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Science Comics: Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield

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In PLAGUES, we get to know the critters behind history's worst diseases. We delve into the biology and mechanisms of infections, diseases, and immunity, and also the incredible effect that technology and medical science have had on humanity's ability to contain and treat disease. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, In PLAGUES, we get to know the critters behind history's worst diseases. We delve into the biology and mechanisms of infections, diseases, and immunity, and also the incredible effect that technology and medical science have had on humanity's ability to contain and treat disease. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!


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In PLAGUES, we get to know the critters behind history's worst diseases. We delve into the biology and mechanisms of infections, diseases, and immunity, and also the incredible effect that technology and medical science have had on humanity's ability to contain and treat disease. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, In PLAGUES, we get to know the critters behind history's worst diseases. We delve into the biology and mechanisms of infections, diseases, and immunity, and also the incredible effect that technology and medical science have had on humanity's ability to contain and treat disease. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic--dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!

30 review for Science Comics: Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield

  1. 5 out of 5

    First Second Books

    In this volume we get to know the critters behind history's worst diseases. We delve into the biology and mechanisms of infections, diseases, and immunity, and also the incredible effect that technology and medical science have had on humanity's ability to contain and treat disease.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    This one was kind of gross, but I still liked it because it was informative and the story was interesting. Basically, wash your hands, take care of yourself better, and vaccinate your kids! UPDATE: Maybe people should read this book during COVID-19. It's for kids, but explains viruses in a simple and fun way.

  3. 4 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Science Comics: Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield Science Comics By Falynn Christine Koch ISBN: 9781626727526 Authors Website: http://www.falynnk.com/ Brought to you by OBS reviewer Andra Summary In PLAGUES, we get to know the critters behind historys worst diseases. We delve into the biology and mechanisms of infections, diseases, and immunity, and also the incredible effect that technology and medical science have had on humanitys ability to contain and http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Science Comics: Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield Science Comics By Falynn Christine Koch ISBN: 9781626727526 Author’s Website: http://www.falynnk.com/ Brought to you by OBS reviewer Andra Summary In PLAGUES, we get to know the critters behind history’s worst diseases. We delve into the biology and mechanisms of infections, diseases, and immunity, and also the incredible effect that technology and medical science have had on humanity’s ability to contain and treat disease. Review This is my first foray into graphic novels. SCIENCE COMICS: PLAGUES is a journey through history describing the how’s of infections, diseases and our immunity. Entertaining in such a way that I was also able to follow the educational aspect without getting bored or confused. Bubonic Plague and Yellow Fever are dropped into a host (so they believe) and promptly begin their attach on the body. As they proceed (unsuccessfully I might add) they are quickly interrupted by a white blood cell. Given that the white blood cell is there to fight off infection and disease, the depiction of the white blood cell is fitting – the cartoon character looks like a linebacker. Humour is sprinkled throughout the dialogue…for example, when the white blood cell is describing both bubonic plague and yellow fever to Elena during a bit of a scuffle he says – “They have the critical thinking power of Jello”. The artwork is cartoony with the characters drawn with simplicity yet with just enough detail, capturing the individuality of each of the characters/diseases: I appreciated the glossary at the end of the book providing a concise and easily understood definitions of what was discussed throughout the book, with pictures. Good for visual learners. With the author presenting complex scientific concepts by using illustrations and humour, I was able to understand the concepts more easily and hopefully I will be able retain this information for a long period of time ☺. I would like to think that if I had had this book available when studying these concepts in school, I would have understood and enjoyed the learning even more than I did. This book is for anyone who wishes to learn about plagues, infections, diseases in an entertaining and educational manner and enjoys comic books. *OBS would like to thank the publisher for supplying a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  4. 5 out of 5

    Raegynn M.

    This book was very interesting to read. I am not the type of person who is so much into bacteria and cells, but this book made it fun and I really liked how it pertained to the different plagues they talked about. I would recommend this book to someone who is interested in science and the difference between some types of plagues.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Romaly Butler

    Biology and comics. What more could you want in life. Love

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield by Falynn Christine Koch is part of the SCIENCE COMICS series, a graphics series of books each of which explores a single scientific topic. In this case, as the title might indicate, its plague, but more broadly its an examination of how pathogens (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, parasites) infect and damage the human body, how the body (sometimes with medical help) tries to fight them off, and, to a lesser degree, how such illnesses have affected human Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield by Falynn Christine Koch is part of the SCIENCE COMICS series, a graphics series of books each of which explores a single scientific topic. In this case, as the title might indicate, its plague, but more broadly it’s an examination of how pathogens (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, parasites) infect and damage the human body, how the body (sometimes with medical help) tries to fight them off, and, to a lesser degree, how such illnesses have affected human history. Plagues begins a bit roughly. The frame story is an unnecessarily confusing bit involving conversations inside a virtual body (that somehow still gets sick from virtual germs?) between the scientist whose virtual body it is, a T-cell, and two plagues—yellow fever and bubonic plague. The plagues are just as confused as most readers probably will be, but while the frame story still is an obstacle to clarity and fluidity now and then, once it’s mostly left behind the text becomes more expository and straightforward, and thus more clear, with the scientist explaining how medicine has progressed with regard to germs, the T-cell explaining the immune system responses, and the germ explaining how they attack the body and their various types and shapes. The language might at times be a bit much for the very young, but YA will be fine and MG will get either all or the vast majority of what is being said. There’s also a helpful glossary toward the end. Stylistically, it’s pretty text heavy and, as noted, straightforward. The attempts at conversational tone or humor I didn’t find all that successful (at times I might even call it detrimental), and I wouldn’t call it the most engaging text, but it is certainly informative and, for the most part, clear and logical. In particular I liked the historical bits, as when the virtual simulation becomes a medieval street for instance to show how the lack of sanitation aided the pathogens. The art is not particularly aesthetic (of course, these are germs), and in the muddled frame story not very helpful, but similar to the narrative, once the frame is somewhat dropped and the artist is able to broaden the palette so to speak, the artwork becomes more clear and does a nice job of conveying meaning or supplementing the text. The medieval street is one such example. An even better one is the drawing of a medieval plague doctor in a large panel as it’s being explained how their “uniform” actually protected them from the plague, though the doctors themselves thought that to be the case for all the wrong reasons. I would have preferred a smoother, more clear entry into the exploration of the topic, and it’s too bad that the book somewhat fights against itself in terms of clarity and engagement early on, but if one can get a reader past that point, then Plagues is a nice detailed and informative text to introduce young readers to the topic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maximilian Lee

    I LOVED this book because it was very Very VERY informative. It had TONS of information in it. It was about plagues. In this book someone made an AI thing that can simulate anything even yourself! If something happens in the simulation, it happens in your body. A woman was trying to convince plagues to become antibiotics. Along the way the plagues told the woman facts about themselves.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Koch, Falynn Science Comics: Plagues: the Microscopic Battlefield, 122 pages. NON-FICTION/GRAPHIC NOVEL. First Second, 2017. $13. A female scientist and her ECHO team have created technology that allows them to speak to germs, bacteria, viruses, ect. They created a simulated environment which allows them to learn about the immune system and how the bubonic plague and the Yellow fever plague interact. Together with a T cell and a variety of guests the reader learns the ins and outs of the immune Koch, Falynn Science Comics: Plagues: the Microscopic Battlefield, 122 pages. NON-FICTION/GRAPHIC NOVEL. First Second, 2017. $13. A female scientist and her ECHO team have created technology that allows them to speak to germs, bacteria, viruses, ect. They created a simulated environment which allows them to learn about the immune system and how the bubonic plague and the Yellow fever plague interact. Together with a T cell and a variety of guests –the reader learns the in’s and out’s of the immune system and a whole lot about the history of plagues. This isn’t the first book from the Science comics series I have reviewed but by far the most interesting topic –and I am still not a fan. It reads like a textbook that someone tried to inject some fun into. It got technical and confusing very quickly, the only parts I enjoyed were the historical components –I don’t think young readers will stick with it long enough to make it that far. The illustrations are busy and often small. EL, MS – OPTIONAL Stephanie, Elementary School Librarian & Author https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2018...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Although this graphic novel was published in 2017, it seems particularly relevant these days during the COVID-19 crisis and the current pandemic. The book highlights the body's immune system and provides some historical context on various epidemics and diseases, discussing malaria, small pox, yellow fever, and the bubonic plague as well as sources of contagion. Featuring Elena, an epidemologist in the future, the pages follow her efforts to understand these plagues and to recruit Yellow Fever Although this graphic novel was published in 2017, it seems particularly relevant these days during the COVID-19 crisis and the current pandemic. The book highlights the body's immune system and provides some historical context on various epidemics and diseases, discussing malaria, small pox, yellow fever, and the bubonic plague as well as sources of contagion. Featuring Elena, an epidemologist in the future, the pages follow her efforts to understand these plagues and to recruit Yellow Fever and Bubonic Plague to join her team. As is the case with all the books in this particular series, there are colorful illustrations and an interesting story line as well as snippets of history and science that are provided in an easy-to-digest and sometimes humorous fashion. Maybe some young reader will be inspired by this book to get involved in future efforts to combat the viruses that will surely assail humanity. I always find it interesting to consider how certain diseases that once plagued our world no longer have much relevance while other, new plagues arise. Science is ever fascinating. Add this one to your science classroom library.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Science Comics are my new favorite series. This one was as gross as it was informative (even in illustrated form, you might need a strong stomach to get through this one!) It followed the history mostly of bubonic plague and yellow fever, but dabbled in all manner of bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi - explaining how they make us sick, how they spread, and how science can contain them. I didn't expect it to be funny but there were many laugh-out-loud moments - like when one poor guy gets all Science Comics are my new favorite series. This one was as gross as it was informative (even in illustrated form, you might need a strong stomach to get through this one!) It followed the history mostly of bubonic plague and yellow fever, but dabbled in all manner of bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi - explaining how they make us sick, how they spread, and how science can contain them. I didn't expect it to be funny but there were many laugh-out-loud moments - like when one poor guy gets all three types of plague and states "I don't look so good..." or when the yellow fever character "boops" a rat on the nose! Also just the fact that throughout, the Yellow Fever character refers to the Bubonic Plague character as "Bub" hahaha. Loved it!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christina Pilkington

    Well, little did I know when my kids and I were reading this book how much it would relate to our personal life in less than a month! In our homeschooling, we had been doing an in-depth study of the Black Plague- the science of plagues, the history and economic devastation that occurred and the social upheaval that took place. This comic book impressed me with its detail and thorough explanation of viruses and plagues. But it also showed what scientists are currently working on to help the Well, little did I know when my kids and I were reading this book how much it would relate to our personal life in less than a month! In our homeschooling, we had been doing an in-depth study of the Black Plague- the science of plagues, the history and economic devastation that occurred and the social upheaval that took place. This comic book impressed me with its detail and thorough explanation of viruses and plagues. But it also showed what scientists are currently working on to help the spread of plague in the future. With the corona virus now infecting the entire world, my kid and I have a more thorough knowledge of how viruses spread and can look at examples from history to see how we might learn from the past.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    While I like the series SCIENCE COMICS I thought "The Microscopic Battlefield" was a little tough to follow. The science was complex enough with so many strains of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and flagella to keep track of, but the authors wanted us to follow the story of the scientists who use simulations to study them. I found the banter between humans and microbes a bit distracting, but learning about Bubonic plagues and Yellow Fever were fascinating. I kept wondering who the intended audience While I like the series SCIENCE COMICS I thought "The Microscopic Battlefield" was a little tough to follow. The science was complex enough with so many strains of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and flagella to keep track of, but the authors wanted us to follow the story of the scientists who use simulations to study them. I found the banter between humans and microbes a bit distracting, but learning about Bubonic plagues and Yellow Fever were fascinating. I kept wondering who the intended audience was-older students might follow the science but the design and illustrations looks like it was addressing younger readers. Still, I think there is a lot for students to take away from this and enjoy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    I'm a big fan of the Science Comics series, but this entry is undercooked (there's a better, illness-related joke there, but I just can't think of it at the moment). The framing device revolves around a scientist who has recruited anthropomorphized versions of the black plague and yellow fever to be cadets in a disease-fighting force. Shoehorned into a lot of weird conversations between germs and humans are various facts about bacteria, viruses, and other assorted tiny nasties. That part of the I'm a big fan of the Science Comics series, but this entry is undercooked (there's a better, illness-related joke there, but I just can't think of it at the moment). The framing device revolves around a scientist who has recruited anthropomorphized versions of the black plague and yellow fever to be cadets in a disease-fighting force. Shoehorned into a lot of weird conversations between germs and humans are various facts about bacteria, viruses, and other assorted tiny nasties. That part of the book is fascinating, but any time we return to the framing story, all momentum and interest is lost.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stacey M

    I really enjoyed this graphic novel. The set up for this book was very interesting and would be an excellent book for students to read. It really goes into the science of plagues and germs and the different types or microorganisms. It also explores some of the newer science and where we may be going and how humans relationships with disease has and keeps changing. If you have a kid who loves science this series is something you need to look into. I did recieve a copy of this graphic novel from I really enjoyed this graphic novel. The set up for this book was very interesting and would be an excellent book for students to read. It really goes into the science of plagues and germs and the different types or microorganisms. It also explores some of the newer science and where we may be going and how humans relationships with disease has and keeps changing. If you have a kid who loves science this series is something you need to look into. I did recieve a copy of this graphic novel from Net Galley in exchange for a review. This book is scheduled to be published August 29th.

  15. 4 out of 5

    emyrose8

    I have mixed feelings about this book. First, the illustrations are great, eye-catching and the characters have been developed in an interesting way. However, the text is very science heavy, which is good, except the average reader will likely have a hard time focusing and absorbing what is actually being talked about. There isn't much of a plot for the first half of the book (as far as I could tell), which made it hard for me to get into the book. I did learn some new things though, and it I have mixed feelings about this book. First, the illustrations are great, eye-catching and the characters have been developed in an interesting way. However, the text is very science heavy, which is good, except the average reader will likely have a hard time focusing and absorbing what is actually being talked about. There isn't much of a plot for the first half of the book (as far as I could tell), which made it hard for me to get into the book. I did learn some new things though, and it grabbed my attention more as the book went on (talking about the history of some diseases).

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jes

    This is an interesting way to disseminate information about not just how your immune system reacts to germs, but the history and methods in which we used to study germs have evolved. The content was a teeny bit dry for the younger crowd, but alas I am almost 30 so I finished this book in a day. Good, solid info, entertaining and easy to understand. I recommend this to budding nonfiction nerds, graphic novel enthusiasts who need some help with cell structure, and people who like to learn about This is an interesting way to disseminate information about not just how your immune system reacts to germs, but the history and methods in which we used to study germs have evolved. The content was a teeny bit dry for the younger crowd, but alas I am almost 30 so I finished this book in a day. Good, solid info, entertaining and easy to understand. I recommend this to budding nonfiction nerds, graphic novel enthusiasts who need some help with cell structure, and people who like to learn about body systems in general.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liza

    Hi everyone! I'm working for a Russian website Papmambook.ru dedicated to children's books and children's reading. We've been building the English version of the website and recently published an article on Plagues: The Microscopic Battlefield. The author read the book with her young son and talks about what they were able to learn from it. Here's the link if you want to check it out.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eme87

    Fantastic graphic novel describing how viruses and bacteria function. Delves both in to the science of plagues and how they spread as well as the history and how vaccines and inoculations were developed to fight them. I enjoyed the process of the scientist talking to the germs to enlist them in helping to fight other diseases as that is what many labs are doing- albeit not in quite the futuristic way they are presenting. Very enjoyable and informative! (SRA 2018?)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Oracle

    Highly educational and surprising well written and illustrated. Walking away from this particular book you will come along with a bunch of fun filled facts in relation to bacterium, helpful vaccines, and several detailed looks into the structure of multiple cells. The way the comic is illustrated keeps the reader entertained all while cramming that added bit of knowledge within. Amazing! After reading this one, I'm looking forward to reading the rest of the series. ^__^

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I just finished reading this with my two young boys. There was a lot of complex info that went way over their heads, but they did enjoy the fun aspects of the story, which kept them entertained even when they didn't understand everything. This was published way before COVID-19 came into our lives, but it ended up being the perfect thing to read during these times, since we're going through a lot of what's depicted in the book in real life. It was very interesting, and I learned a lot!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dana Robinson

    The biggest problem with this book is that is rife with errors and misleading explanations. Penicillin, for example, may have originally come from a fungus but it is not itself a fungus. Even without errors that someone who had taken a good high school biology class wouldn't have made, the book isn't very good. I found the side plot involving a research lab to be distracting and the Scrappy-Doo-like behavior of the virus is annoying.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I loooooooooooove the Science Comics series! Haven't found one we didn't love yet (although my favorite is TREES!) This one is of course in a subject I'm already vastly familiar with, so it was less of a revelation, but it's still well done and fun and informative and highly recommended. It for sure would have blown my mind as a kid! And sadly, it seems prudent to teach our kids how different diseases work and spread and stuff...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    My thanks to Netgalley for the egalley in exchange for review yada yada yada... There are two things I love: comics and reading about infectious diseases. Science Comics: Plagues combined both, making me a very happy nerd. Definitely recommend to young people, or anyone, really, looking for a refresher in microbiology.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Two plagues (Bubonic and Yellow Fever) are taken into a lab and persuaded to aid humanity in fighting other nasty bacteria, fungi, and viruses. In the course of their discussion, the reader is presented with a wealth of information on plagues, infections, body defenses and the like. An interesting way to introduce multiple scientific concepts to junior high/high school students.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Darcy Roar

    Definitely one of the better volumes in the science comics series. Still fairly dense for younger readers, but the frame story is fun and interesting and the science is great! Possibly too much for a first dive into the material, but an excellent follow up to the very basics.

  26. 4 out of 5

    paula

    The first 30 pages, which describe the types of cells involved with the human bodys immune response, are not easy to get through, but persistent readers will be rewarded with all the juicy details any discussion of plagues entail. Buboes! Necrosis! Window screens in Panama! The first 30 pages, which describe the types of cells involved with the human body’s immune response, are not easy to get through, but persistent readers will be rewarded with all the juicy details any discussion of plagues entail. Buboes! Necrosis! Window screens in Panama!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Informative about plagues and how they work, but I would have appreciated more information about exactly how the scientists were planning to turn the viruses and bacteria into helpful versions for humans to use, since that was such a huge part of the framing device of the book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Travis Lynn

    4 stars copyright 2017 genre information theme identity crisis. Favorite part of the book is when the bubonic plague decides to help the scientists. I will use this in my future classroom to discuss different pathogens and the historical significance of the plague.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jacinta Carter

    Comic books like this make me wish I was a science teacher. But, as someone who was never great at science, it's so much more enjoyable to learn about things like germs and immunity through amazingly illustrated comics.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brandi Rae Fong

    I didn't love the art, and the story was a bit too convoluted at the beginning. Just not the book for me. I'm finding the Science Comics series to be a bit hit or miss.

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