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American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century, Volume 2: Melville Stickney American Indian Poetry Folk Songs Spirituals

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The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfe The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfect gift for everyone.


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The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfe The library of America is dedicated to publishing America's best and most significant writing in handsome, enduring volumes, featuring authoritative texts. Hailed as the "finest-looking, longest-lasting editions ever made" (The New Republic), Library of America volumes make a fine gift for any occasion. Now, with exactly one hundred volumes to choose from, there is a perfect gift for everyone.

30 review for American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century, Volume 2: Melville Stickney American Indian Poetry Folk Songs Spirituals

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tim Genetti

    Read volume 1 and 2. Stickney and Lanier are real su'prises. Took me forever because Melville is a tough read even at his best. Volume 1 really didn't have any su'prises. I would say read Cullen Bryant if you haven't already. I also read American Poetry: 17th and 18th Century which I would also suggest. I have American poetry: 20th Century volumes 1 and 2 on my shelf (although I am getting tired of Ezra, Stevens, Eliot) which I look forward to reading. I would suggest reading the 19th century be Read volume 1 and 2. Stickney and Lanier are real su'prises. Took me forever because Melville is a tough read even at his best. Volume 1 really didn't have any su'prises. I would say read Cullen Bryant if you haven't already. I also read American Poetry: 17th and 18th Century which I would also suggest. I have American poetry: 20th Century volumes 1 and 2 on my shelf (although I am getting tired of Ezra, Stevens, Eliot) which I look forward to reading. I would suggest reading the 19th century because John Hollander edited the volumes and he has good taste.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    The poems in this set have an uncertain feel. In Volume 1, there is a sense of a movement toward something, toward an American self-awakening, toward an American pride that culminates in Walt Whitman. This set is much less sure of itself. Certainly Dickinson is among the first rank of poets. Then there is the interesting E.A. Robinson, the mysterious Stephen Crane and the sometimes-awkward verse of Melville. A new, post-Civil War America was in the making, the industrial revolution was in full s The poems in this set have an uncertain feel. In Volume 1, there is a sense of a movement toward something, toward an American self-awakening, toward an American pride that culminates in Walt Whitman. This set is much less sure of itself. Certainly Dickinson is among the first rank of poets. Then there is the interesting E.A. Robinson, the mysterious Stephen Crane and the sometimes-awkward verse of Melville. A new, post-Civil War America was in the making, the industrial revolution was in full swing, a new scientific age was coming, it was the dawning of the Gilded Age: American poets seemed unsure what to say or do in this rapidly changing world. Of the time and the poets, this is an excellent collection. Dickinson and maybe E.A. Robinson are the only poets you might want to dig deeper into. The rest of the poets/poems are unknown, with some, like Melville and Crane, known for other forms. But almost any major poem of the time period is included here. This set is not as vital as Volume 1, but it does bring together some vital pieces of the American Poetry puzzle. If you have a deep interest in American poetry, this is highly recommended. My thoughts on the poets as I re-read them: Melville – I said in another review of Melville’s poetry that he wrote poetry when he wrote prose. Yet when he wrote poetry, the results were not always kind. Most of his poetry is stiff and awkward, particularly Clarel. Trying to fit his large, KJV Old Testament voice into a petite lyric form never seemed to work. He doesn't find his voice until the John Marr set. The lines get longer and the rhythm and the rhymes relax. Dickinson – Dickinson is energetic and groundbreaking, eccentric and innovative. My interests don’t always align with hers, but one can’t deny her passion and the power of her verse. This selection hits her many highlights. If you are interested in reading more, I highly recommend Emily Dickinson’s Poems: As She Preserved Them. This is an excellent volume. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... Crane – For more than a hundred years Stephen Crane’s poetry has earned mixed reviews. He’s never ranked among the greats, but to ignore him seems unthinkable. His works have power and energy. In my lengthier review here https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4..., I question whether he should be judged by the measures of poetry. He more of a teller of parables, at least in Black Riders. One can only wonder what he would have done had he lived longer.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    What I have read I really enjoyed. A great introduction to a lot of good poetry

  4. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  5. 4 out of 5

    The Chuck

  6. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  7. 5 out of 5

    Townsend Scholz

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Jones

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alana Holt

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chesshistorian

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wendi (BrokenBinding)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cora Jane

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ted Morgan

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bap

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  16. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beau Daignault

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zdenko Juskuv

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelvin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hochhalter

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

  23. 4 out of 5

    kerrycat

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dr. John McCartney

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Metcalf

  26. 5 out of 5

    Weloytty

  27. 5 out of 5

    Trace Lara Hentz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike Elliott

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