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Often seen as a key to understanding Elizabethan poetry, Sidney's persuasive treatise follows the rules of rhetoric in presenting evidence of the virtues of poetry. Sidney argues with wit and irony that poetry is the art which best teaches what is good and true. Often seen as a key to understanding Elizabethan poetry, Sidney's persuasive treatise follows the rules of rhetoric in presenting evidence of the virtues of poetry. Sidney argues with wit and irony that poetry is the art which best teaches what is good and true.


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Often seen as a key to understanding Elizabethan poetry, Sidney's persuasive treatise follows the rules of rhetoric in presenting evidence of the virtues of poetry. Sidney argues with wit and irony that poetry is the art which best teaches what is good and true. Often seen as a key to understanding Elizabethan poetry, Sidney's persuasive treatise follows the rules of rhetoric in presenting evidence of the virtues of poetry. Sidney argues with wit and irony that poetry is the art which best teaches what is good and true.

30 review for A Defence of Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danılo Horă

    This is probably still the best way to finish a Defense: "But if - fie of such a but! - you be born so near the dull-making cataract of Nilus, that you cannot hear the planet-like music of poetry; if you have so earth-creeping a mind that it cannot lift itself up to look to the sky of poetry, or rather, by a certain rustical disdain, will become such a mome as to be a Momus of poetry; then, though I will not wish unto you the ass's ears of Midas, nor to be driven by a poet's verses, as Bubonax wa This is probably still the best way to finish a Defense: "But if - fie of such a but! - you be born so near the dull-making cataract of Nilus, that you cannot hear the planet-like music of poetry; if you have so earth-creeping a mind that it cannot lift itself up to look to the sky of poetry, or rather, by a certain rustical disdain, will become such a mome as to be a Momus of poetry; then, though I will not wish unto you the ass's ears of Midas, nor to be driven by a poet's verses, as Bubonax was, to hang himself; nor to be rimed to death, as is said to be done in Ireland; yet thus much curse I must send you in the behalf of all poets: - that while you live you live in love, and never get favor for lacking skill of a sonnet; and when you die, your memory die from the earth for want of an epitaph."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shyam

    But what, shall the abuse of a thing make the right use odious? Who is it that ever was a scholar that doth not carry away some verses of Virgil, Horace, or Cato, which in his youth he learned, and even to his old age serve him for hourly lessons? __________ In this short, and very dense, Apologia , Sidney sets out to refute Plato’s position that Poets and Poesy have no place in an ideal Republic. Drawing from his wide reading and scholarly wit, the dense, humorous, and witty result, is noth But what, shall the abuse of a thing make the right use odious? Who is it that ever was a scholar that doth not carry away some verses of Virgil, Horace, or Cato, which in his youth he learned, and even to his old age serve him for hourly lessons? __________ In this short, and very dense, Apologia , Sidney sets out to refute Plato’s position that Poets and Poesy have no place in an ideal Republic. Drawing from his wide reading and scholarly wit, the dense, humorous, and witty result, is nothing short of spectacular. Along with Aristotle’s Poetics , an essential exploration of literary theory. I read this from the Oxford World Classics Collection, Sir Philip Sidney: The Major Works, which contains excellent notes by Katherine Duncan-Jones. For those of you who incline with Plato's view, Sidney has a little something to say to you . . . __________ I conjure you all that have had the evil luck to read this ink-wasting toy of mine, even in the name of the Nine Muses, no more to scorn the sacred mysteries of poesy; no more to laugh at the name of poets, as though they were next inheritors to fools; no more to jest at the reverend title of “a rhymer;” but to believe, with Aristotle, that they were the ancient treasurers of the Grecian’s divinity; to believe, with Bembus, that they were the first bringers in of all civility; to believe, with Scaliger, that no philosopher’s precepts can sooner make you an honest man, than the reading of Virgil; to believe, with Clauserus, the translator of Cornutus, that it pleased the heavenly deity by Hesiod and Homer, under the veil of fables, to give us all knowledge, logic, rhetoric, philosophy natural and moral, and “quid non?” to believe, with me, that there are many mysteries contained in poetry, which of purpose were written darkly, lest by profane wits it should be abused; to believe, with Landin, that they are so beloved of the gods that whatsoever they write proceeds of a divine fury. Lastly, to believe themselves, when they tell you they will make you immortal by their verses. Thus doing, your names shall flourish in the printers’ shops: thus doing, you shall be of kin to many a poetical preface: thus doing, you shall be most fair, most rich, most wise, most all: you shall dwell upon superlatives: thus doing, though you be “Libertino patre natus,” you shall suddenly grow “Herculea proles,” “Si quid mea Carmina possunt;” thus doing, your soul shall be placed with Dante’s Beatrix, or Virgil’s Anchisis. But if (fie of such a but!) you be born so near the dull-making cataract of Nilus, that you cannot hear the planet-like music of poetry; if you have so earth-creeping a mind, that it cannot lift itself up to look to the sky of poetry, or rather, by a certain rustical disdain, will become such a Mome, as to be a Momus of poetry; then, though I will not wish unto you the ass’s ears of Midas, nor to be driven by a poet’s verses, as Bubonax was, to hang himself; nor to be rhymed to death, as is said to be done in Ireland; yet thus much curse I must send you in the behalf of all poets; that while you live, you live in love, and never get favour, for lacking skill of a sonnet; and when you die, your memory die from the earth for want of an epitaph.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Olivia-Savannah

    I just couldn't get behind this one. I had to read it for my university course and while I do think some of my dislike comes from my lack of knowledge of the references he was making - that could not be all of it. I've read and enjoyed works where I cannot understand all of the references before. I simply was bored, from beginning to end. I didn't always agree with all of the statements he made. And while I can tell that he is being critical and presenting his arguements fairly well, it didn't m I just couldn't get behind this one. I had to read it for my university course and while I do think some of my dislike comes from my lack of knowledge of the references he was making - that could not be all of it. I've read and enjoyed works where I cannot understand all of the references before. I simply was bored, from beginning to end. I didn't always agree with all of the statements he made. And while I can tell that he is being critical and presenting his arguements fairly well, it didn't move me in any way. All in all: meh. I can't really recommend this one to anyone.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This is a difficult read, but a good one. I really love that, when Sidney was writing, "arts" and "sciences" acted almost as synonyms, and each could be used to describe "the different branches of knowledge and/or learning." Maybe if we still thought in that way today, humanities departments at universities wouldn't be in danger of eradication. Also, I love that this was published under two different titles, the second being "an apology for poetry." Way to appeal to two camps by writing one thesi This is a difficult read, but a good one. I really love that, when Sidney was writing, "arts" and "sciences" acted almost as synonyms, and each could be used to describe "the different branches of knowledge and/or learning." Maybe if we still thought in that way today, humanities departments at universities wouldn't be in danger of eradication. Also, I love that this was published under two different titles, the second being "an apology for poetry." Way to appeal to two camps by writing one thesis, Sidney. I wish we had discussed this in class for more than two minutes, but it's definitely something I will want to read again when I have more time to study literary theory.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katheryn Thompson

    Read as part of Sidney's 'The Defence of Poesy' and Selected Renaissance Literary Criticism, ed. Gavin Alexander (Penguin 2004) Read as part of Sidney's 'The Defence of Poesy' and Selected Renaissance Literary Criticism, ed. Gavin Alexander (Penguin 2004)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Biblio Curious

    This text goes under 2 different titles, "A Defence of Poetry" and "Apology for Poetry." The author gave the text 2 opposing titles and sent it off to 2 different publishers on the same day. You know, to fire up a debate! It deserves 5 stars just for being so gutsy and clever! His writing is witty at times with many references to figures from bygone days. He also wrote Astrophil and Stella, a sonnet sequence with semi-autobiographical elements where he tries about 108 different times to woo the s This text goes under 2 different titles, "A Defence of Poetry" and "Apology for Poetry." The author gave the text 2 opposing titles and sent it off to 2 different publishers on the same day. You know, to fire up a debate! It deserves 5 stars just for being so gutsy and clever! His writing is witty at times with many references to figures from bygone days. He also wrote Astrophil and Stella, a sonnet sequence with semi-autobiographical elements where he tries about 108 different times to woo the same lady and is rejected each time. Until, he finally resorts to song. I highly recommend the Penguin Edition that contains this Defensive gem of a read. Included with Sidney's Defence are other key players in literary criticism of the time. Sidney's The Defence of Poesy and Selected Renaissance Literary Criticism If you enjoy Sidney's wit, Peacock's Peacock's Four Ages of Poetry; Shelley's Defence of Poetry; Browning's Essay on Shelley may leave you on the floor in laughter. (Well, I'm exaggerating a bit.)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Momina Masood

    Gosson and the Puritan likes of him charged poetry with depravity and leading people astray etc. Sidney counters that it is not poetry that should be blamed but the amateur poets who don't know how to write good stuff. Poetry is simply a medium. He gives many examples to substantiate his argument and does it very nicely. Also, Sidney suggests that Plato held poetry in great esteem and it was only the 'abuse' of poetry in his time that led him to banish poets from his Republic. Poetry, in itself, Gosson and the Puritan likes of him charged poetry with depravity and leading people astray etc. Sidney counters that it is not poetry that should be blamed but the amateur poets who don't know how to write good stuff. Poetry is simply a medium. He gives many examples to substantiate his argument and does it very nicely. Also, Sidney suggests that Plato held poetry in great esteem and it was only the 'abuse' of poetry in his time that led him to banish poets from his Republic. Poetry, in itself, is not evil or anything, believes Sidney. It is simply the terrible use of it and for that poets must be blamed, not the divine art of poetry. And if someone still doesn't like it, then Sidney, in the last lines of his apology sends forth a curse to all such dull souls: "... yet thus much curse I send you in the behalf of all poets: that while you live in love, and never get favour, for lacking skill of a sonnet; and when you die, your memory die from the earth, for want of an epithet." Haha! Seriously?! After reading Gosson and now Sidney, I'm not sure whether I should take Elizabethan criticism seriously anymore.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    I was pleasantly surprised by how familiar this was - one of those situations where you go, "Oh, this is where that comes from!" I was pleasantly surprised by how familiar this was - one of those situations where you go, "Oh, this is where that comes from!"

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Let’s fight using books. That is just what Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) did to get back at his acquaintance Stephen Gosson, whose book - The School of Abuse - was dedicated to Sidney (without his consent, hence the jab). What ensued was “the first landmark of literary criticism in English” (Leitch 323). The Defence of Poesy (or An Apology for Poetry) (1580) was written, well, to defend the importance of poetry in society. Why is poetry necessary for society? The Defence of Poesy can be roughly di Let’s fight using books. That is just what Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) did to get back at his acquaintance Stephen Gosson, whose book - The School of Abuse - was dedicated to Sidney (without his consent, hence the jab). What ensued was “the first landmark of literary criticism in English” (Leitch 323). The Defence of Poesy (or An Apology for Poetry) (1580) was written, well, to defend the importance of poetry in society. Why is poetry necessary for society? The Defence of Poesy can be roughly divided into three parts. The first part concerns how poetry is better than philosophy, history, and other disciplines. Sidney begins by stating how poets were called “vates” (prophets) in Rome, and poetry was known as “poiein” (to make) in Greece (Leitch 329-330). What distinguishes poetry from philosophy and history is that poetry seeks to “delight and teach,” rather than simply teach and say what is what. Sidney says this is crucial because “for who will be taught if he be not moved with desire to be taught[?]” (Leitch 333, 340). The second part answers various objections to poetry. These objections are: 1) that there are “other more fruitful knowledges” than poetry. To which Sidney says, “If . . . no learning is so good as that which teacheth and moveth to virtue, and [if that is] . . . poetry, then . . . [there] cannot be . . . a more profitable [work]” (Leitch 348). 2) poetry is “the mother of lies.” Sidney argues, “the poet is the least liar . . . he nothing affirms, and therefore never lieth.” But what about discussing false information? Even if he “recount things not true . . . he telleth them not for true,” so he does not lie. (Leitch 348, 349). 3) poetry is “the nurse of abuse” (inspiring us to have sinful desires) (Leitch 348). To this Sidney claims that it is not “poetry [that] abuseth man’s wit, but that man’s wit [that] abuseth poetry” (Leitch 350). There is no bad poetry, but bad poets who create bad work. Plato, too, did not want to banish poetry, only “the abuse” of it (Leitch 353, and which, on page 354, leads Sidney to believe that Plato highly honors poetry). The third part looks at English literature and poetry in Sidney’s lifetime. Basically, it is not so good like in other nations. Some say England would not be able to produce such work because the English language at the time was very “mingled,” having a lot of Latin, French, and other sources present in it. To which Sidney says, “Why not so much the better, taking the best of both the other?” (Leitch 360). My opinions: I commend Sidney for emphasizing the importance of delight in learning. It seems true that we learn better when we experience pleasure in the learning process. I've learned more Czech when laughing with my mother-in-law than I've ever learned in any textbook. Is Sidney convincing in his claims about Plato (that banishing the abuse of poetry is honorable)? Well, it is a noble task to try and prevent misinformation from spreading. However, this begs the question that is all the more relevant today: who determines what is misinformation? This enters the dangerous pit of censorship, and who determines what, and why. Everyone, even Plato, even Sidney, has biases. I applaud Sidney for arguing that Plato had good intentions; in fact, many of us have good intentions. However, what I would have liked to hear more from Sidney is about potential consequences of those intentions. Even the best of intentions can breed bad consequences. It seems here that Plato’s good intentions override potential consequences, but I am not fully convinced by this personally. Recommendation/rating: Overall, I would recommend this text. The general message on why poetry is important is very useful for anyone who is wanting to learn more about literary criticism and how to think about and wrestle with many ideas and issues raised in any book. I gave this text 3/5 stars. I liked it because I study literature, and I want to know more about literary criticism and how that has developed throughout time. However, it’s kind of difficult to read (1500s Early Modern English, horribly long paragraphs sometimes, lots of Greek/Roman references, but with footnotes). Sources I used in this review: Leitch, Vincent B., editor. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. W. W. Norton & Company, 2001.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Juliet

    I had to read this book for one of my university courses so I find it surprising that I didn’t hate it. I’m not a native English speaker and the language in this book at times made me question my reading skills. Also I didn’t get all the references Sidney was making which added to the overall confusion. Sometimes he said contradictory things just to get his point across and that was annoying. The digressions that were supposed to move the reader and make him more engaged usually threw me off tra I had to read this book for one of my university courses so I find it surprising that I didn’t hate it. I’m not a native English speaker and the language in this book at times made me question my reading skills. Also I didn’t get all the references Sidney was making which added to the overall confusion. Sometimes he said contradictory things just to get his point across and that was annoying. The digressions that were supposed to move the reader and make him more engaged usually threw me off track. But, I have to admit it wasn’t totally bad. I understand where Sidney was coming from and I agree with some of his points. I think the text was smart.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shannon K

    Possibly my second favorite book next to Paradise Lost. The introduction is brilliant, and the text itself validates my love of the written word. Thank you, Sir Philip Sidney.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    Just read this in the new R.W. Maslen edition, which I highly recommend for the phenomenal notes and introductory material.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Keshia

    Filled with wit and beautifully intelligent observations. Be at ease world, poets are here to rule you all.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    *Read for College* The only reason I read this is because I had to read this for college, and to be honest, it didn't move me or or anything. *Read for College* The only reason I read this is because I had to read this for college, and to be honest, it didn't move me or or anything.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ben Smitthimedhin

    Minor great thoughts hidden within paragraphs of incomprehensible clutter :D

  16. 5 out of 5

    Raya

    I found some racist remarks, but overall it has good points :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Victor Finn

    I find Sidney's writing style to be very repetitive and overly verbose. This essay could be half the length that it currently is and he would not fail to get his point across. Sidney's argument is that poetry is the best of all teachers of virtue. History is limited by concrete events, whereas poetry is not. Philosophy only teaches the abstract concepts, whereas poetry dresses these abstract concepts in fantasy and thus makes them easier to understand and, in the special case of matters of virtu I find Sidney's writing style to be very repetitive and overly verbose. This essay could be half the length that it currently is and he would not fail to get his point across. Sidney's argument is that poetry is the best of all teachers of virtue. History is limited by concrete events, whereas poetry is not. Philosophy only teaches the abstract concepts, whereas poetry dresses these abstract concepts in fantasy and thus makes them easier to understand and, in the special case of matters of virtue, more attractive to the human mind. Sidney's argument is more nuanced than that, but that is the gist of it. This is a good argument, but I have to disagree with it. Sidney's argument is predicated on the assumption that everyone is wired the same way, so therefore any scholar who reads Virgil will have the same reaction. This simply isn't true. Human beings have diverse temperaments and, thus, diverse tastes. Poetry is the most effective teacher of virtue for those who have an emotional temperament. The fantastic stories of poetry capture their hearts and can potentially direct it towards positive ends. If you have a more intellectual temperament your heart will not be so captured by poetry and you would be better served by the instructions of philosophy. For myself, I read a lot of mythology when I was younger, but none of it inspired me to live a virtuous life. When I started reading philosophical works and heard the arguments of those books it clarified a lot of things in my life, and that is when I strove to live virtuously. Also, what if virtue simply isn't your goal? If you desire something material, such as wealth or power, then surely history is a better teacher. Learning from concrete situations is what will help you attain material goals. Abstracted situations will help you attain more spiritual goals. Read it if you are curious, as it is quite short, but there are better books that say the same thing in less time.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Sidney stands as an advocate for poetry when it is under fire and devalued in England. He has some very interesting ideas. This is a read that should be taken in slowly, as some of the sentences go an entire page. I think what he says is valuable, although quite a bit of it is based on Plato and Aristotle so if you have already read their literary and poetic ideas it is a bit redundant. His conclusion really socks it to you though, and he is definitely a wordsmith.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Suhasini Srihari

    Sidney's language is a little tough to understand but his usage of vocabulary is extensive and enriches our knowledge of English and shows us how little we know of the language. His defense of poetry is indeed a fantastic argument with valid reasons and one can simply not deny what Sidney tells and that poetry is superior to all other branches of learning. Sidney's language is a little tough to understand but his usage of vocabulary is extensive and enriches our knowledge of English and shows us how little we know of the language. His defense of poetry is indeed a fantastic argument with valid reasons and one can simply not deny what Sidney tells and that poetry is superior to all other branches of learning.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I agree that we should value poetry... But I did not enjoy the way this was written...

  21. 4 out of 5

    An upbeat reader

    ‘’Poets utter great and wise things which they do not themselves understand’’ ( Plato). To contrive to teach and to delight at the same time is nothing less than a prodigy. A defense of Poesie; a treatise on poetry; by Sir Philip Sidney is a venture to elevate poetry above the objections it receives, and to refute Stephen Gosson’s charges against poetry made in his school of abuse. Sidney’s essay could be divided into many parts in which he expounds both the aesthetic and moral value of poetry. ‘’Poets utter great and wise things which they do not themselves understand’’ ( Plato). To contrive to teach and to delight at the same time is nothing less than a prodigy. A defense of Poesie; a treatise on poetry; by Sir Philip Sidney is a venture to elevate poetry above the objections it receives, and to refute Stephen Gosson’s charges against poetry made in his school of abuse. Sidney’s essay could be divided into many parts in which he expounds both the aesthetic and moral value of poetry. On the one hand, Sidney devotes the first section of his tract to deal with the antiquity of poetry. Poetry is derived from rhythm of songs which were made for different occasions, such as, thremos, Iambos, dithyrambs,rhapsode, and chorus. Hence, poetry is the first form of literature. The poet has divine origins which resulted in granting him numerous honorable names; a vates, a prophet, a seer, a maker and so on and so forth. The poet represents different stages of civilization. He also provides information about history and culture. He gives advice and useful ideas for life and leads people to discover the truth. Poetry is about universal truths; things we would do and say in a given situation. It doesn’t only imitate nature but it shapes it. The poet is endowed with the gift of writing poetry which enables him to civilize many barbarous nations; through the use of emotions, passions and virtue. Poets teach moral lessons; they represent things as they are, as they were or they ought to be. Sidney looks it up himself to prove that poetry isn’t a vile distraction that promotes sins and superstition; neither, that it softens hearts on the expense of reason nor bombard people with lies. Poetry is the first light giver to ignorance. All the great works , be them, history , philosophy, law and sciences were poems. A poet is the only one who can give perfect pictures of virtue and vice, discuss them; reward virtue and punish vice. While philosophy gives precepts and history gives examples; poetry, through the use of imagination, does both. It stimulates, instructs and empels. As a result it is deemed the noblest of all secular learning. On the other hand, Sidney mentions the most frequently repeated criticism of poetry. Critics believe that poets are mere liars and that poetry is mere rhyming and versifying. They also advise people to spend time on something that is more knowledgeable and fruitful. Sidney casts light on the fact that Plato condemned poetry and believed that it is a form of propaganda. Its aim is to produce unquestioning obedience, to condition people from early age to accept their lives and that poetry trains humans to behave accordingly. He reiterates those objections by urging people to take cognizance of the fact that poetry isn’t exclusively that which is written in verse. He professes that poets neither affirm something to be true nor deceive the readers, to be labeled liars. Moreover, he states that although Plato hated poetry and excluded poets from his republic; he, himself, was the most poetical philosopher ever. At the end of this essay, Sidney turns to talk about ancient and modern English poetry, its potentials and history. Sidney sees no reasons for poetry to flourish if poets aren’t willing to educate themselves, and to learn from the past without imitating it. He believes that the reason why poetry isn’t improving is ascribed to the laziness of the poets. All in all, poetry connects human beings. It immortalizes people, events and stories. It is timeless, universal and touches hearts across time and place. Condemning it; is contributing in your everlasting ignorance.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leanne

    White Englishmen academics really think they're all THAT huh lmao Kidding aside, although I agree with the basic idea of some of the points raised (and I could see why this text is used as foundational reading for a literary theory class), I don't really see the weight of the arguments; in fact, most of the discussion was just constant navel-gazing and romanticizing of poetry, without actually fortifying its potentially subversive role not only in the dynamics of language, but also in the power s White Englishmen academics really think they're all THAT huh lmao Kidding aside, although I agree with the basic idea of some of the points raised (and I could see why this text is used as foundational reading for a literary theory class), I don't really see the weight of the arguments; in fact, most of the discussion was just constant navel-gazing and romanticizing of poetry, without actually fortifying its potentially subversive role not only in the dynamics of language, but also in the power structures of the outside world. I know this is a dated text, and I understand that some of the references are unknown to me, but it doesn't detract from my main rebuttal: it's not so much a defense as it is a self-absorbed rumination hiding its weaknesses behind a dominantly Western historical narrative of poetry.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Clay Hazam

    Hard to read follow without an in-depth knowledge of ancient history (Sidney loves showing off his knowledge). Aside from some ego self-stokery, though, "Defense" is a great read. In a time when poetry was thought childish or silly, Sidney paints it in divine light and ancient tradition. For him, it is life's highest calling. Hard to read follow without an in-depth knowledge of ancient history (Sidney loves showing off his knowledge). Aside from some ego self-stokery, though, "Defense" is a great read. In a time when poetry was thought childish or silly, Sidney paints it in divine light and ancient tradition. For him, it is life's highest calling.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ketelen Lefkovich

    This was not as difficult or impassable as I thought it would be. But the arguments are borderling dumb like he sounds like such a white man (which he is) making a case about something. Anyway read this for my master but adding anyway because yeah.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Slavik

    I can see where DH Lawrence got his inspiration for Why the Novel Matters.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    This treatise is to poetry what Hebrews is to Christ: it shows the supremacy of poetry over other disciplines like philosophy and history.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Poets never affirm (never make a claim to truth) and therefore never lie.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Noura

    Sidney really did THAT, huh? Second time reading this and probably won't be the last. Sidney really did THAT, huh? Second time reading this and probably won't be the last.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Moss

    ‘Her world is brazen, the poets only deliver a golden.’

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kbmaxwell Maxwell

    Love Sidney! Such a sense of humor, so gentlemanly, and so apt!

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