web site hit counter The You I've Never Known - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The You I've Never Known

Availability: Ready to download

How do you live your life if your past is based on a lie? A new novel in both verse and prose from #1 New York Times bestselling author, Ellen Hopkins. For as long as she can remember, it’s been just Ariel and Dad. Ariel’s mom disappeared when she was a baby. Dad says home is wherever the two of them are, but Ariel is now seventeen and after years of new apartments, new sch How do you live your life if your past is based on a lie? A new novel in both verse and prose from #1 New York Times bestselling author, Ellen Hopkins. For as long as she can remember, it’s been just Ariel and Dad. Ariel’s mom disappeared when she was a baby. Dad says home is wherever the two of them are, but Ariel is now seventeen and after years of new apartments, new schools, and new faces, all she wants is to put down some roots. Complicating things are Monica and Gabe, both of whom have stirred a different kind of desire. Maya’s a teenager who’s run from an abusive mother right into the arms of an older man she thinks she can trust. But now she’s isolated with a baby on the way, and life’s getting more complicated than Maya ever could have imagined. Ariel and Maya’s lives collide unexpectedly when Ariel’s mother shows up out of the blue with wild accusations: Ariel wasn’t abandoned. Her father kidnapped her fourteen years ago. What is Ariel supposed to believe? Is it possible Dad’s woven her entire history into a tapestry of lies? How can she choose between the mother she’s been taught to mistrust and the father who has taken care of her all these years? In bestselling author Ellen Hopkins’s deft hands, Ariel’s emotionally charged journey to find out the truth of who she really is balances beautifully with Maya’s story of loss and redemption. This is a memorable portrait of two young women trying to make sense of their lives and coming face to face with themselves—for both the last and the very first time.


Compare

How do you live your life if your past is based on a lie? A new novel in both verse and prose from #1 New York Times bestselling author, Ellen Hopkins. For as long as she can remember, it’s been just Ariel and Dad. Ariel’s mom disappeared when she was a baby. Dad says home is wherever the two of them are, but Ariel is now seventeen and after years of new apartments, new sch How do you live your life if your past is based on a lie? A new novel in both verse and prose from #1 New York Times bestselling author, Ellen Hopkins. For as long as she can remember, it’s been just Ariel and Dad. Ariel’s mom disappeared when she was a baby. Dad says home is wherever the two of them are, but Ariel is now seventeen and after years of new apartments, new schools, and new faces, all she wants is to put down some roots. Complicating things are Monica and Gabe, both of whom have stirred a different kind of desire. Maya’s a teenager who’s run from an abusive mother right into the arms of an older man she thinks she can trust. But now she’s isolated with a baby on the way, and life’s getting more complicated than Maya ever could have imagined. Ariel and Maya’s lives collide unexpectedly when Ariel’s mother shows up out of the blue with wild accusations: Ariel wasn’t abandoned. Her father kidnapped her fourteen years ago. What is Ariel supposed to believe? Is it possible Dad’s woven her entire history into a tapestry of lies? How can she choose between the mother she’s been taught to mistrust and the father who has taken care of her all these years? In bestselling author Ellen Hopkins’s deft hands, Ariel’s emotionally charged journey to find out the truth of who she really is balances beautifully with Maya’s story of loss and redemption. This is a memorable portrait of two young women trying to make sense of their lives and coming face to face with themselves—for both the last and the very first time.

30 review for The You I've Never Known

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christine Riccio

    Great characters, moving story, beautiful writing, really enjoyed it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjLEm... Great characters, moving story, beautiful writing, really enjoyed it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjLEm...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elle (ellexamines)

    DNF at page 306 and I almost feel bad because this book had some good elements, but on the other hand, I feel like lighting this book on fire. ELISE IS AN IDIOT WHO KEPT HOPING HOPKINS WOULD GET LESS BIPHOBIC: PART I do you know how much i regret every life choice i've made? a lot So here's a story about me and Ellen Hopkins. The first Hopkins work I ever read was the Tricks duology, which I absolutely loved. It was a harsh read, but seeing the characters work through these situations was emotiona DNF at page 306 and I almost feel bad because this book had some good elements, but on the other hand, I feel like lighting this book on fire. ELISE IS AN IDIOT WHO KEPT HOPING HOPKINS WOULD GET LESS BIPHOBIC: PART I do you know how much i regret every life choice i've made? a lot So here's a story about me and Ellen Hopkins. The first Hopkins work I ever read was the Tricks duology, which I absolutely loved. It was a harsh read, but seeing the characters work through these situations was emotionally cathartic. Even the characters who angered me got my sympathy. Tricks has a major bi character who is only slightly based off stereotypes and feels real and developed. Somehow, it was all downhill from there. Being a person who reads for authors, I read Impulse, and here's where my issues began; a character who has been established as gay decides he's straight, which would be homophobic and bi-erasive on its own, but was made even worse by the fact that his love interest implies that she would break up with him if he swung both ways. (More on Impulse's thousands of problems here.) I was disgusted for obvious reasons. A year later, after seeing some positive reviews, I read Perfect, which unfortunately decried bi girls as fakers who are really straight. (More on Perfect's many problems, including a fairly gross storyline around rape, here.) ELISE IS AN IDIOT WHO KEPT HOPING HOPKINS WOULD GET LESS BIPHOBIC: PART II Because I am a complete idiot who doesn't learn from her mistakes, I decided to pick up another book by Hopkins, which mentions bisexuality in the blurb. The You I've Never Known started well, with a sympathetic character questioning her sexuality. It quickly broke down into a storyline where the bi main character is dating two people at once and cheating. That's blatant stereotyping in itself and I hate cheating storylines on principle anyway. But that's not why I didn't finish this book. I was going to stick it out to the end and hope the resolution worked. Sure, it's stereotypical and a bit off-putting, but I wanted to see where the book would go with it. I didn't finish this book for one reason and one reason only, and that is one line. Ariel just asked her boyfriend to “fuck her straight”. You think I'm exaggerating, but this is a literal, actual quote from this mess of a book. For those of you who are going to call me out for saying this and deny this quote's existence, it's right around page 295. Okay, but isn't even my main issue! Books can portray self-hatred in bi girls, and I'd even consider it an important topic when handled sensitively. It's not about her asking this; it's about the fact that he did it and the narrative romanticized him for it. Hopkins wants the reader to believe Gabe is a viable romantic option for Ariel, when he is so clearly not. A loving guy would not have sex with a girl who is barely seventeen and a virgin and an abuse survivor because she asked him to convince her she's heterosexual. Don't romanticize that in books people my age are reading. This kind of narrative is incredibly toxic. It romanticizes a guy who will have sex with a girl to prove to her she's not bi, and it spreads the idea that bi people find that attractive. Ariel's inner monologue even mentions that she finds his offer hot. To be entirely fair, there is some chance that Hopkins subverts these tropes and portrays "fucking someone straight" as a bad thing. But given the reviews I've read and her track record, I'm not willing to find out. NOTES ABOUT THIS BOOK NOT HAVING TO DO WITH BIPHOBIA brief because i'm still salty The narrative verse style is still really powerful. Hopkins' style has always clicked with me, and The You I've Never Known was no exception. Maya's storyline does not gel well with Ariel's, and she comes off very one-note. Ariel, on the other hand, starts the book off as a well-developed character. That goes away once the cheating storyline pops up, of course. But she does begin the book likable and believable. Around page 150, this book began to go downhill quickly. It's clear the beginning section is written with more thought than the middle section, and the beginning totally fooled me. I guess this is obvious from my review, but I don't really recommend any of Ellen Hopkins' books anymore.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I love Ellen Hopkins and her books but this one was just okay to me. It's still written in her beautiful verse that I love but I felt like it was too long. <---Yes, her books are long but there were things I didn't really care to read about and it went on and on before things started to fall into place. I did love most of the characters and I felt so bad for Ariel, the way her dad treated her. I mean here she is at seventeen still begging him to let her get her driver's license and he doesn't wa I love Ellen Hopkins and her books but this one was just okay to me. It's still written in her beautiful verse that I love but I felt like it was too long. <---Yes, her books are long but there were things I didn't really care to read about and it went on and on before things started to fall into place. I did love most of the characters and I felt so bad for Ariel, the way her dad treated her. I mean here she is at seventeen still begging him to let her get her driver's license and he doesn't want her getting a job. It's like she has to be stuck to his hip. Ariel does have some friends and this is the one city they have stayed in the longest as they have moved all of her life. Just on and on. . . But now Ariel has friends and love interests and she wants to stay and be a teen! Maya's story isn't as much in the book as Ariel's but it tells about how she ends up getting pregnant and thinks this is the best thing to get away from her mom. She marries a military man and they travel where ever he is stationed. She has a beautiful baby girl but things are never what they seem. I love when we are almost at the end of the book and all of the pieces fit together. I already knew what was coming, I figured it out about halfway through. But I also loved that Ariel got to become the person she was hoping for in certain ways. She also made more wonderful friends. MY BLOG: Melissa Martin's Reading List

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Star Rating: 2.5? 3? Ehh.... Not my favorite Ellen Hopkins novel. Ariel is one of the worst protagonists. Ever. She is just soo dumb and absurdly selfish. (view spoiler)[ I get she's trying to figure out your sexuality, but playing with the girl she reportedly loves emotions is not okay. And not calling the cops when you clearly have a concusion? Come on. And why is everyone letting her make decisions? She's an idiot. (hide spoiler)] I've always liked Ellen Hopkin's books because the stories and Star Rating: 2.5? 3? Ehh.... Not my favorite Ellen Hopkins novel. Ariel is one of the worst protagonists. Ever. She is just soo dumb and absurdly selfish. (view spoiler)[ I get she's trying to figure out your sexuality, but playing with the girl she reportedly loves emotions is not okay. And not calling the cops when you clearly have a concusion? Come on. And why is everyone letting her make decisions? She's an idiot. (hide spoiler)] I've always liked Ellen Hopkin's books because the stories and the characters are plausable. Bad things happen to good people all the time. I'm not saying Ariel's story could never happen, but these characters are not believable. At all. "You smoke weed and inhale." What? Referring to grieving your father as a "pity party"? You remember being 3 years old? Really? That's your story? That's just super convenient isn't it. WHO SAYS THIS STUFF? The story goes on waaaaay longer than it needs to. We get our "big reveal" about 75% in and then the story just. keeps. going. And to make it just so much worse, the whole thing is cheesy af. Me (literally the entire book): Alcohol may have helped.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    *Disclaimer: I was provided with an ARC of The You I’ve Never Known by Ellen Hopkins through Simon and Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review. This does not influence my opinion or rating in any way. -- Ellen Hopkins has been at the top of my favourite authors list probably since about the time I was in grade 9. Which would be about 12 years ago now…okay, before I go through an existential crisis, you should know that I was beyond excited when I found out that Ellen Hopkins had a new nov *Disclaimer: I was provided with an ARC of The You I’ve Never Known by Ellen Hopkins through Simon and Schuster Canada in exchange for an honest review. This does not influence my opinion or rating in any way. -- Ellen Hopkins has been at the top of my favourite authors list probably since about the time I was in grade 9. Which would be about 12 years ago now…okay, before I go through an existential crisis, you should know that I was beyond excited when I found out that Ellen Hopkins had a new novel that would be released this year. Not only that, but I literally freaked out when I found out I’d have the opportunity to read and review it for Big City Bookworm! The You I’ve Never Known is a perfect addition to the wonderful world of Ellen Hopkins and I really enjoyed reading it! -- What I Liked The dual perspective. After reading the first few chapters from Ariel’s perspective, the reader is introduced to the new point of view of Maya. I loved the dual perspectives as it showcased these two different girls and their very different, yet uniquely troublesome lives. Ariel lives on the road with her father and she has never had the opportunity to live in the same place for very long until now. As a teenager, Maya becomes pregnant with the child of an older man. Eventually these two characters and their complicated stories become intertwined. The characters. As the book went on, I really started to enjoy reading about all of the characters. I enjoyed slowly learning about Ariel’s past as well as her present struggle with self-discovery as I read through each chapter. I liked reading about her two love interests, Monica and Gabe, and how Ariel knew she loved them both, but for different reasons. Even though Ariel’s father wasn’t the greatest person (I’m trying not to spoil things here), it was interesting to learn about his past and the issues that he had to deal with…which probably caused him to do half of things that he did. The writing style. Ellen Hopkins is known for writing in verse. I LOVE her writing, and I have ever since I was an early teenager. I had never read anything written in prose before reading Crank and because it was something so new to me, I absolutely loved it. Her books look huge and intimidating at first glance, but they are so fast paced and they move so smoothly while also being so beautifully written. It was different. Different in the sense that it was very unlike the many other books that I have read by Ellen Hopkins in the past. It was a lot lighter…which is kind of funny considering that The You I’ve Never Known contains some pretty serious subject matter. It’s just that in comparison to some of the topics that Ellen Hopkins has covered in the past (of which I have read) this was pretty tame…which was a really nice and interesting change. -- What I Didn’t Like The spoiler synopsis. I really REALLY wish that I hadn’t read the description on the back of this book. I felt like it gave so much away and basically spoiled what could have been a pretty great twist/shock. -- Overall, I’m still beyond excited that I was able to read and review this for Big City Bookworm. I really enjoyed The You I’ve Never Known and I can’t wait to read more from Ellen Hopkins in the future! -- Initial post reading thoughts: Ellen Hopkins has been one of my favourite authors ever since I was in high school. It's been a while since I've read anything by her and I'm so happy that I was given the opportunity to read her new novel The You I've Never Known. In terms of your standard Ellen Hopkins book, The You I've Never Known is not as intense as some of her past works, but it still deals with some serious and heavy topics which is a staple in her novels. As always, The You I've Never Known is written in prose which makes it a really quick and fast-paced read! One thing I will say though, this synopsis gives WAY TOO MUCH away. I wish I hadn't read it before I started the book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Originally, I was enjoying this. However, it started to drag on and feel like nothing was really happening. I found myself skipping parts because it was really adding to the story line. Everything became so predictable that it wasn't enjoyable. Yes, there were a couple twists, but most of the supposed plot twists were very easy to spot from miles away. Originally, I was enjoying this. However, it started to drag on and feel like nothing was really happening. I found myself skipping parts because it was really adding to the story line. Everything became so predictable that it wasn't enjoyable. Yes, there were a couple twists, but most of the supposed plot twists were very easy to spot from miles away.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    I've been reading Hopkins since I discovered CRANK back in middle school years ago. I loved the way she could pack powerful, raw punches to your gut while writing so beautifully. I became fond of her signature gritty ways & found myself always looking forward to the release of her newest addition. Unfortunately, this wasn't her best work. It's clear that this one is personal- she says so in the author's note (which is why I feel guilty giving such a low rating but it really doesn't compare to he I've been reading Hopkins since I discovered CRANK back in middle school years ago. I loved the way she could pack powerful, raw punches to your gut while writing so beautifully. I became fond of her signature gritty ways & found myself always looking forward to the release of her newest addition. Unfortunately, this wasn't her best work. It's clear that this one is personal- she says so in the author's note (which is why I feel guilty giving such a low rating but it really doesn't compare to her earlier titles). But honestly, I didn't care for Ariel. She felt somewhat distant, naive, a doormat...I didn't care what happened to her, which didn't take much to guess because a lot of the synopsis already gives this away. (SERIOUSLY? WHY?) And the whole "figuring out your sexuality" thing just seemed to erase bisexuality. And I'm really tired of hearing bisexuality isn't valid; IT IS. Going back & forth trying to figure out if you like girls or guys more the way she did just seemed like deceit, & I really didn't give a shit about that. None of the characters stayed with me...Ariel's identity crisis came off as childish...not calling the cops for [s r] sooner seemed unrealistic...this simply didn't have the same impact that I've come to expect from Hopkins. And while I'm used to her books being long, this one just seemed to drag out pointlessly. Really, as much as it pains me to say it: this book is soft. Not the subject matter; her books are always mature. But the way Ariel handles everything & the way the story ends is not her usual hard-hitting artistic mark, & it clearly shows. I don't recommend this one unless you're already familiar with Hopkins & want to check it off your list. Otherwise go with the CRANK trilogy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Book Riot Community

    Using both verse and prose, Hopkins yells the story of Ariel, a seventeen-year-old ready to start a life on her own, and Maya, a pregnant teen running from an abusive mother. Ariel and Maya’s lives collide when Ariel’s estranged mother shows up, claiming Ariel was kidnapped by her father when she was a toddler. Hopkins delivers an intense story of two girls in search of truth and redemption while seeking to create their own lives. Backlist bump: Ask Me How I Got Here by Christine Heppermann Tune i Using both verse and prose, Hopkins yells the story of Ariel, a seventeen-year-old ready to start a life on her own, and Maya, a pregnant teen running from an abusive mother. Ariel and Maya’s lives collide when Ariel’s estranged mother shows up, claiming Ariel was kidnapped by her father when she was a toddler. Hopkins delivers an intense story of two girls in search of truth and redemption while seeking to create their own lives. Backlist bump: Ask Me How I Got Here by Christine Heppermann Tune in to our weekly podcast dedicated to all things new books, All The Books: http://bookriot.com/listen/shows/allt...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ayla

    Ellen Hopkins is truly an amazing author, she knows how to write a story that is captivating, emotional, and matters. I love the styles of her writing a poem like lay out. This story, I do not want to go into details it will give the story away. This is something that happens everyday and every year that one would never think could happen to you. The sad part is it happened to her she leaves a little note at the end of the book that this story is made up, but has a lot of truth. I could not put Ellen Hopkins is truly an amazing author, she knows how to write a story that is captivating, emotional, and matters. I love the styles of her writing a poem like lay out. This story, I do not want to go into details it will give the story away. This is something that happens everyday and every year that one would never think could happen to you. The sad part is it happened to her she leaves a little note at the end of the book that this story is made up, but has a lot of truth. I could not put the book down!!!! This is one that will earn a spot on my bookshelves so I can read it anytime I want. This is a must read for any and all ages, the book of the year so far.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This book was a pleasant surprise! Having never read a book by Ellen Hopkins before, I wasn't sure what to expect going into it. I've heard so much about how she writes stories that shock people and that deal with pretty controversial issues. I've also never read a book made up mostly of verse, so that was also a unique experience. Overall, I found myself being completely sucked into the story. Ariel Pearson is a girl who struggles with her sexuality. She's not entirely sure whether she straight This book was a pleasant surprise! Having never read a book by Ellen Hopkins before, I wasn't sure what to expect going into it. I've heard so much about how she writes stories that shock people and that deal with pretty controversial issues. I've also never read a book made up mostly of verse, so that was also a unique experience. Overall, I found myself being completely sucked into the story. Ariel Pearson is a girl who struggles with her sexuality. She's not entirely sure whether she straight, bi, or gay and it was so interesting to watch her figure this out. Her entire story arc I think was just brilliantly portrayed. However, I did think her relationships with Caleb and Monica were a bit strange and unconvincing. Her constant comparisons were also a bit annoying and unrealistic. Maya Macabe was also an interesting character. I believe she grows so much from the naive girl at the beginning of the book to the woman she is at the end. When these two girl collide, I was completely shocked. I don't want to spoil anything, so I'll leave it at it caught me off guard and idk why I didn't see that earlier haha. This is a story about home, family, abuse, friendship, and figuring who you are even when that seems impossible. Even though I had some minor problems with it, I still overall enjoyed myself and even teared up a bit at the ending. I will for sure be picking up more Ellen Hopkins in the future!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    Quick review for a quick read. As per usual, Ellen Hopkins' works tend to feel like I've ran a sheer emotional gauntlet. The experience leaves me winded in the aftermath (in a good way). How does someone describe the whirlwind that is this novel? It's hard not to be drawn into it because you get so connected to the emotional journeys of the character within, how complex and complicated they are, and even hoping that - in the end - things turn out the best . I'll admit I saw the twists in the rel Quick review for a quick read. As per usual, Ellen Hopkins' works tend to feel like I've ran a sheer emotional gauntlet. The experience leaves me winded in the aftermath (in a good way). How does someone describe the whirlwind that is this novel? It's hard not to be drawn into it because you get so connected to the emotional journeys of the character within, how complex and complicated they are, and even hoping that - in the end - things turn out the best . I'll admit I saw the twists in the relationship between these protagonists coming, but even with that the "Aha!" moment felt satisfying to watch as the stories came together. So: "The You I've Never Known" is largely a story about identity and the process of coming to terms with it. This happens multi-fold in the case of Ariel, a young woman who's spent most of her life on the run with her father. She's 17 years old and has never stayed in one place for too long, been in the go-betweens of her father and his numerous relationships that seem to come and go as the need arises. When I say need - well, it means a roof, food, booze, and sex in the case of the father. Ariel's father is a horrible douche, and this novel doesn't flinch at showing his flaws, but also the complicated relationship Ariel has with him. There are many times when she loves him and stays, but others where he abuses and uses her and she wants nothing more than to go. But Ariel finally finds a place where she feels wanted, between relationships as she is a bisexual woman exploring relationships with a boy (Gabe) and a Latina girl (Monica). So things quickly become complicated as Ariel realizes she wants to finally give herself a grounded place (a steady job, to be able to have a car on her own, etc.) The narrative trades spaces with Maya's narrative (distinguished between Ariel's narrative in prose form. Ariel's narration is in the form of poetry.) Maya is a woman who's escaped an abusive mother in Scientology and seeks a relationship with a man who's in the miliary, but certain events play out that complicate the relationship between Maya, her husband, and the baby named Casey whom Maya writes to in her entries. I won't spoil too much more in terms of the story's events, but it definitely felt like it packed a lot of events and conflict into one story (9/11, homophobia, struggles with bisexuality/sexual identity, abusive relationships, gaslighting, etc.). That not to say that the experience doesn't read smoothly, I read this in a matter of about 3 hours or so and didn't put down the book once. Yet, there were parts of the story that I definitely feel like could've used more distinct ties and resolutions and somehow that left a bit of a void and an aching for certain character ties to be more intimate (though the character connections and establishments were solid for the most part). I think this is as strong of an addition to Hopkins's bibliography as any of her works and I enjoyed the experience. I also recognize how brave it was for her to write this narrative given that portions of it were based on true events. Overall, I'd certainly re-read this narrative and thought it was well worth the time spent. Overall score: 4/5 stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicole aka FromReading2Dreaming

    After reading the Crank series by Ellen Hopkins, and absolutely loving that series, I have to say I was VERY disappointed in this book. This book follows Maya and Ariel, two very different girls, living two somewhat similar lives. And true to Hopkin's style, they are connected in someway. Maya is a girl trying to escape her abusive mother, who is a devoted Scientologist, and you want to know how she escapes? By meeting a solider that is quite older than her, and, unexpectedly, getting pregnant i After reading the Crank series by Ellen Hopkins, and absolutely loving that series, I have to say I was VERY disappointed in this book. This book follows Maya and Ariel, two very different girls, living two somewhat similar lives. And true to Hopkin's style, they are connected in someway. Maya is a girl trying to escape her abusive mother, who is a devoted Scientologist, and you want to know how she escapes? By meeting a solider that is quite older than her, and, unexpectedly, getting pregnant in the process, which she uses to make him marry her... I mean come on... Really? If you have to get pregnant in order to keep a guy then you have a serious problem... Next up we have Ariel, who lives with her father and is always on the move. The next part of Ariel's character is what I have a big problem with, and quite frankly I am a little pissed off that Ellen Hopkins wrote it this way. Ariel is bisexual, or at least she thinks she is. And I have to say that the things written in this book are really offensive to people who identify as bi. First off, Hopkins literally writes in the book that Ariel hopes that her guy love interest "fucks her straight"... No amount of ranting from me can even begin to describe how offended I am (P.S. I'm Bi :3). Another thing that Hopkins' wrote is that Ariel is "half-gay", excuse me. We are not half-gay and half-straight. We just like both genders. END OF STORY. I also don't get why authors feel the need to also include a cheating story line when bisexual characters are involved, which is also included in Ariel's story. Bi people cheat, but saying that we cheat on our partners just because we are bi... NO!!! Also Ariel's is just so annoying and stupid... More on that later. But on to actual story, Hopkins likes to write in verse, and honestly that is what made her Crank series so refreshing and an awesome read. This book is told in a verse and standard paragraph form, which doesn't mix well for this story at all. It clashes and Maya and Ariel's story just conflict and become an eye sore. Honestly, just choose on style and write the story like that... (view spoiler)[You know how I said that the two stories are connected... IT TAKES UNTIL PAGE 400 TO FIND OUT HOW!!! Just ughhhhh it is so obvious that Ariel is Maya's daughter and the dad is the solider from Maya's story. It even says in the blurb for the book that "Ariel's life gets turned upside down when her absent mother comes and finds her"... I mean come on it is soooooo obvious. And when Maya tells Ariel that she is her mother and her father kidnapped her, guess who Ariel is mad at?! She gets mad at her mother! I know Ariel was conditioned to hate her mother from her father, but Ariel is just so stupid she blames her mother... I don't get it... (hide spoiler)] But honestly it was a really sad story that tackles abuse and all the stuff in between. Would I recommend this book? Probably not because of the biphobia and the horrible characters... But will I recommend Ellen Hopkins' other books, most definitely.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emerald Sue

    The Dream I fight my way out of is tinted green. Not dark like evergreen but more the hue of summer leaves." Overall Thoughts Let me start by saying I am a huge Ellen Hopkins fan. I've read every single one of her other books and freaking loved them. So when I heard about this one coming out I was so excited to get my hands on it cause it's been awhile since one her books has been new to me. This book held the same rawness and beauty that all of Ellen Hopkins others book have but for me person The Dream I fight my way out of is tinted green. Not dark like evergreen but more the hue of summer leaves." Overall Thoughts Let me start by saying I am a huge Ellen Hopkins fan. I've read every single one of her other books and freaking loved them. So when I heard about this one coming out I was so excited to get my hands on it cause it's been awhile since one her books has been new to me. This book held the same rawness and beauty that all of Ellen Hopkins others book have but for me personally, it has to be my least favorite Ellen Hopkins book. I think between characters and just the story I wasn't as captivated by this book as I usually am the some of Ellen's other stories. I wasn't crazy about Ariel. I know Ariel is a flawed character but I just found her behavior annoying and I didn't care for Monica all that much either. I connected more with Maya's parts of the books. I was more excited to read her parts and I definitely got more emotional during her parts of the book. Maya felt more like an Ellen Hopkins character to me because I can really tap into her whereas with Ariel I just didn't feel much. It's probably just a personal thing because like I said this book still packs the punch that all her other books do, I just personally didn't fall as hard for this story. I don't have many actual complaints or cons. The fact that Ellen experienced something like this in real life really does give the book that much more rawness. If you're looking for an emotional trip that is not going to be sugar coated in any way what so ever, read this book or any other book by Ellen Hopkins. Until Next Time, Emerald BookWorm

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elle (ellexamines)

    Wait this is the same premise as The You I've Never Known. I'm pretty sure they're the same terrible book someone merge them Wait this is the same premise as The You I've Never Known. I'm pretty sure they're the same terrible book someone merge them

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hussein Baher

    4.2/5 "Family is a recipe for heartbreak" Ugh, this was SO GOOD. Despite the fact it was completely predictable, it didn't at all ruin the great experience I had with this. The majority of the book is told in verses, which a lot of people thought it ruined the experience. I, at the contrary thought it amplified it. The writing was really good. Both heartbreaking and heartwarming a story about self discovery, sexuality revelation and experimentation, motherhood, betrayal, family.... And so much more 4.2/5 "Family is a recipe for heartbreak" Ugh, this was SO GOOD. Despite the fact it was completely predictable, it didn't at all ruin the great experience I had with this. The majority of the book is told in verses, which a lot of people thought it ruined the experience. I, at the contrary thought it amplified it. The writing was really good. Both heartbreaking and heartwarming a story about self discovery, sexuality revelation and experimentation, motherhood, betrayal, family.... And so much more. Overall a compelling story that i highly enjoyed.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jacquelyn

    Actual Rating: 4.5 stars This is probably my new favorite book written by Ellen Hopkins. It touched on so many different subjects and the relationships of the characters, the family dynamics, the letters, etc. were all so real and raw. I really liked how the majority of this book was written in verse but there were letters and some things at the end that were written in prose. I absolutely loved this book and was so surprised finding out that Ellen Hopkins was inspired to write this book from her Actual Rating: 4.5 stars This is probably my new favorite book written by Ellen Hopkins. It touched on so many different subjects and the relationships of the characters, the family dynamics, the letters, etc. were all so real and raw. I really liked how the majority of this book was written in verse but there were letters and some things at the end that were written in prose. I absolutely loved this book and was so surprised finding out that Ellen Hopkins was inspired to write this book from her own personal experiences. The only reason I took half a star off was because this one was a little long. I loved that it kept going and going because I thought the story was great but there was some details/pages that weren't absolutely necessary so it felt a little dragged out. Other than that very small detail, I absolutely loved this book. I would love to see a follow-up book to this to see where these characters are at now.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Ellen Hopkins is fucking phenomenal. That is all.

  18. 5 out of 5

    AbigailHaleigh

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When I first finished this book I immediately wanted to give it 5 stars and then move along. But I decided to sit back on this one for a bit, and I'm glad that I did. I'm giving this book a 3.5 out of 5 stars, and here's why. For many reasons I absolutely adored this book: 1. The twist with Maya and Ariel = great. I really didn't start catching on until halfway through the book. 2. Monica and Ariel's relationship. Ariel coming to the understanding that closeness, feeling safe, and being loved is When I first finished this book I immediately wanted to give it 5 stars and then move along. But I decided to sit back on this one for a bit, and I'm glad that I did. I'm giving this book a 3.5 out of 5 stars, and here's why. For many reasons I absolutely adored this book: 1. The twist with Maya and Ariel = great. I really didn't start catching on until halfway through the book. 2. Monica and Ariel's relationship. Ariel coming to the understanding that closeness, feeling safe, and being loved is what really matters over the physical act of sex. 3. Hillary at first being your typical popular snob rich girl only for her character to completely tip on its side and turn into one of the sweetest girls ever (adored it) 4. The verse/prose writing style. This is very different from what I'm used to reading and I enjoyed this immensely. My biggest concern was the bisexual talk in this book. I understand where a lot of it came from. The whole idea that bisexuality isn't a "real thing" blah blah is VERY prevalent in my area. I live in the south, this is unfortunately a very "normal" thought process. So I was following it. Even Ariel's confusion of it I got. When I was coming to the understanding of my sexuality (bisexuals for the win!) Ariel's mentally was very similar to mine. I connected to her so closely. Until she started dating both Monica and Gabriel casually. Until she asked Gabe to fuck her straight. Until both Monica and Gabe seemed aware of the other person and just didn't care. Until this giant romantic triangle was romanticized and nothing big came out of it. I really felt like this story could have been just as impactful if she was only with Monica the entire time. Trying to desperately hide this relationship from her dad, and maybe using Gabe (who was only a friend) as a cover and nothing more (with Gabe being aware and fine with it.) I just felt like most of those scenes felt unnecessary when the main focus of this book was about Ariel, Maya, and her dad. Am I the only one?? Overall I did enjoy the book for the main plot, I was just a bit uncomfortable about the whole romantic relationships.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rain

    Dnf at 6% Normally I rate a book I don't finish with one star, because for whatever reasons, it wasn't good enough to keep my interest, but I won't even do it with this one. It's not bad, it's just written in a poemlike style and I'm not in the mood for that right now Dnf at 6% Normally I rate a book I don't finish with one star, because for whatever reasons, it wasn't good enough to keep my interest, but I won't even do it with this one. It's not bad, it's just written in a poemlike style and I'm not in the mood for that right now

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (Reading is Better With Cupcakes)

    The You I've Never Known is probably my favorite Ellen Hopkins book that I have read so far. I really think that she knocked this one out of the park. The You I've Never Known is mostly told from Ariel's perspective. She is a 17 year old girl who has lived pretty much her entire life moving from one place to another with her dad. At times he would find a lady friend to live with for a short amount of time and other times they would just live out of the car. Ariel's mother abandoned her and her fa The You I've Never Known is probably my favorite Ellen Hopkins book that I have read so far. I really think that she knocked this one out of the park. The You I've Never Known is mostly told from Ariel's perspective. She is a 17 year old girl who has lived pretty much her entire life moving from one place to another with her dad. At times he would find a lady friend to live with for a short amount of time and other times they would just live out of the car. Ariel's mother abandoned her and her father to be with her girl friend and gave up on them, so she has been out of Ariel's life for a very very long time. At the point in her life that this story occurs though, Ariel and her father have finally put down some temporary roots in California. Ariel is finally at a place in her life where she can let herself start to have friends and to find who she really is. And that brings us to one of the big questions that Ariel looks to solve during the course of this story. Who she is, especially when it comes to her sexual identity. Is she into men? Is she into women? Is she into both? Can she be bisexual? Is that even a possibility? And The You I've Never Known follows along with Ariel while she ponders these questions and works to discover herself and the answers to these questions....and more. So much more. Along with having Ariel's story, we also get a few "journal entries" from a girl named Maya. Maya is trying to navigate life and get away from her abusive mother. Oh my goodness guys. My mind is still reeling from reading this. I cannot stop thinking about it. There is just so much in this book! Discovering oneself, sexual identity, abuse, and more. It is a really hard hitting read. I had to put the book down on more than one occasion because there were points that were tough for me to get through and I had to take the extra time to digest what I had just read. However, I could never put it down for very long because I just had to know what was going to happen next! I will say that while I felt very invested in Ariel, that I didn't find myself drawn too much to the other characters. The only exception of this was Maya. It is probably because most of this story is about Ariel and told by Ariel. So it is like you are in her mind. It doesn't allow us to really get to know other characters all that deeply, but it does really let us get to know Ariel. And I really liked getting to know Ariel. I guess it doesn't really need to be said since this is an Ellen Hopkins book, but just in case you are new to her books... like the rest of her books there are some definite trigger warnings. Domestic abuse and child abuse are two very strong topics for this book...and alcohol consumption. Also, Ariel's father is very anti LGBTQIA and feel that should be noted. It is part of Ariel's story though, but I just wanted readers to be aware of it. Like I said in the beginning of my review, I really enjoyed The You I've Never Known. It found myself very pulled in and rooting for Ariel to find her true self. I am glad I read it and didn't put it off! This review is based on an ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. All thoughts and opinions are mine and mine alone. Find more of my reviews here: http://readingwithcupcakes.blogspot.com/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    My rating: 2.5 of 5 stars Not one person on this planet cares about you. No one but Daddy, who loves you more than anything in the whole wide world, and would lay down his life for you. You remember that, hear me? I heard those words too often in any number of combinations Almost always they came floating in a fog of alcohol and tobacco. Arielle has only ever known her dad from an early age. Dependable yet temperamental, he’s taken care of her for years on his own. Bounced from house to house and diffe My rating: 2.5 of 5 stars Not one person on this planet cares about you. No one but Daddy, who loves you more than anything in the whole wide world, and would lay down his life for you. You remember that, hear me? I heard those words too often in any number of combinations Almost always they came floating in a fog of alcohol and tobacco. Arielle has only ever known her dad from an early age. Dependable yet temperamental, he’s taken care of her for years on his own. Bounced from house to house and different woman to woman, Arielle and her father have finally settled down long enough in a town for her to begin to get comfortable. She’s joined the girls basketball team, she’s made friends, and she’s discovered a side of her sexuality that she fears. She’s never had a mom because according to her dad, she left both of them for her lesbian lover. Coming out to her father as the same would be beyond reckless. Maya has a difficult relationship with her mother. She ran her father out of the house and joined Scientology, expecting Maya to do the same. When her mother tells her they’ll be moving from Texas to Sea Org in Los Angeles, a Scientology organization, she concocts a way to avoid having to go: she gets pregnant. The father, Sergeant Jason Ritter, proposes to her and she feels relief at finally escaping her mother but she’s traded one bad situation for another. Funny How the Brain Manages damage control, conveniently curtaining windows that overlook certain footpaths into the past. I try to keep the shades drawn. Anything by Ellen Hopkins is bound to pack a punch with the types of subjects she tackles and The You I’ve Never Known is no different. This time she deals with abandonment, sexuality, and abuse, but it felt much more passive than some of her past stories. I’m always incredibly fond of her dual storylines and trying to determine the connection before the big reveal. While her stories are always lengthy in page count, the time it took for that big reveal to happen seemed to be dragged out for longer than was necessary. Often with Hopkins’ writing style, you find yourself getting lost in the beauty of her words. She still used verse as her main writing style and her typical formatting is there but it was much less lyrical and much more dense with a lot of backstory that lacked the passion her stories usually have. The main issue was with how the parents are portrayed. Her villains come in many forms, but in this story, they were the parents of both Maya and Arielle. They were both written as manic and often terrifying people, with little to no redeeming qualities. It was all black, no white, and definitely no gray area, and this lack of complexity caused them to come off as caricatures and nothing more. Hopkins has long been a favorite of mine and while I felt this one was lacking, her stories still manage to linger in my head long after finishing. She tackles the subjects that most often need to be brought to light, I only wish that she would also focus more on the poetic aspects that make these ugly subjects beautiful. I received this book for free from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julia Sapphire

    3.25 out of 5 stars Another Hopkins book has shocked me yet again. In this novel we follow Ariel, who lives with her father as her mother had run off when she was a child. We also follow Maya who gets pregnant as a teen and undergoes many challenges and obstacles along the way. This book is written in verse as well as just a normal book as the point of views switch. The story took awhile to kick off. Its slower paced but picked up around page 150 or so. This book is diverse in many aspects as 3.25 out of 5 stars Another Hopkins book has shocked me yet again. In this novel we follow Ariel, who lives with her father as her mother had run off when she was a child. We also follow Maya who gets pregnant as a teen and undergoes many challenges and obstacles along the way. This book is written in verse as well as just a normal book as the point of views switch. The story took awhile to kick off. Its slower paced but picked up around page 150 or so. This book is diverse in many aspects as Ariel is questioning her sexuality and there are several lesbian characters involved in the novel. Ariel would get very repetitive at times which got old. I thought that her struggle was especially interesting to follow and something a lot of teens could relate to. I enjoyed the side character Gabe but just thought Ariel's friends were typical. As for Maya I thought she was incredibly brave but also very naive. The two stories intertwine and it's very interesting how Hopkins achieved that. I enjoyed the themes presented in this book as well as the way it was written for the most part. Not my favorite Hopkins but not my least favorite either.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Leigh

    The You I’ve Never Known is about Ariel and Maya both struggling in their lives. Ariel is always moving. Maya has gotten herself pregnant to get away from her mother. As these girl’s lives tangle they find themselves united. This book was hard to put down, as every new page was a different development. The perspective is raw and emotional and it reflects in the writing. Ellen Hopkins has done it again, with yet another lovely verse book. To see my full review http://www.boundtowriting.com/review- The You I’ve Never Known is about Ariel and Maya both struggling in their lives. Ariel is always moving. Maya has gotten herself pregnant to get away from her mother. As these girl’s lives tangle they find themselves united. This book was hard to put down, as every new page was a different development. The perspective is raw and emotional and it reflects in the writing. Ellen Hopkins has done it again, with yet another lovely verse book. To see my full review http://www.boundtowriting.com/review-...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth☮

    This book is written largely in verse. It tells the story of Ariel who lives with her father. He is former military and largely an alcoholic as we see the two traverse the country for reasons that are unknown to us. In interspersed chapters we hear from Maya. A young girl whose mother is into scientology and ignores what is happening in Maya's life. As such, Maya meets a young man and gets pregnant in order to get out of her mother's grip. I like that Ariel's voice is in verse. The author experi This book is written largely in verse. It tells the story of Ariel who lives with her father. He is former military and largely an alcoholic as we see the two traverse the country for reasons that are unknown to us. In interspersed chapters we hear from Maya. A young girl whose mother is into scientology and ignores what is happening in Maya's life. As such, Maya meets a young man and gets pregnant in order to get out of her mother's grip. I like that Ariel's voice is in verse. The author experiments with line breaks and structure and it works. What I didn't like is there are a lot of issues being tackled along with the big issue (I won't reveal it here) that felt forced and not genuine. Teen books don't have to cover every issue you can muster and this felt too heavy with Ariel's budding sexuality. Also, I would have liked Maya's journals sprinkled throughout the book rather than all at the end. I didn't feel much like reading them once I knew the outcome.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Gomez

    full non spoiler review here: https://chicnerdreads.wordpress.com/2... Summary/Plot Told by two different characters, Ariel and Maya. All Ariel knows is moving around the USA with her dad, she doesn’t know stability and staying in one place. She doesn’t know friendships, education, or a household. According to her dad, home is wherever the both of them are since Ariel’s mom abandoned them when she was little. However, for once in Ariel’s life, her and her dad (Mark) have stayed in Sonora, Californ full non spoiler review here: https://chicnerdreads.wordpress.com/2... Summary/Plot Told by two different characters, Ariel and Maya. All Ariel knows is moving around the USA with her dad, she doesn’t know stability and staying in one place. She doesn’t know friendships, education, or a household. According to her dad, home is wherever the both of them are since Ariel’s mom abandoned them when she was little. However, for once in Ariel’s life, her and her dad (Mark) have stayed in Sonora, California for a little over a year and Ariel finally feels normal. Ariel has friends, she’s been to school for a full grade, she’s feeling optimistic about the future, and maybe her and her dad will stop moving around so much. Ariel is also shaken up because she’s experiencing internal battles with herself and sexuality. And having a father who’s a homophobe, living in Sonora that is super conservative, she doesn’t know who to talk to about these feelings she’s experiencing for both Monica and Gabe (I’ll get to them later on in the review). Maya is trying to run away from her mother who happens to be obsessed with Scientology and Maya wants nothing to do with her and that “cult” as Maya likes to call it. She blames Scientology for changing her mom and her parents divorce. Maya cannot stand her mom because she can’t even have a relationship with her father. All of a sudden her father dies and she even goes to his funeral without consent of her mother because she would’ve refused. Maya’s mom wants to move them to LA to be a part of the Church of Scientology but Maya has other plans. And somehow in all of this, Maya and Ariel meet and things take a turn. Writing I loved the writing! The book is written both in verse and prose but mostly verse. Ariel’s POV is verse and Maya’s POV is in prose. I don’t know if any of you know this but Ellen Hopkins is one of my all time favorite authors and a big inspiration to me because of the way she writes her books. As a poetry writer myself, Ellen is like my mom lol. Ellen Hopkins uses different techniques when she writes in verse. Sometimes she’s saying two different things in the same page and I’m still trying to figure out HOW she does that. With a few words, Ellen Hopkins will paint you the world and characters with vivid emotions. Characters I feel like I touched based a little too much with Ariel and Maya in the summary/plot, therefore I will move onto the other characters in this book that we get to meet. I want to discuss a little on Ariel’s dad, Mark. I found him to be a complete asshole, however Ariel makes so many excuses for him and you can clearly see the abuse that is going on between child and father. Mark is an abusive father; physically, emotionally, and mentally. He is a very manipulative character. Not just to Ariel but his girlfriend Zelda as well. Both victims to his schemes and lies. Ariel always playing protector since it’s always been him and her and her dad always spoke so bad about Ariel’s mom and that she never questioned him. He is very good in gaslighting. We also get to meet “The Freak Club” which consist of Ariel, Monica, and Syrah. They call themselves that because they all have “dysfunctional” things going on. And I use quotation marks because not all is wrong. Monica is a Lesbian Mexican American who is not out to her family because she feels like her family wouldn’t accept it. I loved Monica’s character and even though her character felt just slightly stereotypical to me (the Latina bff who always has to say something in Spanish here and there to her non-spanish speaking friends, you know, in order to prove to us the reader that they’re Latinx), Ellen Hopkins wrote her really well. When Hopkins wrote in Spanish, she got the accents right and she even got the Mexican food right! It’s so important to me as a Latina myself that when people write about us, they get our language and culture correct. Monica and Syrah are both very supporting characters towards Ariel and what she’s going through with her internal struggle of bisexuality. Monica and Ariel have feelings for one another but Monica knows that Ariel is having a hard time. And I love that Monica is still willing to be there in the end for Ariel no matter what happens. I love the female friendships in this book because I feel like we don’t get much of that in YA. We definitely see a lot of Monica and Syrah throughout the book. Gabe is introduced a little later in the book, he is Zelda’s (Mark’s girlfriend) nephew and he comes into town to stay a while with Zelda while he tries to figure some things out. Gabe and Ariel hit it off which confuses Ariel even more. Gabe, another supportive character is just a sweet charming guy trying to get by. He sees the abuse of Ariel’s father and tries to protect her but there’s only so much someone can do. Thoughts I loved this book. You might be wondering why I say love when I gave it a 4 star. The reason why I gave it a 4 star was because it got repetitive at times and I wish that what happened more towards the end was extended and the repetition was cut off. Ellen Hopkins writes truths in this book. She writes about how bisexuals are perceived and how even Ariel perceives herself because of social standards towards bi people. Ellen Hopkins also leaves a Authors Note talking about how she wrote this book based off her own experience which had me crying at the end. And I won’t discuss the authors note because it will lead to the spoiler and plot of the book. With Ariel moving so much and the way Ellen Hopkins talks about the instability of staying in one place and even sleeping in the car with her dad for weeks at a time, I asked myself about her health. Hopkins, covered all my questions about how her health was and even her lack of education. I liked the diversity of this book, Ellen never disappoints with her diverse cast of characters and their situations. Maya’s story was short but touching and to the point. Which is why I don’t talk much about her because her story is pretty much a major spoiler. The abuse that both Ariel and Maya experience in their own journeys are heart wrenching and sad. I would definitely recommend this book!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

    I really enjoyed reading this book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I really, really didn´t enjoy this book. First of all, it's mostly written in verse which almost never works for me. Also: If you read the synopsis you already know most of what is happening in this book. (view spoiler)[I also don´t know if it was supposed to be a plot twist that Maya is Ariels mother, because I saw that coming after the third part from Maya’s POV, mainly BECAUSE of the goddamn synopsis. (hide spoiler)] The biggest problems I had with the book are Ariel as a protagonist, the pacin I really, really didn´t enjoy this book. First of all, it's mostly written in verse which almost never works for me. Also: If you read the synopsis you already know most of what is happening in this book. (view spoiler)[I also don´t know if it was supposed to be a plot twist that Maya is Ariels mother, because I saw that coming after the third part from Maya’s POV, mainly BECAUSE of the goddamn synopsis. (hide spoiler)] The biggest problems I had with the book are Ariel as a protagonist, the pacing and how bisexuality was dealt with. Ariel was just very unlikeable to me. She comes off as very distant and also selfish, even though it´s written in her perspective. Most of the secondary characters were boring and some of the dialogue sounded unbelievably stupid. The pacing was off because the first 450-500 pages drag on and on and on… Then (view spoiler)[Maya appears and it´s revealed that she´s Ariel´s mother (hide spoiler)] , then we have almost a 100 pages of interesting stuff and then it just stops. (view spoiler)[The most interesting part would´ve been to see Ariel reconnect with her mother, but we see very little of that. Maya gives Ariel a diary that she has written in, mostly about her daughter. We see most of these entries at the end of the book but to me they felt tacked on and not as if they were an actual integral part of the story. (hide spoiler)] There is just a lot that I´d want to know but the book just stops right before it gets really interesting. (view spoiler)[What happens to Ariel´s father? How will she deal with her new live? Will Monica come out to her family at some point? Again: How will her relationship with Maya evolve? (hide spoiler)] What annoyed me the most however was how Ariel dealt with her sexuality. (view spoiler)[She is in a relationship with Monica but cheats on her with Gabe. I´m just tired of bisexuals being portrayed as cheaters and just because Monica apparently knew about Gabe and Ariel having sex doesn´t make it ok. If Ariel had been up front with Gabe AND Monica I´d feel different but this was just a mess. It was also pretty unnecessary and made the book longer and more boring than it needed to be. Gabe also cheated on Ariel so… he´s also not my favourite person in this book. (hide spoiler)] All in all there were few parts I liked about this (most of them toward the end) and a whole lot that I hated.Would not recommend.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    "I think most people are chameleons, hiding pain and anger beneath a mask of civility." WARNING: If you want to read this book DON'T READ THE SYNOPSIS. It spoils everything. If you want to know something about this book, it's about a girl named Ariel, who lived her entire life with her dad, moving all across the country, and about a girl named Maya, who lives with her overbearing mother. That's it, now, moving on... I did like this book, but it felt to long. Granted, it's over 600 pages, and told "I think most people are chameleons, hiding pain and anger beneath a mask of civility." WARNING: If you want to read this book DON'T READ THE SYNOPSIS. It spoils everything. If you want to know something about this book, it's about a girl named Ariel, who lived her entire life with her dad, moving all across the country, and about a girl named Maya, who lives with her overbearing mother. That's it, now, moving on... I did like this book, but it felt to long. Granted, it's over 600 pages, and told in verse, but I felt like there were things that didn't need to be there, and that the story could have gone a bit faster. I kept thinking "Ok, can something happen now?". I liked Maya a lot more than I liked Ariel. Ariel was very... stupid. Yeah, that's the word. She was very sheltered, and was a bit naive, but bordering on stupid. I didn't like that she went back and forth (view spoiler)[between Gabe and Monica. Yeah, she saw Gabe as a friend with benefits, and Gabe wasn't in love with her either, but Monica kept telling Ariel how much she loved her, and Ariel didn't seem to care. I understand she was coming to terms with her sexuality, but girl, don't play with people (hide spoiler)] . What ended up sealing the whole "Ariel is an idiot" thing was when (view spoiler)[she was ran over in the road and didn't call an ambulance. I got that she didn't want the cops to arrest the person who nearly killed her (I got it, doesn't mean I agreed with it), but girl, you were in a car accident, somebody needs to check on you (hide spoiler)] . Teenagers, I swear. I felt terrible for Maya, I understood why she did some of the things she did, I was devastated with what happened afterwards. Because of the synopsis, I wasn't surprised when (view spoiler)[I found out that Maya was Ariel's mom. I was kinda expecting it (hide spoiler)] . One thing that I didn't like about this book was the rushed ending. We spent 500 pages going on and on about Ariel's life and crap, but the ending came out of nowhere and happened so fast. I wanted more from (view spoiler)[Maya and Ariel talking and getting closer, I wanted to know more about Ariel's future and what was she going to do with her life (hide spoiler)] . I do recommend this book because it's full of heartbreak, sadness, anger and hope.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liza Wiemer

    Blog tour and giveaway going on right now: Please go to http://www.whorublog.com/2017/01/25/b... The You I've Never Known is filled with emotional punches, and it's impossible not to be deeply effected by them in the best way. This story is brilliantly woven into a slow revelation of personal as well as sexual identity. Themes of friendship, love, loyalty, teen pregnancy, and family are key elements. Who am I? Who loves me? What does it mean to be loved? What IS love? Abuse also comes into play, e Blog tour and giveaway going on right now: Please go to http://www.whorublog.com/2017/01/25/b... The You I've Never Known is filled with emotional punches, and it's impossible not to be deeply effected by them in the best way. This story is brilliantly woven into a slow revelation of personal as well as sexual identity. Themes of friendship, love, loyalty, teen pregnancy, and family are key elements. Who am I? Who loves me? What does it mean to be loved? What IS love? Abuse also comes into play, explored and revealed so that the victim comes to realize what she thought of as love was really anger, control, hate. ------Deep breath. This book. So much emotion. So many powerful messages. So important. Once again, Ellen Hopkins pens characters who feel so real, it take imagination to believe that they don't really exist, that you're reading about them in a novel, not a journal of their life. Ariel is at the center of this story and readers will feel her confusion, her attraction, her sense of loyalty, friendships, love, fear. Her father is a despicable person. I have so many emotions wrapped up with him that I may need to amend this review later as I process my emotions. From Monica to Zelda to Gabe to Hillary, I love each of these secondary characters for different reasons. Each one has a very special role in Ariel's lives. They change her profoundly. You need to read this novel to understand each one's impact. And then there's Maya's story—at first separate, but then it converges into Ariel's. PAINFUL! POWERFUL! DEEPLY MOVING! Sad. But then again, HOPEFUL. Ellen Hopkins never shirks away from the tough topics. Be prepared to think. I highly, highly recommend this novel and all of her novels.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Drewthereader20

    What a great first book by a new too me author! I really enjoyed this. Towards the end when I reached 570ish Lorde's green light was playing. And that song fit the book! Anyways, enough about Lorde. Time to talk about this book! But where to start?... First off: Ariel was amazing character. And there was multiple plot twist on this novel. For those who don't know there is some abusiveness in here. Second off: the rating is a 4.5! Almost a 5 stars rating but it just wasn't quite five stars. Idk What a great first book by a new too me author! I really enjoyed this. Towards the end when I reached 570ish Lorde's green light was playing. And that song fit the book! Anyways, enough about Lorde. Time to talk about this book! But where to start?... First off: Ariel was amazing character. And there was multiple plot twist on this novel. For those who don't know there is some abusiveness in here. Second off: the rating is a 4.5! Almost a 5 stars rating but it just wasn't quite five stars. Idk why? Third off: Ellen Hopkins writing was wonderful! I love how quick I read through this!!! That's all I have to say rn....(:

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.