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When DBC Pierre burst onto the scene in 2003, he arrived with no particular literary education. Finding he had something to say, he made the journey solo to that place where dreams and demons live, to try and turn feelings into words.Part biography, part reflection and part practical guide, Release the Bats explores the mysteries of why and how we tell stories, and the cra When DBC Pierre burst onto the scene in 2003, he arrived with no particular literary education. Finding he had something to say, he made the journey solo to that place where dreams and demons live, to try and turn feelings into words.Part biography, part reflection and part practical guide, Release the Bats explores the mysteries of why and how we tell stories, and the craft of writing fiction. DBC Pierre reveals everything he learned the hard way.


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When DBC Pierre burst onto the scene in 2003, he arrived with no particular literary education. Finding he had something to say, he made the journey solo to that place where dreams and demons live, to try and turn feelings into words.Part biography, part reflection and part practical guide, Release the Bats explores the mysteries of why and how we tell stories, and the cra When DBC Pierre burst onto the scene in 2003, he arrived with no particular literary education. Finding he had something to say, he made the journey solo to that place where dreams and demons live, to try and turn feelings into words.Part biography, part reflection and part practical guide, Release the Bats explores the mysteries of why and how we tell stories, and the craft of writing fiction. DBC Pierre reveals everything he learned the hard way.

30 review for Release the Bats: Writing Your Way Out Of It

  1. 4 out of 5

    MJ Nicholls

    A handbook for those who want to write like DBC Pierre, a one-time Booker Prize writer of black comedies and winner of the Annual Richard Madeley Lookalike Contest seven years running. This was a foul-mouthed and entertaining anti-writing manual livened up with personal reflections and punchdrunk motivational shrieks from a 2AM barroom floor. The actual writing advice is prosaic and tends towards the usual how-to stuff found elsewhere (something that Pierre seems to realise, and yet continues to A handbook for those who want to write like DBC Pierre, a one-time Booker Prize writer of black comedies and winner of the Annual Richard Madeley Lookalike Contest seven years running. This was a foul-mouthed and entertaining anti-writing manual livened up with personal reflections and punchdrunk motivational shrieks from a 2AM barroom floor. The actual writing advice is prosaic and tends towards the usual how-to stuff found elsewhere (something that Pierre seems to realise, and yet continues to serve up, contra to his subversive intentions). But I liked the hard kick in the pantaloons that Pierre was offering. The Scotsman reviewer Stuart Kelly wrote an entertaining hatchet job on this one, regardez-vous.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lea

    This is rather unusual as far as writing guides go. There's a chapter on which drugs work with writing and which don't (as expected, most are only ever useful for the first draft), and the first half of this book seems like it's not directly about writing at all, but rather biographical tidbits that are tangible about the life of a writer. There are certainly better books out there if you want to learn about different writing techniques and heathy habits for fostering a lot of writing. But: I fo This is rather unusual as far as writing guides go. There's a chapter on which drugs work with writing and which don't (as expected, most are only ever useful for the first draft), and the first half of this book seems like it's not directly about writing at all, but rather biographical tidbits that are tangible about the life of a writer. There are certainly better books out there if you want to learn about different writing techniques and heathy habits for fostering a lot of writing. But: I found this really engaging and inspiring, and also rather realistic about our chances of actually ever writing something "good enough".

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angus McKeogh

    I found this book extremely informative about the art of writing. I think it was great that Pierre was coming from a "non-university trained" background in writing. He seemed to have much better insights into the craft. And he was a very motivating presence as well. I'd recommend this highly to writers working on their craft. I found this book extremely informative about the art of writing. I think it was great that Pierre was coming from a "non-university trained" background in writing. He seemed to have much better insights into the craft. And he was a very motivating presence as well. I'd recommend this highly to writers working on their craft.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Hobson

    A no nonsense guide to writing in the modern world by DBC Pierre who won the Booker Prize with his first novel, so he must have a good idea of how it is done. I enjoyed the frankness of this book and the simple straightforward way the author suggests a good course to chart. He makes good observations and brings in other authors' ideas to help. One concept which is always hard to get across a meaning is "Show not tell". I have heard it said many times in writers groups but only now have a good des A no nonsense guide to writing in the modern world by DBC Pierre who won the Booker Prize with his first novel, so he must have a good idea of how it is done. I enjoyed the frankness of this book and the simple straightforward way the author suggests a good course to chart. He makes good observations and brings in other authors' ideas to help. One concept which is always hard to get across a meaning is "Show not tell". I have heard it said many times in writers groups but only now have a good description for what it really means. A quote from Chekhov "Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass." Writers are not creating images but suggestions that provoke them. I found his four steps to structure particularly invaluable, and will return to read these again the next time I am struck by the urge to write my own stories. Most of all Pierre is an advocate for the "just wright" school. Get something down on paper. It is impossible to edit and improve a blank sheet. It is also unlikely that you will make this worse that then were at the start of the process.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Marshall

    Having shared an agent with DBC Pierre and met him on the staircase case outside (and read his Booker winning novel Vernon God Little), I was drawn to this book which is part biography and part how to write guide. After all, the author had taught himself how to write - by trial and error - and he had a colourful past. So what's not to like? Sadly quite a lot.... There is not enough biography to be truly understand the man and not enough nuts and bolts to understand his craft. Having said that, it Having shared an agent with DBC Pierre and met him on the staircase case outside (and read his Booker winning novel Vernon God Little), I was drawn to this book which is part biography and part how to write guide. After all, the author had taught himself how to write - by trial and error - and he had a colourful past. So what's not to like? Sadly quite a lot.... There is not enough biography to be truly understand the man and not enough nuts and bolts to understand his craft. Having said that, it did help me understand why the characters in the next book I read - Girl on the Train - seemed flat and unconvincing. If you skip the generalised waffle about writing, you will find the author a knowledge and diverting companion. It just made me wish he'd focused down on one or other side of the book and delivered something truly satisfy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Owen Townend

    I have not read the work of D.B.C. Pierre before. I didn't even know about Vernon God Little, his Mann-Booker prizewinner. To be honest, it was the cover of Release The Bats that first attracted me. Something about a single black bat at the centre of a bright red cover appealed; as if it signified a darker, different approach to the writing craft. This proved accurate though not quite in the way that I was hoping. This is just as much a Gonzo autobiography as it is a guide to storytelling. The Go I have not read the work of D.B.C. Pierre before. I didn't even know about Vernon God Little, his Mann-Booker prizewinner. To be honest, it was the cover of Release The Bats that first attracted me. Something about a single black bat at the centre of a bright red cover appealed; as if it signified a darker, different approach to the writing craft. This proved accurate though not quite in the way that I was hoping. This is just as much a Gonzo autobiography as it is a guide to storytelling. The Gonzo Journalism style can be hit and miss and I'm afraid to say this was mostly miss with me. Pierre has clearly had a rather thrilling life that is more than a little reminiscent of Hemingway (I'm referring specifically to the bullfighting here), but these experiences seemed to have a tenuous relationship to the 'rules of writing' that he sought to share. At times it seemed like he was even bragging about the 'edginess' of his own lifestyle. Nevertheless, when Pierre got down to the main thrust of his arguments, I saw a lot of sense. While I'm not so sure about his advocating any kind of recreational drug usage whilst 'creating', I did agree that transforming one's experiences into the emotional drive of one's fiction can be a powerful yet universally accessible method. Also I may just adapt 'junk' computer files for writing projects into my own process. I am quite willing to admit that I should have read up more about Pierre before trying on his personal views of writing and the world, and I would also agree that this is partly why this guide didn't reach me. Nevertheless I'm not sure any one particular guide to writing has made full sense to me. Really no guide ever will, considering the subjectivity of this particular creative medium. Regardless of this, Release the Bats did inspire me albeit inconsistently. I would recommend this to writers and would-be writers of 'controversial literature'. If you enjoy a book that feels like throwing back a couple of beers with a dude that 'speaks the truth', you can't go wrong here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    It's probably at least misguided to read a writing guide by an author whose actual books you have not read. Never fear, reader, if you find yourself in the same boat, because you get a reasonable sample of Pierre (not his real name)'s writing style in this volume. To demonstrate sometimes farfetched points, he uses mini-stories of his own. Some of them are good, some of them are okay, all of them are very 'this was written by an extremely white dude'. There's a point of description where he says It's probably at least misguided to read a writing guide by an author whose actual books you have not read. Never fear, reader, if you find yourself in the same boat, because you get a reasonable sample of Pierre (not his real name)'s writing style in this volume. To demonstrate sometimes farfetched points, he uses mini-stories of his own. Some of them are good, some of them are okay, all of them are very 'this was written by an extremely white dude'. There's a point of description where he says 'even barefoot, she walked like she was in high heels', which points up my problem with this kind of literary writing. It tries to be so clever and so spare that it ends up not making any sense. If he'd said 'she carried herself like she was wearing stilettos, even when she was barefoot' he'd take more words but get more of the meaning. The first one is poetic and nonsensical, the second one shows how facile a way this is to illustrate character. There's also a whole chapter on how various street drugs affect your writing output. In case you were in the dark about that. It's not all bad. The bit where he describes how trying out outrun your inner demons is like squeezing a water balloon is accurate. His attitude to writing in general - that it's a demanding inner force, that it means something important for humanity - is also accurate. If you ended up following his advice to the letter, though, you'd just end up writing more extremely white dude prose, and personally I think the world already has enough of that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tien

    I'm not a writer and not particularly interested in writing. I'm most definitely a reader. I received this book in a swag bag for volunteering at a certain writers' festival and I thought maybe it'll prove an interesting read to see what gets an author going etc. Was it? Mostly, yes... it was interesting even if quite a lot of he said went over my head but there were some universal truths that made it quite interesting but otherwise, it's really not my cup of tea. For those who care, there are sw I'm not a writer and not particularly interested in writing. I'm most definitely a reader. I received this book in a swag bag for volunteering at a certain writers' festival and I thought maybe it'll prove an interesting read to see what gets an author going etc. Was it? Mostly, yes... it was interesting even if quite a lot of he said went over my head but there were some universal truths that made it quite interesting but otherwise, it's really not my cup of tea. For those who care, there are swearing in this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Venky

    Honesty dictates that I begin this review with a confession. This is a book ‘on writing’ unlike any that I have read till date. No, in fact to lend an even more transparent perspective, this book is unlike all the books ‘on writing’ that I have read. I cannot say that I have come out all the more wiser or intuitive after reading this book than from where I was before I opened its cover! “Release The Bats” is more a raucous, rambunctious, rabble rousing exercise in freewheeling spontaneity than a Honesty dictates that I begin this review with a confession. This is a book ‘on writing’ unlike any that I have read till date. No, in fact to lend an even more transparent perspective, this book is unlike all the books ‘on writing’ that I have read. I cannot say that I have come out all the more wiser or intuitive after reading this book than from where I was before I opened its cover! “Release The Bats” is more a raucous, rambunctious, rabble rousing exercise in freewheeling spontaneity than a how-to-manual for an aspiring writer. As the author himself rightly says, stereotypical how-to-manuals on writing abound freely and are one too many. I personally feel that these dull, drab, run-of-the-mill works sully the bookshelves rather than add tangible value. However, “Release The Bats” is something else altogether! The four letter expletive of choice liberally litters the pages and each expletive is differentiated from the other only by the prefix accorded to it; head or rat for instance. DBC Pierre elucidates that writing for him was akin to ‘painting a dictionary on the back of live rats’ (how a person can even come up with such a peculiar analogy is beyond the grasp of my limited intellect). But reading his book for me was akin to trying to create a portrait on water! The venerable duo of Strunk and White would be left scratching their hair until their scalps completely peeled away! Visualise Carlos Castaneda and Fritjof Capra joining together to devise a short and temporary course on the art of modern and postmodern literary criticism! Think about a completely stoned Charles Bukowski meeting the press after a book release! Imagine an inebriated Jean Paul Sartre on a combined overdose of methamphetamines and barbiturates holding forth on the need for proportion, poise and perseverance for achieving success as a writer! A condensed agglomeration of all these events and individuals make for DBC Pierre and his “Release The Bats”. For example when he says that one can be crazy but not effing crazy to write a book, I am left genuinely bewildered pondering an acceptable degree of lunacy that I should inculcate in order to begin writing. In a curious piece of advice for which this Booker Prize winning author of “Vernon God Little” devotes an entire Chapter, I was treated to the pros and cons of imbibing various genres of drugs as an accoutrement if not an accompaniment for writing. I derived the following unique ranking of various deadly substances in the order of their level of acceptance or rejection: Cannabis – “Weed is a writerly drug. It is the drug of choice for staring at a blank page and watching stories grow in tangents.” Cocaine and Speed – “If you go for it I’d say try to finesse it into a perfect routine: open the page at the same time every day, lay out the lines and write to a specific target every time.” Ecstasy – “I’m inspired to think this might be a playwright’s drug” Opium – “If you take it in the vein you are either going to write a labyrinthine saga or nothing at all.” Hallucinogens – “Not even for a first draft”. Well! I will be damned! Hell even the pioneer of opening the doors of perception the genius Aldous Huxley would be damned! Finally in an Appendix to the book, DBC Pierre lays down certain guidelines for writing a book. Even here he doesn’t hold back. For e.g. one of the tenets advocates “Thomas Wolfe had to stand naked fondling his genitals in order to write well. Do what you have to do” Bloody hell, in DBC Pierre’s own words “F^%K IT!”

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Ashley

    I can't believe there is anything less than a 5 star that can be given to this wonderful book. People writing negative reviews really do say the most ridiculous things. The only conclusion I can come to is that it's too subtle, too insightful, for their boorish and unsophisticated tastes. He includes little observations and philosophies that feed into some pretty profound writing advice that I have never seen anywhere before. It is fresh and intelligent and most importantly useful. I can't believe there is anything less than a 5 star that can be given to this wonderful book. People writing negative reviews really do say the most ridiculous things. The only conclusion I can come to is that it's too subtle, too insightful, for their boorish and unsophisticated tastes. He includes little observations and philosophies that feed into some pretty profound writing advice that I have never seen anywhere before. It is fresh and intelligent and most importantly useful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Blake

    In the beginning I wasn't too sure how to approach this book -- I'd been told it was a sort of guide to writing, and the last thing I like is being told how to do the one thing I enjoy. I was wary, at first, and almost looked for anything to complain about, a reason to not continue. Accidentally, I pushed through and ended up treating the thing as an actual novel. I imagined Pierre narrating the random events of his life in a sort of detached and blase, but humorous manner. It made the whole thi In the beginning I wasn't too sure how to approach this book -- I'd been told it was a sort of guide to writing, and the last thing I like is being told how to do the one thing I enjoy. I was wary, at first, and almost looked for anything to complain about, a reason to not continue. Accidentally, I pushed through and ended up treating the thing as an actual novel. I imagined Pierre narrating the random events of his life in a sort of detached and blase, but humorous manner. It made the whole thing much more bearable, and I'm glad it was suggested to me. I'm not sure if I've taken any advice from it to heart -- only time will tell, I suppose.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Linschoten

    More like 3.5. Useful advice. Some of the stories were a bit rambling. One reviewer here on Goodreads has said that it might have been better to make two separate books out of this (one for the writing advice, one for the autobiograpy). I wouldn't go quite that far, but DBC Pierre has a unique writing style which took me a while to get used to. Nevertheless, some useful notes on process. More like 3.5. Useful advice. Some of the stories were a bit rambling. One reviewer here on Goodreads has said that it might have been better to make two separate books out of this (one for the writing advice, one for the autobiograpy). I wouldn't go quite that far, but DBC Pierre has a unique writing style which took me a while to get used to. Nevertheless, some useful notes on process.

  13. 4 out of 5

    KtotheC

    Interesting. Let's see if it can salvage the unsalvageable... Interesting. Let's see if it can salvage the unsalvageable...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Among the plethora of how-to-write and how-I-wrote books out there, this one has more to recommend it than most. I have to say I had rather written off DBC Pierre as a one-hit wonder, having read Vernon God Little and some journalism and little else. The press office machinations that led to the perfectly-timed revelations of his having "scammed" someone, thus suggesting his novel was a kind of cosmic atonement by a colourful character, actually left rather a bad taste in the mouth and sent my r Among the plethora of how-to-write and how-I-wrote books out there, this one has more to recommend it than most. I have to say I had rather written off DBC Pierre as a one-hit wonder, having read Vernon God Little and some journalism and little else. The press office machinations that led to the perfectly-timed revelations of his having "scammed" someone, thus suggesting his novel was a kind of cosmic atonement by a colourful character, actually left rather a bad taste in the mouth and sent my radar away from his follow-up works. It turns out that there is something to DBC Pierre/Peter Finlay that does to an extent live up to the hype: he has been out there, thought about things and come back with a little extra nous. And in doing so has some advice to writers that is heartfelt, often pithy, sometimes funny and overall both useful and enjoyable. Rather than step-by-step advice, this is more about asking yourself the right questions, mapping your imaginary world, running it through its paces, being ruthless with stuff that is pretty but empty. He also looks at the influence - positive or otherwise - of narcotic use and general bacchanalia. It won’t take a putative Robert Ludlum to bestseller fruition, but it may help a putative DBC Pierre to take his/her own Vernon God Little into the final stages and beyond.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Richards

    There were times where I really didn't like what DBCP had written, I was frustrated, 'why don't you just tell me how to write a goddam book!' And then I got it and it all clicked into place. I was teetering on giving a full 5/5 for this one, but it's not quite a 100% book, it's 90/100, in my opinion. Inside this book are hidden so many gems, and I have to admit, the author of Vernon God Little has, in this unassuming little book, handed all the keys over to writing a Vernon God Little - all it ta There were times where I really didn't like what DBCP had written, I was frustrated, 'why don't you just tell me how to write a goddam book!' And then I got it and it all clicked into place. I was teetering on giving a full 5/5 for this one, but it's not quite a 100% book, it's 90/100, in my opinion. Inside this book are hidden so many gems, and I have to admit, the author of Vernon God Little has, in this unassuming little book, handed all the keys over to writing a Vernon God Little - all it takes is absolutely everything. 'There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.' W. Somerset Maugham I reckon I will come back to Release the Bats regularly. I read it as a cover-to-cover read but really, it needs referencing at every point of the writing journey. I think DBCP has effectively put down on the page the painful, beautiful, rewarding process that is creative writing. Writing a good story, or having an idea is one thing, getting it down onto the screen/paper and not loathing it or the experience is something that DBCP covers well.

  16. 4 out of 5

    A.M.

    I saw this on someone’s list of writing books to read. I have dozens and I baulked at buying it… but voila, the local library came through. And honestly I would buy my own copy. If only for the tactile bats on the cover… It’s good. But it’s not your standard writing advice book. He writes little short stories about his life and kind of explains how you could (or couldn’t) write fiction based on the same incident. It’s often been said that truth or life is stranger than fiction, and I know in my own I saw this on someone’s list of writing books to read. I have dozens and I baulked at buying it… but voila, the local library came through. And honestly I would buy my own copy. If only for the tactile bats on the cover… It’s good. But it’s not your standard writing advice book. He writes little short stories about his life and kind of explains how you could (or couldn’t) write fiction based on the same incident. It’s often been said that truth or life is stranger than fiction, and I know in my own life things have happened that you would get a shouty one star review for writing if you put them in a book. At the end, he has 32 one sentence mindbites which are one sentence summaries of each of the things he’s written about. #2 We more easily believe an idea than a fact. So do our characters. Or #24 Write in a reckless fever. Rewrite in a cardigan. And his glossary of publishing terms made me laugh. 4 stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bobbie Darbyshire

    Among the countless books by fiction writers about writing fiction, this was a goody – plenty of insightful advice and lots of inspirational chat, written with enormous passion and panache. I have a few reservations: I’m not a fan of the quick-dash first draft, and I’d warn against swallowing his advice on chapter lengths and what elements each chapter should contain, but otherwise it is good and often brilliant stuff, painfully insightful into us batty writers, chipping away at the coalface of Among the countless books by fiction writers about writing fiction, this was a goody – plenty of insightful advice and lots of inspirational chat, written with enormous passion and panache. I have a few reservations: I’m not a fan of the quick-dash first draft, and I’d warn against swallowing his advice on chapter lengths and what elements each chapter should contain, but otherwise it is good and often brilliant stuff, painfully insightful into us batty writers, chipping away at the coalface of psychological truth in our pyjamas, because when we finally make ourselves start we can’t stop. I wasn’t too keen on his Booker winner, ‘Vernon God Little’, which I read in 2004, sadly before I started making notes on my reactions, so I can’t remember why.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jason Mills

    This is a happily opinionated guide to the art (if not the business) of being a writer. I found the early autobiographical sections elliptical and a bit bonkers; but then they do address amorphous matters such as why people write and what should or does drive them. If this stuff is sometimes hard to get a handle on, with its wild prose and showers of profanity, it is still valuable and thought-provoking discussion. From this, the book settles down into more practical matters: structure, character This is a happily opinionated guide to the art (if not the business) of being a writer. I found the early autobiographical sections elliptical and a bit bonkers; but then they do address amorphous matters such as why people write and what should or does drive them. If this stuff is sometimes hard to get a handle on, with its wild prose and showers of profanity, it is still valuable and thought-provoking discussion. From this, the book settles down into more practical matters: structure, character, dialogue, what drugs to take for writing different moods(!)... This is easier reading and much of it is shrewd and straightforwardly helpful to the aspiring writer.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    I want to give this book fewer, maybe 4 stars because, while it's very well written, it's far from a masterpiece. But it *is* a phenomenal masterclass in the art of writing, as well as a practical guide on how to get all the shit from our head to the page. It's practicality makes it inspiring in a way I've not encountered in a long time. Am I gonna write now? Who knows, but I've already caught myself using some of what I learned. We'll see. I want to give this book fewer, maybe 4 stars because, while it's very well written, it's far from a masterpiece. But it *is* a phenomenal masterclass in the art of writing, as well as a practical guide on how to get all the shit from our head to the page. It's practicality makes it inspiring in a way I've not encountered in a long time. Am I gonna write now? Who knows, but I've already caught myself using some of what I learned. We'll see.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    The strangest book about writing I’ve ever read. The only one to include a guide on how various drugs affect the writing process. Some useful insights in a very badly written book. It just goes to show that inspiration and originality can get you so far, but graft is required to get published and to keep on writing.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jalen Lyle-Holmes

    I didn't like all the memoiry stuff mixed in and the overblown polemics about how the world works. I liked how realistic he was about how the writing processed has actually worked for him, rather than an idealised version. I found interesting the idea of taking any small story as the germ of the writing process and I didn't like all the memoiry stuff mixed in and the overblown polemics about how the world works. I liked how realistic he was about how the writing processed has actually worked for him, rather than an idealised version. I found interesting the idea of taking any small story as the germ of the writing process and

  22. 4 out of 5

    Happy

    Sorry, couldn't finish it. Just not good timing for me to get into it. I chose the title because a friend of mine had bats in her walls at the time and I thought 'release the bats' - not too worry, neither of us enjoyed the book. Perhaps I'll try again at another time. Sorry, couldn't finish it. Just not good timing for me to get into it. I chose the title because a friend of mine had bats in her walls at the time and I thought 'release the bats' - not too worry, neither of us enjoyed the book. Perhaps I'll try again at another time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Massimo Fiorentino

    An excellent handbook for anyone interested in the arts Whether you are a writer or someone just having an infatuation with the arts, this little gem is worth all of your precious time.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sonia Bellhouse

    The cover and title caught my eye. So I read it and its a opinionated guide to writing and I guess if you are prize winning author you are entitled to be opinionated. Was it useful to me personally? Probably not, but the advice might work for you.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Leyshon

    I found aspects of DBC Pierre's book refreshing. Particularly the ideas around writer's tools and writing seasons. However the style of writing lost me at times and clarity was often lost in order to show literary prowess. I found aspects of DBC Pierre's book refreshing. Particularly the ideas around writer's tools and writing seasons. However the style of writing lost me at times and clarity was often lost in order to show literary prowess.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Broccoli

    Top tips from a rad guy on what writing is and how to do good. Heck yeah, release the bats, baby.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    I loved this little book. I particularly liked the focus on the human condition and importance of the chaos of creation as opposed to scientific truths.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    I

  29. 4 out of 5

    Edwin McRae

    The best book on writing I’ve read since Stephen King’s ‘On Writing’ came out!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Celtria

    A generous two stars, given I found it too boring to finish. Most interesting parts are the quotes from other writers.

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