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The latest entry in the multiple New York Times best-selling Ring of Fire series created by Eric Flint. After carving a free state for itself in war-torn 17th century Europe, citizens of the modern town of Grantville, West Virginia go on a quest for the makings of medicines that have yet to be invented in 17th century Europe. The United States of Europe, the new nation form The latest entry in the multiple New York Times best-selling Ring of Fire series created by Eric Flint. After carving a free state for itself in war-torn 17th century Europe, citizens of the modern town of Grantville, West Virginia go on a quest for the makings of medicines that have yet to be invented in 17th century Europe. The United States of Europe, the new nation formed by an alliance between the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus and the West Virginians hurled back in time by a cosmic accident—the Ring of Fire—is beset by enemies on all sides. The U.S.E. needs a reliable source of opiates for those wounded in action, as well as other goods not available in Europe. The Prime Minister of the U.S.E., Mike Stearns, sends a mission to the Mughal Empire of India with the aim of securing a trade deal with the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan. The mission consists of a mixed group of up-timers and down-timers, including paramedics, a squad of soldiers with railroad-building experience, a spy and a pair of swindlers. On reaching India the mission finds a grieving emperor obsessed with building the Taj Mahal, harem-bound princesses, warrior princes, and an Afghan adventurer embroiled in the many plots of the Mughal court. The emperor’s sons are plotting against each other and war is brewing with the newly risen Sikh faith. But in the midst of these intrigues, the U.S.E. mission finds a ally: the brilliant and beautiful Jahanara Begum, the eldest daughter of Shah Jahan. She is the mistress of her father's harem and a power in her own right, who wishes to learn more of these women who are free in a way she can scarcely comprehend. When the Emperor learns of what befalls his empire and children in the time that was, he makes every effort to change their fate. But emperors, princesses, and princes are no more immune to the inexorable waves of change created by the Ring of Fire than are the Americans themselves. About Eric Flint's groundbreaking Ring of Fire series: “This alternate history series is . . . a landmark…”—Booklist About Eric Flint's best-selling Jao Empire series coauthored with K.D. Wentworth and David Carrico: “The action is fast and furious . . . a trimphant story . . . ”—The Midwest Book Review “Building to an exhilarating conclusion, this book cries out for a sequel.”—Publishers Weekly About Eric Flint's Boundary series, coauthored with Ryk E. Spoor: “. . . fast-paced sci-fi espionage thriller . . . light in tone and hard on science . . .” —Publishers Weekly on Boundary “The whole crew from Flint and Spoor's Boundary are back . . . Tensions run high throughout the Ceres mission . . . a fine choice for any collection.” —Publishers Weekly on Threshold “[P]aleontology, engineering, and space flight, puzzles in linguistics, biology, physics, and evolution further the story, as well as wacky humor, academic rivalries, and even some sweet romances.” —School Library Journal on Boundary  


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The latest entry in the multiple New York Times best-selling Ring of Fire series created by Eric Flint. After carving a free state for itself in war-torn 17th century Europe, citizens of the modern town of Grantville, West Virginia go on a quest for the makings of medicines that have yet to be invented in 17th century Europe. The United States of Europe, the new nation form The latest entry in the multiple New York Times best-selling Ring of Fire series created by Eric Flint. After carving a free state for itself in war-torn 17th century Europe, citizens of the modern town of Grantville, West Virginia go on a quest for the makings of medicines that have yet to be invented in 17th century Europe. The United States of Europe, the new nation formed by an alliance between the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus and the West Virginians hurled back in time by a cosmic accident—the Ring of Fire—is beset by enemies on all sides. The U.S.E. needs a reliable source of opiates for those wounded in action, as well as other goods not available in Europe. The Prime Minister of the U.S.E., Mike Stearns, sends a mission to the Mughal Empire of India with the aim of securing a trade deal with the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan. The mission consists of a mixed group of up-timers and down-timers, including paramedics, a squad of soldiers with railroad-building experience, a spy and a pair of swindlers. On reaching India the mission finds a grieving emperor obsessed with building the Taj Mahal, harem-bound princesses, warrior princes, and an Afghan adventurer embroiled in the many plots of the Mughal court. The emperor’s sons are plotting against each other and war is brewing with the newly risen Sikh faith. But in the midst of these intrigues, the U.S.E. mission finds a ally: the brilliant and beautiful Jahanara Begum, the eldest daughter of Shah Jahan. She is the mistress of her father's harem and a power in her own right, who wishes to learn more of these women who are free in a way she can scarcely comprehend. When the Emperor learns of what befalls his empire and children in the time that was, he makes every effort to change their fate. But emperors, princesses, and princes are no more immune to the inexorable waves of change created by the Ring of Fire than are the Americans themselves. About Eric Flint's groundbreaking Ring of Fire series: “This alternate history series is . . . a landmark…”—Booklist About Eric Flint's best-selling Jao Empire series coauthored with K.D. Wentworth and David Carrico: “The action is fast and furious . . . a trimphant story . . . ”—The Midwest Book Review “Building to an exhilarating conclusion, this book cries out for a sequel.”—Publishers Weekly About Eric Flint's Boundary series, coauthored with Ryk E. Spoor: “. . . fast-paced sci-fi espionage thriller . . . light in tone and hard on science . . .” —Publishers Weekly on Boundary “The whole crew from Flint and Spoor's Boundary are back . . . Tensions run high throughout the Ceres mission . . . a fine choice for any collection.” —Publishers Weekly on Threshold “[P]aleontology, engineering, and space flight, puzzles in linguistics, biology, physics, and evolution further the story, as well as wacky humor, academic rivalries, and even some sweet romances.” —School Library Journal on Boundary  

30 review for 1636: Mission to the Mughals

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eric Moore

    Some of the 1632 books suffer from an overly expanded cast, either because they're a mainline novel which has to tie in to the rest of the concurrent goings on, or because (it seems to me) they evolved out of a collection of loosely coupled short stories. This book has a more manageable cast of characters than many. Although it can be roughly separated into two sub-novels that only really start to link up at the end. There's the story of the Grantviller embassy to the Mughal empire, and the stor Some of the 1632 books suffer from an overly expanded cast, either because they're a mainline novel which has to tie in to the rest of the concurrent goings on, or because (it seems to me) they evolved out of a collection of loosely coupled short stories. This book has a more manageable cast of characters than many. Although it can be roughly separated into two sub-novels that only really start to link up at the end. There's the story of the Grantviller embassy to the Mughal empire, and the story of the court intrigues of the Mughal empire, and the effect of the ring of fire on them, and only towards the very end do these stories have any real effect on one another. The latter strikes me as the better of the two stories, partly because I think I'm supposed to remember the Grantvillers from some previous story, but I don't, either because I never read it (probably because it was only published in the gazette) or because I forgot it (perfectly likely, given the aforementioned panaloply of characters). That said, this is one of the best (if not the best) non mainline 1632 novels, and as tightly plotted and well characterized as any in the entire series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    A very good read, quite enjoyable! 2018 re-read: A sequel can't come soon enough! A very good read, quite enjoyable! 2018 re-read: A sequel can't come soon enough!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lexxi Kitty

    This entry in the series starts nearish the beginning, oh, maybe a year after the beginning of the series (as in, roughly 1633 - with the series starting in 1632 with the arrival of 20th Century Grantsville West Virginia in the middle of the Germanies trapped in the 30 years war), when Mike Stearns and various other people are setting up a group of people to head off to India on a trading mission. Mostly to get gunpowder and opium. Sent on the trip are some railroad people, an EMT, a con-man, an This entry in the series starts nearish the beginning, oh, maybe a year after the beginning of the series (as in, roughly 1633 - with the series starting in 1632 with the arrival of 20th Century Grantsville West Virginia in the middle of the Germanies trapped in the 30 years war), when Mike Stearns and various other people are setting up a group of people to head off to India on a trading mission. Mostly to get gunpowder and opium. Sent on the trip are some railroad people, an EMT, a con-man, and a con-woman. Oh, and a spy. The book then makes snippet jumps up to 1636. The book is not just from the European perspective, though, no there are many Indians who get a turn at the POV wheel. Many of whom share variations of the name ‘Johan’. And are related to people with a name like that. (Not to be confused with John, the lead European dude (well, he's from Granstville West VA USA, but that's in Europe now)). The book is an interesting look inside Mughal India. My only real problem with the book was the part where I didn’t really like any of the characters. I didn’t dislike them, per se, I just didn’t like any of them. Oh, and then there’s the problem wherein I looked up the historical characters – a good portion of the Indians – so that I’d have a better understanding of the place and time – which is a problem only in the part where I lost myself reading about them, learning about them, then trying to forget all I learned because I didn’t want to apply that to these characters. Or, I should say, want to remember their real life histories, and let that bias me in what I was reading. Right. So. Europeans head to India and wander around. Indians intriguing as they apparently do, wandering around fighting each other, and attempting to mourn and build the Taj Mahal. There was an abundance of weepy emotional men in this book – from the lead European (by way of Grantville West VA) who kept whimpering from being forced to kill a kid (then whimpering over people dying near him; then whimpering about other things), to various Indians – the hot-headed Muslim leader, the Emperor guy alternating mourning for his dead wife (sorry, for his favorite wife – who died, he both has other wives and has concubines - and there's talk of him constantly 'using' them, carnally) with bouts of anger, to . . . um, well, others were overly emotional as well. Bah, I fought to find something to write, but I’m not really getting anywhere. Interesting enough book. Set in India (mostly), and involving no character who has ever been seen before in this series (at least the full-length books I’ve read) except for Sterns (or was that Stearns?) and Nasi (or whatever that fella's name was). Oh, and like many of the books in this series, there are many plot-lines that remain unresolved by the time the book ended. Rating: 3.6 December 22 2017

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steven Mix

    When I previously considered purchasing alternative history/historical fiction, I thought of dusty tropes and strange dialects. It didn't interest me in the least. I sure am thankful that I took the time to pick up this book though. It was incredible! Let me tell you, without spoiling much; this book involves time travel, mercenaries, hill-billies, ancient India, and even Star Trek jokes. Eric Flint and Griffin Barber also prove that you can tell pretty historically accurate timelines and still When I previously considered purchasing alternative history/historical fiction, I thought of dusty tropes and strange dialects. It didn't interest me in the least. I sure am thankful that I took the time to pick up this book though. It was incredible! Let me tell you, without spoiling much; this book involves time travel, mercenaries, hill-billies, ancient India, and even Star Trek jokes. Eric Flint and Griffin Barber also prove that you can tell pretty historically accurate timelines and still get wicked with your plotlines. The action in this book plays out as it would in blockbuster films, and lord is there a lot of it. Plus there are some detailed moments of intrigue that I would have never considered occurring. For instance, a harem is not just a place just filled with sexy women; you won't find that tired cliche in this book. I can also tell you that a harem is also NOT neutral ground. Which brings me to another point, the women in this story are strong and every bit as brutal as the men when they need to be. This book is also a fascinating look at the caste system of India. I had never read any of the Grantville books, but I'm glad I started with this one, and the end of it had me looking up details about a throne I'd never heard of... I shouldn't say anymore, and I am worried I might have spoiled it already for myself by googling history but, whatever. I guess it's just a testament to how good this book was. Buy this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Walt Boyes

    Griff Barber and Eric Flint did a wonderful job of marrying the 1632 universe and the world of the Mughal empire. The Grantvillers who travel to India are well-described and real, but above all, the Indian people are real, three dimensional and fascinating. This book provides a real slice of life look at the Mughal empire in the time of Shah Jehan and the building of the Taj Mahal. Readers of the 1632 universe are accustomed to the blend of technology, sociology and history that makes a 1632 sto Griff Barber and Eric Flint did a wonderful job of marrying the 1632 universe and the world of the Mughal empire. The Grantvillers who travel to India are well-described and real, but above all, the Indian people are real, three dimensional and fascinating. This book provides a real slice of life look at the Mughal empire in the time of Shah Jehan and the building of the Taj Mahal. Readers of the 1632 universe are accustomed to the blend of technology, sociology and history that makes a 1632 story come alive. If you believe that the 1632 universe is Eurocentric, and too caucasian for you, this book, and Iver Cooper's previous offering, 1636: Seas of Fortune, will set you straight.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Shellenbarger

    Mission to the Mughals is another good universe-expanding volume in the Ring of Fire series. The United States of Europe is in need of a good source of opium for medicine and saltpeter for its arms industry and the only good source for either in the 17th century is the Mughal Empire, which dominates India. Unfortunately for the USE, the Mughal Empire has maintained tight restrictions on foreign trade and (apart from the Dutch) most of the firmans (trade permissions for ferenghi (yup, just like S Mission to the Mughals is another good universe-expanding volume in the Ring of Fire series. The United States of Europe is in need of a good source of opium for medicine and saltpeter for its arms industry and the only good source for either in the 17th century is the Mughal Empire, which dominates India. Unfortunately for the USE, the Mughal Empire has maintained tight restrictions on foreign trade and (apart from the Dutch) most of the firmans (trade permissions for ferenghi (yup, just like Star Trek), aka foreigners) are held by the USE's enemies of the League of Ostend. In order to win the Sultan's favor, the USE sends an embassy with experts on medicine and railroad construction, areas that could be of great benefit to the Mughals. The greatest threat to the USE's trade mission is the internal Mughals politics, especially since the Sultan has received word of the future history brought back with Grantville. Not only has this revealed the ignominious collapse of the Mughal Empire's power over the next century and the British conquest of India, but, more importantly, it has revealed that the seeds of those events were brought about by the succession crisis that followed the current sultan's rule and the rise of his fratricidal Muslim-Fundamentalist son Aurangzeb whose anti-Hindu/Sikh policies turned the subcontinent's religious majority against him and whose wars of expansion weakened the Empire at the same time that rival European powers were expanding their presence, fueled by the great Imperial wars of the late 17th and early 18th century. So the USE mission finds things unsettled in the court upon their arrival, to say the least, and is forced to turn to unconventional allies, Salim, a young Afghan officer who has risen rapidly in Court (thanks to his role in salvaging the Mughal's mission to the USE, which was mostly disastrous thanks to the impolitic idiocy of their ambassador, who ended up getting poisoned by his mercenary escorts (as detailed in a short story in one of the collections, though I can't remember which off the top of my head)) and Begum Sahib Jahanara, the Sultan's favorite daughter and ruler of his harem, who is frustrated at her fate, as her father has sworn she will never marry (due to his fear that it would further complicate the succession), although she is also his most loyal and competent child. Things are further complicated by conflict with the Sikh and with the petty sultanates of the Deccan. Unlike some of the other Ring of Fire side stories that have to focus on fairly petty events, there is a lot of big stuff going on in Mission to the Mughals and thanks to a large number of interesting characters (up-time and down-time) and a rigorous exploration of Mughal court politics, this is a really interesting book. In fact, it's got so much going on that it doesn't even really develop some plot points until the end, which (view spoiler)[ is obviously setting up a two or three-way succession war between the three rival prince-claimants after the assassination of the Sultan by Muslim extremists and introduces the possibility of the USE's European enemies throwing their support behind one of the princes (obviously, not the good one) (hide spoiler)] . I also liked that the book walked the fine line between condemning European colonialism while also noting that the Mughal weren't any better, which is a point that often gets overlooked in this sort of book. That is to say that the British were invading foreigners who controlled India through brutal tactics, but so were the Mughals, and so were the Mongols before them and the Greeks before them and the Persians before them, making a big deal about it is silly as the locals' real interest would be the fact that their own dynasty fell apart not some sense of misplaced outrage that Europeans could've conquered them just like they conquered their predecessors. Frankly, the English get screwed in this book, as their small company outpost in India gets its trade rights revoked, then they get massacred, and all for things that other people did in another universe (and not even in their lifetimes). Oddly, the weakest point in this book is the section in the USE at the beginning where Mike Stearns and Francisco Nasi are discussing why a mission to the Mughals is necessary and oddly, whoever wrote the section seems to have forgotten that Stearns is supposed to be a bit of a historian as he seems to have no idea how important India is in the 17th century, which seems out of character. My only other gripe is that this sets up yet another hanging story arc in the Ring of Fire as the book ends with a lot of stuff up in the air and India on the verge of a major civil war (just like France, and the Papal States, and Britain, and Russia, and (possibly) Poland). I enjoy these side stories, but what I really want is for the main series to move forward, and I'm beginning to feel like the sheer number of ongoing plots that the series is juggling has become a bit unwieldy. Again, this isn't really a criticism of this book, just something I worry about as a fan of the series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kristene Perron

    This book swept me away to 1600's India--what a trip! Mixed in with the wild ride of royal intrigue, thrilling fight scenes, and mysterious harems was a feast of Indian history. And while this story is sure to please anyone who loves adventure, history or time travel, I particularly recommend it to women (or men) who want to read fully developed, complex and kick-ass female characters. (Atisheh is badass!) I loved and appreciated how well the female characters were handled in this book, especial This book swept me away to 1600's India--what a trip! Mixed in with the wild ride of royal intrigue, thrilling fight scenes, and mysterious harems was a feast of Indian history. And while this story is sure to please anyone who loves adventure, history or time travel, I particularly recommend it to women (or men) who want to read fully developed, complex and kick-ass female characters. (Atisheh is badass!) I loved and appreciated how well the female characters were handled in this book, especially because it would have been so easy to use the worn out old trope of the sexy harem women as mere props to the male characters. Well done, Barber and Flint! This is the third book I've read in the Ring of Fire series. And while I think it would be helpful to have read the first book, and to understand why there are modern day Americans running around India in 1636, I don't think it's strictly necessary. If you love Machiavellian drama, you will love Mission to the Mughals! I burned through this book and stayed up way past my bedtime to finish. Can't wait for the next one!

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Key

    Good addition to the series! Starts slow, helps to have read the Grantville Gazette's for the introduction and initial plot. Gathers speed when they get to India. Once again, Flint manages, with his coauthor, to take the 1632verse to a whole new culture and introduce us and his characters to a world far different from ours. A big part of Flint's appeal is the what if element of the "Butterfly Wings" affect theory. You history might be affected and changed by things as seemingly inconsequential as Good addition to the series! Starts slow, helps to have read the Grantville Gazette's for the introduction and initial plot. Gathers speed when they get to India. Once again, Flint manages, with his coauthor, to take the 1632verse to a whole new culture and introduce us and his characters to a world far different from ours. A big part of Flint's appeal is the what if element of the "Butterfly Wings" affect theory. You history might be affected and changed by things as seemingly inconsequential as religious toleration American style, or the introduction of rifled flintlock muskets a coup!e a hundred years earlier than occurred here. Biggest problem Flint's love of cliffhanger ending, leaving you hanging for heaven only knows long for the sequel to resole the hanging. Eric Flint 1 of my 5 favorite modern author's.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tim Fay

    Fascinating. Worth the price of admission... Firstly, I must say: I want More! This is a fascinating look at an entirely different cultures, told more from the Indian POV than the mission from Grantville, it is an intriguing look at life in the highest levels of Mugal India. A place for intrigue, assassination, murder, and the politics of Empire. And a revealing look at life in an Indian harem and its impact on the world without.... Buy this book. It's totally worth your dime! Fascinating. Worth the price of admission... Firstly, I must say: I want More! This is a fascinating look at an entirely different cultures, told more from the Indian POV than the mission from Grantville, it is an intriguing look at life in the highest levels of Mugal India. A place for intrigue, assassination, murder, and the politics of Empire. And a revealing look at life in an Indian harem and its impact on the world without.... Buy this book. It's totally worth your dime!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    I really enjoyed this story--I'm familiar with the 1632 world, but hadn't read any of the novels before this one, and had no problem getting into the story. The writing is great. The research that went into it shines through in a way that gives the setting and the characters a real sense of place and authenticity. Jahanara is a great character, she really stands out among a strong cast in an adventure that keeps the pages turning. I really enjoyed this story--I'm familiar with the 1632 world, but hadn't read any of the novels before this one, and had no problem getting into the story. The writing is great. The research that went into it shines through in a way that gives the setting and the characters a real sense of place and authenticity. Jahanara is a great character, she really stands out among a strong cast in an adventure that keeps the pages turning.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    This is an interesting side story (sequel is a must) set in the Mughal Empire on the Indian subcontinent. Flint and Barber let you know early on that the USE trade delegation know little of what they are getting into. The royal successions in the Mughal Empire make Game of Thrones look like quiet/nap time in a preschool class. Help yourself by reading an encyclopedia entry for Indian history 600-1700 to get a better feel for the time and place.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Really between 3 1/2 & 3 3/4 stars. This was OK but not one of my favorites in this series, but as always I will continue to read all the books in the Ring of Fire series

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gail Morris

    very good, can't wait to read the sequel: because this one does NEED a sequel ;) very good, can't wait to read the sequel: because this one does NEED a sequel ;)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Wultsch

    If you have not read any books in the 1632 series (officially known as The Ring of Fire series), stop now. You will want to read these books in order and this book is the latest in the ever growing series. The series answers a fun “what if” question: what could happen if a modern day (okay, a decade or so ago now) small town in West Virginia, U.S. is scooped up and plopped down in Europe in 1632. Suddenly someone with a high school education becomes one of the most knowledgeable people in the wo If you have not read any books in the 1632 series (officially known as The Ring of Fire series), stop now. You will want to read these books in order and this book is the latest in the ever growing series. The series answers a fun “what if” question: what could happen if a modern day (okay, a decade or so ago now) small town in West Virginia, U.S. is scooped up and plopped down in Europe in 1632. Suddenly someone with a high school education becomes one of the most knowledgeable people in the world. Small things that we take for granted become amazing wonders that the world has not seen before. History textbooks become fortune tellers. In this installment, a delegation is sent to make contact with the Mughal empire in India. The party wants to establish trading so they can acquire much desired medications for pain, opium and morphine. Modern day people are used to having access to safe and effective drugs. The party consists of “up timers” (those from the current time) and “down timers” (those who were born in the current time and have not time traveled) who are male and female. Fortunately, there are some medical personnel along as there are some situations that require them to make use of their skills. As with all other books in this series that I have read, I am again impressed with the research the authors have done and the attention to detail they use to craft this tale. I say they because the original author, Eric Flint, is working with several other authors on this series. Eric Flint and Griffin Barber worked together to write this book. I am very happy about this because it means that several creative minds are building this universe and it may mean that, because the workload is shared, the books are being published faster than if it was all done only by one author (I have no idea if this is true or not but it makes sense to me). In the back of the book there is a list of the characters with some basic information about them and a glossary of unfamiliar terms. I found both of these very helpful and consulted them multiple times. I have read almost all other books in this series, but there are so many characters that it is easy to start getting them mixed up. I was amused to find that “ferenghi” means foreigner (especially a white foreigner) and the “ferenghi” have a reputation of being all about trade and money. I kept picturing Quark, Rom, and Nog instead of plain old humans. There is some violence in this story, very little sexual content, and the language is very clean. This series would be good for middle school age and up. History buffs who like the 17th century may love this series and/or find details that are not quite right (but only experts would be able to find). Sci-fi lovers like me will also find a lot to love in this series and in this book. I received this book through the Goodreads Giveaways program. Thank you to the author and/or publisher.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    I have really, really enjoyed the 1632 series. I've always loved alternate history. But this series with its twentieth-century West Virginia town of Grantville suddenly transported back to 1632 Europe has been a particularly delightful sandbox. I have also especially enjoyed forays away from Central Europe such as the two books covering adventures in Russia [1636: The Kremlin Games & the upcoming 1637: The Volga Rules] and 1636: Commander Cantrell in the West Indies. Grantville (and the rest of th I have really, really enjoyed the 1632 series. I've always loved alternate history. But this series with its twentieth-century West Virginia town of Grantville suddenly transported back to 1632 Europe has been a particularly delightful sandbox. I have also especially enjoyed forays away from Central Europe such as the two books covering adventures in Russia [1636: The Kremlin Games & the upcoming 1637: The Volga Rules] and 1636: Commander Cantrell in the West Indies. Grantville (and the rest of the USE) being almost continually at war since 1632 it makes sense that a reliable source of saltpeter (critical component of gunpowder) and also opium (anesthetic for surgery) would be sorely needed. Both are plentiful in India. I also particularly enjoy getting to see another culture up close. In this case, the Mughal Emperor's harem. In this culture, the royal women are kept separate from the men but that does not mean that the Emperor's daughters are not educated, same as their brothers. So, the USE mission deliberately includes wives & a daughter so as to have envoys in the "other" camp, as it were. The Mughals themselves are Muslim but the majority of the people they rule are Hindu or Sikh. Current Mughal policy is toleration towards other religions. But one of the Emperor's three adult sons (were he to claim the throne) is definitely against that and seeks to keep the other religions in their place. NOTE: The Mughals do not have primogeniture. That is, any of the Emperor's sons can succeed him if he is able to win the ensuing civil war and be the one left standing at the end of the day. So, I highly recommend both Mission to the Mughals (and the entire 1632 series) to anyone who enjoys alternate history, anthropology, and lots of intrigue!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    Different angle. We know central Europe is in the middle of wars. At the same time the biggest monument to love is being built. Great backdrop. Great reminder that history is playing out everywhere. [it doesn't just stop while this other story is happening somewhere else] Flint has built a great story. [I found a lot I want to know more about.] Good people, fun personality mix. I hope we see more of them and more of what is going on the The Empire soon. The changes from the Ring of Fire are making th Different angle. We know central Europe is in the middle of wars. At the same time the biggest monument to love is being built. Great backdrop. Great reminder that history is playing out everywhere. [it doesn't just stop while this other story is happening somewhere else] Flint has built a great story. [I found a lot I want to know more about.] Good people, fun personality mix. I hope we see more of them and more of what is going on the The Empire soon. The changes from the Ring of Fire are making their way across the world. The history books are becoming meaningless with every book. New things are coming...things they can't cheat the answers by just reading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

    3.75 stars. Not really sure why this was put in 1636. Most of the story takes place in 1634. It then rushes through 1635 and concludes at the beginning of 1636. The book contains nearly all new characters with just cameos for some of the favorites from the series. Obviously much more story to tell in India as there is in every other storyline going on now. When you see that James Patterson seems to be producing a book a month, I think Eric can pump up the volume.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Moses

    On the whole, I've really enjoyed this series. Some of the volumes are better than others, some are sharper, some are downright fascinating. It depends a lot on who the co-writer happens to be. This one is a complete aside, in which the original characters appear in short vignettes here and there. But the story itself was interesting and kept me reading right along through the book. There will be a sequel to this, obviously. And I plan to read that too. On the whole, I've really enjoyed this series. Some of the volumes are better than others, some are sharper, some are downright fascinating. It depends a lot on who the co-writer happens to be. This one is a complete aside, in which the original characters appear in short vignettes here and there. But the story itself was interesting and kept me reading right along through the book. There will be a sequel to this, obviously. And I plan to read that too.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Randy Pursley

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I did not know much at all about the Mughal Empire and the history of the Taj Mahal. The characters were very interesting and the story line kept me reading. A great addition the the Ring of Fire series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Nice addition to the main story of the universe This story follows a side mission that adds much to the universe allowing the reader to see the impact of the up timers in places besides Europe

  21. 5 out of 5

    Felicia

    fun - now I have a craving for Indian food

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    One I had really hard time putting down, the USE has a mission to India beset with pirates, bandits, & plotting courts for the Sultan of Sultans job. Religion, castes & purdah stirs together to result into a highly flammable mix. Can't wait for the next one! One I had really hard time putting down, the USE has a mission to India beset with pirates, bandits, & plotting courts for the Sultan of Sultans job. Religion, castes & purdah stirs together to result into a highly flammable mix. Can't wait for the next one!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Muff

    Makes me want to read more about this era.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anandasubramanian

    Wow Simply wow. Well written. And believable. Good research. And good proof reading. Teaches a lot about shah Jahan than history books.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Seth Dwyer-frazier

    Another interesting thread in the series Other than in a few Gazettes we haven't seen India. Now we get to see how much the Ring of Fire impacts even distant empires. A fun new narrative with some interesting characters. Looking forward to more. Another interesting thread in the series Other than in a few Gazettes we haven't seen India. Now we get to see how much the Ring of Fire impacts even distant empires. A fun new narrative with some interesting characters. Looking forward to more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cyber Midas

    A really good story told by a awesome storyteller. Well sketched out characters and solid plotlines add to the awesomeness of the story. Never once the story feels dragged on or trying too hard to maintain itself. A solid 5 out of 5. P.S. - One of the angonists is Mullah Mohan. This is a bit confusing as the character is a radical muslim and Mohan is another name of Hindu god Krishna. Though it is only a name.....

  27. 5 out of 5

    Clyde Green

    Good read I liked the story. Write more like this one. I can't wait to read the next story in this series. Good read I liked the story. Write more like this one. I can't wait to read the next story in this series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Friedrich Haas

    Very nice, a whole new front has opened up, and a new set of religions to drive me crazy. Well actually I followed along with these much better than the tedious minutia of european religions. The Sultan of Sultans is extremely wealthy, but he still can't afford to trust anyone. Very nice, a whole new front has opened up, and a new set of religions to drive me crazy. Well actually I followed along with these much better than the tedious minutia of european religions. The Sultan of Sultans is extremely wealthy, but he still can't afford to trust anyone.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul Jacobs

    Good extension of the franchise Interesting reach by the USE to secure vital supplies not under threat from the Ottoman empire or Spain. Nice primer about a very influential empire that's not familiar to Americans. Not 5 stars because IMO too much byplay in the harem, not enough military stuff. Good extension of the franchise Interesting reach by the USE to secure vital supplies not under threat from the Ottoman empire or Spain. Nice primer about a very influential empire that's not familiar to Americans. Not 5 stars because IMO too much byplay in the harem, not enough military stuff.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Allan Dyen-Shapiro

    This is the second book I've read in Eric Flint's series, after the original 1632. I very much enjoyed it. The plot: the Grantville folks need opium (for medicines) and saltpeter (for gunpowder). To get it, they send a trade mission to the Mughal empire. This is an impeccably researched many POV foray into court politics of the Mughals. Along the way, the role of women and the levels of tolerance/intolerance of other religious groups within India are prominent themes. Okay, a warning, it takes a This is the second book I've read in Eric Flint's series, after the original 1632. I very much enjoyed it. The plot: the Grantville folks need opium (for medicines) and saltpeter (for gunpowder). To get it, they send a trade mission to the Mughal empire. This is an impeccably researched many POV foray into court politics of the Mughals. Along the way, the role of women and the levels of tolerance/intolerance of other religious groups within India are prominent themes. Okay, a warning, it takes a while to feel like you are immersed in this--the list of characters in the back is pretty helpful up to that point. But the family drama really does grip you in the middle of the book. Like most alternate history, there are battle scenes, but those are confined to a small part at the end. I would have loved to have seen an exploration of the differing thought of the two religious thinkers in the background of the story--this book stopped at calling one accepting of the Sikhs and others and the other intolerant of them. But, alas, that was not to be. The framing device of the mission worked well--the authors keep the story grounded in it, but it doesn't dominate the narrative. The interplay of characters--West Virginians from the future, their European allies, the Mughal court, the slaves/servants/eunochs, the various functionaries, and the Sikhs--makes the book. The interpersonal politics remained compelling throughout. Highly recommended.

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