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Analyses Concerning Passive and Active Synthesis: Lectures on Transcendental Logic

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Coming from what is arguably the most productive period of Husserl's life, this volume offers the reader a first translation into English of Husserl's renowned lectures on `passive synthesis', given between 1920 and 1926. These lectures are the first extensive application of Husserl's newly developed genetic phenomenology to perceptual experience and to the way in which it Coming from what is arguably the most productive period of Husserl's life, this volume offers the reader a first translation into English of Husserl's renowned lectures on `passive synthesis', given between 1920 and 1926. These lectures are the first extensive application of Husserl's newly developed genetic phenomenology to perceptual experience and to the way in which it is connected to judgments and cognition. They include an historical reflection on the crisis of contemporary thought and human spirit, provide an archaeology of experience by questioning back into sedimented layers of meaning, and sketch the genealogy of judgment in `active synthesis'. Drawing upon everyday events and personal experiences, the Analyses are marked by a patient attention to the subtle emergence of sense in our lives. By advancing a phenomenology of association that treats such phenomena as bodily kinaesthesis, temporal genesis, habit, affection, attention, motivation, and the unconscious, Husserl explores the cognitive dimensions of the body in its affectively significant surroundings. An elaboration of these diverse modes of evidence and their modalizations (transcendental aesthetic), allows Husserl to trace the origin of truth up to judicative achievements (transcendental logic). Joined by several of Husserl's essays on static and genetic method, the Analyses afford a richness of description unequalled by the majority of Husserl's works available to English readers. Students of phenomenology and of Husserl's thought will find this an indispensable work.


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Coming from what is arguably the most productive period of Husserl's life, this volume offers the reader a first translation into English of Husserl's renowned lectures on `passive synthesis', given between 1920 and 1926. These lectures are the first extensive application of Husserl's newly developed genetic phenomenology to perceptual experience and to the way in which it Coming from what is arguably the most productive period of Husserl's life, this volume offers the reader a first translation into English of Husserl's renowned lectures on `passive synthesis', given between 1920 and 1926. These lectures are the first extensive application of Husserl's newly developed genetic phenomenology to perceptual experience and to the way in which it is connected to judgments and cognition. They include an historical reflection on the crisis of contemporary thought and human spirit, provide an archaeology of experience by questioning back into sedimented layers of meaning, and sketch the genealogy of judgment in `active synthesis'. Drawing upon everyday events and personal experiences, the Analyses are marked by a patient attention to the subtle emergence of sense in our lives. By advancing a phenomenology of association that treats such phenomena as bodily kinaesthesis, temporal genesis, habit, affection, attention, motivation, and the unconscious, Husserl explores the cognitive dimensions of the body in its affectively significant surroundings. An elaboration of these diverse modes of evidence and their modalizations (transcendental aesthetic), allows Husserl to trace the origin of truth up to judicative achievements (transcendental logic). Joined by several of Husserl's essays on static and genetic method, the Analyses afford a richness of description unequalled by the majority of Husserl's works available to English readers. Students of phenomenology and of Husserl's thought will find this an indispensable work.

40 review for Analyses Concerning Passive and Active Synthesis: Lectures on Transcendental Logic

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kira

    The idea is that if you want to show how all reasoning in empirical science is grounded in subjective acts that instantiate the forms of pure logic as norms ("transcendental logic") you have to show how the objects experienced in empirical science (and everyday life) come to be (partially) given in intuition. In other words, since logic, at the very least, describes relationships between apophantic forms (predications-- "X is Y"), and formal logic can be connected to the world we live in via mod The idea is that if you want to show how all reasoning in empirical science is grounded in subjective acts that instantiate the forms of pure logic as norms ("transcendental logic") you have to show how the objects experienced in empirical science (and everyday life) come to be (partially) given in intuition. In other words, since logic, at the very least, describes relationships between apophantic forms (predications-- "X is Y"), and formal logic can be connected to the world we live in via models or structures that give the formalism a semantics, a transcendental logic would have to show how logic becomes connected with the meanings we subjectively intend, without reducing the ideal logical forms themselves to any psychological or even phenomenological account of logical reasoning. It's like the phenomenological equivalent of giving a logical form or schema (a formula of the system) an interpretation, that allows the schema to be assigned a truth-value based on the way the world actually is. The big difference between transcendental and formal logic is that Husserl's idea of a transcendental logic demands more than just a formalism and a model. Transcendental logic, it seems to me (based on reading parts of this book and parts of Experience and Judgment) encompasses the epistemology and phenomenological constitution of the concepts, ideal types, and real objects that the predicates of formal logic ultimately depend upon for their truth-assignments. In other words, Husserl is interested in philosophy of language, the theory of mental/intentional content, the relationship between formal logic and metaphysics, and relationship between rationality and knowledge. So, while his interests overlap those of "analytic philosophy," he's kinda taking on the whole of metaphysics and epistemology at once, in search of foundations for the logical, scientific rationality par excellence. The above summary of what I take to be Husserl's larger project of "transcendental logic" doesn't nearly exhaust the possible motivations for reading this book, though. In fact, I think that people interested in Merleau-Ponty and the phenomenology of embodied perception, especially cognitive scientists, might find this book fascinating. I'm sure they already do, I just haven't met anyone who talked about this particular book in that context. Husserl's concept of passive synthesis is highly relevant to the current debate between philosophers supporting a 'concepts-all-the-way-down' account of perception and action, like McDowell, and those who take a more Heideggerian approach that divides perception/action into pre-conceptual 'coping' and action guided by conceptual representations.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    In proper context, reading Husserlian phenomenology is like coming up for air from deep dives in other programs of philosophy or psychology. Love him or hate him, the man just had a solid grasp of the description of experiential life from the inside out. What makes Husserl unique is his staunch abstinence of judgment beyond the judgment of...judgment? Assigning a language to the phenomenon of judgment? And all other subjective experience, or so that was his aim. It will be interesting to read so In proper context, reading Husserlian phenomenology is like coming up for air from deep dives in other programs of philosophy or psychology. Love him or hate him, the man just had a solid grasp of the description of experiential life from the inside out. What makes Husserl unique is his staunch abstinence of judgment beyond the judgment of...judgment? Assigning a language to the phenomenon of judgment? And all other subjective experience, or so that was his aim. It will be interesting to read some criticism of his platform, as is inevitable after any undertaking of a supposed first philosophy, a description of a venue encompassing all potential sciences. I like to use his material as an anchor when reading some other more presumptive or driving material. Husserl seems to have no aim apart from painting with language what happens when....things happen. Unnecessarily high brow, very useful.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shira

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mads

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Ryan

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hamid

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Lawrence

  9. 4 out of 5

    Osselaer Noemi

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michal Lipták

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rodger Broome

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Orr

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kem Crimmins

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hamed G.H

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Ware

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Dombrowski

  19. 5 out of 5

    Simon Vigneault

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam Cardoen

  21. 5 out of 5

    rotenotes

  22. 4 out of 5

    .

  23. 5 out of 5

    stephen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dana Miranda

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mycomplexconcept

  26. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Dunnington

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sinatonokaze

  29. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marc

  31. 5 out of 5

    Dee

  32. 4 out of 5

    Petlemay

  33. 4 out of 5

    Azor Ahai

  34. 4 out of 5

    Soren (Carnal Malefactor)

  35. 5 out of 5

    Matthew A LaPine

  36. 5 out of 5

    rotenotes

  37. 4 out of 5

    Ward

  38. 5 out of 5

    Ming

  39. 4 out of 5

    Pnina

  40. 5 out of 5

    Blake

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