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Passion-Driven Education: How to Use Your Child's Interests to Ignite a Lifelong Love of Learning

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Here's the hard truth: the modern education system is a disaster. Why do parents subject their children to a process that disregards their interests, ignores their basic humanity, and subjects them to arbitrary mandates and micro-management? Your children deserve better than to be bored learning about subjects they aren’t interested in and frustrated with endless busywork. T Here's the hard truth: the modern education system is a disaster. Why do parents subject their children to a process that disregards their interests, ignores their basic humanity, and subjects them to arbitrary mandates and micro-management? Your children deserve better than to be bored learning about subjects they aren’t interested in and frustrated with endless busywork. There is a better way—one that ensures your child sees learning as a joy and provides you, the parent, with a much less stressful way to educate and empower your son or daughter. In this book, Connor Boyack shares the exciting philosophy and empowering day-to-day steps involved in passion-driven education. A child’s curiosity and natural desire to learn are like a tiny flame, easily extinguished unless it’s protected and given fuel. This book will help you as a parent both protect that flame of curiosity and supply it with the fuel necessary to make it burn bright throughout your child’s life. Let’s ignite our children’s natural love of learning!


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Here's the hard truth: the modern education system is a disaster. Why do parents subject their children to a process that disregards their interests, ignores their basic humanity, and subjects them to arbitrary mandates and micro-management? Your children deserve better than to be bored learning about subjects they aren’t interested in and frustrated with endless busywork. T Here's the hard truth: the modern education system is a disaster. Why do parents subject their children to a process that disregards their interests, ignores their basic humanity, and subjects them to arbitrary mandates and micro-management? Your children deserve better than to be bored learning about subjects they aren’t interested in and frustrated with endless busywork. There is a better way—one that ensures your child sees learning as a joy and provides you, the parent, with a much less stressful way to educate and empower your son or daughter. In this book, Connor Boyack shares the exciting philosophy and empowering day-to-day steps involved in passion-driven education. A child’s curiosity and natural desire to learn are like a tiny flame, easily extinguished unless it’s protected and given fuel. This book will help you as a parent both protect that flame of curiosity and supply it with the fuel necessary to make it burn bright throughout your child’s life. Let’s ignite our children’s natural love of learning!

30 review for Passion-Driven Education: How to Use Your Child's Interests to Ignite a Lifelong Love of Learning

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Burke

    As a parent of two homeschooled kids, Passion-Driven Education by Connor Boyack was very inspiring and motivating. It reminded me of all the reasons why we decided to homeschool our kids in the first place, it made me reassess how well we're doing, and motivated me to refocus our approach to our kid's education. The John Taylor Gatto introduction is a compelling appetizer to the main course of this book, which is a great primer on alternative-- and frankly, superior-- methods for approaching edu As a parent of two homeschooled kids, Passion-Driven Education by Connor Boyack was very inspiring and motivating. It reminded me of all the reasons why we decided to homeschool our kids in the first place, it made me reassess how well we're doing, and motivated me to refocus our approach to our kid's education. The John Taylor Gatto introduction is a compelling appetizer to the main course of this book, which is a great primer on alternative-- and frankly, superior-- methods for approaching education. The book lays out the problems-- indeed, the inherent flaws-- of the current schooling model before introducing an alternative approach... A focus on the things that inspire and motivate each child individually. Boyack provides several examples of tried models that take this approach, as well as suggestions and examples of how parents might do the same. He also addresses potential concerns and doubts parents might have in implementing a passion-driven education in the lives of their own children. I appreciated the references to sources in the footnotes. Boyack does a good job of covering the "what", the "why", and the "how" of the topic... As a parent who's already homeschooling children, the "what" and the "why" were concepts I've already dealt with, but it was a good reinforcement. I found myself wishing that the "how" of helping children focus on their passions was more in-depth... But this book was a great starting point to introduce the concepts and point parents in the right direction. I plan to read it again as we lay out a new focus in our approach to the education of our own children. I recommend Passion-Driven Education for any parents who desire to instill the qualities of creativity, initiative, and adaptivity in their children for a rapidly changing world.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There are a good many valid and extremely useful ideas in this book, however it seems to constantly be against parental authority. Teaching our children how to think and not always what to think, can be beneficial but also dangerous. As parents, it is our duty to protect our children and educate them about right and wrong. A child left to his own devices will cause trouble because there are no boundaries. I like how it reinforces parents to teach children how to learn and not just memorizing fact There are a good many valid and extremely useful ideas in this book, however it seems to constantly be against parental authority. Teaching our children how to think and not always what to think, can be beneficial but also dangerous. As parents, it is our duty to protect our children and educate them about right and wrong. A child left to his own devices will cause trouble because there are no boundaries. I like how it reinforces parents to teach children how to learn and not just memorizing facts. However, I believe children need a firm foundation to begin with and then you can start building from there. They encourage a less structured learning style, which is all well and good, but they seem to emphasize a lack of boundaries and seem to depict parents just following the child's lead. A good parent will recognize when something sparks their child's interest and will be able to gear a majority of their studies around such interest. However, not everything in life can be about Legos or spiders, or clouds. We as parents are also responsible for raising well adjusted and disciplined individuals who can accomplish things whether or not they are all related to their passion. Sometimes you have to do things you just don't like. That's life. It seems the book is more geared for people who let their children do whatever they want, instead of enforcing rules, boundaries and limitations that are in place for a purpose. I'm not saying you have to be a tyrant, but at the complete opposite end of the spectrum the grass isn't any greener. A discerning parent will be able to glean a few new ideas to add to their repertoire, but I wouldn't count on this being a monumental, life-changing book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kenya Wright

    I found this to be extremely helpful. I did think there was a large part of the book that argued against the modern public school system. I already am on that side of the argument so I didn't need the consistent chapters on why the present system doesn't work. However, this helped me a lot in being strategic with how I homeschool my children. I'm glad I read it. I found this to be extremely helpful. I did think there was a large part of the book that argued against the modern public school system. I already am on that side of the argument so I didn't need the consistent chapters on why the present system doesn't work. However, this helped me a lot in being strategic with how I homeschool my children. I'm glad I read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura Jane

    This was mostly a diatribe against modern education. Not an unfounded one, but the meat of the proposal didn't come until the last third of the book. And then, very little of that was practical advice. Overall, the idea is great. But the end result is biased, majorly flawed, and lacking practical examples of an alternative to modern government education, especially for working parents who are unable to homeschool. This was mostly a diatribe against modern education. Not an unfounded one, but the meat of the proposal didn't come until the last third of the book. And then, very little of that was practical advice. Overall, the idea is great. But the end result is biased, majorly flawed, and lacking practical examples of an alternative to modern government education, especially for working parents who are unable to homeschool.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kaylee

    This was a quick read with some great thoughts. The author's approach to education is unschooling or the equivalent (he mentions a few other options) that give the child the driver's seat (his words) and the topics of study are driven by the child. It definitely made me think outside of my status quo as I homeschool our kids and I plan on contemplating his ideas more as I think about ways to improve what we're doing but I also don't think this is the right route for our family to go. This was a quick read with some great thoughts. The author's approach to education is unschooling or the equivalent (he mentions a few other options) that give the child the driver's seat (his words) and the topics of study are driven by the child. It definitely made me think outside of my status quo as I homeschool our kids and I plan on contemplating his ideas more as I think about ways to improve what we're doing but I also don't think this is the right route for our family to go.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I really enjoyed this book. It echoed many of my own thoughts. I'm glad to have access to some hard copies to give out to people. We opted to place our twins in a Montesorri school starting in Kindergarten. I get a lot of questions about it. People tend to either get that it's an attempt to teach kids in a way that is actually beneficial or they look at me like I've grown a second head. (Especially when I announce that they don't give letter grades and have very minimal homework.). I've wanted t I really enjoyed this book. It echoed many of my own thoughts. I'm glad to have access to some hard copies to give out to people. We opted to place our twins in a Montesorri school starting in Kindergarten. I get a lot of questions about it. People tend to either get that it's an attempt to teach kids in a way that is actually beneficial or they look at me like I've grown a second head. (Especially when I announce that they don't give letter grades and have very minimal homework.). I've wanted to hand a book out multiple times for people to read. However, handing someone a copy of Montessoris the absorbent mind, and expecting someone to read it is probably a bit optimistic. I love the simplicity of this book. It's fairly thorough and thought provoking, yet it doesn't bog the reader down in the intricacies of a theory and it's development. There's also plenty of sourcing for those who wish to dig deeper.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Great book. However the subtitle is a little misleading. The entire book is not about "How to use your child's interests to ignite a lifelong love of learning" but rather consists of 3 chapters on WHY, a chapter on WHAT to do about it and a final chapter on HOW. Still a great book and one that every parent ought to read, especially those with kids in school. Are the underlying lessons your kids are learning from the system (even though they have a wonderfully kind teacher and they love school) r Great book. However the subtitle is a little misleading. The entire book is not about "How to use your child's interests to ignite a lifelong love of learning" but rather consists of 3 chapters on WHY, a chapter on WHAT to do about it and a final chapter on HOW. Still a great book and one that every parent ought to read, especially those with kids in school. Are the underlying lessons your kids are learning from the system (even though they have a wonderfully kind teacher and they love school) really what you want them to learn?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Jacobson

    While I agree with the basic tenants of this book (people learn much more when they are passionate about it), I just didn't see any value in this book. He says in the intro that it will be extreme. And it is. I didn't see the need for dozens of pages about negatives in education. I wanted solutions. When I finally got to them, they were so obvious, that it was pointless. It was nothing I hadn't read before, and other books do a better job saying the same thing and then some. It's a very short re While I agree with the basic tenants of this book (people learn much more when they are passionate about it), I just didn't see any value in this book. He says in the intro that it will be extreme. And it is. I didn't see the need for dozens of pages about negatives in education. I wanted solutions. When I finally got to them, they were so obvious, that it was pointless. It was nothing I hadn't read before, and other books do a better job saying the same thing and then some. It's a very short read, so I'm not too upset about it, but I won't be recommending it to anyone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    We've been homeschooling for a year now (COVID plus dissatisfaction with our local district) and I really like the idea of letting my children's interests lead some of the things we study. Given the right environment, I wholeheartedly agree with most of the positives in this book, that kids will naturally gravitate and thrive in subjects and studies that they're interested in. But you know when it's election time and you see all those political ads talking about how the other guy is so terrible a We've been homeschooling for a year now (COVID plus dissatisfaction with our local district) and I really like the idea of letting my children's interests lead some of the things we study. Given the right environment, I wholeheartedly agree with most of the positives in this book, that kids will naturally gravitate and thrive in subjects and studies that they're interested in. But you know when it's election time and you see all those political ads talking about how the other guy is so terrible and will do nothing but ruin things if elected? I would much rather hear about the actual candidate, their platform, and what their plans are to improve things for the community and people in whatever area they're in. I felt that while reading this book. A good majority was talking about the DANGERS of public schooling and it was very off-putting. "Schools have become like bacteria-ridden petri dish, waiting to corrupt any pure specimen placed inside." Many families don't have the luxury of being able to have one parent stay at home to facilitate a child's education. Housing prices and the cost of living keep going up while wages aren't increasing at the same rate. So this book felt very preachy, essentially saying, "you need to figure out how to do this or your kids are going to be ruined." But lots of people just can't swing it financially. Overall, I guess I might recommend this book for someone considering homeschooling so they can think about other approaches. But as a "survivor" of the public school system, it was eye roll inducing and extreme.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kiara

    Great book with golden information and a fast read. I’m just really grateful I got the chance to read this book before I become a parent. Can’t wait to implement what I learned! Also, this isn’t a book about how to be a parent. It’s a book on how to be a teacher-facilitator. The author isn’t saying to let them do whatever the heck they want. He’s saying to let their passions drive what they learn (*cough cough* the title *cough*) As a parent, you still set boundaries and rules pertaining to how t Great book with golden information and a fast read. I’m just really grateful I got the chance to read this book before I become a parent. Can’t wait to implement what I learned! Also, this isn’t a book about how to be a parent. It’s a book on how to be a teacher-facilitator. The author isn’t saying to let them do whatever the heck they want. He’s saying to let their passions drive what they learn (*cough cough* the title *cough*) As a parent, you still set boundaries and rules pertaining to how things are run in the house and with each other. He even says “Allowing more freedoms for children does not mean that they are adults; parents should still parent.” He also mentioned an example like, if they have a passion for music, that doesn’t mean you should allow them to go to raves and such. It’s about balance and that’s your job on how to find that balance. You know your child best. While it would be helpful to have more chapters on solutions to the problems of modern education, it’s enough to get started. It should be enough information for parents to decide how they want to dictate their children’s educational experience. The author is just giving you ideas and the _freedom_ to teach your children the way you think is best.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    The majority of the book deserves 5 stars. I was hesitant to like it, because it seemed like the author didn't really have the life experience to be telling me what to do with my children. But it's more a reiteration of the things John Holt and John Gatto have said before, so not much new information. Well written information though. My biggest complaint is that he spends 4/5ths of the book telling you to stop trying to teach your kids and instead let them learn, but then his examples are all.... The majority of the book deserves 5 stars. I was hesitant to like it, because it seemed like the author didn't really have the life experience to be telling me what to do with my children. But it's more a reiteration of the things John Holt and John Gatto have said before, so not much new information. Well written information though. My biggest complaint is that he spends 4/5ths of the book telling you to stop trying to teach your kids and instead let them learn, but then his examples are all......exactly the same thing as they do in school. Only for stupid subjects. I thought the point of it was that if your kid is really, really, really into airplanes, then you should let them run wild with it. We tend to truly learn the things we're passionate about learning. But by his suggestions if my kid seemed to be getting more and more interested in airplanes I'd try to force that into learning about math, or learning about World War II, or drawing airplanes. So it would still be teacher directed education that is trying to trick the kid by making the subject something they like. So I'd give that section 1/5. But don't let that dissuade you from reading it!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mieresa Denton

    This book is a Winner! I gave this book 5 stars because the author, Connor Boyak, nailed this topic! This is a must read for anyone considering how and why to get their child(ren) off of the conveyor belt of the tired & mundane public school system! Currently my family still follows a cahrter/piblic/homeschool model, however there are still tons and tons of textbooks and worksheets. My 8 year old son is sooooo painfully bored with them and I feel bad to continue to force that stuff on him. I am t This book is a Winner! I gave this book 5 stars because the author, Connor Boyak, nailed this topic! This is a must read for anyone considering how and why to get their child(ren) off of the conveyor belt of the tired & mundane public school system! Currently my family still follows a cahrter/piblic/homeschool model, however there are still tons and tons of textbooks and worksheets. My 8 year old son is sooooo painfully bored with them and I feel bad to continue to force that stuff on him. I am trying desperately to find creative ways to make learning fun for him. Lastly my 15 year old son is also homeschooled (is severely behind on his credits and at a credit recovery school..yikes!) buutttt.....he has a passion of graphic design. He is self taught/auto-didact (since like age 12/13ish?) and we just try to step out of his way and allow him to get as creative as possible. He started a business with it....has paying clients and markets his services & all that good stuff! Soooo all in all this book is truly a winner you won't be disappointed! Thanks Connor!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Wheeler

    Pro-Education, Anti-Public Schools This book is as much against the public school system as it is supportive of taking your child’s education into your own hands. Be ready for a lot of arguments against public schooling, but also for the instruction on how to choose a different path of education for your child(ren). The advice contained in this text is extremely useful for anyone finding themselves wanting to educate a child freely, without a rigid curriculum. It is also helpful to anyone who has Pro-Education, Anti-Public Schools This book is as much against the public school system as it is supportive of taking your child’s education into your own hands. Be ready for a lot of arguments against public schooling, but also for the instruction on how to choose a different path of education for your child(ren). The advice contained in this text is extremely useful for anyone finding themselves wanting to educate a child freely, without a rigid curriculum. It is also helpful to anyone who has a child who struggles to focus on much outside their own personal interests - the reader learns that a child’s interests, even if that interest is a video game, can be used as a teaching tool. I have to say, though, if you have children enrolled in a conventional school, you may take away some guilt or anger from the intense criticisms the author has for this kind of education!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Loved the author’s suggestions about how to follow your children’s passions to spark their educational interest (the author planned an entire curriculum around the game Angry Birds, his son’s passion as a child). However most of the book was a negative tirade against traditional education systems, eg public (and most private) schools. I would have appreciated more insight on how to really put his ideas into action, especially for busy parents who don’t have the time I would assume it would take Loved the author’s suggestions about how to follow your children’s passions to spark their educational interest (the author planned an entire curriculum around the game Angry Birds, his son’s passion as a child). However most of the book was a negative tirade against traditional education systems, eg public (and most private) schools. I would have appreciated more insight on how to really put his ideas into action, especially for busy parents who don’t have the time I would assume it would take for most parents to plan a completely customized homeschool educational plan for their child - or multiple children. It left many practical questions left unanswered mainly on how to implement such an idealistic plan. However it sparked some ideas for integrating my son’s current interests into our homeschool experience, which I appreciated.

  15. 5 out of 5

    James Davis

    I love the principles of love, freedom, learning, empowerment, trust and faith expressed in Passion-Driven Education. Boyack also provides case-studies which prove the efficacy of those principles. It's inspired me to more seriously pursue my own passion-driven education and provide the right environment and guidance for my children to learn and grow. My wife is excited to read it now that I'm done. Reading this little gem reminded me of the sentiments expressed by Albert Einstein: "Curiosity is a I love the principles of love, freedom, learning, empowerment, trust and faith expressed in Passion-Driven Education. Boyack also provides case-studies which prove the efficacy of those principles. It's inspired me to more seriously pursue my own passion-driven education and provide the right environment and guidance for my children to learn and grow. My wife is excited to read it now that I'm done. Reading this little gem reminded me of the sentiments expressed by Albert Einstein: "Curiosity is a delicate little plant that, aside from stimulation, stands mainly in need of freedom." "I never teach my pupils. I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn." "Play is the highest form of research." "It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I love the idea and message of this book! Boyack spends a big portion of the book defining the problem with mainstream education today. One is eager to read his passion-driven solution and it's brilliant! But I can't help feeling that he could've outlined it in an article. Some profound sentences that I have highlighted and will tweet and share. Some children have clearer and more overt passions than others. I have seen children become experts on subjects and I greatly admire them for it. But I' I love the idea and message of this book! Boyack spends a big portion of the book defining the problem with mainstream education today. One is eager to read his passion-driven solution and it's brilliant! But I can't help feeling that he could've outlined it in an article. Some profound sentences that I have highlighted and will tweet and share. Some children have clearer and more overt passions than others. I have seen children become experts on subjects and I greatly admire them for it. But I'm not sure my children have such clear-cut interests which leaves me to gently steer our learning and make it fun and interesting. All-in-all, a very inspiring read which has fueled my enthusiasm for what we are: homeschoolers and life-long learners.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shalyce

    I don't agree that public schools are as disastrous and as completely corrupt as Boyack, but he did share some good information and make some good points regarding the educational process. I feel like his unschooling approach holds some appeal, but doesn't seem realistic unless you have a good bit of time and only one, maybe two children. I do really appreciate the book for its encouragement to critically analyze the educational process, to recognize that mainstream education is often far remove I don't agree that public schools are as disastrous and as completely corrupt as Boyack, but he did share some good information and make some good points regarding the educational process. I feel like his unschooling approach holds some appeal, but doesn't seem realistic unless you have a good bit of time and only one, maybe two children. I do really appreciate the book for its encouragement to critically analyze the educational process, to recognize that mainstream education is often far removed from best practices and to be courageous in going against the norm in favor of what is best for your child.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    What I liked best about this book was the second half, where Boyack gives practical suggestions. (The first half of the book is a summary of John Taylor Gatto's writings about the problems inherent in public schooling. While I love Gatto's writings, he's heavy on analyzing the problem and light on suggesting solutions.) In the last few chapters, Boyack talks about unschooling, Thomas Jefferson Education, Montessori, and hackschooling as alternatives to traditional public schooling. He also gives What I liked best about this book was the second half, where Boyack gives practical suggestions. (The first half of the book is a summary of John Taylor Gatto's writings about the problems inherent in public schooling. While I love Gatto's writings, he's heavy on analyzing the problem and light on suggesting solutions.) In the last few chapters, Boyack talks about unschooling, Thomas Jefferson Education, Montessori, and hackschooling as alternatives to traditional public schooling. He also gives several examples for incorporating art, writing, math, history, science, and so on into your child's interests.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeneece Western

    Quic and easy read that shows the pitfalls of public education. Anyone who has been a part of the educational system will understand that how it was set up and the ways they keep trying to "fix it" are not really ever going to get it to how most parents want their children taught. Having said that I have been most fortunate in my education and my childrens with fabulous teachers that have done everything they can to produce best environments and learning activities while still being at the mercy Quic and easy read that shows the pitfalls of public education. Anyone who has been a part of the educational system will understand that how it was set up and the ways they keep trying to "fix it" are not really ever going to get it to how most parents want their children taught. Having said that I have been most fortunate in my education and my childrens with fabulous teachers that have done everything they can to produce best environments and learning activities while still being at the mercy of the large cogs. I have always been active in all my kids classrooms as well. It has given me plenty to think over as I approach the concept of homeschooling my kids.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vicki Arnold

    Passion-Driven Education is one of those books that will light a fire in homeschool parents. It boldly challenges you to rethink what you believe about education. Boyack does not mince his words. He believes our current education system is failing our society and his observations are hard to argue with. This isn’t just for homeschool parents. Teachers and parents of children in schools public and private would benefit from Boyack’s ideas. The book presents many issues, but it also offers solution Passion-Driven Education is one of those books that will light a fire in homeschool parents. It boldly challenges you to rethink what you believe about education. Boyack does not mince his words. He believes our current education system is failing our society and his observations are hard to argue with. This isn’t just for homeschool parents. Teachers and parents of children in schools public and private would benefit from Boyack’s ideas. The book presents many issues, but it also offers solutions. This book is one that I will recommend for years to come. A must read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karla Oroz

    Pretty informative book. 5 stars We had just started out homeschooling journey, my decision was confirmed when I met a family homeschooling their daughter. I was not clear on how to do it, and funny thing what I was doing was reason driven education. Definitely this book have me more ideas and reasons to continue this style. The first chapters made me realize in a deeper way the non sense of modern education, specifically with understanding the origins. I recommend this book to anyone who wants t Pretty informative book. 5 stars We had just started out homeschooling journey, my decision was confirmed when I met a family homeschooling their daughter. I was not clear on how to do it, and funny thing what I was doing was reason driven education. Definitely this book have me more ideas and reasons to continue this style. The first chapters made me realize in a deeper way the non sense of modern education, specifically with understanding the origins. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to leave the system and wants to know more available open and ideas.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    When I look at the products of our education system (often bored, apathetic, rebellious, unmotivated, uninspired teens) I think there has to be a better way. But, what is it? Boyack shares the history behind our education system, the ways and reasons it is so miserably failing, AND what we can do instead. This book is not for the faint of heart. To act on his recommendations will take courage and a willingness to stand apart from everyone else, but I'm pretty sure the results will be worth it. When I look at the products of our education system (often bored, apathetic, rebellious, unmotivated, uninspired teens) I think there has to be a better way. But, what is it? Boyack shares the history behind our education system, the ways and reasons it is so miserably failing, AND what we can do instead. This book is not for the faint of heart. To act on his recommendations will take courage and a willingness to stand apart from everyone else, but I'm pretty sure the results will be worth it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tirzah

    Great overview of self-directed education Started homeschooling this year (as many have) and been devouring many unschooling books. This book has a lot of information and practical advice on approaching this style of education. This book would be great for homeschoolers, people looking for alternative education, or students who would like to convince their parents to take a new course of action.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Nielsen

    Excellent! Hit on several questions that were swimming around in my head. Connects problems and solutions in our society in a way that elevates the family unit and enhances the value of the individual. Loved it...enough that I stayed up to the early AM hours to finish in one sitting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Halie Marie

    Borderline paranoid Borderline paranoid/conspiracy theory type read, but there was a lot of interesting facts and studies regarding the modern education system. I would recommend to anyone considering homeschooling, even if you have no plan to unschool or to any parent wanting to foster a love for learning in their child

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gene Griffith

    Great perspectives I didn't like public school. I was way smarter than my peers and got in to lots of trouble from them and teachers. I hated the traditional curriculum and would have loved to choose my own adventure. Alas, it was not available back in the day. At least mouth on my family. Now If i could just figure out how to do it for my own kid. Great perspectives I didn't like public school. I was way smarter than my peers and got in to lots of trouble from them and teachers. I hated the traditional curriculum and would have loved to choose my own adventure. Alas, it was not available back in the day. At least mouth on my family. Now If i could just figure out how to do it for my own kid.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie

    ABSOLUTE MUST READ! Every parent should take a moment and read this book. And then read it again. I’m on my second time in a week and this book sits so profoundly with my heart, morals, soul. Everything I felt and deep down knew to be true is brought to light in this book. Thank you so much for writing this book!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lori Scheffler

    Quick motivational read Nothing new or profound but a good review of the topic and lots of helpful examples. Good read for someone new to the idea as well as seasoned homeschoolers or unschoolers.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Azevedo

    Important and eye-opening. I really enjoyed this one and I'll make some changes based on its ideas. I do recommend it. Important and eye-opening. I really enjoyed this one and I'll make some changes based on its ideas. I do recommend it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    M K

    Awesome !!!

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