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AgeProof: How to Live Longer Without Breaking a Hip, Running Out of Money, or Forgetting Where You Put It--The 8 Secrets

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Two of the world's leading experts explain the vital link between health and wealth that could add years to your life and dollars to your retirement savings. All the money in the world doesn't mean a thing if we can't get out of bed. And the healthiest body in the world won't stay that way if we're frazzled about five figures worth of debt. TODAY Show financial expert Two of the world's leading experts explain the vital link between health and wealth that could add years to your life and dollars to your retirement savings. All the money in the world doesn't mean a thing if we can't get out of bed. And the healthiest body in the world won't stay that way if we're frazzled about five figures worth of debt. TODAY Show financial expert Jean Chatzky and the Cleveland Clinic's chief wellness officer Dr. Michael Roizen explain the vital connection between health and wealth--giving readers all the tactics, strategies, and know-how to live longer, healthier, more lucrative lives. The same principles that allow us to achieve a better body will allow us to do the same for our investment portfolio. For instance, physical and financial stability comes down to the same equation: Inflow versus outflow. Do we burn more calories than we ingest? Likewise, are we making more money than we spend? The authors detail scientific ways to improve our behavior so that the answers tilt in the readers' favor. They also offer ways to beat the system by automating how we do things and limiting our decisions in the face of too much food or too much debt. Chatzky and Roizen provide a plan for both financial independence and biological strength with action steps to get you there.


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Two of the world's leading experts explain the vital link between health and wealth that could add years to your life and dollars to your retirement savings. All the money in the world doesn't mean a thing if we can't get out of bed. And the healthiest body in the world won't stay that way if we're frazzled about five figures worth of debt. TODAY Show financial expert Two of the world's leading experts explain the vital link between health and wealth that could add years to your life and dollars to your retirement savings. All the money in the world doesn't mean a thing if we can't get out of bed. And the healthiest body in the world won't stay that way if we're frazzled about five figures worth of debt. TODAY Show financial expert Jean Chatzky and the Cleveland Clinic's chief wellness officer Dr. Michael Roizen explain the vital connection between health and wealth--giving readers all the tactics, strategies, and know-how to live longer, healthier, more lucrative lives. The same principles that allow us to achieve a better body will allow us to do the same for our investment portfolio. For instance, physical and financial stability comes down to the same equation: Inflow versus outflow. Do we burn more calories than we ingest? Likewise, are we making more money than we spend? The authors detail scientific ways to improve our behavior so that the answers tilt in the readers' favor. They also offer ways to beat the system by automating how we do things and limiting our decisions in the face of too much food or too much debt. Chatzky and Roizen provide a plan for both financial independence and biological strength with action steps to get you there.

30 review for AgeProof: How to Live Longer Without Breaking a Hip, Running Out of Money, or Forgetting Where You Put It--The 8 Secrets

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    The subtitle is what caught my eye on this one: Living longer without running out of money or breaking a hip. A money expert and a doctor discuss science of diagnostics, habits, stress, teams (pros and friends), survival (basics on health and wealth), catching up, working, and home. Helpful info I want to note: regularity of medical tests; bottom-line essentials: blood pressure and savings; questions to ask before test or treatment: 1) what difference will it make/will results change our approac The subtitle is what caught my eye on this one: Living longer without running out of money or breaking a hip. A money expert and a doctor discuss science of diagnostics, habits, stress, teams (pros and friends), survival (basics on health and wealth), catching up, working, and home. Helpful info I want to note: regularity of medical tests; bottom-line essentials: blood pressure and savings; questions to ask before test or treatment: 1) what difference will it make/will results change our approach to treatment? 2) how much improvement in prolongation of life or reduction in risk of this problem is treatment actually going to make? 3) how likely and severe are side effects?; reminder on expenses from total income: housing (rent/mortgage, taxes, ins., maintenance) 35%, transportation (car payments, ins., gas, maintenance) 12.5%, debt (credit cards, student loans) repayment 12.5%, savings (emergency cushion, retirement, college) 15%, life (groceries, entertainment, clothing, health care, communication) 25%. The point on hips: jumping games, calcium, leafy greens. Good resource on fixes for all kinds of financial and several health issues; improving your workspace and homespace for health; starting a new job and various investment opportunities; buying a house. A book to read in your thirties and probably every five years or so. The "8 secrets" really aren't secrets and are basically general common sense.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Lots of good advice. The book makes the case that paying attention to both your health and your "wealth" (money issues) can make for Interesting take-aways: *grip test description and how to improve one's grip (p. 18). Who knew how important grip strength was to longevity and health? *having a trusted "team" in place is important as one gets older and needs more assistance with health and wealth issues. *the section on a healthy home that can promote healthy living (stocking good foods in kitchen, d Lots of good advice. The book makes the case that paying attention to both your health and your "wealth" (money issues) can make for Interesting take-aways: *grip test description and how to improve one's grip (p. 18). Who knew how important grip strength was to longevity and health? *having a trusted "team" in place is important as one gets older and needs more assistance with health and wealth issues. *the section on a healthy home that can promote healthy living (stocking good foods in kitchen, de-cluttering, etc.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Janel

    Great overview of how to "age proof" your finances and health. Most of the financial advice I am already doing but would be great for someone to read early in their career. Alot of their advice, I got from my parents when I first started working but not everyone is as fortunate. The healthy living advice was very holistic approach. Great tidbits to tuck away. No quick fixes. I like the concept of substitutions. Great overview of how to "age proof" your finances and health. Most of the financial advice I am already doing but would be great for someone to read early in their career. Alot of their advice, I got from my parents when I first started working but not everyone is as fortunate. The healthy living advice was very holistic approach. Great tidbits to tuck away. No quick fixes. I like the concept of substitutions.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alan Tomkins-Raney

    Really basic, common sense stuff. If you know absolutely nothing about health and personal finance and suddenly wake up wanting to, I suppose this would be a good and useful book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    An interesting combination of health and financial information, suggestions, and advice on how to age gracefully and to prepare for a long healthful and financially secure life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Suezq

    A thoroughly enjoyable book packed with useful advice, written in a laymen's terms (big plus here). Jean Chatzky and Dr. Michael Roizen provide a lot of information on how to stay healthy and maintain your desired standard of living well into your retirement years. It is done in plain English (no need for a degree in finance or medicine). Highly recommended whether you're heading into your retirement years or decades away. A thoroughly enjoyable book packed with useful advice, written in a laymen's terms (big plus here). Jean Chatzky and Dr. Michael Roizen provide a lot of information on how to stay healthy and maintain your desired standard of living well into your retirement years. It is done in plain English (no need for a degree in finance or medicine). Highly recommended whether you're heading into your retirement years or decades away.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Interesting, with a rehash of stuff that both of these authors have already written about before.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kimball

    Great book. Needs to be on every shelf in America. The title is misleading because I didn't remember them specifically listing out 8 secrets. You know if everyone had their beep together in finances and wealth, think of how different our market economy would be. Think of all the wasted dollars that go to marketing unhealthy foods and unnecessary products to spend our money on. All those dollars could be used for a better government (no, I'm not advocating a bigger, filthier liberal government da Great book. Needs to be on every shelf in America. The title is misleading because I didn't remember them specifically listing out 8 secrets. You know if everyone had their beep together in finances and wealth, think of how different our market economy would be. Think of all the wasted dollars that go to marketing unhealthy foods and unnecessary products to spend our money on. All those dollars could be used for a better government (no, I'm not advocating a bigger, filthier liberal government dang it) with improved infrastructure, military, and education. Although if people spent less that would change things drastically. It does make me wonder though. Health and Finances are two hot topics. I recommend audioing this book because the guy co-author, Michael, goes wild while he reads and gets really excited. It's entertaining like Vinnie Tortorich. Being Age Proof is about longevity. Living strong and secure for your whole life. Running out of money before running out of time is the biggest fear that retirees have. I'm worried about it now even at my age. The age old question is how much to save for retirement and the answer is: It depends. You can do your best and guess. Your grip strength is strongly associated with longevity and good health. I hadn't heard of this one before. The thing about fear is that it's temporary and not a lasting motivation. It's about dang time that religion is finally, after thousands of years, barely realizing this and trying a new tactic to get people to change their behavior. Although I did see a billboard the other day that said "Real Christians read the Bible." Yeah that little marketing scheme is retarded and won't work at all. So maybe some religions haven't realized it. But the Eastern ones like Buddhism/Taoism, Confucianism don't play on fear like Christianity and Islam do. The best long-term motivator is the thrill of the chase. Seeing and feeling improvement. I thought that was peculiar. But it certainly works for me. In the war for health and wealth, comparing yourself to others won't do you any good. We also shouldn't use weight as a main data point since it fluctuates so much. But if you don't take stock of where you are you'll never know when you'll fall apart. Awareness of when something occurs (like stress) is the first step to defeating it. The pursuit of perfection is what derails people in their self help plans. Instead of making a mistake and moving on. Most people make a mistake and justify another one. "One more epsiodey on Netflix." House payments including mortgage, tax, insurance, the retarded PMI, should never exceed 28% of your gross income. Assets minus debt equals net worth. Net worth is all about context for retirement in comparison to income. Changing bad habits isn't a matter of will but a matter of reengineering. The key to breaking habits is to find the new connections in your brains circuit board. They have to be replaced by another good thing. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business discussed this concept. I didn't like that these people discredited willpower so easily, though. It is just as important as the other factors in breaking a bad habit or trying to start a good one. We will need the capacity and capability to say no because sooner or later the automation we've designed for ourselves will fail. Someone will throw a wrench in our system, figuratively, and when that happens we need to learn how to drive manually without wrecking until we can get things sorted and in order (being conscious and mindful of course). 40% of what we do everyday isn't governed by decisions but by habits. That percentage seems low to me. Our emotional reaction is up to 3 times faster than our cognitive one. Especially the more primitive the reaction. Yes, emotion is good but it can be a vice. When you have competing priorities correcting one bad habit will set you up for long term success. Don't try to eliminate all your weaknesses in One Foul Swoop. This rarely works unless your personality or tendency fits 180 degree behavioral changes. Credit cards are the financial version of stretchy pants. They allow give and comfort but you don't look attractive in them (using them). Creating connections with others contributes to more oxytocin -the chemical that makes you feel good. (This is an interesting concept in the next book I read The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit.) Your accountability buddy needs to be someone that will listen and be honest. It can't be a best friend, spouse, or Mom. If you need an accountability buddy I will be that guy for you. Message me. When dealing with financial advisers always get references and call them. Ask if they own shares in the investments they are recommending to you. How did they handle the 2008 recession? Many eating habits are based on childhood associations. I wonder what I can trace mine back to. I also wonder if the reason we have weaker bones today is because of our cushy tennis shoes. They absorb too much of the impact while we walk. Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder and Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen both discussed this topic. To protect our bones we should engage in jumping games. The best exercise is the one you love. Your body has a finite supply of stem cells to heal itself with. You can either use them for bigger injuries or waster them on little ney-ney ones such as sunburns and heart burn. Depression is one of the signals your body tells you that something isn't quite right and you should be thinking of coping strategies to get your mind and body on the right track. (Yes I know depression is a mental illness.) Feeling that you are the one in charge makes you happier. Yes. Yes. Yes. That's why addictions are so crappy. This book discussed buying a home vs renting and I loved that they didn't just say "always buy a home no matter what because renting is wasting your money." People think owning a home is a no brainer and such a lucrative idea. How come the majority of home owners aren't just loaded, especially the ones that own multiple homes like my sister in law? I wish we'd stop that default mindset that we have to own a home as quickly as possible. The authors also recommended not paying off the home right away and instead use that extra money to invest. This goes against what Dave Ramsey teaches but I don't think it should be discredited so fast.

  9. 5 out of 5

    D.j. Lang

    Were these types of books out there when I was younger and I just ignored them? Maybe. Then, again, when I was younger, families thought they were feeding their children healthy food if they could afford the new boxed cereals, commercially canned fruits and vegetables (loaded with sugar and salt), and a commercial loaf of bread that could be molded into a marshmallow (with same type of texture). I started AgeProof on January 1 and finished it on February 9. The book is meant to be worked through Were these types of books out there when I was younger and I just ignored them? Maybe. Then, again, when I was younger, families thought they were feeding their children healthy food if they could afford the new boxed cereals, commercially canned fruits and vegetables (loaded with sugar and salt), and a commercial loaf of bread that could be molded into a marshmallow (with same type of texture). I started AgeProof on January 1 and finished it on February 9. The book is meant to be worked through not raced through. The subtitle is "Living Longer Without Running Out of Money or Breaking a Hip." Jean Chatzky provides the financial information, Michael F. Roizen, MD provides the health information, and Ted Spiker writes it in a way so that the reader is not bored to death. The format is easy to work with and humorous as Spiker "spikes" (I had to) the information with quips from the two experts. The chapters alternate between finance and health (with connections to each other interwoven). I have not read any of these authors other works so it was not a rehash for me. I did know much of the information, but it was nice to see it in writing with the background research written in common vocabulary and not medical or financial jargon. Reviews are all over the place with this book -- the first that I've seen that happen on a site like Goodreads. The fluctuations in ratings seem to come from whether the reader gained much from the book or little, and that makes sense. If you already know the information, then the book will be boring or shallow. If the reader doesn't want to hear that Americans need to eat healthier, then that reader is going to think the doctor is pompous. Was it totally new to me? No, but did I find useful information or encouragement? Yes. Do I think the book is worth working through, if only as a checkup if you already know everything? Yes. Do I already believe in healthy eating and living healthy financially as well? Yes. My rating range: 3-5.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Denis S

    This book, apparently an idea by two authors to rehash the obvious combining medical/financial health, is pathetic and shameful. Ideas such as keeping a soft toothbrush in your medicine cabinet or removing loose throw rugs so you don't trip over them are about as full of wisdom as rehashing asset allocation for your money. The margins of the book include "think bubbles" in which the two authors talk back and forth to, presumably, meld their medical and financial ideas into one place. That adds m This book, apparently an idea by two authors to rehash the obvious combining medical/financial health, is pathetic and shameful. Ideas such as keeping a soft toothbrush in your medicine cabinet or removing loose throw rugs so you don't trip over them are about as full of wisdom as rehashing asset allocation for your money. The margins of the book include "think bubbles" in which the two authors talk back and forth to, presumably, meld their medical and financial ideas into one place. That adds more corny (no, stupid) context to an already stupid premise. Shame on these authors, and snake oil and publicity whore Dr. Oz who writes the forward, for ripping off presumably older folks who really could benefit from the wisdom not contained in "Age-Proof".

  11. 4 out of 5

    John (JP)

    Age-proof living longer without running out of money or breaking a hip.The title says it all. The premise of this book is that diet aging and finance are all intertwined. The idea makes a certain level of sense, but like most of the diet books I have read its the doing that's the hard part. The book is divded into five sections each elaborating on a different aspect of Jean Chatzky a TV financial guru and Dr Michael Roizen a well known doctor at the Cleveland Clinic's idea.Most of what is in the Age-proof living longer without running out of money or breaking a hip.The title says it all. The premise of this book is that diet aging and finance are all intertwined. The idea makes a certain level of sense, but like most of the diet books I have read its the doing that's the hard part. The book is divded into five sections each elaborating on a different aspect of Jean Chatzky a TV financial guru and Dr Michael Roizen a well known doctor at the Cleveland Clinic's idea.Most of what is in the book is the same advice that they have given on their various TV appearances. The strength of the book is in its 1st part titled System Checks. This part gives the reader guideposts as to where they should be physically and financially. This book is full of self tests that force self examination. Fortunately the tests require no extra tech than a tape measure, a pencil and an active mind. The physical test will such things as how many push ups can you do in one minute, given your age, how many curls can you do. One test that surprised me was the simplest. Can you stand up from a chair without using your arms ? The financial self tests are a little harder requiring the reader to know their income and expenditures. The point of part one is to collect data so you can know where you stand and have the ability to measure progress.The weakest parts of the book is its definite bias toward married people. It assumes that the reader has a spouse as a key part of their support system. When it addresses insurance and financial needs there is no mention or thought of the peculiar needs of the single person.This is a good book and might be worth buying and is definitely worth getting from your library for test drive. It is available in both audiobook form and e-book form.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    The authors offer us a very fresh, novel and brilliant perspective on the convergences between health and wealth, as well as how to implement them based on common principles. It is the first book I have knowledge that brings together both relevant topics in human life and integrates them through 8 ways to manage them with smart tactics to make good decisions. The premise of the authors is the current reality where life expenctancy has increased significantly and most middle-aged adults are not pl The authors offer us a very fresh, novel and brilliant perspective on the convergences between health and wealth, as well as how to implement them based on common principles. It is the first book I have knowledge that brings together both relevant topics in human life and integrates them through 8 ways to manage them with smart tactics to make good decisions. The premise of the authors is the current reality where life expenctancy has increased significantly and most middle-aged adults are not planning a financial longevity that allows us to face a much longer, dignified, happy and with sufficient age means. Although I want to mention that the circumstances are different for our children, that due to pollution, destruction of ecohabitats, processed foods and pesticides, the statistics point to a deterioration in the quality of their life with respect to our generation, therefore they are facing new health conditions such as high chances of having cancer and a very competitive fast-paced economy. I totally agree with the authors that it requires new ways of thinking, new strategies and developing a new set of skills. The value of this book is that they propose a way to achieve good health and prolonged wealth for more decades, accompanied by a reduction of the stress associated with these topics. My gratitude to the Publisher and NetGalley for allowing me to review the book

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I need to preface this review by stating that I am an avid reader of personal finance literature, and am pretty knowledgeable in this topic. I am also a very healthy, middle-aged person. That said, I was very intrigued by the concept of discussing how to create a lifestyle that enables long term health and financial security, however, I found the book to be pretty disappointing. I did like how each section of the book was broken up into a health section and a financial section. Unfortunately the I need to preface this review by stating that I am an avid reader of personal finance literature, and am pretty knowledgeable in this topic. I am also a very healthy, middle-aged person. That said, I was very intrigued by the concept of discussing how to create a lifestyle that enables long term health and financial security, however, I found the book to be pretty disappointing. I did like how each section of the book was broken up into a health section and a financial section. Unfortunately the book is very shallow in it's content, especially the personal finance portions. I guess the forward by Dr. Oz was a sign of the 'Oprah-ish' style of the book. I did find some of the health sections interesting, but overall it was a disappointment. I will say that if someone is just starting to read up on personal finance and personal health, this would be a good introductory book. If everyone could follow half of the advice and guidelines in this book, the world would be a much healthier and financially secure place for most. If you've done some reading on personal finance and health, I'd pass on this book. If this is one of the first books on these topics that you're considering, it's not a bad introduction that ties both of these topics together.

  14. 5 out of 5

    KM

    Kind of embarrassed by how long it took me to read this book, but I’m finally through it. This book literally touches on everything from what medicines you should keep stocked in your home to how different types of mortgages and IRAs work. It’s a great book for beginners in finance or those who are older but want to optimize their health. The correlation between health and wealth is emphasized throughout this book because you can’t enjoy wealth without being healthy in retirement, and you won’t Kind of embarrassed by how long it took me to read this book, but I’m finally through it. This book literally touches on everything from what medicines you should keep stocked in your home to how different types of mortgages and IRAs work. It’s a great book for beginners in finance or those who are older but want to optimize their health. The correlation between health and wealth is emphasized throughout this book because you can’t enjoy wealth without being healthy in retirement, and you won’t enjoy good health if you’re in financial stress. It’s a good book, but three stars from me because there wasn’t much new info here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    It was interesting and helpful to see correlations between financial and physical health, with many good ideas for people to get their situations in line to help them prepare for the future. However, I think it was really written for those that are still working, and probably 25-30 years younger than myself. A lot of their suggestions do make sense and would help someone trying to figure it all out, but I think most people know if they are eating well or not, and not sure this book would motivat It was interesting and helpful to see correlations between financial and physical health, with many good ideas for people to get their situations in line to help them prepare for the future. However, I think it was really written for those that are still working, and probably 25-30 years younger than myself. A lot of their suggestions do make sense and would help someone trying to figure it all out, but I think most people know if they are eating well or not, and not sure this book would motivate someone into changing his/her lifestyle.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I am not the intended audience for this book since I am already retired but I thought there might be something in it for me. There was but not as much as I had hoped. I enjoyed Jean's writing because she always imparts knowledge and information in an easy to understand manner, almost like a friend or family member. However, I found Dr. Roizan's contributions to be less friendly and at times he seemed pompous and disdainful. His part is what made this a long slog for me. I did learn a few things I am not the intended audience for this book since I am already retired but I thought there might be something in it for me. There was but not as much as I had hoped. I enjoyed Jean's writing because she always imparts knowledge and information in an easy to understand manner, almost like a friend or family member. However, I found Dr. Roizan's contributions to be less friendly and at times he seemed pompous and disdainful. His part is what made this a long slog for me. I did learn a few things from him, but not enough to rate more than 3 stars.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Chummy style is easy to skim through quickly. Lots of solid, basic advice is presented from a dual health/wealth point of view. Both authors are big on the concept of gathering a team of support staff, i.e. doctors, financial advisors, etc, to help one get and stay on track. These services aren't exactly free of charge, though, which isn't addressed. Almost a little too wide-ranging in scope on the financial side, so the audience might be young or retirement-age. Almost a little too general in c Chummy style is easy to skim through quickly. Lots of solid, basic advice is presented from a dual health/wealth point of view. Both authors are big on the concept of gathering a team of support staff, i.e. doctors, financial advisors, etc, to help one get and stay on track. These services aren't exactly free of charge, though, which isn't addressed. Almost a little too wide-ranging in scope on the financial side, so the audience might be young or retirement-age. Almost a little too general in coverage on the health side. I enjoyed the voices of both Ms. Chatzy & Dr. Roizen.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    My rating is really 3.5 stars. This book is interesting in that it takes a wholistic approach to managing your money and your health and discusses their interrelationship. I listened to the audiobook. Both authors do a good job of enthusiastically presenting the material. I found I knew a lot of the financial information already and some of the health stuff was common sense. But that said, I also found information I wasn’t familiar with—especially the medical stuff. It’s worth a listen and makes My rating is really 3.5 stars. This book is interesting in that it takes a wholistic approach to managing your money and your health and discusses their interrelationship. I listened to the audiobook. Both authors do a good job of enthusiastically presenting the material. I found I knew a lot of the financial information already and some of the health stuff was common sense. But that said, I also found information I wasn’t familiar with—especially the medical stuff. It’s worth a listen and makes what is often dry subject matter relatively entertaining.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ligaya

    Not a lot of new information here, but rather packaged together in an interesting way - relating financial health with personal health. The new things I did learn about: health savings accounts (HSA), deferred-income annuities (QLAC), and the preferred sunscreen Dr. Roizen recommends (with micronized zinc oxide and nothing else as ingredients). This is a great book that lays out all those adult things you need to do to protect your health and wealth.

  20. 5 out of 5

    W. Whalin

    Money and Health Have an Intimate Connection I have known Jean Chatzky and her financial expertise from seeing her on The Today Show. Until I heard AGE-PROOF which Chatzky wrote with Dr. Michael F. Roizen, I had not connected health and money. Dr. Roizen reads the health chapters and Chatzky reads the financial chapters which alternate throughout the book. The concept is engaging and enlightening. I enjoyed this audiobook and highly recommend it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    It was OK. I was expecting more innovative solutions in this book than were present. It's kind of "Adulting" for people in midlife, a collection of tips on how to do the basics of living for people at that stage of the life course. I think most people who are likely to pick this up are going to be doing some of what they're recommending already, so it might be more useful as a book you flip through for specific sections on areas you want to improve than as a permanent addition to your library. It was OK. I was expecting more innovative solutions in this book than were present. It's kind of "Adulting" for people in midlife, a collection of tips on how to do the basics of living for people at that stage of the life course. I think most people who are likely to pick this up are going to be doing some of what they're recommending already, so it might be more useful as a book you flip through for specific sections on areas you want to improve than as a permanent addition to your library.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carter Hemphill

    The chapters alternative between health and financial information. The authors provide a lot of good advice, although some of the topics were too general and the use of comment boxes for authors to interject various thoughts was annoying. The book is a good beginning for those needing to learn more about health and financial issues, although the reader will likely need to pursue other books to get a more comprehensive coverage of the material.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Travis McKinstry

    I hope this doesn’t come across as egotistical, and perhaps it’s just because of my profession, but I felt like most of this information was extremely rudimentary. This book was either targeted for really old people who have absolutely no idea what any health indicator from the doctor means, or for really young people who haven’t learned the basics of health and money. Either way, if you’re a millennial, you likely already know everything this book has to offer.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Full of useful insights and ways to measure your health and money. I found the health measures easier - but that is because they aren't something that requires you to figure out records and what not. Following the structure of the book - and actually doing the exercises, takes time. It is not entirely enjoyable. However, I did feel more aware of my current status and more prepared for future after doing the exercies. Full of useful insights and ways to measure your health and money. I found the health measures easier - but that is because they aren't something that requires you to figure out records and what not. Following the structure of the book - and actually doing the exercises, takes time. It is not entirely enjoyable. However, I did feel more aware of my current status and more prepared for future after doing the exercies.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth

    I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. Lots of great advice and many good suggestions in this book. A good book to read before you actually need it. Excellent for children of older parents as well as the aging themselves. Very supportive and realistic. Not another fad book, but real advice for the realities faced by those getting older in today's complicated world. I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. Lots of great advice and many good suggestions in this book. A good book to read before you actually need it. Excellent for children of older parents as well as the aging themselves. Very supportive and realistic. Not another fad book, but real advice for the realities faced by those getting older in today's complicated world.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    An interesting combination and good review of money and physical health as one ages. Mostly a review, with a few new insights on both topics. The name really grabbed my attention as health and wealth are connected. Some fun ideas stated in a fun way!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Listening to the library version is great, but none of the PDFs are available, which will make it very hard to remember the lists, websites and plethora of info the book provides. This would probably be one book that would be better to own so you could use it as a reference.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tess Mertens-Johnson

    As I read this book, I saws that I was doing most of what they recommended for someone my age and my income. Hmmm.. I was saving, paying things off , exercising regularity and eating well. There were some extra tips I took to heart, but I felt pretty good that I was on the right path.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kyra Meadows

    Touches all aspects of live and savings as well as health. Small consist things make the most difference. Nothing earth shattering but good reminder to stay on track and easy does it

  30. 4 out of 5

    Neda Oshideri

    What an amazingly well written and well thought out book! I plan on reading this multiple times throughout my life since it has so much information regarding all aspects and all age groups.

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