web site hit counter Masao: A Nisei Soldier's Secret and Heroic Role in World War II - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Masao: A Nisei Soldier's Secret and Heroic Role in World War II

Availability: Ready to download

An elderly Japanese-American soldier narrates his unique and untold story about World War II and it changes the interviewer's life forever. Born in San Bernardino in 1916, Japanese-American Masao Abe was a typical American child. In 1924, his family traveled to Japan. Not knowing the language, other children called him 'chitai' - retard. He hated Japan and wanted to go home An elderly Japanese-American soldier narrates his unique and untold story about World War II and it changes the interviewer's life forever. Born in San Bernardino in 1916, Japanese-American Masao Abe was a typical American child. In 1924, his family traveled to Japan. Not knowing the language, other children called him 'chitai' - retard. He hated Japan and wanted to go home. His family returned to California without him, an eight-year-old American child left in a foreign country. Masao adapted, even succeeded and became a military officer in training. After five years, his parents rejoined him in Japan. But when Masao was 19, his father sent him back to California to live with an uncle who became a father-figure. Again, Masao found himself in a foreign country. He spoke limited English. Other Japanese-Americans viewed him as Kibei, not a polite term. He wanted to go home to Japan. In 1941, Masao was drafted in the U.S. Army and would eventually be recruited into the highly secret Military Intelligence Service. Unlike many other M.I.S. soldiers, Masao was deployed to the South Pacific where he fought on the ground, on the front line in three battles earning a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart. He faced an enemy that looked like him and survived the U.S. troops' mentality that 'the only good Jap is a dead Jap'. Meanwhile, his family struggled in Japan and his uncle in California was imprisoned. After the war, Masao was eager to get back to the States but was instead sent to Japan to serve in the occupation. The idea of home had eluded him since he was eight, but it was in Japan that he met his future wife, a fellow Japanese-American, and he found his home in her. Throughout the book, I intersperse anecdotes about the last years of Masao's life and from a personal point of view. He was a wonderful man with a unique and untold story.


Compare

An elderly Japanese-American soldier narrates his unique and untold story about World War II and it changes the interviewer's life forever. Born in San Bernardino in 1916, Japanese-American Masao Abe was a typical American child. In 1924, his family traveled to Japan. Not knowing the language, other children called him 'chitai' - retard. He hated Japan and wanted to go home An elderly Japanese-American soldier narrates his unique and untold story about World War II and it changes the interviewer's life forever. Born in San Bernardino in 1916, Japanese-American Masao Abe was a typical American child. In 1924, his family traveled to Japan. Not knowing the language, other children called him 'chitai' - retard. He hated Japan and wanted to go home. His family returned to California without him, an eight-year-old American child left in a foreign country. Masao adapted, even succeeded and became a military officer in training. After five years, his parents rejoined him in Japan. But when Masao was 19, his father sent him back to California to live with an uncle who became a father-figure. Again, Masao found himself in a foreign country. He spoke limited English. Other Japanese-Americans viewed him as Kibei, not a polite term. He wanted to go home to Japan. In 1941, Masao was drafted in the U.S. Army and would eventually be recruited into the highly secret Military Intelligence Service. Unlike many other M.I.S. soldiers, Masao was deployed to the South Pacific where he fought on the ground, on the front line in three battles earning a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart. He faced an enemy that looked like him and survived the U.S. troops' mentality that 'the only good Jap is a dead Jap'. Meanwhile, his family struggled in Japan and his uncle in California was imprisoned. After the war, Masao was eager to get back to the States but was instead sent to Japan to serve in the occupation. The idea of home had eluded him since he was eight, but it was in Japan that he met his future wife, a fellow Japanese-American, and he found his home in her. Throughout the book, I intersperse anecdotes about the last years of Masao's life and from a personal point of view. He was a wonderful man with a unique and untold story.

50 review for Masao: A Nisei Soldier's Secret and Heroic Role in World War II

  1. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Mcpherson

    Most of us grew up reading one-sided American war stories. However, because Masao Abe trusted Vea to share his experience as a Japanese American soldier in World War II, readers' eyes are opened to yet another part of history that was omitted from our textbooks and literature. This book is beautifully written and shows the love between the author and her subject as well as a unique history lesson about Japan and the U.S. The only reason I did not give it five stars is because I am left wanting t Most of us grew up reading one-sided American war stories. However, because Masao Abe trusted Vea to share his experience as a Japanese American soldier in World War II, readers' eyes are opened to yet another part of history that was omitted from our textbooks and literature. This book is beautifully written and shows the love between the author and her subject as well as a unique history lesson about Japan and the U.S. The only reason I did not give it five stars is because I am left wanting to know even more - a sign of a good read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan Walker

    This is a very interesting book. The fact that it could not be told for 30 years after the war was a pretty interesting concept. You will have a hard time putting this book down.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie King

    The author, Sandra Vea, is the daughter-in-law of Masao. Is this heartfelt book, Sandra reveals the bond between herself and Masao, a Japanese man who was raised in both the US and Japan and who enlisted in the US Army during WWII. The author weaves Masao's WWII stories into the times she spent caring for this aging man, someone she respected and loved deeply. She recorded his stories and vowed to make them known, although Masao had been sworn to secrecy by the military about his mission for ove The author, Sandra Vea, is the daughter-in-law of Masao. Is this heartfelt book, Sandra reveals the bond between herself and Masao, a Japanese man who was raised in both the US and Japan and who enlisted in the US Army during WWII. The author weaves Masao's WWII stories into the times she spent caring for this aging man, someone she respected and loved deeply. She recorded his stories and vowed to make them known, although Masao had been sworn to secrecy by the military about his mission for over 30 years after the war ended. I was struck by the drama, difficulties, and life-threatening existence of a man who, on the battle field, was a target not only for the Japanese, but often from his own army. The military assigned three body guards to Masao and to other interpreters/interrogators. These were soldiers, who at first, resented the duty, but eventually realized Masao was a loyal American. Vea's description of the first time Masao came face-to-face with a Japanese soldier on a South Pacific Island and had to make the decision to kill or be killed was wrenching. She details Masao's emotional struggle as well as the physical. I highly recommend this book as a window into a history of WWII that many of us would never have known.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gary Detrick

    Extraordinary book. Falls into one of the top 5 books I've read this year. An emotional and wonderfully interviewed work. Sandra's conversations with Masao seamlessly move from his spoken words into an amazingly delightful story, taking us on a journey through his life experiences in the U.S., Japan and Hawaii and the events surrounding his secret role in the U.S. service. Masao pass away in 2013, and we are fortunate to be able to hear his story as he describes events of those days, the U.S. Ja Extraordinary book. Falls into one of the top 5 books I've read this year. An emotional and wonderfully interviewed work. Sandra's conversations with Masao seamlessly move from his spoken words into an amazingly delightful story, taking us on a journey through his life experiences in the U.S., Japan and Hawaii and the events surrounding his secret role in the U.S. service. Masao pass away in 2013, and we are fortunate to be able to hear his story as he describes events of those days, the U.S. Japanese camps, the collapse of their U.S. businesses, the racial hatred, the sad but somewhat understandable events of the times. A history lesson we can all learn from.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jan Stone

    A loving tribute.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Renée

    I received this book through a GR giveaway. I signed up for the giveaway because I was fascinated by the subject of it. Japans role in WW II is quite 'obvious' but the Japanese soldiers who fought on the American side are quit often forgotten. I'm Dutch and to be honest, I had no idea so many Japanse Americans fought in WW II. Plus Masao is just a amazing man, so it was great getting to know him a little through this book. Thank you so much for the book Sandra, I really enjoyed reading it. I received this book through a GR giveaway. I signed up for the giveaway because I was fascinated by the subject of it. Japans role in WW II is quite 'obvious' but the Japanese soldiers who fought on the American side are quit often forgotten. I'm Dutch and to be honest, I had no idea so many Japanse Americans fought in WW II. Plus Masao is just a amazing man, so it was great getting to know him a little through this book. Thank you so much for the book Sandra, I really enjoyed reading it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I got this book through a GR giveaway and was very excited to read it. Unfortunately the arrival of the book coincided with a very busy time in my life, so it took me forever to get a start on it. But once I did, it was well worth the wait. A very enjoyable read. The story alternates between a present-day timeline and a historic timeline. I was least engulfed by the present-day timeline, because there is too much pathos in the narrative for my personal taste. However, I found the historic timeli I got this book through a GR giveaway and was very excited to read it. Unfortunately the arrival of the book coincided with a very busy time in my life, so it took me forever to get a start on it. But once I did, it was well worth the wait. A very enjoyable read. The story alternates between a present-day timeline and a historic timeline. I was least engulfed by the present-day timeline, because there is too much pathos in the narrative for my personal taste. However, I found the historic timeline to be very interesting. It is a part of U.S. history that I knew very little about. Definitely a story that needs to be told - and heard. So, thank you Sandra Vea for giving me a chance to hear the story of Masao!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    An interesting book about a second generation Japanese who served in World War 2 as an intelligence officer. At times Masao Abe put his life in peril as being the interpreter for Japanese soldiers captured during combat or hiding in caves. The book recounts his entire life, when his parents sent him to Japan and his return to the states, his allegiance to the military and having to overcome racial tensions due to his ancestry. His role in the war was top secret and could not be revealed for at l An interesting book about a second generation Japanese who served in World War 2 as an intelligence officer. At times Masao Abe put his life in peril as being the interpreter for Japanese soldiers captured during combat or hiding in caves. The book recounts his entire life, when his parents sent him to Japan and his return to the states, his allegiance to the military and having to overcome racial tensions due to his ancestry. His role in the war was top secret and could not be revealed for at least 30 years, which is why reading the book was a joy for me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    aryan sas

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gloria V.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Boiko

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jared Nash

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mirinsing Angkang

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stacie Miller

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kathie A. Abe

  18. 5 out of 5

    Val

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

  20. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erica Ojeda

  24. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  25. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  27. 5 out of 5

    SALLY WHITE

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Taylor-Cruz

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  31. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  32. 5 out of 5

    Dolli

  33. 4 out of 5

    DEBORAH SHAW

  34. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

  35. 5 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  36. 4 out of 5

    Bob Ly

  37. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

  38. 4 out of 5

    Barry Collins

  39. 4 out of 5

    Doreen Miller

  40. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  41. 5 out of 5

    DENNIS

  42. 5 out of 5

    Arf2D2

  43. 5 out of 5

    Pat Eells

  44. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  45. 4 out of 5

    Karen Forsyth

  46. 4 out of 5

    Terry Pearson

  47. 5 out of 5

    Exapno Mapcase

  48. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  49. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  50. 4 out of 5

    Kay Smillie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.