web site hit counter A History of India - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A History of India

Availability: Ready to download

Listening Length: 18 hours and 22 minutes Over 5,000 years, India has been home to a rich tapestry of peoples and cultures. Two of the world's great religions - Hinduism and Buddhism - have their origins in South Asia, and the lands east of the Indus River have long been a central hub for trade, migration, and cultural exchange. Today the subcontinent contains 20 percent of Listening Length: 18 hours and 22 minutes Over 5,000 years, India has been home to a rich tapestry of peoples and cultures. Two of the world's great religions - Hinduism and Buddhism - have their origins in South Asia, and the lands east of the Indus River have long been a central hub for trade, migration, and cultural exchange. Today the subcontinent contains 20 percent of the world's population and is a thriving center for global business, making this region one of most significant economic powerhouses in the world. Go inside this thrilling story with A History of India, a breathtaking survey of South Asia from its earliest societies along the Indus and Ganges rivers through the modern challenges of the 21st century. These 36 sweeping lectures enable you to understand the epic scope of the subcontinent's history. Perhaps the most important facet of this history is how diverse the region truly is. Roughly the size of continental Europe, India - along with its neighbors, Pakistan and Bangladesh - contains a myriad of ethnic groups, socioeconomic classes, religions, and cultural mores. In this wide-ranging investigation, you'll: Meet the many religious communities that have coexisted in India, including Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, Muslims, Christians, Jews, and Zoroastrians Delve into the legacies of the Mauryan Empire, the Mughal Empire, and British colonialism - three of the few governments that ever unified the subcontinent Witness the fight for independence from European powers and the partition of the region into the countries of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in the 20th century Consider the challenges and opportunities faced by this area today, from expanding urbanization to the vast need for energy sources to the ongoing heated debates about national identity Professor Fisher, who has traveled and taught in South Asia for decades, reveals this complex narrative with skill and compelling insights. 1. Introduction to India 32 min 2. The Mughal Empire in 18th-Century India 32 min 3. Indian and British Economic Interests 31 min 4. British Expansion in India (1757-1820) 28 min 5. Knowing the Country: British Orientalism 30 min 6. Race, Gender, and Culture (1750-1850) 30 min 7. The Age of Reform (1830-1850) 30 min 8. The Great Uprising (1857-1858) 27 min 9. Economics and Society under the Raj 29 min 10. Caste and Tribal Identity under Colonialism 29 min 11. The Nationalization of Hinduism (1870-1900) 32 min 12. Indian Muslim Identity and Colonial Rule 31 min 13. The Late-19th-Century British Raj 29 min 14. Princely States and Royalist Relationships 29 min 15. Indian Nationalism and the Freedom Struggle 31 min 16. The Great War and Its Impact on India 29 min 17. Gandhi's Moral-Political Philosophy 29 min 18. The Noncooperation Movement 31 min 19. Indian Muslim Politics between the Wars 29 min 20. The Civil Disobedience Campaign 32 min 21. Britain and Its Empire in the 1940s 30 min 22. The Raj on Its Knees (1945-1947) 30 min 23. A Split India: Negotiating Independence 30 min 24. Reflections on Postcolonial India 29 min


Compare

Listening Length: 18 hours and 22 minutes Over 5,000 years, India has been home to a rich tapestry of peoples and cultures. Two of the world's great religions - Hinduism and Buddhism - have their origins in South Asia, and the lands east of the Indus River have long been a central hub for trade, migration, and cultural exchange. Today the subcontinent contains 20 percent of Listening Length: 18 hours and 22 minutes Over 5,000 years, India has been home to a rich tapestry of peoples and cultures. Two of the world's great religions - Hinduism and Buddhism - have their origins in South Asia, and the lands east of the Indus River have long been a central hub for trade, migration, and cultural exchange. Today the subcontinent contains 20 percent of the world's population and is a thriving center for global business, making this region one of most significant economic powerhouses in the world. Go inside this thrilling story with A History of India, a breathtaking survey of South Asia from its earliest societies along the Indus and Ganges rivers through the modern challenges of the 21st century. These 36 sweeping lectures enable you to understand the epic scope of the subcontinent's history. Perhaps the most important facet of this history is how diverse the region truly is. Roughly the size of continental Europe, India - along with its neighbors, Pakistan and Bangladesh - contains a myriad of ethnic groups, socioeconomic classes, religions, and cultural mores. In this wide-ranging investigation, you'll: Meet the many religious communities that have coexisted in India, including Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, Muslims, Christians, Jews, and Zoroastrians Delve into the legacies of the Mauryan Empire, the Mughal Empire, and British colonialism - three of the few governments that ever unified the subcontinent Witness the fight for independence from European powers and the partition of the region into the countries of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in the 20th century Consider the challenges and opportunities faced by this area today, from expanding urbanization to the vast need for energy sources to the ongoing heated debates about national identity Professor Fisher, who has traveled and taught in South Asia for decades, reveals this complex narrative with skill and compelling insights. 1. Introduction to India 32 min 2. The Mughal Empire in 18th-Century India 32 min 3. Indian and British Economic Interests 31 min 4. British Expansion in India (1757-1820) 28 min 5. Knowing the Country: British Orientalism 30 min 6. Race, Gender, and Culture (1750-1850) 30 min 7. The Age of Reform (1830-1850) 30 min 8. The Great Uprising (1857-1858) 27 min 9. Economics and Society under the Raj 29 min 10. Caste and Tribal Identity under Colonialism 29 min 11. The Nationalization of Hinduism (1870-1900) 32 min 12. Indian Muslim Identity and Colonial Rule 31 min 13. The Late-19th-Century British Raj 29 min 14. Princely States and Royalist Relationships 29 min 15. Indian Nationalism and the Freedom Struggle 31 min 16. The Great War and Its Impact on India 29 min 17. Gandhi's Moral-Political Philosophy 29 min 18. The Noncooperation Movement 31 min 19. Indian Muslim Politics between the Wars 29 min 20. The Civil Disobedience Campaign 32 min 21. Britain and Its Empire in the 1940s 30 min 22. The Raj on Its Knees (1945-1947) 30 min 23. A Split India: Negotiating Independence 30 min 24. Reflections on Postcolonial India 29 min

30 review for A History of India

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yaaresse

    It's possible I'm being a bit generous here simply because I'm a little overwhelmed. There is a lot, and I mean a LOT, of in formation packed into these 18 hours of lectures. Still, it is barely an introduction to the topic. To go more in depth would have required exponentially more lectures. Honestly, I could probably listen to this a couple more times and still not extract everything from it. The biggest takeaway to me was a reconfirmation of just how limited is the American education system's It's possible I'm being a bit generous here simply because I'm a little overwhelmed. There is a lot, and I mean a LOT, of in formation packed into these 18 hours of lectures. Still, it is barely an introduction to the topic. To go more in depth would have required exponentially more lectures. Honestly, I could probably listen to this a couple more times and still not extract everything from it. The biggest takeaway to me was a reconfirmation of just how limited is the American education system's coverage of global, especially non-western, history.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

    I generally liked this summary of Indian history. But I was slightly annoyed at how the word hypergamy comes up quite often in the early parts, and the lecturer feels the need to define it every time. Once was enough.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    This was an engaging and informative lecture series. Although I have studied the religions of India and know something of its ancient history (mainly the Indus valley civilization and the Mauryan Empire, discussed in other lecture series I have listened), it had been one of the blank spots in my overall understanding of world history. So I was excited to find this at the library. It was fun listening to it, and listening fits best in my schedule, but I do sort of wish this were a DVD series; I a This was an engaging and informative lecture series. Although I have studied the religions of India and know something of its ancient history (mainly the Indus valley civilization and the Mauryan Empire, discussed in other lecture series I have listened), it had been one of the blank spots in my overall understanding of world history. So I was excited to find this at the library. It was fun listening to it, and listening fits best in my schedule, but I do sort of wish this were a DVD series; I am not at all familiar with the geography of India and visuals would have helped a great deal in making sense of it all. And this is one of the newer sorts that doesn't come with proper guide book but rather a PDF guide on a CD; how is one supposed to consult that while listening to a lecture series on the go? Anyway, this lecture series fulfilled my hopes for it by giving me an overview of Indian history and culture. I think it is a bit unusual that so much of the series is focused on culture rather than descriptions of events, but I tend to be more interested in the big concept history rather than minutia so I enjoyed it. Though I think it could also be interesting to have a bit more of the minutia, and also a bit more detail of the history of India prior to major foreign incursions, though I get the impression that much of that may be lost. I noticed a few reviews of this that commented on the professor's voice. I actually thought he was engaging and easy to follow and understand, though that may be partly because the lecture series I listened to before was by such a poor lecturer.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Juan Rivera

    For work and friendships I have had the opportunity to meet many cities of the beautiful country that is India. But in many occasions I was astonished by the movements and history, of which I only know parts. However today the course: "A History of India" published by The Great Courses narrated by Professor Michael H. Fisher. Many things I learned from this book, for example - The value of the two thousand-year-old books: The Ramayana and the Mahabharata (they knew that the latter is the longest b For work and friendships I have had the opportunity to meet many cities of the beautiful country that is India. But in many occasions I was astonished by the movements and history, of which I only know parts. However today the course: "A History of India" published by The Great Courses narrated by Professor Michael H. Fisher. Many things I learned from this book, for example - The value of the two thousand-year-old books: The Ramayana and the Mahabharata (they knew that the latter is the longest book ever written, twice the size of the Bible). - The Bhagavad Gita I read so carefully is only part of the Mahabharata. - There are three main races that were established in India, and from which all the Indians of today are derived. - Bangladesh and Pakistan were part of India, very interesting the history of how they separated and what are today these countries. - The power of Indira and her family. - The history of religious groups: Inductors, Muslims, Parsis, Christians, Jews and others who settled in India. - Conquered India and Portuguese and British influence. What is certain is that India is a very diverse, enigmatic and beautiful country. You have to know it, it's a different experience.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nannette

    A History of India Author(s): Michael Fisher Genre: History Imprint: The Great Courses CD - unabridged Audio (19 CDs) Product Number: GC0821 Released: Oct 12, 2016 ISBN: #9781501938351 Narrator/s: Michael Fisher Publisher: Recorded Books, Inc. by arrangement with The Teaching Company I have had some experience with The Great Courses by The Teaching Company over the last ten or so years. I have had two DVD courses and several audio only ones. The majority of the course work fine in audio only with some exc A History of India Author(s): Michael Fisher Genre: History Imprint: The Great Courses CD - unabridged Audio (19 CDs) Product Number: GC0821 Released: Oct 12, 2016 ISBN: #9781501938351 Narrator/s: Michael Fisher Publisher: Recorded Books, Inc. by arrangement with The Teaching Company I have had some experience with The Great Courses by The Teaching Company over the last ten or so years. I have had two DVD courses and several audio only ones. The majority of the course work fine in audio only with some exceptions like a course on the great works of art. I have not only learned a great deal from each course but have truly enjoyed them. A History of India was offered as a review copy from Recorded Books. India, as a country, a culture and a people, has long fascinated since I received a copy of The Far Pavilions by M. M. Kaye for my 16th birthday. I have not really had the opportunity to experience any non-fiction looks at India. A History of India was an excellent learning experience and achieved my goal of familiarizing myself with all of India, not just the historical fiction India. The course is taught by Michael H. Fisher, Ph.D., a professor of History at Oberlin College. Professor Fisher spent time living in India, with shorter periods in Pakistan and Bangladesh.He has a true love for the subject matter and it comes through in his lectures. Since this is an audio course, I would like to mention that the sound and production quality are excellent. Professor Fisher has a pleasant speaking voice. His pronunciations of foreign terms are clear and distinct so the listener can truly catch the word. When the same word comes up later, it is not an unknown term. He really does an excellent job. The course consists of thirty-six lessons of thirty minutes in audio format. Also included is a course guide in a pdf format. The course guide consists of a summary of each lecture, including some maps or photographs. The lecture summaries are rather more complete than normal summaries. Each lecture summary ends with a suggested reading list for those who want to explore more of the material covered in that lecture. What I really liked about the course was the completeness of the material covered. The first lecture, “Earliest History of the Indian Subcontinent” covers India’s geographic history. One of the things my children learned early in their education was that history occurs where it does for a reason. There were mountains that formed a barrier. There was a river that allowed a civilization to rise. There were weather conditions that changed the land and how it could be used. All of these are very important factors in why history happens where it does. The first lecture helps the listener understand how the geography of the Indian subcontinent shaped what was to come. The lectures continue with the migration of different peoples into the different areas of India. Literature and religion are not neglected but have several lectures dedicated to them. Each Indian empire is discussed. Lecture twenty-three begins the exploration of the influence of European Countries. The European conquest, rebellions and eventual Indian independence are covered next. The last two lectures examine the modernization of India beginning in the 1960’s and the 21st Century from the perspective of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and the surrounding nations). It really is a complete course on the history of India. There are several ways to enjoy or utilize this course. The lectures can be listened to as time allows without reference to the course guide. The listener can read the lecture notes from the course guide and then listen to the accompanying lecture. This allows the listener to have familiarized themselves with the material similar to doing the required reading before a college class. The reader could also listen to the lectures and refer to the course guide only as they feel necessary. There is no wrong way to utilize the course. I took thirty days to complete the course. I listened to one lecture per day, two if time allowed. I did read over the course guide for each lecture before listening to the lecture. This method required an hour at the most of my time per lecture. I chose to do it in this manner to make sure that I had a full understanding of what I was hearing. I am planning on listening to the course again in a more informal manner, probably starting in April. I learned quite a bit. I highly recommend A History of India in audio format. While driving, working at home or the office, the listener could enjoy an educational field trip to a country, culture, and people unique in our world.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ritwika Chakraborty

    In two words: Fabulous summary! I love history. It's my favorite subject and I really wanted a book to dive into India's glorious past in a summarized form to give me a wholesome idea of how we built our country. Since I picked this up on Audible, there was no going back. The author has touched upon every important era of our past, from the Adivasi ages to the current Narendra Modi era. The topics taken up from every period are very informative, crisp and to the point. He doesn't beat about the b In two words: Fabulous summary! I love history. It's my favorite subject and I really wanted a book to dive into India's glorious past in a summarized form to give me a wholesome idea of how we built our country. Since I picked this up on Audible, there was no going back. The author has touched upon every important era of our past, from the Adivasi ages to the current Narendra Modi era. The topics taken up from every period are very informative, crisp and to the point. He doesn't beat about the bush, but rather gives us a very unbiased information about India and its might. It isn't a comprehensive book, as in the author touches upon every topic , discusses it in brief and about its affect on Indians(South Asia) and then moves on. He knows that and so he also gives us few references(different books) here and there to get a clearer and more detailed idea about these topics which he categorizes as supplementary reads. I especially liked the structure that he provided with the text. He kept separate chapters on Ramayana and Mahabharata, detailing on its importance and relevance in Indian culture that was to come after and still persists. Time and again, he emphasized on issues from the past and how they have affected our present thought process and national issues. He has given importance to all the regions in South Asia, from North to East to South Indian rulers, among others. He has gone on length to speak about the evolution of languages in different cultures and their political leaders in every era. Exposure and growth of different religions has been an important part of his narrative as well. All in all, it's has been a splendid read, very concise and very interesting. I will go back to his references and delve deeper into the intricate history of our nation and I thank him for curating this book! Definitely recommending this ahead.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cory

    I sort of wanted to give this a 3-star rating, but I think the course is probably the best one can do in the "survey history" genre so I give it +1. Overall it does an excellent job covering all the major topics one should know about in India's [shorthand for India/Pakistan/Bangladesh or British India] history. Many of the lectures are quite good, & notably he manages to cover good detail in areas such as the concept of jati versus varna in the caste system & many of the less-than-heroic aspects I sort of wanted to give this a 3-star rating, but I think the course is probably the best one can do in the "survey history" genre so I give it +1. Overall it does an excellent job covering all the major topics one should know about in India's [shorthand for India/Pakistan/Bangladesh or British India] history. Many of the lectures are quite good, & notably he manages to cover good detail in areas such as the concept of jati versus varna in the caste system & many of the less-than-heroic aspects of Gandhi's life. Fisher has remarkable clarity in lectures, one example of which being his (good) tendency to quickly redefine academic concepts needed in discussion (e.g. edic/emic histories) which produces a grounding effect on the work. Some areas could have been covered better. There wasn't much connecting the jati / varna difference to caste today where the differences no longer exactly apply. And it does not discuss Gandhi's penchant for sleeping near underage girls as part of temptation resistance. Microfinance [ala the Grameen Bank] is discussed very briefly as a cure for poverty, despite robust economic studies showing it has no average impact. Furthermore, I suppose I ultimately became unhappy with the idea of a survey course in general. So many topics were rushed through. Jinnah's life gets only a few minutes of time & Pakistan's history in general is pushed through in maybe thirty minutes. But then again, what could he have done in an 18 hour audiobook course, considering there were very few things he could reasonably have cut?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Umar Farooq

    Very nice set of lectures that taught me a lot about the subcontinent. It is more of an overview than an indepth analysis and summarizes all the major eras of Indian history and also goes into the details of the current geopolitical situation of the region including Pakistan and Bangladesh. It was a good introduction to me for the history of one of the most fascinating and beautiful places and taught me many interesting facts that helped me understand my homeland's past. The era of Indra Gandhi Very nice set of lectures that taught me a lot about the subcontinent. It is more of an overview than an indepth analysis and summarizes all the major eras of Indian history and also goes into the details of the current geopolitical situation of the region including Pakistan and Bangladesh. It was a good introduction to me for the history of one of the most fascinating and beautiful places and taught me many interesting facts that helped me understand my homeland's past. The era of Indra Gandhi was for example a completely new chapter for me that sounded like a movie plot by the end or Babur or Shivaji or many other characters were all larger than life. The author tries to be fair to all sides and I think he does a good job in explaining complex historical situations in a simple and concise way. The introduction to Adiwasi communities that are traditionally forest dwellers was also new and fascinating thing to learn.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karissa Laurel

    A vast and easy to follow overview that touched on many of the subjects and details I was hoping to learn about. Fisher mostly does a good job providing the necessary context for understanding and comprehension without getting bogged down in detracting details. There are some subjects that I'd like to study more in depth after hearing about them in this presentation, but all I was hoping for with this lecture series was an extensive summary of India's history and that's what I got. Fisher's lectu A vast and easy to follow overview that touched on many of the subjects and details I was hoping to learn about. Fisher mostly does a good job providing the necessary context for understanding and comprehension without getting bogged down in detracting details. There are some subjects that I'd like to study more in depth after hearing about them in this presentation, but all I was hoping for with this lecture series was an extensive summary of India's history and that's what I got. Fisher's lecture style isn't my favorite. His speech patterns, rhythms, and pronunciations were a bit rough in spots, but not enough to keep me from appreciating and enjoying the information. For a basic but extensive overview of India's political, social, and geographical history, I highly recommend this lecture series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kimball

    Boy, was this a long book. 2.5 stars. I was hoping to read it all with Ashley before our trip to India back in February but we failed. Only got through about half of it. In a way that was good because being there in India gave me greater context so I could understand it differently. But I'm still so unfamiliar with all of that world and history that I didn't get much from it. I'd love to have a college class where we study a section each week and the teacher taught and expounded on the sections. Boy, was this a long book. 2.5 stars. I was hoping to read it all with Ashley before our trip to India back in February but we failed. Only got through about half of it. In a way that was good because being there in India gave me greater context so I could understand it differently. But I'm still so unfamiliar with all of that world and history that I didn't get much from it. I'd love to have a college class where we study a section each week and the teacher taught and expounded on the sections. That would be great. But reading it on my own was just too tough for me. I tried. No one can say I didn't try.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I have long been interested in history and as I have aged that interest has become more specific. I like to read books that give a barebones view of what shaped that particular subject, and then dive into any specific subtopic that catches my interest. For example, this book presented the dominant religions of India, their beginnings, the reason each was appealing to the population, and how each influenced the country and each other. It did not detail every prophet and what he ate for breakfast. I have long been interested in history and as I have aged that interest has become more specific. I like to read books that give a barebones view of what shaped that particular subject, and then dive into any specific subtopic that catches my interest. For example, this book presented the dominant religions of India, their beginnings, the reason each was appealing to the population, and how each influenced the country and each other. It did not detail every prophet and what he ate for breakfast. I wanted an overview of how India came to be and I was very happy with this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rajjjjj.....

    Great summary of the history of India. Even though I'm an Indian and know half of it, I have to agree that I didn't understand several others before reading this book. It's good to listen the details in complete chronological order. There are certain areas that are very high level and very summarised but I totally agree that you can't put a history of a country in one book. I learnt so many new things about my country and it eventually motivates me to seek other books to know more in detail. Great summary of the history of India. Even though I'm an Indian and know half of it, I have to agree that I didn't understand several others before reading this book. It's good to listen the details in complete chronological order. There are certain areas that are very high level and very summarised but I totally agree that you can't put a history of a country in one book. I learnt so many new things about my country and it eventually motivates me to seek other books to know more in detail.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shubhanshu Agrawal

    This series is a nice overview of Indian History. It is primarily a cultural progression description of the region than an events based one. It lacks in details for middle ages (Post Mauryan to Mamluk Dynasty). Also I found details about southern Indian empires very limited. But overall I would recommend this series to anyone wants to have an overview before dwelling into greater details of Indian History. Author's narration is superb. Going to revise it once more. This series is a nice overview of Indian History. It is primarily a cultural progression description of the region than an events based one. It lacks in details for middle ages (Post Mauryan to Mamluk Dynasty). Also I found details about southern Indian empires very limited. But overall I would recommend this series to anyone wants to have an overview before dwelling into greater details of Indian History. Author's narration is superb. Going to revise it once more.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shana Yates

    Solid set of lectures on India. Professor Fisher is thorough and intelligent, though his delivery can feel dull. It took me a while to get through the lectures and they are a useful foundation in Indian history, bringing you all the way up to the present day. Acts as a good primer for those trying to understand one of the largest economies of the world.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    This is an easy-to-follow and high-level overview of the history of the Indian subcontinent. I especially liked the material on the origin of the India religions -- Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism. The lectures spend a lot of time on ancient India, medieval India, colonial India, and modern India. The areas that are now the modern countries of Pakistan and Bangladesh are also covered.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I think the lecturer does a good job addressing the vast complexity of his subject with relative sensitivity, though as he wound to his conclusion I understood how much he'd skipped over to jam everything into an 18-hour series. Still, looking forward to perusing the bibliography and finding out more. I think the lecturer does a good job addressing the vast complexity of his subject with relative sensitivity, though as he wound to his conclusion I understood how much he'd skipped over to jam everything into an 18-hour series. Still, looking forward to perusing the bibliography and finding out more.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carol Chapin

    I listened to this course to supplement what I was learning at Kent State University, where I audited a "History of India" course. It was helpful, but I much preferred the context that the KSU professor provided. I got different outlooks from each course. I listened to this course to supplement what I was learning at Kent State University, where I audited a "History of India" course. It was helpful, but I much preferred the context that the KSU professor provided. I got different outlooks from each course.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    It was very informative. The professor seemed to have a good level of knowledge about India and its past. He seemed to be a bit biased toward India but that can be forgiven. Makes a good person to tell its history. The professor was engaging. Had no trouble following his voice or his speech.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Koda Whitney

    A very engaging, well narrated lecture series. It was necessarily brief as the history of such a diverse collections of peoples and traditions spanning millennia must be. Will definitely use it as a stepping stone for more on the Mughal empire and also the Ghandi regime of the 70s.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wozniak

    This felt just a little bit like a list of names and dates. Part of that is the challenge of trying to do a history of so many years and so many different religions, empires, etc. But whatever the cause this was less insightful than I hoped.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rich Uncle Pennybags

    Definitely just a general overview but good for me because I am hardly knowledgeable about South Asia. I was particularly interested to learn about Hinduism and Jainism, which have some apparent indirect influence on Buddhism in East Asia.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sruti Raju

    It is an “overview” level course in the subcontinent’s history, but insights provided were deep. I was born and educated in India, but I learnt many things about the history of the subcontinent only after viewing Mr. Fisher’s lectures in this course. Highly Recommended.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gil

    Disappointing and dry. Lacking in connecting and relating events. Sometimes it seems like it is trying to mix history and philosophy and still managing to keep them apart.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I found this program an excellent introduction to Indian history. I learned a lot about ancient and contemporary history of South Asia.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    A clear and cogent introduction to a part of the work that I am very ignorant of - made me want to hear more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Travis Webber

    Informative, but read from notes rather than given as a lecture. Would actually be greatly improved by being presented as prose.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gowri Kumar

    Its a good book for someone who wants to know a historical summary of india. Of course the history of india itself needs at least 3 volumes. Now i can move on to the anarchy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anjalica

    This was awesome. Great history

  29. 4 out of 5

    DavidO

    Not the best narrator, but sometimes very interesting regardless.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    A decent if not great series of lectures on the history of India. These lectures are a helpful introduction to the history of the subcontinent. The series of lectures did not gel well for me, and there were many discontinuities. Fisher could have made the different lectures connect better. A lot of times I just wondered why he was jumping to this new topic that did not seem to have grown out of earlier lectures.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.