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Tales of the Dark Knight. Batman's first fifty years: 1939 - 1989 - Vaz, Mark Cotta - Futura Publications Tales of the Dark Knight. Batman's first fifty years: 1939 - 1989 - Vaz, Mark Cotta - Futura Publications


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Tales of the Dark Knight. Batman's first fifty years: 1939 - 1989 - Vaz, Mark Cotta - Futura Publications Tales of the Dark Knight. Batman's first fifty years: 1939 - 1989 - Vaz, Mark Cotta - Futura Publications

30 review for Tales of the Dark Knight: Batman's First Fifty Years

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    We were given this book in 1989 as part of a swag bag from an invite-only event we attended to celebrate Batman's 50th anniversary. Also in the bag were the leather-bound version of The Complete Frank Miller Batman and The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told (read/reread those in 2017), and a few other various Batman items. I have read the introduction chapter of this book a few times over the years, as well as flipped through it numerous times to enjoy the great full color reprints of classic com We were given this book in 1989 as part of a swag bag from an invite-only event we attended to celebrate Batman's 50th anniversary. Also in the bag were the leather-bound version of The Complete Frank Miller Batman and The Greatest Batman Stories Ever Told (read/reread those in 2017), and a few other various Batman items. I have read the introduction chapter of this book a few times over the years, as well as flipped through it numerous times to enjoy the great full color reprints of classic comic book covers and a few of the comic panels. However, I found that first chapter awfully dull and academic, and never got farther into the prose than that. Thirty years later in 2019 I still have this book on my shelf, and now that we are celebrating Batman's 80th year, I am finally reading Tales of the Dark Knight: Batman's First Fifty Years cover to cover. Better late than never? I found the whole thing rather lightweight. While there was definitely some detail I didn’t know included here, and I enjoyed the acknowledgement of the differences the character had in each decade, and of course the included comic panels and full color cover art reprints are great, the prose itself was rather general, simplistic, and made for undemanding readers. Would I have wanted some deeper literary criticism? Likely nothing too deep or hard to read, I admit. However there is definitely a way to split that difference. Glad I finally read this book 30 years later, however perhaps with this 80th Anniversary year I’ll be able to find a more satisfying book about the history of the character. Sure a lot of the same ground will be covered but just as Batman can battle the Joker and Penguin time and again, I’m sure I can handle reading some repetitive information.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Glen Hannah

    Tales of the Dark Knight: Batman's First Fifty Years 1939-1989 by Mark Cotta Vaz Published 1989 This book was originally published to celebrate Batman's first fifty years and came at a time when the 1989 Batman movie was to breathe new life into the character. It chronicles the development of the character from his dark beginnings (where Batman sometimes killed in cold blood and used a gun) to the complex, brooding figure of the 1980s. The character softened in the early 1940s with the introduction Tales of the Dark Knight: Batman's First Fifty Years 1939-1989 by Mark Cotta Vaz Published 1989 This book was originally published to celebrate Batman's first fifty years and came at a time when the 1989 Batman movie was to breathe new life into the character. It chronicles the development of the character from his dark beginnings (where Batman sometimes killed in cold blood and used a gun) to the complex, brooding figure of the 1980s. The character softened in the early 1940s with the introduction of Robin and made the "Dynamic Duo" team a popular one with comic book fans. In the late 50s and early 60s the Batman comics took a science fiction angle (that seemed more in line with Supeman) where the costumed crimefighters fought aliens and mad scientists with ray guns that could change them into bronze statues or fish (Yes, FISH) There was also the extended Batman family (Batwoman, Batgirl, Bat mite and Ace the Bat hound..sheesh!) The comic adopted the tongue-in-cheek tone of the popular TV series in the mid-60s before returning to a solo Batman in the 1970s (Robin flew off to College) Probably the most interesting chapter for pulp fiction fans would be Ch2 "The Dark knights of the past." It examines the influences of The Shadow, The Spider, Dick Tracy, Zorro and others. It even goes way back to 1882 where a story called "The Man in Black" appeared in "The Boys of New York" publication for boys. Other chapters examine "Terrible Traps and Fantastic Escapes,"Bat Noir," "Into the Underworld" and "Obsession." Includes 48 color covers and excerpts and panels from dozens of Batman's adventures. A well researched and interesting character study and a worthy addition to your batshelf (Sits neatly next to "The Shadow Scrapbook" on mine.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Beau Johnston

    I grew up in a town that considered football, fishing and surfing to be the only forms of entertainment that should be available to young people. If you read books, you were thought to be a little strange. But comics "Comics, what? Like Daffy Duck or Mickey Mouse?"? No, comic books were for children. In short, this book is basically an encyclopaedia of all things Batman (and the real-world events that helped shape the Dark Knight). As I moved from casual reader to fan, I had all sorts of question I grew up in a town that considered football, fishing and surfing to be the only forms of entertainment that should be available to young people. If you read books, you were thought to be a little strange. But comics "Comics, what? Like Daffy Duck or Mickey Mouse?"? No, comic books were for children. In short, this book is basically an encyclopaedia of all things Batman (and the real-world events that helped shape the Dark Knight). As I moved from casual reader to fan, I had all sorts of questions about Batman's origins. In the days before the internet, this book was a life-line.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I've enjoyed Batman over the years. I'm not a fanatical fan but have enjoyed the comics, T.V. show and movies. I picked up this book that has been on the bookshelf for years as i was ill lying on the couch. The more I read it the better it got. It's well laid out and has many interesting tales of the people and processes behind the comics, also lots of rare reprinted scenes from the comic pages of the past. If you've enjoyed Batman it's well worth having a look at. I've enjoyed Batman over the years. I'm not a fanatical fan but have enjoyed the comics, T.V. show and movies. I picked up this book that has been on the bookshelf for years as i was ill lying on the couch. The more I read it the better it got. It's well laid out and has many interesting tales of the people and processes behind the comics, also lots of rare reprinted scenes from the comic pages of the past. If you've enjoyed Batman it's well worth having a look at.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Moore

    Informative. I purchased it thinking that it was a different kind of book. Still worth the read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Interesting from a historical perspective, but very much an easy read lacking in depth. The best parts were the random historical facts about each character that aren't well known such as *spoilers* Alfred being killed off in the 50's due to the fears about three men living together or Clayface being one of Batman's oldest foes. I'm sure there are several far better books about Batman's history, but this provides some insight into views on Batman during the 80's. Interesting from a historical perspective, but very much an easy read lacking in depth. The best parts were the random historical facts about each character that aren't well known such as *spoilers* Alfred being killed off in the 50's due to the fears about three men living together or Clayface being one of Batman's oldest foes. I'm sure there are several far better books about Batman's history, but this provides some insight into views on Batman during the 80's.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael P.

    Generally informative book about a subject that is of interest, but does not really matter. Little depth, but many facts. Usefully credits Bill Finger as the co-creator. Mostly for fans, but may also be of interest for those who want to learn more about Batman, but do not want a scholarly approach or rigor.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kylethoreau

    first book I ever purchased

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    read SOMETIME in 2001

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jakob Damsbo

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  12. 5 out of 5

    Blake Larson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Murphy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Frye

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elise B

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alithea

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Molner

  18. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Patishnock

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  21. 5 out of 5

    Avi

  22. 4 out of 5

    C.W. Browning

  23. 4 out of 5

    Professor

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dennistag

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 5 out of 5

    Miles

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Detroit

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hal Johnson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dans Mon Arbre

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