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Ciało [Audiobook PL]

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Czwórka dwunastoletnich przyjaciół przypadkowo dowiaduje się, że w głębokim lesie leży ciało nieboszczyka - zaginionego chłopca. Chłopcy postanawiają udać się tam. Droga wiedzie przez gęstą puszczę. Podczas wędrówki chłopcy napotykają wiele trudności i muszą zmagać się ze swoimi problemami i lękami. Stawiają też czoła groźnej bandzie chuliganów. Wyprawa staje się dla chłop Czwórka dwunastoletnich przyjaciół przypadkowo dowiaduje się, że w głębokim lesie leży ciało nieboszczyka - zaginionego chłopca. Chłopcy postanawiają udać się tam. Droga wiedzie przez gęstą puszczę. Podczas wędrówki chłopcy napotykają wiele trudności i muszą zmagać się ze swoimi problemami i lękami. Stawiają też czoła groźnej bandzie chuliganów. Wyprawa staje się dla chłopców próbą siły ich charakterów, a także okazją by bliżej się poznać. Narratorem opowiadania jest jeden z chłopców - uczestników wyprawy. Jego to oczami widzimy tę historię.


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Czwórka dwunastoletnich przyjaciół przypadkowo dowiaduje się, że w głębokim lesie leży ciało nieboszczyka - zaginionego chłopca. Chłopcy postanawiają udać się tam. Droga wiedzie przez gęstą puszczę. Podczas wędrówki chłopcy napotykają wiele trudności i muszą zmagać się ze swoimi problemami i lękami. Stawiają też czoła groźnej bandzie chuliganów. Wyprawa staje się dla chłop Czwórka dwunastoletnich przyjaciół przypadkowo dowiaduje się, że w głębokim lesie leży ciało nieboszczyka - zaginionego chłopca. Chłopcy postanawiają udać się tam. Droga wiedzie przez gęstą puszczę. Podczas wędrówki chłopcy napotykają wiele trudności i muszą zmagać się ze swoimi problemami i lękami. Stawiają też czoła groźnej bandzie chuliganów. Wyprawa staje się dla chłopców próbą siły ich charakterów, a także okazją by bliżej się poznać. Narratorem opowiadania jest jeden z chłopców - uczestników wyprawy. Jego to oczami widzimy tę historię.

30 review for Ciało [Audiobook PL]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Muhtasin Oyshik

    The Body by Stephen King Such a wonderful story that we can relate to the characters' lives and their interaction with each other. Stephen King did a wonderful job of writing this book about characters in a way that made them seem completely genuine and authentic. The emotions that the author evoked were deep and the ending will have you pondering for a certain long time. Love isn’t soft, like those poets say. Love has teeth which bite and the wounds never close. Charming book. The Body by Stephen King Such a wonderful story that we can relate to the characters' lives and their interaction with each other. Stephen King did a wonderful job of writing this book about characters in a way that made them seem completely genuine and authentic. The emotions that the author evoked were deep and the ending will have you pondering for a certain long time. Love isn’t soft, like those poets say. Love has teeth which bite and the wounds never close. Charming book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nataliya

    For all of those who keep insisting that Stephen King is a literary equivalent of Big Mac and fries, writing in the comfortable confines of the frequently-despised 'genre' - please take a look at The Body: The Fall from Innocence, which is much more familiar to public in the quite faithful adaptation by Rob Reiner - 'Stand by Me'. It's not King's trademark horror; it is actually free of the constraints of any so-called 'genre'. It is a coming-of-age character-study novella set in 1960 Maine wher For all of those who keep insisting that Stephen King is a literary equivalent of Big Mac and fries, writing in the comfortable confines of the frequently-despised 'genre' - please take a look at The Body: The Fall from Innocence, which is much more familiar to public in the quite faithful adaptation by Rob Reiner - 'Stand by Me'. It's not King's trademark horror; it is actually free of the constraints of any so-called 'genre'. It is a coming-of-age character-study novella set in 1960 Maine where monsters are not hiding behind bushes but instead live in the hearts of people - the setting and themes at which King excels. This is a story of four boys on the brink of adolescence; the last moments of childhood told with occasional almost Bradbury-esque nostalgia but with the rose-tinted glasses mercilessly torn off. The blue-collar childhood in a small Maine town in 1960 is not a place of magic and wonder - these boys are no strangers to abandonment and abuse and prejudice. Hot-tempered and volatile Teddy Duchamp has been physically mutilated by his mentally ill father whom he still worships. Childish and not-too-bright Vern Tessio lives in fear of his brother. Gordie Lachance, whose adult writer self is telling us this story, is little but a stranger to his parents who never got over the death of his older brother. Smart and tough Chris Chambers, a kid from a family that supplies Castle Rock with alcoholics and juvenile delinquents, is being seriously abused by his father and is seen as a worthless and even dangerous person because of his family."Chris didn't talk much about his dad, but we all knew he hated him like poison. Chris was marked up every two weeks or so, bruises on his cheeks and neck or one eye swelled up and as colorful as a sunset, and once he came to school with a big clumsy bandage on the back of his head. Other times he never got to school at all. His mom would call him in sick because he was too lamed up to come in. Chris was smart, really smart, but he played truant a lot, and Mr. Halliburton, the town truant officer, was always showing up at Chris's house, driving his old black Chevrolet with the NO RIDERS sticker in the corner of the windshield. If Chris was being truant and Bertie (as we called him - always behind his back, of course) caught him, he would haul him back to school and see that Chris got detention for a week. But if Bertie found out that Chris was home because his father had beaten the shit out of him, Bertie just went away and didn't say boo to a cuckoo bird. It never occurred to me to question this set of priorities until about twenty years later."But childhood, even though not at all sheltered, still gives them something of a shield against the world - that sense of invulnerability that only the young children have, the love for adventure, and the protection of sincere and lighthearted friendship."Everything was there and around us. We knew exactly who we were and exactly where we were going. It was grand." But we meet them right at the time when they are about to leave the protection of childhood behind them, when in the miserably hot summer of 1960 they set out on a trip to find a body of a boy who disappeared in the woods - a trip that makes at least two of them go through quite significant emotional turmoil and reevaluate their priorities and see the strengthening of one friendship while the others fall apart as the realization sets in that there is more to friendship than just fun and leisure. This is a trip that uncovers both the steel and the vulnerability in the characters of Chris and Gordie, and shoves them from the haven of childhood into the world where things take work and sacrifice and pain, the world that is often cruel and cynical and unavoidable."But he said: "Your friends drag you down, Gordie. Don't you know that? [...] Your friends do. They're like drowning guys that are holding onto your legs. You can't save them. You can only drown with them." This is a scary realization when you are young - that your friends are not good for you. I remember getting that feeling at around twelve, the age the boys in this book are, and I remember how unsettling that realization was. At that time it feels like friendships are forever, and that things that connect you to other people are there to stay - and realizing how easy and even necessary it can be to break those bonds is quite unsettling. "You always know the truth, because when you cut yourself or someone else with it, there's always a bloody show." And some of this is present here - but on the other hand we are also treated to the strengthening of the true friendship between Gordie and Chris. Gordie, a kid who is emotionally neglected by his family, acutely feels the sincerity and kindness that Chris brings into the world, despite his 'tough' origins - Chris, the center of this ragtag group, is grown up beyond his years, and has some hard-earned wisdom for his twelve years of age, sprinkled with a bit of pain and bitterness but grounded in common sense."But it was only survival. We were clinging to each other in deep water. I've explained about Chris, I think; my reasons for clinging to him were less definable. His desire to get away from Castle Rock and out of the mill's shadow seemed to me to be my best part, and I could not just leave him to sink or swim on his own. If he had drowned, that part of me would have drowned with him, I think." I love the narrative voice of this story - the narration by a young but accomplished writer Gordon Lachance, bringing the perspective that the few decades that have passed since that summer of 1960 have given him - but yet conveying the feelings and the attitudes of a twelve-year-old boy who feels both resentment and love and experiences profound beauty and the low of human ugliness. There are lyrical parts and trademark-King unflinching gory parts, and social commentary without the slightest sugar-coating. The story is peppered in places with the stories written by older Gordon and full of reflections of the adult man reflecting on the important and defining experience of the end of his childhood. "The most important things are hardest to say, because words diminish them." It is a fascinating, engrossing read, the one that is well worth several hours of your time, even if you have never been a fan of King. 5 stars. ———— ———— Apparently my original review defaults to something attributed to “Robin Waterfield” instead of Stephen King. 🤷‍♀️ So reposting it here as apparently something weird happened between 2012 when it was written and now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Stephen King’s wonderful 1982 novella, which was transformed into the classic 1986 film, Stand By Me, four young boys to come of age over a weekend together. Set in 1960, the story takes place in the small town of Castle Rock, Maine, where twelve-year-old Gordie Lachance and his three friends are ready to set out to substantiate the rumours that the body of a missing boy has turned up near the next town. As the boys to begin their summer trek, they must come together to face winding train tracks Stephen King’s wonderful 1982 novella, which was transformed into the classic 1986 film, Stand By Me, four young boys to come of age over a weekend together. Set in 1960, the story takes place in the small town of Castle Rock, Maine, where twelve-year-old Gordie Lachance and his three friends are ready to set out to substantiate the rumours that the body of a missing boy has turned up near the next town. As the boys to begin their summer trek, they must come together to face winding train tracks, a brief dip in an interesting water hole, and a great deal of self-discovery. In a story that seeks to explore the innermost thoughts and feelings of these four, the reader can see that emotions run deep and that the ‘tough guy’ exteriors are only a pre-teen facade. King pulls the reader in from the outset in this well-paced piece, which shows just how amazing youth can be, when tempered with a little sobering maturity. Recommended for those who like King and his various writing styles. No need to be wary, for there is little gore, but enough language that some readers may want to look elsewhere. I always enjoy Stephen King pieces, as they keep me wondering where things will go in his circuitous writing style. There was a strict ban on my reading his novels when I was younger, for reasons I am not entirely sure I remember. My adult years have been spent catching up and I have come to see that King can be a little intense, but he has a great deal I thoroughly enjoy. King offers up a lighter novella here, allowing his characters to develop nicely without the excessive gore. Gordie Lachance is both the presumptive protagonist and the ‘author’ of this story, a flashback piece penned when he was much older. Lachance explores some of the sentiments of his own childhood, as well as honing his skills as a writer. Gordie offers up much development as it relates to his friends, giving the reader a more comprehensive approach to those who populate the story. Through a series of events that weave together into the larger story, King allows his characters to mature through their learning experiences. Keeping the reader engaged throughout this quick read, King shows just how strong his writing can be, close to four decades later. Kudos, Mr. King, for another wonderful piece of writing. I am happy to have stumbled upon this one and will admit that I have not seen Stand By Me in its entirety, which will soon change. Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ The premise is simple: “Do you guys wanna go see a dead body?” The end product is quite possibly the best coming-of-age story ever written. This is what the saying “boys will be boys” is about. It’s about going on an adventure, and saying swear words when out of your parents’ earshot, and trying a cigarette just so you can say you did, and standing up to bullies, and most of all it’s about friendship. Because really? “I never had a Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ The premise is simple: “Do you guys wanna go see a dead body?” The end product is quite possibly the best coming-of-age story ever written. This is what the saying “boys will be boys” is about. It’s about going on an adventure, and saying swear words when out of your parents’ earshot, and trying a cigarette just so you can say you did, and standing up to bullies, and most of all it’s about friendship. Because really? “I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, did you?” I decided to give this one a listen after forcing it on my oldest son in order to make sure he’s actually reading when he says he is. There’s a good chance he’ll choose to be contrary simply to hurt my feelings since even the most decent teenager is still pretty horrible. The good news is I was able to pull a double-whammy and make the youngest listen too on the way to and from his baseball tournament this weekend. He arrived a little late to the party when Gordy and the boys were getting ready to meet Milo Pressman and the notorious “Chopper” and was on the edge of his seat during the train dodge. He completely blew me away when he complained as I hit strategically hit pause at a certain point in the story so we could hear it in full the next morning. And what a morning we had! A total barf-o-rama full of cackling and full-blown guffaws. An obvious must for any Constant Reader and, as far as I’m concerned, anyone else as well. Truly an actual contender when it comes to the “like this or we can’t be friends” option. It’s that good. And the movie is one of the best book-to-screen translations in the history of filmmaking. Perfection. Endnote: This was my third audio book and I finally found a winner. Frank Muller’s voice was just like butter. The only thing that could have been better is if it would have been Richard Dreyfus doing the narrating : )

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brett C

    I really enjoyed this story. I've read other Stephen King short stories and I must confess: he has a way with words and storytelling. Sometimes human emotion is diluted by words and loses its effect. Stephen King however, delivers every time. The story was the inspiration for the 1987 film 'Stand By Me'. The story is a first-person narrative by the main character, Gordon LaChance. He is telling the story many years later as an adult. He reflects about himself and his three best friends during the I really enjoyed this story. I've read other Stephen King short stories and I must confess: he has a way with words and storytelling. Sometimes human emotion is diluted by words and loses its effect. Stephen King however, delivers every time. The story was the inspiration for the 1987 film 'Stand By Me'. The story is a first-person narrative by the main character, Gordon LaChance. He is telling the story many years later as an adult. He reflects about himself and his three best friends during the summer of 1960. The four 12-year-olds are going on a journey to see a dead body. During their journey they experience the full spectrum of human emotion and come out of the journey a little different, a little more mature. The readability and realism kept me engaged the entire time. I would highly recommend this alongside "Shawshank Redemption" because of the human element layered in the story. Stephen King is a great writer all around: horror and drama. Thanks!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    4.5 Stars I LOVE the movie Stand By Me. I don't know if its because its a great film(it is). Or if it's because I watched it around the same time, I watched movies like The Sandlot and My Girl. So in my mind I just equate them with summers in my childhood. I haven't watched Stand By Me in probably over 15years, it was probably around the same time I read this book for the first time. I remember not really liking the book back then. I think it was the combination of it being a non-horror Stephen K 4.5 Stars I LOVE the movie Stand By Me. I don't know if its because its a great film(it is). Or if it's because I watched it around the same time, I watched movies like The Sandlot and My Girl. So in my mind I just equate them with summers in my childhood. I haven't watched Stand By Me in probably over 15years, it was probably around the same time I read this book for the first time. I remember not really liking the book back then. I think it was the combination of it being a non-horror Stephen King book and/or because I loved the movie so much. This time around I loved this book the only thing stopping it from being a 5 star read is that its in my opinion too short. I want more. As an adult I read this book in a completely different way and I'm sure that I would view the movie differently now as well. The Body is about 4 friends who decide to go on a weekend "adventure" to find the rumored body of a kid who was hit by a train. It's Stephen King so know its gonna be a darker read but despite that morbid premise The Body is a story of friendships. The boys are around 12 years old and they've been inseparable for years but they can feel themselves growing apart. High School tends to do that. When I was a kid I hung out with about 6 girls and we just knew we would be friends forever but by sophomore year I was only still friends with 3 and as an adult I'm only friends with 1. Times change. In high school I found my tribe but I still have fond memories of my preteen "girl gang", even if I'm no longer friends with them. The Body is the perfect gateway drug to start reading Stephen King. Its not scary, its not gory(maybe a little bit gory), and it has a lot of heart.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    Amazing. I think King is at his best when he writes kids. Or more precisely when he writes about growing up. About leaving behind the innocent and carefree times of youth. I think that’s what first made me fall in love with his writing. Not that these kids had a particularly carefree youth. No, there are some struggles. But, you know, life is getting harder as you get older. Before it gets easier again. But nothing will ever be quite the same way as it had been when you were twelve years old and h Amazing. I think King is at his best when he writes kids. Or more precisely when he writes about growing up. About leaving behind the innocent and carefree times of youth. I think that’s what first made me fall in love with his writing. Not that these kids had a particularly carefree youth. No, there are some struggles. But, you know, life is getting harder as you get older. Before it gets easier again. But nothing will ever be quite the same way as it had been when you were twelve years old and had all your life in front of you. This is the well-known story of four kids going on a hike to find the dead body of a boy somewhere along a railway track. What they are really going to find is themselves, though. King wonderfully captures that sense of freedom and adventure, of wonder and boundless imagination. That time when everything seemed so much bigger, but also so much less complicated. Before at some point there’s this inevitable shift that you can sense just before it is about to happen. And then you can never go back. But sometimes, for a short moment, you feel like you almost could. There’s little horror in this story. But fear does play a role. Both the absence of fear in situations your adult self might shy away from instinctively, but also the presence of it in moments where it wouldn’t even be taken into consideration by your rational grown-up mind. The moments in which only a child will feel afraid, because only a child has the imagination for it. And then there is the very real fear that while you’re just about to go on your long journey and your life is lying in front of you, fresh and ready to be explored, a web of roads that may lead you anywhere, a succession of crossroads that present you with endless possibilities, that you might take a wrong turn somewhere and end up in a cul-de-sac. That fear of getting it wrong. But mostly this is a story about friendships, and how they won’t last forever. At least most of them don’t. And maybe that’s for the better. Because you have to become your own person. You have to change and grow and experience new things and meet new people. You have to live your life. But cherish the memories. Think back to those big adventures that you had when you were just a kid. Don’t forget your friends. You’ve been an important part of their lives as well. I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, did you? 5 stars Up next in my quest to read all the stories in the Castle Rock Cycle: Well, my list says Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. But I've already read that one and don't quite see the connection. So I guess it will be Uncle Otto's Truck.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    The Body may not be perfect, but it was for me. I grew up around kids like this. The story resonates with me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Literature & Lofi - Benjamin Blackmore

    "Some people drown, that’s all. It’s not fair, but it happens..." My god! I expected to be impressed by this charming novella, but I never expected to fall in love with this tale as much as I did. A group of four tight-knit friends border lining the beginning of their teenage years agree to journey out of town to look at a dead body. Stephen King captures the coming of age journey perfectly. We witness this adventure transform each individual so poignantly. Gone is the innocence and nativity to "Some people drown, that’s all. It’s not fair, but it happens..." My god! I expected to be impressed by this charming novella, but I never expected to fall in love with this tale as much as I did. A group of four tight-knit friends border lining the beginning of their teenage years agree to journey out of town to look at a dead body. Stephen King captures the coming of age journey perfectly. We witness this adventure transform each individual so poignantly. Gone is the innocence and nativity to be replaced with something new. A fresh perspective on life. One that is dancing around dark thoughts of the macabre, a realism distinguishing optimism and undeniable truth. I particularly enjoy how the journey reveals every character's flaw with the perpetual realization that inevitably everything comes to an end. "Friends come and go like waiters in a restaurant, did you ever notice that?" This is without a doubt the best exploration of friendship that I have seen in any piece of literature work. While perhaps not the best embodiment of friendship, we do exploration every single dynamic of how friendships work, how they thrive, and how they can drift apart. The antics our four characters get up are without a doubt relatable to any adult reminiscing on their teenage years. With the shadow of adulthood looming over them, we're truly indulged as to what specific moment made these boys become men. There are just so many running themes beautifully represented and packed cozily within the 179 pages. I particularly loved King's superb focus on social identities, reality versus idealism, and the pressures of adolescence to name a few. There are so many iconic scenes that will forever stick in my mind. Perhaps I should even mention a few refreshing lessons to take away from this story as well. There's something almost enlightening with this read and I am left descending a deep rabbit hole of nostalgia reflecting that everything has worked out exactly the way things should be. Final verdict: 9.5 out of 10

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was okay. I listened to it on audio, narrated by Frank Muller. I think this was my first time listening to him as a narrator, and I thought he was great. The story itself was nothing special. It was very classic Stephen King, a coming of age story for four boys in Castle Rock, Maine. I was reminded a lot of IT- not because anything in the book was all that scary, but just because the boys seemed like they were doing a lot of the same things. (Walking train tracks through the woods, battling This was okay. I listened to it on audio, narrated by Frank Muller. I think this was my first time listening to him as a narrator, and I thought he was great. The story itself was nothing special. It was very classic Stephen King, a coming of age story for four boys in Castle Rock, Maine. I was reminded a lot of IT- not because anything in the book was all that scary, but just because the boys seemed like they were doing a lot of the same things. (Walking train tracks through the woods, battling bullies, swimming, etc.) One of them is even a writer- which I believe one of the kids in IT grows up to be? The whole thing was so similar it just struck me as odd. Sure, King reuses a lot of the same themes, (set in Maine, writers, coming of age, kids as heroes, bullies, etc.) but nothing I've ever read from him made me go- gee, haven't I heard this story before? It just seemed lazy to me. The highlight, for me, was the stories we're given from the writer, Gordie. He has one about a man named Chico, that's autobiographical for him in a way, and I really enjoyed it. In the end, I'm not really sure what the point of The Body was. Kids go on a walk to find a body. That's pretty much it. Maybe I just couldn't relate. I know this was originally part of a collection, so I wouldn't rule the entire collection out- I just wouldn't bother re-reading this one.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J.C.

    I feel like I just watched an audio-only version of the film "Stand By Me". Which makes sense as this was the original story that inspired the movie. And its surprising how much the movie not only followed the original story, but captured much of its spirit. Certainly the King version is much more vulgar and up front, but the wonder of youth and the harsh reality of time is there, in the film. I've always wanted to read this. I've always been a huge fan of the film and was always curious as to K I feel like I just watched an audio-only version of the film "Stand By Me". Which makes sense as this was the original story that inspired the movie. And its surprising how much the movie not only followed the original story, but captured much of its spirit. Certainly the King version is much more vulgar and up front, but the wonder of youth and the harsh reality of time is there, in the film. I've always wanted to read this. I've always been a huge fan of the film and was always curious as to King's take on it. Much of King's material goes back to a group of kids, a pack, going through some kind of bizarre adventure. One only has to look at "It" and "Dreamcatcher" to see this. Both are very strong tales, some say his best (I've only read Dreamcatcher, FYI), and that is the same case here. The one thing I will say that seperates the tale from the film is the ending. It's much broader here, more real and more heart breaking. I wont spoil it beyond that point. But, even though I hate to see things turn out in such a fashion for those characters, it makes sense to me. I think it's logical given the theme of the story and I don't think it's harsh or cruel or out of context. If you enjoyed the movie or enjoy King's work this is another that I highly recommend.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Bea

    this was like a 2.5/3 for me. Sorry if you're really into it, lol. It had some really nice moments but otherwise I was kinda meh about it. Maybe if I had read a physical copy I would have had more of an emotional response to it. this was like a 2.5/3 for me. Sorry if you're really into it, lol. It had some really nice moments but otherwise I was kinda meh about it. Maybe if I had read a physical copy I would have had more of an emotional response to it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    The only other thing that I've ever read by Stephen King roughly the first 200 pages of Under The Dome. I gave up on it after I realized how vulgar the writing was. That was a while ago, and I have read many books since then, and my tastes have developed more. I decide to try out reading The Body because it was classified as young adult, and it might be less... The book was perfectly fine, It was almost similar to the Outsiders. It was just shy of 200 pages, and if it was any longer, I would hav The only other thing that I've ever read by Stephen King roughly the first 200 pages of Under The Dome. I gave up on it after I realized how vulgar the writing was. That was a while ago, and I have read many books since then, and my tastes have developed more. I decide to try out reading The Body because it was classified as young adult, and it might be less... The book was perfectly fine, It was almost similar to the Outsiders. It was just shy of 200 pages, and if it was any longer, I would have never entertained the idea of reading it. It was still a little graphic to be classified as young adult, but I suppose that is the best you will get with a Stephen King book. 3.5/5 stars. I may read something else by Stephen King, but it will not be anywhere in the foreseeable future.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    A Disappointing Read. Synopsis: Four boys hear about the location of a dead body in a forest that 40 miles away. Wanting to do something 'big' they decide to hike their way over there to find the body and lead the police to it, partially in the hopes of a little bit of fame. The novella also deals with the low prospects the kids face from growing up in a small factory town. Thoughts: By far and away my biggest issue with this novella was that I didn't care for the characters. Part of this is that A Disappointing Read. Synopsis: Four boys hear about the location of a dead body in a forest that 40 miles away. Wanting to do something 'big' they decide to hike their way over there to find the body and lead the police to it, partially in the hopes of a little bit of fame. The novella also deals with the low prospects the kids face from growing up in a small factory town. Thoughts: By far and away my biggest issue with this novella was that I didn't care for the characters. Part of this is that the novella feels a lot like a precursor to IT, and Gordon in particular feels like he's just a slight variation of Big Bill. I did feel pity for Chris and Teddy, though I couldn't tell you a single thing about Vern. The fact that it seemed so much like IT also effected my enjoyment of it, there were a lot of similarities here. Another issue I had with this is that it's supposed to deal with the low prospects of the kids but other than the last couple of chapters that sum up what happened to them later in life, there's really only one section that really deals with that concept. I was expecting it to be a bigger theme throughout so I was a bit surprised/disappointed by this. One of the most bizarre features of this novella was that it contains two short stories written by an older version of the protagonist and both were fairly unpleasant and seemingly unnecessary. The first is one part erotica, one part family drama. This one at least seemed to mirror some of the lives of the boys so I could kind of understand its inclusion, but the erotica part of it was still pretty unpleasant. The second one is about a pie eating contest that devolves into literally everyone throwing up. It was unpleasant to read and was seemingly irrelevant to the overall plot, it kind of felt like a riff on Carrie. The journey itself was quite compelling, but it kind of just boiled down to three or four interesting events split up by weird dreams, the short stories, or conversations between the characters so it didn't really feel like a cohesive narrative to me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kru

    Stephen King's books start very interestingly, keep the intrigue, turn irresistible until 60% and then feel dragging till 85%, which upon persevering turn out awesome to me, the reason I prefer his novellas and short stories. The Body was the same, and did not remind me of other works of King, except for the Cujo reference. (This relating-to-other-works-of-the-author is somewhat reducing the magic of the current read, since it strays into everything and leaves no room to get into the magic... for Stephen King's books start very interestingly, keep the intrigue, turn irresistible until 60% and then feel dragging till 85%, which upon persevering turn out awesome to me, the reason I prefer his novellas and short stories. The Body was the same, and did not remind me of other works of King, except for the Cujo reference. (This relating-to-other-works-of-the-author is somewhat reducing the magic of the current read, since it strays into everything and leaves no room to get into the magic... for me!) A bildungsroman, with a group of 4 young adolescents, coming from a small town, and each with a pitiable back story, King explores fear and strength, friendship and masculinity, with horror as lavishly as possible in this novella. Times I feel these are better read than watched as movies, since they leave the reader more thoughtful.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, did you? Stephen King never disappoints. Even though this is a short story, I felt like I knew the characters just as well as I would have in one of King's novels, and better than some characters in other authors' novels. At the heart of this novella lies a story of youth. A story that can only occur when one is a child. A story that can never be relived. There is an adventurous sense of wonder within the pages of this I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, did you? Stephen King never disappoints. Even though this is a short story, I felt like I knew the characters just as well as I would have in one of King's novels, and better than some characters in other authors' novels. At the heart of this novella lies a story of youth. A story that can only occur when one is a child. A story that can never be relived. There is an adventurous sense of wonder within the pages of this book, and it is one that no adult can ever achieve naturally. Only four kids would get bored one day and ask, "You guys wanna see a dead body?" This is a tale of friendship, innocence, heartbreak, and reality. It is not one to be missed.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Diego Sanchez

    Once again with King. I was not expecting something from this book, since I watched the film long time ago and I don’t even remember it at all, so that made me feel like I was introduced to a completely new story: The good: - The friendship. All the characters have their own struggles, but they help each other that the club seems more like a family. I really enjoyed the fact that we get the description of their lives, so you just don’t get a bunch of students solving a mystery but a group of frien Once again with King. I was not expecting something from this book, since I watched the film long time ago and I don’t even remember it at all, so that made me feel like I was introduced to a completely new story: The good: - The friendship. All the characters have their own struggles, but they help each other that the club seems more like a family. I really enjoyed the fact that we get the description of their lives, so you just don’t get a bunch of students solving a mystery but a group of friends who try their best to be something. - The dog scene. There is a particular scene where I totally lost my mind. It is related with a dog and I think this one stands the most from the book. - The parents. By no means I am saying the parents are good parents but, as King usually do, you get to hate some of them because is just unbelievable what they do to the family. - The mystery. A dead body that hasn’t been found yet and even though that’s what creates this story, you will get to find more secret things. - The ending. I was expecting to get my doubts clear, but I got more that I was not expecting. Not good, not bad: - I did not find something bad about the book, but I am just curious on how a bunch of kids with no means are better than the police sometimes. - I don’t think this is a pure horror story because it talks more about life and friendship. - Do not compare this friendship with “It” because we are reading something different.

  18. 4 out of 5

    lyss

    Being such a huge fan of the movie adaptation (I literally used to restart the movie over and over again as soon as it ended), I just had to see what the story would be like. The adaptation stays very true to the original story, and I especially appreciated that when it came to the dialogue. Getting to read the words and hearing the kids in the movie say them in my head was awesome. The story was full of so much detail for a short story, I felt like a read a full length, 300 paged book. I love t Being such a huge fan of the movie adaptation (I literally used to restart the movie over and over again as soon as it ended), I just had to see what the story would be like. The adaptation stays very true to the original story, and I especially appreciated that when it came to the dialogue. Getting to read the words and hearing the kids in the movie say them in my head was awesome. The story was full of so much detail for a short story, I felt like a read a full length, 300 paged book. I love the story, the adventure, and the characters especially.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    I love this story. I have read it many times, but this was my first listen and also the first time I've had the pleasure of listening to a Frank Muller audiobook. This was a masterful reading, and I'm looking forward to taking in much of Stephen King's catalog in the future as Frank Muller readings. I love this story. I have read it many times, but this was my first listen and also the first time I've had the pleasure of listening to a Frank Muller audiobook. This was a masterful reading, and I'm looking forward to taking in much of Stephen King's catalog in the future as Frank Muller readings.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eddie Generous

    Audio revisit. So damned good. Vibrant and full of heart and soul. Best coming of age story I've ever read. Frank Muller did a great job narrating, too. Audio revisit. So damned good. Vibrant and full of heart and soul. Best coming of age story I've ever read. Frank Muller did a great job narrating, too.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott Semegran

    This is the third time I’ve read this novella and my love for it has not diminished one bit. But for this review, I wanted to take a closer look at the structure of the story and try to discover why I love it. Structurally, this novella is flawed. There are some things about it that I do not like at all and detract from the overall plot and narrative. But even with its flaws, it is an amazing story with literary flourishes and fully-formed characters. It has a touch of nostalgia and reveals an e This is the third time I’ve read this novella and my love for it has not diminished one bit. But for this review, I wanted to take a closer look at the structure of the story and try to discover why I love it. Structurally, this novella is flawed. There are some things about it that I do not like at all and detract from the overall plot and narrative. But even with its flaws, it is an amazing story with literary flourishes and fully-formed characters. It has a touch of nostalgia and reveals an endearing remembrance of a friendship whose power is not diminished over time. It’s an affecting depiction of the power of friendship. “The most important things are the hardest things to say…” is the mantra of this story. Stephen King repeats this mantra a few times, even parses it at one point, then admits to the irony of an author declaring that words diminish the important things in our lives. Here’s the brief book description: It’s 1960 in the fictional town of Castle Rock, Maine. Ray Brower, a boy from a nearby town, has disappeared, and twelve-year-old Gordie Lachance and his three friends set out on a quest to find his body along the railroad tracks. During the course of their journey, Gordie, Chris Chambers, Teddy Duchamp, and Vern Tessio come to terms with death and the harsh truths of growing up in a small factory town that doesn’t offer much in the way of a future. This novella is the basis for the classic movie Stand by Me. King shows great descriptive flair and the dialogue is snappy and true to life. Gordie (the narrator and one of the boys as an adult) is likeable and an effective storyteller who reveals the goodness beneath the hard exterior that is beginning to form during this formidable time in their lives. The story is both an adventure and a coming-of-age tale with a bit of mystery. We, the readers, never find out how or why exactly Ray Brower is killed, neither at the time or in hindsight. But the initial spookiness of his death and the morbid desire of the boys to see his body eventually turns into a meditation on life, what Ray Brower will be missing, and what the four friends unintentionally have to look forward to in their own lives. The connection between the four friends is palpable, particularly between Gordie and Chris. They eventually find the wherewithal to do better in school so they can escape the oppressive blue-collar life of the town of Castle Rock. And the connection they have begins with this adventure to find Ray Brower. Structurally, I feel the novella fails in a couple of areas. First, two short stories are included—in full—within the novella that are examples of what Gordie publishes as an adult when he becomes a professional writer. Unfortunately, they do not add anything to the story of the four, young friends; and the "pie eating contest" could have more effectively been told by young Gordie as a campfire tale within the main narrative. Second, the ending is a letdown. It feels—to me—like King didn’t know what to do with a story like this, as it was way outside of his wheelhouse at the time of its original publication. The morbid Ch 33 and deflated Ch 34 (the last two chapters) seem as if King decided to “right the ship” and steer the plot to an ending that would ultimately satisfy his horror-loving readership, rather than find meaning in the things he was exploring in this story: friendship, camaraderie, and many of the important things in one’s life. “The most important things are the hardest things to say…” And as we are reminded of this time and time again in the story, King chose not to say them, or even to try to attempt to say what he really wanted to say. A period of great friendship in a person’s life can have a lasting effect, one that resonates long after the friendship is over, as is evident in a story like this. In the end, King was and still is known as a horror writer, and there was no way he was going to end this story on a positive note. But again, even with these flaws, I love this story and novella. The friendship between the boys is the heart of the story and I love their adventure and the way they lookout (mostly) for each other. I love that an adventure like this can be known only to its principal actors, as no one in Castle Rock was aware of what they did during their time looking for Ray Brower, and it’s a secret we share with the boys. And I love being reminded that any preconceptions you can have about a writer can be shattered with a curveball like this. King summarizes the story best at the end of Ch 11. “I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was twelve. Jesus, did you?” Now that is the true conclusion of this wonderful novella.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    Engaging wonderful experience watching and listening to some twelve-year-old boys. But the ending was a downer. This novella was first published in the anthology “Different Seasons.” It is available individually as an audiobook, which is how I heard/read it. This review is solely for The Body, not the others in the anthology. The Body was also made into the movie “Stand By Me.” This is a novella, but it didn’t feel like a short story. The characters were wonderfully developed. I was frequently smi Engaging wonderful experience watching and listening to some twelve-year-old boys. But the ending was a downer. This novella was first published in the anthology “Different Seasons.” It is available individually as an audiobook, which is how I heard/read it. This review is solely for The Body, not the others in the anthology. The Body was also made into the movie “Stand By Me.” This is a novella, but it didn’t feel like a short story. The characters were wonderfully developed. I was frequently smiling as I listened to these four twelve-year-old boys hanging out and taking a sixteen hour walk. This book is alive. You feel like you’re right there with them. I loved the dialogue. Things they liked they called “boss.” No one wanted to be a pu*** (wimp). They did stupid things. They did heroic things (that also were stupid). They were brave. They cried. They were loyal to each other. One of them was slow mentally. All of them came from troubled homes. Gordon’s parents weren’t physically abusive, but they were emotionally gone. Chris’ alcoholic father beat him frequently and severely. The abuse parts were not the main story, but it’s behind things. The best part was the kids’ friendship, interaction, and doing things together. Some events were a cheating grocery store owner, a junkyard dog and his owner, crossing a railroad trestle, swimming in a pond, and a pie eating contest. The only reason I did not give this 5 stars was because the ending was depressing in two ways. Something bad happened to the boys at the end of their journey, although they survived. The second was Gordon ends up having a good life as an adult, but the other three don’t. What happened to one of them was depressing. I was walking around in a funk. I want to be entertained and feel good, which I was during most of the book, but the ending took me down. I was reminded of a comment in another S. King book “God doesn’t care.” But, I’m still glad I read it. Note on stupidity. I frequently dislike characters doing stupid things for the sake of the plot - when the stupidity does not fit the character - for example an intelligent adult. That does not apply here. The kids’ stupidity fits them and is natural. And it’s funny. (view spoiler)[Chris was innately smart but frequently missed school, never applied himself, and was a poor student in grades 1 to 7. Starting in 8th grade, he decides to apply himself to go to college to have a life. His father continues beating him and is against it. The teachers don’t like him and resent his presence. He has a lot of catching up to do since he didn’t learn English and Math the way he should have during the first seven years of school. But he stays with it against all these odds, and he does it. He ends up going to college. What a heroic thing. I was proud of him. I wish the author would have stayed with that and given me a happy ending for Chris. Instead the author slams us with another of life’s unfortunate events - God doesn’t care. (hide spoiler)] The narrator Frank Muller was excellent - as always. DATA: Narrative mode: 1st person Gordon. Unabridged audiobook reading time: 5 hrs and 50 mins. Swearing language: strong. Sexual content: one sex scene referred to, no details shown. Setting: 1960 Castle Rock, Maine. Book copyright: 1982. Genre: relationships fiction, friendship. Ending: Happy for one, depressing for others. OTHER BOOKS: For a list of my reviews of other Stephen King books, see my 5 star review of Carrie. http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

  23. 4 out of 5

    J.D.

    Summary: The story behind the 1986 movie: Stand By Me Gordie retells a story from his youth about going to see a dead body with his 3 best friends at the time. On their journey, the four boys must go through a few challenges, some scary ordeals and certain moments that will change their lives forever. Personal opinion: This story was completely new to me as I have not seen the movie. I'm happy that I got the chance to read the book first as they usually tell a lot more details you just can't get fr Summary: The story behind the 1986 movie: Stand By Me Gordie retells a story from his youth about going to see a dead body with his 3 best friends at the time. On their journey, the four boys must go through a few challenges, some scary ordeals and certain moments that will change their lives forever. Personal opinion: This story was completely new to me as I have not seen the movie. I'm happy that I got the chance to read the book first as they usually tell a lot more details you just can't get from watching the film. In the typical Stephen King fashion, this emotional coming of age story was well written with great characters and told with even greater detail. I would definitely recommend as a good and emotional short read for Stephen King fans.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sara Salehi

    Chasing bodies? Morbid adventures? This book takes the experiences of adolescence to a whole new level. And if there's one thing Stephen King knows to do well, it's showing camaraderie between a group of people, and in this case, a group of teenagers. I saw the film adaptation, Stand By Me, ages ago. But I can vaguely recall the scenes, and all I can remember was an adventure that was beyond my imagination. The book is much more gruesome, and it discusses the many ways people try to survive in d Chasing bodies? Morbid adventures? This book takes the experiences of adolescence to a whole new level. And if there's one thing Stephen King knows to do well, it's showing camaraderie between a group of people, and in this case, a group of teenagers. I saw the film adaptation, Stand By Me, ages ago. But I can vaguely recall the scenes, and all I can remember was an adventure that was beyond my imagination. The book is much more gruesome, and it discusses the many ways people try to survive in dreadful situations. King also connects to his other books such as The Shawshank Redemption, and maybe a hint of Cujo. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this book as it was perfect for the spooky season, and I hope to read the rest of the novellas in Different Seasons. Final rating: 3.5/5

  25. 5 out of 5

    Crys

    It's funny, sometimes, how you can build an impression of an author early in your life and then, based on that impression, avoid their books. I always thought that SK's books were too scary, too gory, too dark for me to enjoy so I never bothered with them. However, over the last year or so, I've started reading his novellas and his newer releases. I'm never disappointed. This book is no exception. I remember the movie Stand By Me well, and the book is even better with an ending that left me so s It's funny, sometimes, how you can build an impression of an author early in your life and then, based on that impression, avoid their books. I always thought that SK's books were too scary, too gory, too dark for me to enjoy so I never bothered with them. However, over the last year or so, I've started reading his novellas and his newer releases. I'm never disappointed. This book is no exception. I remember the movie Stand By Me well, and the book is even better with an ending that left me so sad as I finished listening to the audiobook early this morning.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    **** Review to come. ****

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lacey

    This was one of my fave movies, and I also loved the book!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina

    One of the best King stories :)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Perry

    You know what’s hard? We change, and as we do we leave behind a trail of once-loves and old passions. For years King was my favorite author, bar none. Now someone else holds the crown. And I think it’s time to finally admit to myself that I have reached full Stephen King Burnout. I just haven’t been as interested in reading his stuff in a long time now. In the last two years, I’ve read two novellas by him--Gwendy’s Button Box and this one, The Body. That’s it. And while I rated Gwendy 4 stars, it You know what’s hard? We change, and as we do we leave behind a trail of once-loves and old passions. For years King was my favorite author, bar none. Now someone else holds the crown. And I think it’s time to finally admit to myself that I have reached full Stephen King Burnout. I just haven’t been as interested in reading his stuff in a long time now. In the last two years, I’ve read two novellas by him--Gwendy’s Button Box and this one, The Body. That’s it. And while I rated Gwendy 4 stars, it hasn’t aged well in my head. This one never even got that far, although if I’d read it 3-4 years ago it would have been a 5-star read, possibly even a spot on the favorites shelf. Objectively I think it’s a good story, but I couldn’t love it as much as I wanted. The Burnout has me seeing the flaws more prominently—the over-writing, one-dimensional bullies, etc. It sucks, because I can still see the good mixed in there too. And he still has a place in my heart (and On Writing is still my favorite book of all time). However, I think it is time for this Constant Reader to take a break. 3/5 (No, I haven’t seen the movie.)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gillian Mann

    This is so different from the normal Stephen King I am used to. I so accustomed to diving headfirst into horror and gore, but with this novel, I was delighted to read about four misfit kids. Reading about how these four learn about friendship, family, and reputations was a different twist on the coming of age. I thought that this had a new-ish twist on how people learn about the real meaning of life and death and how to cope with large unpredictable events that will arise in your life. I gave th This is so different from the normal Stephen King I am used to. I so accustomed to diving headfirst into horror and gore, but with this novel, I was delighted to read about four misfit kids. Reading about how these four learn about friendship, family, and reputations was a different twist on the coming of age. I thought that this had a new-ish twist on how people learn about the real meaning of life and death and how to cope with large unpredictable events that will arise in your life. I gave this short story a 5-star rating for a number of reasons. I have always loved the ways in which King ties in mentions of other novels of his. I thought that this was a story that so many people can relate to. I love how even though this is a short story, King does an amazing job of fully developing the characters, which I think is something that a lot of other authors have a hard time doing in a short amount of pages.

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