one of the first attempts--perhaps the first serious attempt--to create what we think of as Russian literature. As someone said--Ilya Kaminsky, I think--before Pushkin: darkness. Tolstoy, according to Pevear's introduction to War & Peace, said that each Russian author has wholesale reinvented the novel. Has had to do so, because the tradition of the novel, of any real literature, was so lacking in Russia. You can see Pushkin grappling with this problem, as with the problem of history, as the problem of lineage, in these works. Perhaps more visibly than with the other Russian greats.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jaylia3

    Reading this collection of beautifully written fiction it’s easy to see why Pushkin was held in such high regard by later Russian authors, including Tolstoy. According to a letter quoted in the Introduction one of the included stories, “The Guests were arriving at the Dacha”, helped inspire Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. Several of my favorite pieces, notably “Roslavlev” and “We Were Spending the Night at the Dacha”, reminded me of salon scenes in War and Peace. I also greatly enjoyed “The Moor of Pet Reading this collection of beautifully written fiction it’s easy to see why Pushkin was held in such high regard by later Russian authors, including Tolstoy. According to a letter quoted in the Introduction one of the included stories, “The Guests were arriving at the Dacha”, helped inspire Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. Several of my favorite pieces, notably “Roslavlev” and “We Were Spending the Night at the Dacha”, reminded me of salon scenes in War and Peace. I also greatly enjoyed “The Moor of Peter the Great”, a fictionalized account of the life of Pushkin’s African great-grandfather. The only caveat about this collection is that many of the works are unfinished, and it’s a big disappointment coming to the abrupt end of a story you really wish would continue. But they are still well worth reading and I’m glad to have even fragments by an author as talented and perceptive as Pushkin. I read an advanced review copy of the book supplied to me at no cost or obligation by the publisher. Review opinions are mine. I had never tried Pushkin before so I can’t compare this translation with any other, but I have read several Russian novels rendered into English by the same husband and wife team, Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky and I’ve always enjoyed their versions. I especially appreciate their endnotes, which often add to my understanding and appreciation of whatever story I’m reading.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Fernando Pestana da Costa

    This volume collects all works in prose of the famous Russian poet. Some are unfinished texts, others have been part of Pushkin's beloved published works since ever. I enjoyed the book overall, but I particularly liked "The tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin", "The Queen of Spades", and I delighted myself with the masterpiece "The Captain's Daughter", and with the narration of Pushkin's involvement with military actions in the Caucasus and in the war against the Ottoman Empire in the deligh This volume collects all works in prose of the famous Russian poet. Some are unfinished texts, others have been part of Pushkin's beloved published works since ever. I enjoyed the book overall, but I particularly liked "The tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin", "The Queen of Spades", and I delighted myself with the masterpiece "The Captain's Daughter", and with the narration of Pushkin's involvement with military actions in the Caucasus and in the war against the Ottoman Empire in the delightful "Journey to Arzrum".

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brenna

    wow Pushkin is great. guess my lil bro's got good taste faves were The Captain's Daughter, Journey to Arzrum. I loved the fragments. it's so rare you get to see the works in progress of renowned authors wow Pushkin is great. guess my lil bro's got good taste faves were The Captain's Daughter, Journey to Arzrum. I loved the fragments. it's so rare you get to see the works in progress of renowned authors

  10. 5 out of 5

    Billie Pritchett

    Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837) was a genius who not only birthed modern Russian literature, he did it before the age of 20. Famously throughout his life, because of his radical politics, he was censored by his government, sought life outside the cities, and eventually met and fell in love with a society woman. But fate was not done with our dear Pushkin. He suspected his wife of infidelity, challenged the alleged adulterer to a duel, and was shot down at the age of 37. From his spilled blood spra Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837) was a genius who not only birthed modern Russian literature, he did it before the age of 20. Famously throughout his life, because of his radical politics, he was censored by his government, sought life outside the cities, and eventually met and fell in love with a society woman. But fate was not done with our dear Pushkin. He suspected his wife of infidelity, challenged the alleged adulterer to a duel, and was shot down at the age of 37. From his spilled blood sprang the likes of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and all the other so-called Russian masters whom memory reveres while our dear Pushkin is left lying in the snow. Thank goodness for Novels, Tales, Journeys: The Complete Prose of Alexander Pushkin and the book's translators, Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, who had previously translated new editions of Anna Karenina, War and Peace, and The Brothers Karamazov. So what to expect from Pushkin? His stories and short novels move along at a good clip, and every moving part is necessary to what tend to be mystery stories of sorts. For me to tell you what those mysteries are here would be to spoil the fun for you. But I will highlight a few of the outstanding works you'll find in this volume. First is an unfinished novel called The Moor of Peter the Great. One of Peter the Great's most trusted confidantes, a Moor, travels to Paris to serve as diplomat, but overstays his time as a functionary, so Peter sees it, Peter unaware that the Moor has fallen in love with one of the women from French high society. But Peter, loving his friend the Moor and valuing his freedom above all, permits him to stay. The romance becomes serious between the Moor and the woman, and while I won't say what happens, it looks as though we only have about a fifth of what would have been the novel here. It would have been interesting to see how it would have developed. Next is a story called "The Shot," which is about a duel that had taken place in the past between two men, but with there being no firm resolution, the two men vow that they will pick up the duel again one day. And pick it up they do, many years later. Our protagonist has been waiting for this moment for a long time, and when it comes, he is shaken to the core... It is interesting to remind again here that Pushkin himself died in a duel. As expected, he imbues these two men's situation with the utmost gravity. Dubrovsky! Dubrovsky is another of Pushkin's unfinished novels, but never mind that here, because there is enough of the book to have a satisfying resolution. I will only let you in on the setup, because all of the other twists and turns that happen after are quite surprising and fun. There is a cruel landlord named Troekurov. He abuses his peasants, he pays off the police, and the neighboring landlords are in fear of him, lest they swindle them out of their land. Troekurov permits one and only one neighboring landlord to speak plain with him, and that is his friend Dubrovsky, a petty landlord, a property owner, to be sure, but the property is not of much value to Troekurov. Well, one day Dubrovsky is insulted not by Troekurov but by one Troekurov's servants. Dubrovsky demands an apology but proud T. says no, and doesn't stop there: he allows his peasants to cut down the trees on Dubrovsky's property. D. ties up T.'s peasants, and D. becomes irate and discovers a way to swindle T. out of all his land. Read the tale for more. It's wonderful. Three other outstanding works are the novellas The Queen of Spades, Egyptian Nights, and The Captain's Daughter. As much as I would love to let you know about them, I'm tired of writing, and besides, literary criticism is often a pale reflection of the literature itself, which in this case, goodness, I hope you read this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ned Olson

    Pushkin seems much more the upbeat adventurous type than other Russian authors I've read in translation, yet he also feels so decidedly Russian. This translation was very readable in English. A nice introduction for me to yet another fascinating Russian writer. Pushkin seems much more the upbeat adventurous type than other Russian authors I've read in translation, yet he also feels so decidedly Russian. This translation was very readable in English. A nice introduction for me to yet another fascinating Russian writer.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Batya K.

    Writing a good translation of Russia's most celebrated literary figure is a nearly impossible task, but Pevear & Volokhonsky achieve perhaps as ably as anyone ever could. For the non-Russian speaker, there is no reason to ever read another translation of Pushkin. Writing a good translation of Russia's most celebrated literary figure is a nearly impossible task, but Pevear & Volokhonsky achieve perhaps as ably as anyone ever could. For the non-Russian speaker, there is no reason to ever read another translation of Pushkin.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steven Feldman

    I've been told that reading translations of Russian poetry is frankly a waste of time. As prose from one of Russia's greatest literary figures, this book was excellent and the translations were clear and well done. The stories themselves were varied and at times reminded me of Robin Hood, the Great Game, and other stories. These works had a wonderful way of conveying Russian history and customs which I found rather appealing. I've been told that reading translations of Russian poetry is frankly a waste of time. As prose from one of Russia's greatest literary figures, this book was excellent and the translations were clear and well done. The stories themselves were varied and at times reminded me of Robin Hood, the Great Game, and other stories. These works had a wonderful way of conveying Russian history and customs which I found rather appealing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vesna

    for college- The Tale of Tsar Saltan, The Tale of the Fisherman and the Fish and The Tale of the Dead Princess

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Powell

    Enjoyed many of the stories. Frustratingly most are unfinished. Many have a fairy tale like quality with neatly wrapped ending, for those that did end. The prose did not wow me but kept me fairly engaged.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Giulia

    Having read Eugene Onegin, I very eagerly picked up Pushkin's prose in this wonderful edition which compiles them with excellent footnotes and explainations of the time period's references (of which there are many). Here are my thoughts on the ones which stood out to me. The Moor of Peter the Great Though the story was not spectacular, it's very interesting that Pushkin was interested in writing a romanticised biography of his grandfather. The Shot, The Blizzard, The Young Lady Peasant These were all Having read Eugene Onegin, I very eagerly picked up Pushkin's prose in this wonderful edition which compiles them with excellent footnotes and explainations of the time period's references (of which there are many). Here are my thoughts on the ones which stood out to me. The Moor of Peter the Great Though the story was not spectacular, it's very interesting that Pushkin was interested in writing a romanticised biography of his grandfather. The Shot, The Blizzard, The Young Lady Peasant These were all wonderful little tales which follow a similar track regarding young love and family fueds, which I really enjoyed as they had hints of humour, satire and tragedy. Dubrovsky This one was really good, especially because it started in such a tragic and painful way. It also signalled a slightly different approach for Pushkin compared to other other tales, by focusing on older country gentlemen rather than a character similar to himself. The Queen of Spades This classic tale was mysterious, perfectly told and was sort of a moralistic tale. It had thrilling aspects which was new, and a character who was deceitful which is unlike most of his frank characters. Considering Pushkin's interest in folklore and fairytales, I find this story similar to a fable. The Captain's Daughter Hailed as one of the most perfect novellas in Russian literature on the blurb of this edition, I was totally amazed with this story. It was quite literally perfect - the tension was gripping, the personal vengence, fear, passion, violence, character growth and nuances in character relationships were just fantastic. It was worth reading all 27 short stories just to read that one. I insist everyone tries this! If you don't like this story, Pushkin probably isn't for you! Journey to Arzurm As I mentioned earlier, Pushkin does tend to write about characters who are similar to each other and to himself; idle, aristocratic, pleasure-seeking young men of means. So it was really interesting to get into the head of the authour himself in this account of a journey to defeat a rebellious Pasha in modern-day Turkey. The locations and descriptions of the journeying is wonderful and makes you really appreciate what the references in a lot of his stories - the Caucasian campaigns. The Guests Were Arriving in the Dacha, and A Novel in Letters The former showed Pushkin's wit and ability to write moralistic, philosophical and highly entertaining conversation. I would read a whole novel of these anonymous characters discussing the worth of the aristocracy, especially when we have a foreign Spaniard asking questions which we can sympathise with. The latter was also fascinating as I never considered this type of novel being as old as it was. The 'conversation' is also witty, and perfectly encapsulates what I imagine the zeitgeist of the time was. Along with the other fragments, you find wonderful sentences and epigrams, some of which were lifted and moved into stories which he did complete. Furthermore, the use of the same names across the stories suggest Pushkin found the names favourable for some reason, which is I think most professional and amateur writers also find.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Pinkerton

    I like reading period literature from Europe, because it's so alien/foreign to my contemporary US life. And prose by Pushkin, about early 19th century Russia, fits that nicely. Some of this is a bit turgid and heavy on names/places that don't mean anything to me, so i'd recommend skipping around in the book to find what you like. I like reading period literature from Europe, because it's so alien/foreign to my contemporary US life. And prose by Pushkin, about early 19th century Russia, fits that nicely. Some of this is a bit turgid and heavy on names/places that don't mean anything to me, so i'd recommend skipping around in the book to find what you like.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Alexander Pushkin, on his birthday June 6 A Romantic who modeled himself and his poetry on Byron and supported the Greek Revolution as did his hero, invented the modern Russian language as it is used today, inspired his student Gogol and many admirers including Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Chekov, Bunin, and Turgenev, foresaw his own death in the Great Book Eugene Onegin, which was gloriously set to music in Tchaikovsky's opera; Alexander Pushkin changed his culture by the power of his art. He remains Alexander Pushkin, on his birthday June 6 A Romantic who modeled himself and his poetry on Byron and supported the Greek Revolution as did his hero, invented the modern Russian language as it is used today, inspired his student Gogol and many admirers including Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Chekov, Bunin, and Turgenev, foresaw his own death in the Great Book Eugene Onegin, which was gloriously set to music in Tchaikovsky's opera; Alexander Pushkin changed his culture by the power of his art. He remains an immortal icon of his nation. Beyond Russia, most people today will be familiar with him through the film made of one of his poetic dramas, Mozart and Salieri, the spectacular Amadeus. Many of his works deserve a wider audience; his superbly researched history of the Cossack Revolt, The History of Pugachev, and the fictionalized version in The Captain's Daughter, a satire of authority and autocrats, when read together create a whole made of his two kinds of vision; the layered and juxtaposed fields of history and of narrative. One looks outward to social structures built on material conditions; but man's secret eye looks inward, to passion and the ineffable. Do read the startling new translation, Novels, Tales, Journeys: The Complete Prose, a translation of Pushkin by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. It contains an unfinished novel, The Moor of Peter the Great, about his black great grandfather, an African slave who was liberated from the Ottoman Sultan by an ancestor of Tolstoy, then studied engineering in France, and became a nobleman and general of the Russian Empire, godson and favorite courtier of the Czar, an aristocrat and black former slave owning hundreds of white serfs in 18th century Europe. Here is a lost masterpiece; someone must give voice to this secret history and reimagine and complete Pushkin's story of his ancestor Ibrahim Petrovich Gannibal

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Raymond

    A mixed bag, really. There were some great novellas like "the captain's daughter" and the short war memoir "Journey to Arzrum," but vast majority of tales are unfinished sketches which cry for a proper denouement. Like a cat crying for food although having just recently been fed, I found myself sucked into a story all the while forgetting that, yeah, just like the last tale, this one's going to end suddenly without a satisfactory conclusion. I also miss the dark, dry wit I've come to expect from A mixed bag, really. There were some great novellas like "the captain's daughter" and the short war memoir "Journey to Arzrum," but vast majority of tales are unfinished sketches which cry for a proper denouement. Like a cat crying for food although having just recently been fed, I found myself sucked into a story all the while forgetting that, yeah, just like the last tale, this one's going to end suddenly without a satisfactory conclusion. I also miss the dark, dry wit I've come to expect from Russian Literature, from Gogol, to Bulkanov, to Solzhenitsyn. If you're an absolute Pushkin nut and love his poetry, this might be the book for you. Otherwise, it's probably not worth the time spent. P.S. (Also, I'm a sucker for footnotes, and this one has way too many. I suggest turning off the WIFI when reading this one or you're bound to tumble into many a wikihole after skimming through the footnotes and feeling the need to dive deeper into each topic on the Internet).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason Furman

    Wonderful to have a complete collection of Pushkin's prose--including all the incomplete writings and fragments. While the published ones are the best (Tales of Belkin, The Queen of Spades and The Captain's Daughter), everything Pushkin wrote is various combinations of direct, vivid, insightful, funny, satirical, suspenseful and perceptive. The Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translations are controversial with many but no issues jumped out with me and the accurate and completeness outwei Wonderful to have a complete collection of Pushkin's prose--including all the incomplete writings and fragments. While the published ones are the best (Tales of Belkin, The Queen of Spades and The Captain's Daughter), everything Pushkin wrote is various combinations of direct, vivid, insightful, funny, satirical, suspenseful and perceptive. The Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky translations are controversial with many but no issues jumped out with me and the accurate and completeness outweigh any downsides, especially when many of these are only available in very dated translations. If you have not read Pushkin before, however, would start with the ones listed above and then sample from the rest.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vanjr

    This is a collection of short stories by Pushkin. He clearly is a master writer and not just a great poet. Interesting many of his stories have very interesting openings and middle games so to speak, then he tends to just tends to leave the ending short or less developed than the rest of the story. I wonder if some of these were not quite finished to the level of the rest of his writing. Clearly he is a brilliant writer. Was. I suspect many of these short pieces would have been masterpieces had This is a collection of short stories by Pushkin. He clearly is a master writer and not just a great poet. Interesting many of his stories have very interesting openings and middle games so to speak, then he tends to just tends to leave the ending short or less developed than the rest of the story. I wonder if some of these were not quite finished to the level of the rest of his writing. Clearly he is a brilliant writer. Was. I suspect many of these short pieces would have been masterpieces had he lived long enough I suspect more than one of these would be known as the greatest Russian fiction novel.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Petra

    Firstly, I really appreciated how this book is published and the translation is incredible, as usual. This book is enjoyable journey through Pushkin's prose. However, I think that it would have been better to start with a smaller collection when starting to read Pushkin because at some parts I was very overwhelmed with the number of stories and fragments in the book. I really love Pushkin's writing style and really hope he would have written something grand and massive as Dostoevsky and Tolstoy Firstly, I really appreciated how this book is published and the translation is incredible, as usual. This book is enjoyable journey through Pushkin's prose. However, I think that it would have been better to start with a smaller collection when starting to read Pushkin because at some parts I was very overwhelmed with the number of stories and fragments in the book. I really love Pushkin's writing style and really hope he would have written something grand and massive as Dostoevsky and Tolstoy have. I enjoyed this collection very much and am looking forward to delving into Pushkin's poetry.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linden

    A fascinating collection of Pushkin’s short fiction, newly translated by Pevear and Volkonsky. Some of it is fragmented and some difficult to follow, but it provides a remarkable glimpse into the mind of one of Russia’s most renowned 19th century authors, who died at age 37 from injuries suffered in a duel.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Barry Smirnoff

    Pushkin’s Complete Prose translated by the best into modern English Pushkin is the most respected Russian writer of the 19th century, in his own country. These stories are translated by the best duo into modern English. The Captain’s Daughter is the best story in the collection, the tale of Pugashev’s revolt. The Shot is also a classic work, but all the stories have merit.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    This is a highly enjoyable read especially in the winter when the snow is high. It is nearly always winter in Pushkin.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Geert

    Mostly quite enjoyable reading

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anil

    A great translation of Pushkin’s prose works! Some of the greatest novellas including “The Captain’s Daughter”, “Queen of Spades” & “The Tales of Bellini”.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Enjoyed way more than I even expected to.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karrie

    Very comprehensive. I didn't read the whole book, and would like very much to return to it over the summer. Very comprehensive. I didn't read the whole book, and would like very much to return to it over the summer.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    3.5 stars

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