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The Resistance

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The year is 2140. Having escaped the horrors of Grange Hall, Peter and Anna are living freely on the Outside, trying hard to lead normal lives, but unable to leave the terror of the Declaration—and their experiences as surpluses—completely behind them. Peter is determined to infiltrate Pharma Corporation, which claims to have a new drug in the works; "Longevity+" will not The year is 2140. Having escaped the horrors of Grange Hall, Peter and Anna are living freely on the Outside, trying hard to lead normal lives, but unable to leave the terror of the Declaration—and their experiences as surpluses—completely behind them. Peter is determined to infiltrate Pharma Corporation, which claims to have a new drug in the works; "Longevity+" will not just stop the ravages of old age, it is rumored to reverse the aging process. But what Peter and Anna discover behind the walls of Pharma is so nightmarish it makes the prison of their childhood seem like a sanctuary: for in order to supply Pharma with the building blocks for Longevity+, scientists will need to harvest it from the young. Shocking, controversial, and frighteningly topical, this sequel to Gemma Malley's stellar debut novel, The Declaration, will take the conversation about ethics and science to the next level.


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The year is 2140. Having escaped the horrors of Grange Hall, Peter and Anna are living freely on the Outside, trying hard to lead normal lives, but unable to leave the terror of the Declaration—and their experiences as surpluses—completely behind them. Peter is determined to infiltrate Pharma Corporation, which claims to have a new drug in the works; "Longevity+" will not The year is 2140. Having escaped the horrors of Grange Hall, Peter and Anna are living freely on the Outside, trying hard to lead normal lives, but unable to leave the terror of the Declaration—and their experiences as surpluses—completely behind them. Peter is determined to infiltrate Pharma Corporation, which claims to have a new drug in the works; "Longevity+" will not just stop the ravages of old age, it is rumored to reverse the aging process. But what Peter and Anna discover behind the walls of Pharma is so nightmarish it makes the prison of their childhood seem like a sanctuary: for in order to supply Pharma with the building blocks for Longevity+, scientists will need to harvest it from the young. Shocking, controversial, and frighteningly topical, this sequel to Gemma Malley's stellar debut novel, The Declaration, will take the conversation about ethics and science to the next level.

30 review for The Resistance

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    “Richard Pincent is determined to twist the world to his own dark ends; you are on the side of the angels. But even angels fall, sometimes. We all make mistakes; without them we would learn nothing.” Man this series is great! Peter and Anna are now legals, living on the outside after escaping from Grange Hall. Peter is offered a job working at the infamous Pincent Pharma by his all powerful grandfather, Richard Pincent. Peter plans to spy on the creation of Longevity and report back to the Unde “Richard Pincent is determined to twist the world to his own dark ends; you are on the side of the angels. But even angels fall, sometimes. We all make mistakes; without them we would learn nothing.” Man this series is great! Peter and Anna are now legals, living on the outside after escaping from Grange Hall. Peter is offered a job working at the infamous Pincent Pharma by his all powerful grandfather, Richard Pincent. Peter plans to spy on the creation of Longevity and report back to the Underground - those fighting against eternal life. But secrets and lies cause Peter to question his loyalties, which side is really right or wrong, and how does his half brother tie in? At times pretty damn terrifying, this series shows the lengths people will go to preserve youth and to live forever, no matter the cost or the pain of others. Non stop drama and action, this is a powerful dystopian portraying what can happen when science goes too far, and morality becomes even greyer.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ugh. This book was awful. This book is the sequel to The Declaration, and picks up pretty much right after it. Peter and Anna are living together, taking care of Anna's one-year-old brother, Ben. Yes, the 15- and 14-year-old are playing house, including all the grown-up aspects of that. How does Anna even know how to do anything? She said in the last book that she only knew that babies cried. Now she's taking care of a baby and cooking nice meals and acting like a regular ol' Legal? The first 200 Ugh. This book was awful. This book is the sequel to The Declaration, and picks up pretty much right after it. Peter and Anna are living together, taking care of Anna's one-year-old brother, Ben. Yes, the 15- and 14-year-old are playing house, including all the grown-up aspects of that. How does Anna even know how to do anything? She said in the last book that she only knew that babies cried. Now she's taking care of a baby and cooking nice meals and acting like a regular ol' Legal? The first 200 pages could be summed up as "should we or should we not sign the Declaration?" That's it. 200 pages about signing a paper. Riveting stuff. Why did the pair have their Declarations, anyway? Peter is a year older than Anna, so he was the one turning 16; Anna would only be 14 or 15. She shouldn't have her Declaration anyway. But I digress, I was so relieved when Anna signed it so that the story could move on!!! The last 100 pages got really graphic and voyeuristic. Okay, I get it--the Surpluses aren't really human, so we can experiment on them. Great. But I found that the author's choice of using Sheila to be a little manipulative. We already felt bad that she got left behind in the last book, so now the author has to drag poor Sheila out and have her impregnated with 12 fetuses?!? What. the. hell. We get it; Pincent Pharma is evil. While we're on the subject of pregnancy, Anna is stupid. If all the Surpluses were sterilized, then why the hell were the girls having periods back at Grange Hall? Why were the nights of sleeping on the floor during menstruation not mentioned? Then we find out that Anna is pregnant and everyone is so happy and excited for her. Hello? The 14-year-old girl is pregnant and we're excited about this? Have we gone back to the Middle Ages? Anyway, the first 2/3 was boring, then it got a little messed up, then it got boring again. I should have stopped with book one. I had book three on hand, but I don't think I'm going to bother. I can already guess where it's going to go ("forever people" are dying!). No thanks. I hate it when series are ruined. PS...The kid on the cover reminds me of Zachary Ty Bryan.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Karin

    THE RESISTANCE is the much anticipated sequel to THE DECLARATION. It picks up where THE DECLARATION leaves off and is told through Peter’s eyes. He and Anna live together with Ben, Anna’s brother, in a run down house trying to keep out of the way. Peter and Anna aren’t comfortable being Legal yet and find the stares and nasty comments coming from the other citizens unsettling. Peter and Anna work for the Underground whenever they can. They both want to see the Declaration a thing of the past. Pe THE RESISTANCE is the much anticipated sequel to THE DECLARATION. It picks up where THE DECLARATION leaves off and is told through Peter’s eyes. He and Anna live together with Ben, Anna’s brother, in a run down house trying to keep out of the way. Peter and Anna aren’t comfortable being Legal yet and find the stares and nasty comments coming from the other citizens unsettling. Peter and Anna work for the Underground whenever they can. They both want to see the Declaration a thing of the past. Peter gets his chance when his grandfather and head of Pincent Pharma offers him a position at the company. Pincent Pharma is responsible for Longevity, the drug that makes an extended life possible. Peter uses this opportunity to get information for the Underground. What he finds causes him to question his beliefs about the Declaration, the Underground, and his relationship with Anna. It takes uncovering a horrible secret to put him back on track. THE RESISTANCE was just as good as THE DECLARATION. The suspense keeps you turning page after page. Peter’s character is so likeable and his devotion to Anna is heartwarming. Gemma Malley leaves it open for another story and I for one can’t wait to see what happens next.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brooke ♥booklife4life♥

    Find this review, plus more, on my blog: Booklikes OR Blogger Basic Info Format: Kindle Pages/Length: n/a Genre: Young Adult; Dystopia Reason For Reading: Challenge, and story! At A Glance Love Triangle/Insta Love/Obsession?: No Cliff Hanger: No Triggers: n/a Rating: 4.5 stars Score Sheet All out of ten Cover: 7 Plot: 9 Characters: 8 World Building: 8 Flow: 9 Series Congruity: 9 Writing: 8 Ending: 8 Total: 8 In Depth Best Part: Jude! Worst Part: None Thoughts Had: So much is going on, i love it! Conclusion Continuing Find this review, plus more, on my blog: Booklikes OR Blogger Basic Info Format: Kindle Pages/Length: n/a Genre: Young Adult; Dystopia Reason For Reading: Challenge, and story! At A Glance Love Triangle/Insta Love/Obsession?: No Cliff Hanger: No Triggers: n/a Rating: 4.5 stars Score Sheet All out of ten Cover: 7 Plot: 9 Characters: 8 World Building: 8 Flow: 9 Series Congruity: 9 Writing: 8 Ending: 8 Total: 8 In Depth Best Part: Jude! Worst Part: None Thoughts Had: So much is going on, i love it! Conclusion Continuing the Series: Yes Recommending: Yes Short Review: Wow that was a wide ride! Just as great as the first, if not better. I really liked having Peter's POV, to see how he thinks since you know from book 1 he is very stubborn in his ways. Anna wasn't in this as much, she kinda freaked out too much for my liking. Jude is a great addition to the story, and i loved how they worked Shelia back into the story, and now i feel bad for her, so i like her a bit more now than i did after reading book 1. I was happy to see the inside of the place that makes people live forever. Interacting with Peter's grandpa and Dr. Edwards. Very good book, super fast paced, finished in a few hrs. Misc. Book Boyfriend: Jude! Best Friend Material: I guess Anna still, thou maybe not.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    I think, dare I say it, that The Resistance actually has a slight edge on The Declaration, which was a marvellous enough book as it is. Now that Peter and Anna are on the outside, living as young Legals in a world were most of the inhabitants mark their age with three digits, and raising Anna's brother Ben, we get to see them interacting with a markedly different facet of society. Rather than living in a Surplus Hall, where they are brainwashed and trained to serve and be Valuable Assets*, they I think, dare I say it, that The Resistance actually has a slight edge on The Declaration, which was a marvellous enough book as it is. Now that Peter and Anna are on the outside, living as young Legals in a world were most of the inhabitants mark their age with three digits, and raising Anna's brother Ben, we get to see them interacting with a markedly different facet of society. Rather than living in a Surplus Hall, where they are brainwashed and trained to serve and be Valuable Assets*, they now show us their world from quite a unique viewpoint and it is through this that we explore how the "normal" members of society are - for the most part - just as brainwashed as those they subjugate. The Resistance delves much deeper into the politics and ethics of this world and hints at the slippery slope as moral questioning is appeased bit by little bit. Similarities with Never Let Me Go. I also suspect this series could be of interest to those who enjoyed Unwind. *This term takes a much more sinister twist in The Resistance.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    Look, I really enjoyed this book, probably even more than the first one when I got into it but the author went and did exactly the same thing again... created a happy ending. It's annoying me. Both books follow the same format of Problem > Panic > Solution > The End. I finished the first book thinking "hey, that was a really original story" but I only half-heartedly purchased the second one because the first one had ended with both Anna and Peter alive, well and no longer on the run. There is no Look, I really enjoyed this book, probably even more than the first one when I got into it but the author went and did exactly the same thing again... created a happy ending. It's annoying me. Both books follow the same format of Problem > Panic > Solution > The End. I finished the first book thinking "hey, that was a really original story" but I only half-heartedly purchased the second one because the first one had ended with both Anna and Peter alive, well and no longer on the run. There is no "oh my god, I must know what happens next" and Gemma Malley went and did it again with the second in the series. But, aside from that fact, I am completely in love with this dystopia that Gemma Malley has created. Anna was far more bearable in this book than the last, and I liked the twist in the story (that I'm obviously not going to give away and ruin for other readers). It employed some crazily good elements of mystery, horror and science-fiction; it also made me sure that I would be getting the next book in the series, even if the ending didn't call urgently for it. So, yeah, overall it was a really good read. But next time, I demand cliffhangers.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sabrin Ahmed

    This is at the top of my pile of 'most disappointing sequels'. This is at the top of my pile of 'most disappointing sequels'.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really enjoyed the first book in this series (The Declaration)and think that Gemma Malley's concept is incredibly thought provoking, but I found myself unable to really get into The Resistance. The series tells the story of a future where Longevity drugs have wiped out disease and death, resulting in a population that lives forever. To prevent the population from growing too large, you have to sign a declaration promising not to have children. Any children that do occur are illegal, referred t I really enjoyed the first book in this series (The Declaration)and think that Gemma Malley's concept is incredibly thought provoking, but I found myself unable to really get into The Resistance. The series tells the story of a future where Longevity drugs have wiped out disease and death, resulting in a population that lives forever. To prevent the population from growing too large, you have to sign a declaration promising not to have children. Any children that do occur are illegal, referred to as surpluses, and are basically trained to be slaves. In The Resistance, Peter and Anna have become legal and have began settling into their new lives away from the surplus hall. Both are determined to aid the resistance movement and to opt-out of signing the Declaration. Peter begins working at Pincent Pharma (his grandfather's company) where Longevity drugs are created in order to help the resistance. Gemma Malley's concept is magnificent and really made me think. Why do we have children? Is it just a biological need to pass on our DNA or would we still want to have children in a world where we could never die? In a world where no one had children how long would it take for kids to become the "other" and demonized as such? This concept was truly one that I couldn't get out of my head. I did not, however, really like Malley's execution of the concept. Here were my main problems with the book: 1) I really wish she had made Anna and Peter older. Even knowing the kind of world that they live in I found it hard to not be disturbed by a 16 year old (I'm assuming she was 16 since she received her declaration) caring for a one year old and pregnant with her first baby. 2) This book switched the main narrator from Anna to Peter (probably because Peter's role in this book was far more exciting than Anna's role of babysitter) and I found Peter's voice to be less fresh than Anna's brainwashed point of view in book 1. 3) Almost every character in the book was either 100% good or 100% bad. The characters almost seemed like caricatures instead of fully developed, realistic individuals. There was really no way to relate to the other side in this book. 4) This book was so action packed that it just didn't seem very realistic. The previous book had seemed much more subtle. I finished reading this book, and finished reading it quickly, but I found myself constantly looking ahead to see how many pages I had left and then hoping to finish quickly. I just wasn't really in to this book, which is a shame because I loved the premise and really enjoyed the first book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marnie (Enchanted Bibliophile)

    I should really start to DNF books. This book was really a drag. I didn’t like the writing style, the characters were shallow and in all honesty the plot sucked! I will most defiantly not be reading the last book of this series… It’s going to be my first ever DNF!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Big Book Little Book

    Helen for www.bigbooklittlebook.com Copy received from publisher in exchange for an honest review The story continues from not long after the point where we left it in The Declaration (read my review here). Peter and Anna are living legally on the outside, trying to cope with their new life and looking after little Ben, Anna’s brother. Anna is enjoying being a mother to Ben but is struggling with living in the world so different from the Surplus Hall. Both she and Peter feel alien from this societ Helen for www.bigbooklittlebook.com Copy received from publisher in exchange for an honest review The story continues from not long after the point where we left it in The Declaration (read my review here). Peter and Anna are living legally on the outside, trying to cope with their new life and looking after little Ben, Anna’s brother. Anna is enjoying being a mother to Ben but is struggling with living in the world so different from the Surplus Hall. Both she and Peter feel alien from this society and Anna particularly feels the stares of those who disapprove of her youth and her status. Neither Anna nor Peter have signed the declaration and neither want to take the wonder drug Longevity that will keep them alive for ever, but at the expense of not being able to have children and create new life. As they are refusing the drug and because of their background a close eye is being kept on them by the authorities. Unsurprisingly, after all their experiences, Peter and Anna want to help the resistance movement in its fight against Longevity and its producer Pincent Pharma, Peter’s Grandfather’s company. Peter agrees to go and work for the company to feed information back to the Resistance, but he finds this a difficult task as his Grandfather starts to pressurise and then manipulate Peter to get what he wants, which is for Peter to sign up to the Declaration. For the reader though, the insight into Pincent Pharma and the whole operation is interesting, as well as watching the development of Peter’s relationship with his Grandfather, Pincent himself Meanwhile Anna is also being manipulated , for the same reason, and to try and catch her out, getting her into trouble. Anna still has much of the naivety and innocence from her life shut way and inexperience of the real world. Anna is desperate to do her bit to help and her desire to help other children who have been abandoned by their parents, or taken from their parents, causes problems. As this novel is told from Peter’s voice I did miss Anna’s voice from the first book. Peter has a fresh perspective though that adds a new dimension. I enjoyed the development of Peter and Anna’s relationship. It was so easy to see how they have become like a normal couple with arguments, insecurities and ups and downs and yet they are a couple like no other in the world that they live in. The pressure and insecurities this brings really tests them. There are new characters too from the Resistance and other places. Peter and Anna have to work out where to put their trust. One of the most interesting new characters is Jude who has another unique perspective as he is Peter’s age but having been a legal all his life. He is a computer whizz kid, but his life shows us how the worlds resources have been stretched by immortality. On top of that he is Peter’s half-brother and takes us deeper into the back story. The on-going story continues to provoke, raising issues about our desire to live longer, the price we pay for immortality, the cost to the world as we use our resources carelessly and so on. In particular it made me think about our priorities as we encourage everyone to work more and not necessarily be at home with children and families. This really made me feel that the right to be a mother is precious and not to be taken for granted. Verdict: This is a brilliant follow on from The Declaration and is another gripping and challenging read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rusty's Ghost Engine (also known as.......... Jinky Spring)

    I've gotta say the levels of brutality and evil really surprised me. This may sound weak, but this was probably one of the most disturbing books I've ever read, with the levels of hostility and all. I did however enjoy the concept and philosophy of these series. The suspense and shocking revelations made this worthy of the title bestseller. This makes me puzzle over the fact that most people vote for shit such as the Matchedtrilogy and The Maestro when there are works of real art like this. Plus I've gotta say the levels of brutality and evil really surprised me. This may sound weak, but this was probably one of the most disturbing books I've ever read, with the levels of hostility and all. I did however enjoy the concept and philosophy of these series. The suspense and shocking revelations made this worthy of the title bestseller. This makes me puzzle over the fact that most people vote for shit such as the Matchedtrilogy and The Maestro when there are works of real art like this. Plus these books have a message. The ending was a cliffhanger that left me desperate for the finale. Definitely for all dystopian fans.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Librarysteph

    Gemma Malley’s The Resistance is an incredible piece of literature. I think this should be studied in school, it has the potential to be the next Brave New World or 1984. The novel deals with a lot of social issues, and critiques society in a way that will have young people thinking. I have several ideas for essays I could write about this book, and it would not be difficult for a high school English teacher to create lesson plans for it. This is the second book in the series, but I read this one Gemma Malley’s The Resistance is an incredible piece of literature. I think this should be studied in school, it has the potential to be the next Brave New World or 1984. The novel deals with a lot of social issues, and critiques society in a way that will have young people thinking. I have several ideas for essays I could write about this book, and it would not be difficult for a high school English teacher to create lesson plans for it. This is the second book in the series, but I read this one first since my library doesn’t have The Declaration. The book is successful as a stand-alone but I imagine it is even stronger if you have read the first book. The Setting In 2140 the world has an aging population, who are living forever with the assistance of medication. Drastically extended life spans have resulted in overpopulation and a lack of natural resources. In response to these issues laws are made regarding procreation, which quickly becomes illegal and standard of living is reduced as they make room for progress by giving up homes for small apartments. Illegal children (called Surpluses) are kept in prisons and taught that their existence is a sin. Plot Peter and Anna grew up as Surpluses but they have been given legal status (this adventure was presumably the plot of the Declaration) and now they are trying to fit in among the general population. They are mistrusted and mistreated because of their youth and begin to question why they wanted to become legal. Peter takes a job at Pincent Pharma The company is responsible for Longevity+ – a drug rumoured to reverse the ageing process. But there is more to the drug than Peter and Anna could have ever imagined He takes the job with the intention of spying on the pharmaceutical company for the rebels, but his co-workers are persuasive about the benefits of eternal life and he loses track of his goals. The Issues •Technology artificially lengthening lives •The importance of the circle of life, the fresh ideas of a new generation •Greed •Pharmaceutical conspiracies Why It’s Awesome …a few hundred years ago, many countries in the world considered slavery to be a perfectly sound way to run businesses and households. A bit like the attitude towards Surpluses now…Many people lost their lives fighting for these rights – to vote, to be free, to work, to be able to get on the same bus as someone considered their superior. And it was the next generations who embedded these changes, who came to view women as equals to men, who came to understand that skin colour his of no relevance. Young people are the future. Without them, the world stands still. ( Malley 117) •It recognizes that young people have potential, and encourages young readers to make the most of their lives •It combines the issues of dependency on technology and an aging population seamlessly •It is a fast-paced, action-filled novel •Well written •Compelling characters who are naive, gullible, or cocky •I love a book that examines human nature Who It Will Appeal To •People who like dystopian science fiction •Young people who feel oppressed because of their age •Religious people (Even though I’m essentially an atheist) because it leans towards religions being right •Conspiracy theorists Overall I was fascinated! I was interested in the ideas, I thought the plot flowed nicely, I cared about the characters…basically awesome

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This is the sequel to The Declaration. I don’t think there will be a third… but who knows. I may have to look into it. But The Resistance ends fine, and while not everything is wrapped up, it’s pretty much settled. So really, there’s no need for a third, but it would be interesting. So The Resistance is set in the same world as The Declaration. We’ve got Anna and Peter together, with baby Ben, a few months after The Declaration left off. A new character is thrown in- a young Legal, just a little This is the sequel to The Declaration. I don’t think there will be a third… but who knows. I may have to look into it. But The Resistance ends fine, and while not everything is wrapped up, it’s pretty much settled. So really, there’s no need for a third, but it would be interesting. So The Resistance is set in the same world as The Declaration. We’ve got Anna and Peter together, with baby Ben, a few months after The Declaration left off. A new character is thrown in- a young Legal, just a little older than Peter. As in, the son from the mistress who made Peter a Surplus by taking his Legal status. This makes Peter and the boy, Jude, half brothers. Once again, the book is in third person, skipping from person to person. Mostly, the focus is on Anna, Peter, and Jude, with occasional glimpses into Richard Pincent, Peter’s grandfather and leader of Pincent Pharma, and also Pip, leader of the Underground, the group sworn to take down Longevity and all that it stands for. Each of the young lives are actually quite separate. Peter and Anna live together with Ben. (Which I find a bit weird- they’re so young! Like, my age… I can’t imagine living with a boy now. Plus, they’re young in their world too, compared to all the Legals, all over 100 or whatever. Crazy.) But they don’t actually interact much it seems, since Peter is busy with his new job at Pincent Pharma. Jude doesn’t actually meet either Peter or Anna until later. I felt the characters were kind of lacking. They were more just like figurines to play out the plot and deliver the theme and messages, which really are the two focus points. There’s nothing much new about the characters so much and I don’t find them all that interesting. But the themes… hoo boy. There’s so much to think about. It reminded me in ways of The House of Scorpions by Nancy Farmer, which I read a few weeks ago. Old people must rely on young ones to keep them alive. In The House of Scorpions, powerful people make clones of themselves to take organs from when needed. In The Resistance… well I won’t say. It’s pretty terrible though. Also, I've been thinking... In the post-apocalypse books I've read (really, this means The Chrysalids and The Forest of Hands and Teeth), both societies revert back to religion. Like, it's religion all the way. And then, in The Resistance, there's no religion whatesoever. There's a bit of talk about the lack of religion actually, but no one is actually religious. Why is it that science and religion are always on the opposite sides of the river? I mean, I get it, and in some ways, I wonder why they can't be together... alright ignore me. Now I'm rambling and off pondering. All in all, great read. It really gets one thinking: about all that stuff that could happen, about social status, about what it means to live, about how to live, and about what it would be like to live in a world like that. The whole thing’s a bit disturbing, and as a young person, I find some of the stuff horrifying, but also extremely interesting, and really worth the read. :)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kellie Alley

    This book was better than the first one. It was both intriguing, yet irritating. Characters I thought to trust, ended up being bad. Ones I didn't trust, turned out to be heroes. The whole series is an extremely easy read. This book was better than the first one. It was both intriguing, yet irritating. Characters I thought to trust, ended up being bad. Ones I didn't trust, turned out to be heroes. The whole series is an extremely easy read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marcia

    Ik heb opnieuw enorm genoten van The Resistance. De originele toekomstvisie uit  The Declaration wordt verder uitgewerkt en de schrijfstijl is nog altijd even vlot. Door de perspectiefwisselingen en de introductie van nieuwe personages blijft het boek bovendien erg spannend. Hoewel het einde geen echte cliff hanger heeft, ben ik zeker benieuwd naar het laatste boek in deze toffe trilogie. Mijn complete recensie lees je op Oog op de Toekomst. -- 2015 -- I think The Resistance is a great second bo Ik heb opnieuw enorm genoten van The Resistance. De originele toekomstvisie uit  The Declaration wordt verder uitgewerkt en de schrijfstijl is nog altijd even vlot. Door de perspectiefwisselingen en de introductie van nieuwe personages blijft het boek bovendien erg spannend. Hoewel het einde geen echte cliff hanger heeft, ben ik zeker benieuwd naar het laatste boek in deze toffe trilogie. Mijn complete recensie lees je op Oog op de Toekomst. -- 2015 -- I think The Resistance is a great second book in the The Declaration series. The book starts a bit slow, but I kind of liked the way this builded up the tension. I loved the way the story continues and the fact that most of it is from Peter's POV. I also like newly introduced character Jude a lot. The only reason I didn't give this book five stars is because of two fifteen year olds 'playing house'. Where did Anna learn to take care of a child? In Grange Hall, the surplusses were not alowed on the floor of the Smalls.. And am I the only one grossed out by the fact that they are 'making love'? Besides that, Longevity made woman and man equal. It's like the ultimate way of emancipation. And Anna and Peter go all the way back to the Middle Ages, with her taking care of the children and Peter going to work.. I didn't like this at all. But all in all I loved this book and I just couldn't stop reading. It was amazing!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tia

    The second book of this series I find deals more with Peter than anything else. He begins posing at his grandfathers company where they make Longevity. Peter is trying to find any information to help the Underground. The Underground is a group resistance, they go against everything the Authority and the declaration stand for. Anna, in what little we see in this book, gets herself into some trouble by being forced into a trap, which the people of the Underground with Peter's help; gets her out of. The second book of this series I find deals more with Peter than anything else. He begins posing at his grandfathers company where they make Longevity. Peter is trying to find any information to help the Underground. The Underground is a group resistance, they go against everything the Authority and the declaration stand for. Anna, in what little we see in this book, gets herself into some trouble by being forced into a trap, which the people of the Underground with Peter's help; gets her out of. Peter finds information about the Authority and Longevity, gruesome information. He passes it along to Pip, the leader of the Underground and they attack Longevity's base, freeing Anna, Ben and a whole bunch of Surplus's in the mean time. Anna finds out she is pregnant. Ben, Peter and Anna make a break with it to the country, so they can live in peace, while Peter's half brother Jude takes over where Peter ended. Just a general guess but I don't think we will really be hearing from Anna, Ben, Peter & eventually their new baby in the next book. Once again, a very good read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dava Tuttle

    All I can say is how much I CANNOT wait for autumn to come so that I can read the last book in this set. I only found "The Declaration" last Friday and am already so engrossed in the lives of these characters that I've forgotten to go to sleep. Oh how I cannot wait to see my predictions pan out or get shot down. So far I've guessed ALMOST everything correct and I LOVE that! I love that I've been so in sync with the authoress that I can see exactly where her mind is moving! TOTALLY RECOMMEND!!!!! All I can say is how much I CANNOT wait for autumn to come so that I can read the last book in this set. I only found "The Declaration" last Friday and am already so engrossed in the lives of these characters that I've forgotten to go to sleep. Oh how I cannot wait to see my predictions pan out or get shot down. So far I've guessed ALMOST everything correct and I LOVE that! I love that I've been so in sync with the authoress that I can see exactly where her mind is moving! TOTALLY RECOMMEND!!!!! AGES 13+ : Some disturbing scenes involving female "stuff".

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This is a book that Caitlin read - not sure that it is suitable for a 11 year old or if she understood it all. Can people live for ever with a longevity drug? This is part 2 in The Declaration Trilogy. A lesson I'm learning fast - read what your children are reading - don't think they had books like this when I was 11. Anyway adults although simply written it is well worth reading. Looking forward to part 3. This is a book that Caitlin read - not sure that it is suitable for a 11 year old or if she understood it all. Can people live for ever with a longevity drug? This is part 2 in The Declaration Trilogy. A lesson I'm learning fast - read what your children are reading - don't think they had books like this when I was 11. Anyway adults although simply written it is well worth reading. Looking forward to part 3.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sonia

    the resistance is a sequel to the declaration now basically peter is looking at how longevity is made and he becomes a monster in the process. Longevity is harvested from somewhere top secret. Overall amazing a little slow at first though

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This is the second book in The Declaration trilogy and I truly enjoyed the first book. However, The Resistance just plain out sucked. Anna went from having her own dreams about freedom to only caring about being the new fertile founders of the world. Peter changes character totally. Everybody is suddenly very easy to manipulate and nobody seems to think for themselves. It’s a shame because the world building is interesting - but this book felt extremely juvenile and it didn’t suit the theme. Yes This is the second book in The Declaration trilogy and I truly enjoyed the first book. However, The Resistance just plain out sucked. Anna went from having her own dreams about freedom to only caring about being the new fertile founders of the world. Peter changes character totally. Everybody is suddenly very easy to manipulate and nobody seems to think for themselves. It’s a shame because the world building is interesting - but this book felt extremely juvenile and it didn’t suit the theme. Yes, they were young in the first book too - but it felt like I was reading about two teenagers playing house.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie MagMag

    **3.5 STARS** Just finished listening and enjoyed the first book in this series. Bummed the library didn't have the rest on audio CD so reading it. Unique dystopian world building. **3.5 STARS** Just finished listening and enjoyed the first book in this series. Bummed the library didn't have the rest on audio CD so reading it. Unique dystopian world building.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cátia

    Imagine a world where people are immortal! If you want to have a child you have to give your life or if you have one in secret and are discovered they take your child. What happens to the children in the orphanage? The first book was amazing written and the second is awesomely brutal. It's impossible to be insensitive reading the obscure secrets that the organization that discovered the immortality does to continue the treatment. I love that we follow the characters of the first book and see how Imagine a world where people are immortal! If you want to have a child you have to give your life or if you have one in secret and are discovered they take your child. What happens to the children in the orphanage? The first book was amazing written and the second is awesomely brutal. It's impossible to be insensitive reading the obscure secrets that the organization that discovered the immortality does to continue the treatment. I love that we follow the characters of the first book and see how they survive at the eyes of those that think they shouldn't exist. There is a moral question that I am curious to know how people will react and act?!

  23. 5 out of 5

    jesse

    #--##--# The chair was padded, obviously intended to put him at ease, but it wasn’t working. He rarely felt comfortable. Anna said it was because he liked to make things difficult for himself, but he wasn’t sure. He figured that it just wasn’t in his nature to feel too comfortable. Comfort made you lazy. It was the easy option. #--##--# ‘All beauty has a dark side. Heaven can’t exist without hell.’

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tori (InToriLex)

    Enjoyed it more than the first, more fast pace, and Peter's decisions and choices seemed really annoying to me but understandable for a scared teenage boy. Jude is interesting, and I want to see how his need to be better, plays out in the third book Enjoyed it more than the first, more fast pace, and Peter's decisions and choices seemed really annoying to me but understandable for a scared teenage boy. Jude is interesting, and I want to see how his need to be better, plays out in the third book

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    this book is horrible!!! the first one is reeeally good but this one stinks. I started reading it but had to put it down because i couldnt stand reading it anymore.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michèle

    As good as the first!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie

    2.5* I thought I'd give this a shot just in case it improved on the last one, and at first I thought it did. Malley's writing style, at the very least, improved substantially from The Declaration to this one. However, that doesn't seem to last long. By halfway through the novel, I realized I should have just given up after The Declaration. While the story has promise, it's clumsily executed. Like the last book, character changes of heart happen on a dime with no internal struggle, and what feeble 2.5* I thought I'd give this a shot just in case it improved on the last one, and at first I thought it did. Malley's writing style, at the very least, improved substantially from The Declaration to this one. However, that doesn't seem to last long. By halfway through the novel, I realized I should have just given up after The Declaration. While the story has promise, it's clumsily executed. Like the last book, character changes of heart happen on a dime with no internal struggle, and what feeble attempts at a struggle are made have no weight at all behind them. Dialogue is terrible, sometimes laughably so. At one point, a character kills another character and the resulting dialogue and exchange actually made me burst out laughing. At another, Peter finds a wheely chair in the middle of a mission and spins around in it. Sheila makes another appearance in this novel, though other than her name you would never guess that it was the same character; she doesn't share a single personality trait with the girl who appeared in The Declaration. Then again, all the characters are rather flat. There was also... A lot of sexism in this book. Not even from the irredeemably evil characters (which is all the bad guys. There are no shades of grey, despite what Richard Princent might say), but also in how Peter barely has anything to do with Ben and of that falls directly on Anna's shoulders. The female characters only get pregnant or raise babies, the male characters do the actual stuff. Yawn. There was potential here. It's just a shame that it was so poorly done.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tribe

    Maybe I’m just way too lazy to get back and find out the exact passages that made me feel like I was reading an unfinished draft, like some things were missing and others were better left off the book, or maybe I’m lost in the hunt of a positive reason that would change my view on that. Either way, although I personally loved (and still love) the whole idea behind this Declaration series, I think there’s way too much redundance, repetition of things, etc. And as much as I love dystopian books, y Maybe I’m just way too lazy to get back and find out the exact passages that made me feel like I was reading an unfinished draft, like some things were missing and others were better left off the book, or maybe I’m lost in the hunt of a positive reason that would change my view on that. Either way, although I personally loved (and still love) the whole idea behind this Declaration series, I think there’s way too much redundance, repetition of things, etc. And as much as I love dystopian books, you never want to go too much into the extreme with the perspective of anyone, otherwise it loses a little of... what is it? Veracity, credibility, maybe? In addition to the constant redundance and emphasis, there’s also way too much re-summarizing of the things that happened in the previous book (I already started the third one and same happens there), there are also typos (plural), and in the third one there parts where there should be at least a horizontal line to separate changes of scenery and characters, and nothing there, you jump from one paragraph to the next one like things continue flowing in the same place. In brief, I still like the idea and most of the flow, I just was looking everywhere who was the editor ir who helped polish the author’s work, and it seems that never happened. It’s a very, very good unfinished draft.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Malley, Gemma The Resistance, 320 p. Bloomsbury, September 2008. Peter and Anna have escaped Grange Hall and the life of a Surplus, saving Anna’s little brother along the way. Now they are adjusting to a world with no teens, no children and danger still awaits them. In order to aid the resistance, Peter goes to work for his enemy – his own grandfather – the man who made people virtually immortal and children unnecessary. Just when Peter seems to be losing his opposition to his grandfather’s mani Malley, Gemma The Resistance, 320 p. Bloomsbury, September 2008. Peter and Anna have escaped Grange Hall and the life of a Surplus, saving Anna’s little brother along the way. Now they are adjusting to a world with no teens, no children and danger still awaits them. In order to aid the resistance, Peter goes to work for his enemy – his own grandfather – the man who made people virtually immortal and children unnecessary. Just when Peter seems to be losing his opposition to his grandfather’s manipulation, a horrible secret is revealed within the pharmaceutical factory – one that may end his grandfather’s dominance permanently. I have not read the first book in this series – The Declaration, but I didn’t have any problem following the plot and guessing at the previous contents. Three swear that mean absolutely nothing in light of the great discussions a teacher could have about ethics, morality and end of life. HS – ADVISABLE. Cindy Mitchell – Library-Teacher https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2008...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I loved this book just as much as the first. Personally I can't understand the bad reviews. This book focuses a little less on Anna and Peter and more on Peter and his Grandfather and Longevity drugs. Peter and Anna are finally together living as Legals, although their lives are still troublesome as they are not socially accepted simply because of their youth and because of how they actually became legal. Peter, wanting to help the Underground Movement (the group of people against Longevity), pre I loved this book just as much as the first. Personally I can't understand the bad reviews. This book focuses a little less on Anna and Peter and more on Peter and his Grandfather and Longevity drugs. Peter and Anna are finally together living as Legals, although their lives are still troublesome as they are not socially accepted simply because of their youth and because of how they actually became legal. Peter, wanting to help the Underground Movement (the group of people against Longevity), pretends he wants to be apart of Pincent Pharma and begins to work for his Grandfather. He uncovers some dark truths about how Longevity, the drug responsible for immortality, is actually made. The story is heart-breaking and tear wrenching, with a very original storyline and interesting characters. If you enjoyed the first book, the Declaration, you will love The Resistance.

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