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Lucifer, Vol. 5: Inferno

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From the pages of THE SANDMAN...Lucifer Morningstar returns to Hell in this fifth collection of the acclaimed LUCIFER series, reprinting issues #29-35. Still weak, with most of his power locked in the feathers stolen by Susano-O-No-Mikoto, Lucifer must now face the challenge of single combat to the death with his brother, the angel of the Host Amenadiel. But as Mazikeen From the pages of THE SANDMAN...Lucifer Morningstar returns to Hell in this fifth collection of the acclaimed LUCIFER series, reprinting issues #29-35. Still weak, with most of his power locked in the feathers stolen by Susano-O-No-Mikoto, Lucifer must now face the challenge of single combat to the death with his brother, the angel of the Host Amenadiel. But as Mazikeen hunts for Susano and Lucifer plans his strategy, angels and devils alike are plotting for his defeat even before the challenge has begun! This volume contains: Lucifer #29–35


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From the pages of THE SANDMAN...Lucifer Morningstar returns to Hell in this fifth collection of the acclaimed LUCIFER series, reprinting issues #29-35. Still weak, with most of his power locked in the feathers stolen by Susano-O-No-Mikoto, Lucifer must now face the challenge of single combat to the death with his brother, the angel of the Host Amenadiel. But as Mazikeen From the pages of THE SANDMAN...Lucifer Morningstar returns to Hell in this fifth collection of the acclaimed LUCIFER series, reprinting issues #29-35. Still weak, with most of his power locked in the feathers stolen by Susano-O-No-Mikoto, Lucifer must now face the challenge of single combat to the death with his brother, the angel of the Host Amenadiel. But as Mazikeen hunts for Susano and Lucifer plans his strategy, angels and devils alike are plotting for his defeat even before the challenge has begun! This volume contains: Lucifer #29–35

30 review for Lucifer, Vol. 5: Inferno

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Inferno is a great arc. Lucifer's duel with the angel, Amenadiel, finally comes to pass with Lucifer in a greatly weakened state. Mazikeen is her typical badass self. This woman needs her own book. The back half of the book isn't nearly as good with a couple of one offs and a two parter that are really just setup for the future.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    As much as I hate to do it, I think this has to be the first four star volume in the series. I absolutely love the first four issues [Inferno] and really they follow directly off the end of the last volume in the whole 'Paradiso, Purgatorio, Inferno' thing, but the last three issues here just aren't that great. For once one-shot side story just doesn't really grab my attention, and the last two issues are decent enough but really they're just there to set up the events of the next volume. As for As much as I hate to do it, I think this has to be the first four star volume in the series. I absolutely love the first four issues [Inferno] and really they follow directly off the end of the last volume in the whole 'Paradiso, Purgatorio, Inferno' thing, but the last three issues here just aren't that great. For once one-shot side story just doesn't really grab my attention, and the last two issues are decent enough but really they're just there to set up the events of the next volume. As for Inferno, you would think at some point I would get tired of "Lucifer almost dies but at the last minute he doesn't and reveals that this was his brilliant plan all along" but I definitely don't. Also I love Duma. And Mazikeen. She's amazing and her storyline in this volume is so badass. Can't wait for the next volume though, Mansions of Silence is so cool. Mentions of will: Some highlights: me over here being an unrepentant Lucifer/Mazikeen shipper my badass queen Duma being great the proper reaction when a giant gorilla is trying to rape you #holla I just love Lucifer breathing fire like a fucking dragon to kill the snake hanging over Loki lol Lucifer, about to go to Jotenheim: Well it's gonna be cold so I'd better take off my suit jacket but put on this ridiculously adorable scarf

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    I suppose every long series have to have low point.Volume 5 isn't necessary bad but it's not on par with rest of the series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Airiz

    The spark of God's former lamplighter is dancing precariously in the middle of a gusty compromise. One false glide would mean hissing out of existence forever, and this time the embers are unlikely to rise again like the last time....what would Lucifer do? Inferno, the fifth volume in the Lucifer series, successfully wraps up everything for the first major story arc while setting up the stage for the next book. Lucifer Morningstar, after being brought back into existence with the help of Elaine The spark of God's former lamplighter is dancing precariously in the middle of a gusty compromise. One false glide would mean hissing out of existence forever, and this time the embers are unlikely to rise again like the last time....what would Lucifer do? Inferno, the fifth volume in the Lucifer series, successfully wraps up everything for the first major story arc while setting up the stage for the next book. Lucifer Morningstar, after being brought back into existence with the help of Elaine Belloc, goes to the city of Effrul in Hell to fulfill a promise he made twelve moons ago: a duel with the angel Amenadiel. But this is no combat between heaven and hell. Amenadiel is only seeking a private vendetta after his host’s assault on Los Angeles to destroy the Lightbringer goes awry. The Devil may have survived his downfall the last time, but will he be able to evade his demise now in his vulnerable state? It is refreshing to see Lucifer as a very fragile character, for most of the previous volumes depict him as a semi-omnipotent creature. I’m sure the Devil would have ended up in a stereotypical Gary Stu mold if Carey hadn’t been so adroit in shaping him into a compelling antihero. One obvious way of making fictional beings strike a chord with readers is to give them human-like qualities, even if no single iota in their bodies are classifiable as human’s. I’ve seen that in Neil Gaiman’s Morpheus (brooding about his love lives the same way an emo kid might emote about being dumped) and Death (perky down-to-earth gothette…need I say more?). Carey succeeded in doing just that, and after reading this I really feel that The Sandman readers who haven’t picked up this series yet are doing themselves a disservice. Issue by issue, some of Lucifer’s protective covering—both emotional and physical—are being shed, revealing more of who he has become. Apparently the changes brought about by recent events propelled the falling off of his facades. For instance, he is beginning to show more intimacy to Mazikeen, and he realizes that no matter how strong his will is, sometimes his body cannot follow. The only things that seem to be constant about Lucifer are his pride and wit. The duel between Lucifer and Amenadiel is entertaining enough, what with a clever twist at the end and misleading first pages of the first issue. Christopher Rudd’s poetic narration is spot-on; his character has grown on me a little and I wish he gets a few more major roles in the sequels. Here we also meet a character from Mazikeen’s past, and Solomon makes his debut appearance as a badass, hard-boiled detective (you win so much at life, Carey!). The ever-silent Duma plays a key role in aiding the Fallen for the second time, and it isn’t so surprising that he’s taking the Lucifer ticket as well in the end. Dig this, friends: three rebel archangels! It’s nice to see Loki again, still his trickster self despite his pus-filled eye sockets (courtesy of the Corinthian from The Sandman) and his entrails-cuffed incarceration. I’m a sucker for stories with Norse folklore, so needless to say I quite enjoyed the last two issues of this tome. The standalone story “Bearing Gifts” is bizarrely interesting and I quite liked it. Kudos to the illustrators, by the way! The art is becoming more and more gorgeous. I'm definitely looking forward to more of this series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Reynolds

    This is my least favourite of the Lucifer volumes, mostly dealing with Lucifer's duel with Amenadiel, which is my least favourite arc of Lucifer - there's a whole bunch of villains, including Amenadiel, Susano o-no-mikoto, Mazikeen's husband (who is awkwardly introduced and just happens to have a plot-device that gives him access to the mind of God which he doesn't seem to have much use of himself), plus a few minor threats who are out to kill Lucifer. All of these enemies go down in a pathetic This is my least favourite of the Lucifer volumes, mostly dealing with Lucifer's duel with Amenadiel, which is my least favourite arc of Lucifer - there's a whole bunch of villains, including Amenadiel, Susano o-no-mikoto, Mazikeen's husband (who is awkwardly introduced and just happens to have a plot-device that gives him access to the mind of God which he doesn't seem to have much use of himself), plus a few minor threats who are out to kill Lucifer. All of these enemies go down in a pathetic manner; one demon assassin who's the cousin of the demon who was killing angels back in Children and Monsters dies from falling off a tower, yet what Lucifer can survive is ill-defined. He's supposed to have had his powers removed yet at one point he is impaled through the chest with spikes. After this arc, we get "Bearing Gifts", which is mediocre and doesn't really go anywhere or play into anything further down the line. Then the last two issues (#34 and #35) start to set up the next arc: Lucifer's interactions with the Norse gods are great, the earthbound stuff is decent but I don't like the reimagining of Solomon as a sort of zealot version of the Punisher. It seems at odds with his biblical character. My rankings of the Lucifer volumes: 3 (best), 6, 8, 4, 11, 2, 10, 1, 7, 9, 5 (worst)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Given that we've been building up to it since Children and Monsters three volumes ago, it's not surprising that fully half of Carey's Inferno is dedicated to the long-promised duel between Lucifer and Amenadiel. And if Lucifer's a bit shaky on his pins after being mostly dead all day, then he's simply going to be that much more cunning to survive - at least long enough for Mazikeen to track and kill the god who's trapped Lucifer's power in his last surviving wingfeathers. (Just go with it, Given that we've been building up to it since Children and Monsters three volumes ago, it's not surprising that fully half of Carey's Inferno is dedicated to the long-promised duel between Lucifer and Amenadiel. And if Lucifer's a bit shaky on his pins after being mostly dead all day, then he's simply going to be that much more cunning to survive - at least long enough for Mazikeen to track and kill the god who's trapped Lucifer's power in his last surviving wingfeathers. (Just go with it, guys.) While watching Lucifer outmaneuver assassins is always fun, I was more interested in Mazikeen's arc, which brings her back into conflict with her ex-husband. (Believe me when I say that after meeting him no one will ever question why she traded up to the Lord of Hell.) Her success is vital to that of Lucifer's, and it's interesting to see how the change in power dynamics between the two of them had changed the nature of their relationship. The second half of the book contains two or three stories - a terrifying birth, a judgment by Solomon, and a quick visit to Loki to borrow some metaphorical car keys - which are clearly all doing set up for future storylines now that we've reached the conclusion of the grand fated duel. And if the climax of that confrontation was just the aperitif, I can't wait to see what Carey has in store for the culmination of this series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Zec

    Contains the stories: Inferno, Bearing Gifts, Come to Judgement. Continues to have the same style and substance of the series. This volume concludes the end of the first main arc with the Basanos and angry Long haired angel. It also sets up some stuff and characters for future arcs. I was interested in seeing what changes have happened to the Lady Lys but she just seems a lot more in control of her desires and still evil. Rudd remains a semi-interesting plot device. Duma is an intriguing plot Contains the stories: Inferno, Bearing Gifts, Come to Judgement. Continues to have the same style and substance of the series. This volume concludes the end of the first main arc with the Basanos and angry Long haired angel. It also sets up some stuff and characters for future arcs. I was interested in seeing what changes have happened to the Lady Lys but she just seems a lot more in control of her desires and still evil. Rudd remains a semi-interesting plot device. Duma is an intriguing plot device, I enjoy most scenes he’s in. Mazikeen is as badass as ever but I do wonder what she’s getting out of all this. It is quite obvious that she cares for Lucifer more than he does for her. The arc is obviously a few steps down from the previous one in terms of momentum, but I do enjoy the one-shots in the series and I am very much invested in the cast of characters. This series has consistently been good, smart, dark, existential. It hasn’t reached perfection yet, but I have a good feeling for things to come. One of the few series that I want to read slower so that I can savour it more.

  8. 4 out of 5

    SaraKat

    I love the way Lucifer solves his problems with cleverness and doesn't even need his super powers to beat beings that have them. That is what makes him the hero of the books even though his moral compass is a little off-center. :) The plot always seems to put Lucifer in an impossible situation with an obvious solution that seems impossible and then a secondary surprise solution that he ends up using. I like how he tends to do things quietly with no explanation to those around him and it ends up I love the way Lucifer solves his problems with cleverness and doesn't even need his super powers to beat beings that have them. That is what makes him the hero of the books even though his moral compass is a little off-center. :) The plot always seems to put Lucifer in an impossible situation with an obvious solution that seems impossible and then a secondary surprise solution that he ends up using. I like how he tends to do things quietly with no explanation to those around him and it ends up that he is doing something to help someone that I've already forgotten about from a previous book. The planning and thought that must go into this series is incredible! I also enjoyed the part called Bearing Gifts. It didn't have our usual characters, but they were mentioned and the writing was still the same high quality I've come to expect.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steven Werber

    Lucifer has a duel with an angel and he hasn't got his divine powers back yet....

  10. 4 out of 5

    James

    Such an interesting and thought provoking series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Keeloca

    OKAY I LOVE THE BITS WITH DEATH AND ELAINE so this gets a happy 5 from me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Štěpán

    i really liked it

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hennie

    4 stars! It's a Lucifer kind of day today!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Lucifers fifth collection begins and ends with a promise. The first is a promise fulfilled: Lucifer returns to Hell to fulfill an oath to Amendiel...and fight to the death. Still reeling from the events of TheDivine Comedy, and not at his full strength, Lucifer is additionally handicapped by the scheming not onlyof Amendiel and various factions of demonic nobility, but of Hells new ruler, the angel Remiel. It concludes with a promise of another sort. Lucifer is someone who does not like to be Lucifer’s fifth collection begins and ends with a promise. The first is a promise fulfilled: Lucifer returns to Hell to fulfill an oath to Amendiel...and fight to the death. Still reeling from the events of “TheDivine Comedy,” and not at his full strength, Lucifer is additionally handicapped by the scheming not onlyof Amendiel and various factions of demonic nobility, but of Hells’ new ruler, the angel Remiel. It concludes with a promise of another sort. Lucifer is someone who does not like to be indebted. After Elaine committed the ultimate sacrifice for him in the previous volume, he seeks to fulfill his substantial debt to her by bringing her back from the land of the dead. He closing pages see him taking the first steps towards this goal. One would expect that, following the events of “The Divine Comedy,” Lucifer would hit a lull. Usually, at the conclusion of a major arc, comics will revert to a series of one-shorts or trifle adventures, both to keep the reader in suspense about coming events, and to prepare for the Next Big Thing. With the exception of the Gaudium and Serpa centered issue at the end of “Comedy”—which drops a bombshell of its own in the final pages—the creative team continues its fast pace by bringing Lucifer once again to the realm of Hell, this time for the duel that has been a year in the making. Carey continues his top-notch storytelling by taking what should be a straight-up fight to the death and twisting it into a multi-layered story of adventure, scheming, politics and mentally disturbed cherubs that will shake the foundations of Hell’s political structure and cause another angel to break faith with God’s plan. And, in a house of gears built by a demonic smith, it is a story about a serene pool that links directly to the thoughts of God. Following the conclusion of the duel, Lucifer finally learns of Michael’s fate, and the focus of the series shifts away from its titular character for a couple of those interludes I mentioned earlier. The first focuses on a birth; the second, a death. Though Zimet—who is introduced in the first of these stories–will come into play later her tale is not particularly memorable. Haunting and creepy, yes, but as far as a single-issue story, it has never been one of my favorites. It is the second story, which begins with the funeral of Elaine Belloc, that is the stand-out here. Told from the perspective of another great figure of the Christian religion—Solomon, living in the modern world as a detective of sorts. He seeks retribution for Elaine’s death, a mission he believes to be of divine origin. His journey to find it will put him in contact with Elaine’s human and not-so-human families. In the final issues of this collection, we leave the Shinto gods behind and move on to the Norse, who will remain a driving factor as the story continues. One of the things I love most about Lucifer and its predecessor, The Sandman is how it delves into so many different mythologies and religions, incorporating them into one interwoven narrative. Though this collection doesn’t pack the punch of “The Divine Comedy,” it is a solid follow-up that continues to drive the overall story forward, albeit at a not-quite-as-relentless pace. The sheer amount of elements this collection manages to bring together makes it a quick read that brings a lot of depth to a number of characters, and the art team is superb as always.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Miller

    I think court intrigue is one of the most boring plot structures ever, and this was a lot of that with the royalty of Effrul (especially Lady Lys). I already had too much of it in Volume 3, and then here it was again. Also the duel between Lucifer and Amenadiel felt like a side tangent that they remembered to wrap up (and they did so sloppily). I wish they had kept on forgetting. For the aforementioned reasons I think this trade paperback was the weakest point in the first run of the Lucifer I think court intrigue is one of the most boring plot structures ever, and this was a lot of that with the royalty of Effrul (especially Lady Lys). I already had too much of it in Volume 3, and then here it was again. Also the duel between Lucifer and Amenadiel felt like a side tangent that they remembered to wrap up (and they did so sloppily). I wish they had kept on forgetting. For the aforementioned reasons I think this trade paperback was the weakest point in the first run of the Lucifer comics. I actually stopped reading the series for months, stuck on this trade. Things I liked: The little bit of Gaudium and Spera, the introduction of some more Norse mythology.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sonja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have to say that this is probably my least favorite of the series so far. Which isn't really saying anything because I stayed up past my bedtime reading it, Mazikeen is still my personal hero, and Lucifer is still up to his usually charismatic, trickster self. I guess I got the feeling that this text was all about setting pieces in order for more substantial character arts and Awesome Happenings -- which is totally okay. Set-up whets the appetite for more. If every minute of everything was I have to say that this is probably my least favorite of the series so far. Which isn't really saying anything because I stayed up past my bedtime reading it, Mazikeen is still my personal hero, and Lucifer is still up to his usually charismatic, trickster self. I guess I got the feeling that this text was all about setting pieces in order for more substantial character arts and Awesome Happenings -- which is totally okay. Set-up whets the appetite for more. If every minute of everything was awesome, then there would not be an awesome. I wasn't really expecting Mazikeen's husband to show up. That was an interesting story-line -- I like how she defeated him, how because she was a woman, nobody taught her, nobody expected her to learn -- but she did. Empowering. I also liked the character Lys. She's been infected with humanity, she's scrabbling for her father's authority. All good stuff. Looking forward to see what'll happen next with her. I think when one of the most tender moments was when Duma came to Lucifer's aid. There is so little compassion -- true compassion -- like that left in the world. I find it utterly beautiful wherever I see it. And when he tells Lucifer that three have defied God's will -- he looks so sad. Speaking of compassion -- there was an odd little arc about Miss Zim'et and Sabah. There is this trope that the Big Bad is always going to want human life, babies, or some virgin -- but they wanted Sabah's tumor, thus saving his life. I wasn't really expecting that, and I thought it hinted at an interesting direction. I hope to see more of where this leads. I guess the most surprising character was Solomon -- I wasn't really expecting him to show up. I'm glad that they kind of commentaried on that blind fanatacism, forcing them to question whether they truly are doing God's will, even if they think they are. Good stuff.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    By this point in the series, Lucifer had hit its stride. The central characters are, for the most part, laid out, the mythology more or less is mapped, and the artwork has stabilized between Peter Gross and Dean Ormston's very different penciling styles. This isn't to say new characters and such will not be introduced (as the apparently still-alive Biblical Solomon is here as final form of justice), but things are set up and are coming to heads. To start, Lucifer first must deal with his longtime By this point in the series, Lucifer had hit its stride. The central characters are, for the most part, laid out, the mythology more or less is mapped, and the artwork has stabilized between Peter Gross and Dean Ormston's very different penciling styles. This isn't to say new characters and such will not be introduced (as the apparently still-alive Biblical Solomon is here as final form of justice), but things are set up and are coming to heads. To start, Lucifer first must deal with his longtime antagonist, the archangel Amenadiel in a duel in Hell. This arc also deals with the Japanese god Susano, brings in Mazikeen's ex-husband, shows Lucifer uses his brains to get ahead better than his power (largely stripped from him as a result of the previous storyarc), and then shows Christopher Rudd's ambitious plans to get ahead in Hell's hierarchy. This arc was entitled "Inferno," completing the trilogy based on the names of the three parts of Dante's Divine Comedy, only with the series in reverse with Paradiso first in the previous volume (also called "The Divine Comedy") and finishing up in Hell. Mazikeen is further cemented as Lucifer's asskicker of choice, and then the Morningstar begins the step, freeing himself of any obligation he might have had to the late Elaine Belloc, requiring a trip to see Loki, and then get a ship from his brother, one made of the fingernails of dead men. The volume ends there, with the voyage set for the next volume.

  18. 4 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

    "Lucifer Vol. 5: Inferno" marks the conclusion of a major story arc: whatever happened to those wings of Lucifer? Last seen in the possession of Susano-O-No-Mikoto, they left the battlefields as the Basanos committed suicide, apparently into the mists of time (or whatever passes for cryptic walking-off- into-the-sunset in Lucifer's world anyway.) Lucifer duels with Amenadiel (both following the code duello)--that duel promised in "Lucifer Vol. 2: Children And Monsters", but sends his deputy, "Lucifer Vol. 5: Inferno" marks the conclusion of a major story arc: whatever happened to those wings of Lucifer? Last seen in the possession of Susano-O-No-Mikoto, they left the battlefields as the Basanos committed suicide, apparently into the mists of time (or whatever passes for cryptic walking-off- into-the-sunset in Lucifer's world anyway.) Lucifer duels with Amenadiel (both following the code duello)--that duel promised in "Lucifer Vol. 2: Children And Monsters", but sends his deputy, Mazikeen, to deal with the wings. Along the way, she meets someone from her past. Scoria, a Lilim like herself, which would technically make the union incest, but this is 'Lucifer' after all, and there are no taboos. Scoria claims to have seen the very thoughts of God. The duel fought and won (sort of, on a technicality), Lucifer ends the book by taking on a loan from Loki, setting the stage for "Lucifer Vol. 6: Mansions of the Silence". Writer Carey is as irreverent as they come, but he also knows his theology inside and out, both Judeo-Christian and otherwise: King Solomon turns up, appropriately enough, in a hard-boiled detective role, and a few of the Norse gods put in memorable cameo appearances near the end of this volume. Lucifer himself is portrayed as a dapper man-about-town who can rip people's faces off when necessary. Book Details: Title Lucifer Vol. 5: Inferno Author Mike Carey Reviewed By Purplycookie

  19. 5 out of 5

    Korpuskat Morris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After Lucifer's bout with the Basanos, he is immediately called upon to answer the challenge of a duel issued a year prior. This would seem mundane and simple for the Morningstar, except that in the fight with the Basanos, Lucifer lost much of his power. On top of his unusual weakness his opponent, Amenadiel, has proceeded to cheat in this duel. In the process of fighting the pre-duel attacks on him, we see Lucifer injured in a mundane fashion which sets the mood for much of the book. Lucifer is After Lucifer's bout with the Basanos, he is immediately called upon to answer the challenge of a duel issued a year prior. This would seem mundane and simple for the Morningstar, except that in the fight with the Basanos, Lucifer lost much of his power. On top of his unusual weakness his opponent, Amenadiel, has proceeded to cheat in this duel. In the process of fighting the pre-duel attacks on him, we see Lucifer injured in a mundane fashion which sets the mood for much of the book. Lucifer is obviously not himself. While it is interesting to continue with the previous volume's display of Lucifer's vulnerability, after the previous volume showing his relative weakness through his near death (that resulted in Elaine's death), the weakness displayed in Inferno was underwhelming. His near-failure was necessary, plot wise, to show the fall of Duma but in entertainment value it was too little, too soon to give a full effect. Lucifer was not near-bested by an old enemy on something he should have suspected- no, Lucifer has to rely on his intellect for the entire volume (as with the previous volume) and was attacked by a cherubim, by despair. That is not to say it ruined the whole story. Seeing Lucifer weakened is still enjoyable even if it is not as well done, but add to is Rudd's, Duma's, and Mazikeen's development, Lucifer's plan and execution, and ultimately the arc as a whole is well written and makes it above average.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phaedra

    This book explored the realm that Lucifer 'created', how he played out his own version of Adam and Eve and his sole dictum to not worship anything or anyone. Again, this went deeper into Lucifer's personality and character, he is himself. Lucifer is the truest form of the Shakespearean adage 'to thine ownself be true', he never once swerves away from being fully what he is - the trickster who stands at the door and forces us to see ourselves as we are, not as we wish to be seen. He is the mirror This book explored the realm that Lucifer 'created', how he played out his own version of Adam and Eve and his sole dictum to not worship anything or anyone. Again, this went deeper into Lucifer's personality and character, he is himself. Lucifer is the truest form of the Shakespearean adage 'to thine ownself be true', he never once swerves away from being fully what he is - the trickster who stands at the door and forces us to see ourselves as we are, not as we wish to be seen. He is the mirror which strips away our seeming, which is literally shown as he faces down Bergelmir. Lucifer does not lose, it isn't that he manipulates events until they suit his ends. He allows events to play out as they will and takes advantage of whatever might happen. With his power or without it, he is so in tune with himself that he knows he will always have the advantage because he is willing to see how things really are and he doesn't try to manipulate the outcome to suit himself. I like that when Lucifer does ply his hand at shaping events, it's never shown through him directly. The people who may or may not have had their course changed wonder if, perhaps, someone else has guided them to where they have ended up. Lucifer is subtlety personified, which allows him to be credited with schemings that may or may not be his.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aldi

    So. Bloody. Good. The whole duel plot in Effrul is just fantastic - great pacing, great powerplays within powerplays, and Christopher-as-narrator was the perfect voice. I also absolutely love his ongoing push-and-pull with Lys - they've fucked each other over beyond all hope of redemption but there are real feelings under it all, which makes the pain so perfect. In other side players I adore, can I just say that Duma is one of my favourite angels and I am shipping him shamelessly with Lucifer. So. Bloody. Good. The whole duel plot in Effrul is just fantastic - great pacing, great powerplays within powerplays, and Christopher-as-narrator was the perfect voice. I also absolutely love his ongoing push-and-pull with Lys - they've fucked each other over beyond all hope of redemption but there are real feelings under it all, which makes the pain so perfect. In other side players I adore, can I just say that Duma is one of my favourite angels and I am shipping him shamelessly with Lucifer. Sometimes the subtext there is just so very... texty. (view spoiler)[Also, that panel where Lucifer reflects that two angels have turned now, and Duma wordlessly signals "three" because Michael only went and fucking turned! Shivers. (hide spoiler)] The art in this was amazing too, just so many great pieces. Peter Gross and Ryan Kelly deliver gorgeous and dynamic art as ever, and Craig Hamilton's guest art is beautiful - very different from Gross/Kelly but it works so well for that arc, and I love his bold sketch marks. Also: hello Bergelmir, you smooth-talking charming bastard. Looking forward to the Naglfar quest (I have forgotten all about it, which is super-convenient.)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Raj

    Despite having lost most of his power, Lucifer has a meeting to attend in Hell, and he prides himself on always keeping his word. He has been challenged to a duel by the angel Amenadiel and the time has come to fulfil that obligation. Meanwhile, his consort, and war-leader of the Lilim, Mazikeen, is on the track of the god who has the two feathers that contain this power. I found this story pretty riveting, with Lucifer's pride in never going back on his word being shown as a major weakness, but Despite having lost most of his power, Lucifer has a meeting to attend in Hell, and he prides himself on always keeping his word. He has been challenged to a duel by the angel Amenadiel and the time has come to fulfil that obligation. Meanwhile, his consort, and war-leader of the Lilim, Mazikeen, is on the track of the god who has the two feathers that contain this power. I found this story pretty riveting, with Lucifer's pride in never going back on his word being shown as a major weakness, but he has enough intelligence and generally sneakiness that you always hope and feel that he'll come out on top. As well as the main story of Lucifer's duel, at the end, there is a short story at the end about the parents of Elaine Belloc, who died in the previous volume, and the detective who will anger angels to find out the truth. Also, the fallen cherubim who hang around with Michael are awfully cute. Although I've found earlier volumes in this series to be quite slow, the pace really picked up from the last volume and I'm looking forward to getting stuck into the rest of the series now.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    There's a certain feeling of "resetting" that occurs in this book following the major events of volume 4, but it doesn't last very long. After a brief period of checking in and evaluating how the major characters are affected by the various changes, we get right back into the stuff I love most about this series: watching Lucifer be the most cunning evil mastermind of all time. We get that in spades here. It's like reading a fantastic con story, only instead of grifters and marks we have demons There's a certain feeling of "resetting" that occurs in this book following the major events of volume 4, but it doesn't last very long. After a brief period of checking in and evaluating how the major characters are affected by the various changes, we get right back into the stuff I love most about this series: watching Lucifer be the most cunning evil mastermind of all time. We get that in spades here. It's like reading a fantastic con story, only instead of grifters and marks we have demons and angels having battles of both wits and fists. I was also pleasantly surprised to see the return of several interesting but so-far underused characters from early chapters. It gave me the same feeling of payoff I got from reading the often slow build of Sandman. It's funny to me that this series works best when it isn't reaching a climax, but is instead just exploring and existing its own world. It's one of the most original takes on this sort of spiritual realm multi-verse stuff I've read, and I'm enjoying it immensely.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Darrell

    Lucifer prepares for his duel with Amenadiel in Hell while the nobility of Effrul we met in A Dalliance with the Damned scheme behind the scenes. Meanwhile, Mazikeen hunts down Susano-O-No-Mikoto and ends up having a run in with her husband Scoria who is planning on taking Gods place. Apparently, God is going to follow Lucifers example by abandoning his post. This volume also features Solomon, the famous judge from the Bible. In his appearance here, hes more like Judge Dread. Loki from The Lucifer prepares for his duel with Amenadiel in Hell while the nobility of Effrul we met in A Dalliance with the Damned scheme behind the scenes. Meanwhile, Mazikeen hunts down Susano-O-No-Mikoto and ends up having a run in with her husband Scoria who is planning on taking God’s place. Apparently, God is going to follow Lucifer’s example by abandoning his post. This volume also features Solomon, the famous judge from the Bible. In his appearance here, he’s more like Judge Dread. Loki from The Sandman also makes an appearance, as well as his brother Bergelmir. Bergelmir, like Loki, is an embodiment of chaos, the polar opposite of the law-obsessed Solomon. While it was fun watching Lucifer and his allies outmaneuver their enemies, I wasn’t as impressed with this volume as with previous volumes. It felt more action oriented and less literary to me. No quotes, themes, or literary references really jumped out at me this time.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I've recently re-read the first three collected trade volumes of this series. I don't have Volume 4, and can't justify paying the prices seton e-boob for it, so I skipped from Volume 3 to Volume 5. I don't feel as if I've missed anything particularly important. Oh sure a minor character has died, some new (minor) characters are introduced, and I'm sure there must have been a story or two that I've missed.... but it all seems so circular. Volume 5 doesn't introduce anything major to the plot... and I've recently re-read the first three collected trade volumes of this series. I don't have Volume 4, and can't justify paying the prices seton e-boob for it, so I skipped from Volume 3 to Volume 5. I don't feel as if I've missed anything particularly important. Oh sure a minor character has died, some new (minor) characters are introduced, and I'm sure there must have been a story or two that I've missed.... but it all seems so circular. Volume 5 doesn't introduce anything major to the plot... and neither had Volume 3 or 2... it just seems as if the story, although entertaining... doesn't really go anywhere. I used to be a jogger... part of the fun I got from jogging, was enjoying the scenery. Then one day, I got a threadmill and started to jog on that... it didn't take long that I stopped enjoying jogging and gave it up. Right now, Lucifer is starting to feel like that threadmill. Hopefully Vol. 6 will give a change of scenery.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Shehu

    A fantastic take on Lucifer, the fallen one, and his stance towards both god and Michael his brother. A tale that both adds to the meaning of Sandman, but draws heavily from it too. While retired, Lucifer undertakes a job from Heaven, which grants him a letter of passage. This sets the universe on course for its end, and results with a new Creation, Lucifer's one, the death of Michael, but also the transfer of his powers into Elaine Belloc and of course Yahwehs quitting of his role, leaving his A fantastic take on Lucifer, the fallen one, and his stance towards both god and Michael his brother. A tale that both adds to the meaning of Sandman, but draws heavily from it too. While retired, Lucifer undertakes a job from Heaven, which grants him a letter of passage. This sets the universe on course for its end, and results with a new Creation, Lucifer's one, the death of Michael, but also the transfer of his powers into Elaine Belloc and of course Yahwehs quitting of his role, leaving his position void, which makes the Universe unmake itself, only for Elaine to become God. This grants Samael, the freedom he so much desires.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Siria

    The fifth of the Lucifer series, this sees the end of the first big story arc. The artwork improves as the book progresses, as does the cohesion of the storyline. It's not the most successful of the collections, as these stories are grouped together because that was the order in which they were written, not because they form a distinct grouping in and of themselves; still, very worth reading, if only because Lucifer makes the most delicious of Anti Heroes (yes, the capital letters are required.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    I'm still loving this series. It took me awhile to get into the first issue in this collection as I couldn't remember all the details of the previous one but when I did I really liked it. This collection features three stories, one that sees Lucifer in a duel in hell, while the real fight takes place elsewhere. A story about demons and an old Jewish man that made me cry as it was just so lovely, and the hunt for the killers of the little angel girl. The last story was the weakest in that it felt I'm still loving this series. It took me awhile to get into the first issue in this collection as I couldn't remember all the details of the previous one but when I did I really liked it. This collection features three stories, one that sees Lucifer in a duel in hell, while the real fight takes place elsewhere. A story about demons and an old Jewish man that made me cry as it was just so lovely, and the hunt for the killers of the little angel girl. The last story was the weakest in that it felt a bit like transition and didn't have much of a satisfying conclusion. But still loved it overall.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Kaufmann

    Lucifer returns to Hell for his duel with Amendiel severely weakened by the recent attack against him; Mazikeen goes looking for the magic feathers that will restore Lucifer to full strength, and runs into a very dangerous ex-boyfriend; and Samson from the Bible investigates Elaine's death. However, the best story in this volume is the standalone "Bearing Gifts," in which a demon asks a devoutly religious man for help. It's touching and beautifully told. At this point, LUCIFER has become one of Lucifer returns to Hell for his duel with Amendiel severely weakened by the recent attack against him; Mazikeen goes looking for the magic feathers that will restore Lucifer to full strength, and runs into a very dangerous ex-boyfriend; and Samson from the Bible investigates Elaine's death. However, the best story in this volume is the standalone "Bearing Gifts," in which a demon asks a devoutly religious man for help. It's touching and beautifully told. At this point, LUCIFER has become one of my favorite comics series ever.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Annette Jordan

    The time has come for Lucifer's duel against the angel Amenadial, and he is still in a weakened state, but that is not his only problem- an assassin from The House of Windowless rooms is in pursuit. Using his cunning to reveal treachery Lucifer is triumphant. The second half of the book sees Solomon investigating the death of Elaine, the child of the Archangel Michael who saved Lucifers life while Lucifer himself seeks out Loki and borrows a ship Another interesting and complex volume in a very The time has come for Lucifer's duel against the angel Amenadial, and he is still in a weakened state, but that is not his only problem- an assassin from The House of Windowless rooms is in pursuit. Using his cunning to reveal treachery Lucifer is triumphant. The second half of the book sees Solomon investigating the death of Elaine, the child of the Archangel Michael who saved Lucifers life while Lucifer himself seeks out Loki and borrows a ship Another interesting and complex volume in a very enjoyable series, and the addition of the norse mythology is always welcome

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