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MR. FIELD'S " HANDBOOK OF CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY " needs no commendation. For eighteen years it has been before the public; and twenty-three thousand copies of it have been sold. There is no better compendium of Divine truths, as expounded by John Wesley, than this. Mr. Field takes Methodism's first two theological tutors as his guides; and, in doing this, he has acted wisely MR. FIELD'S " HANDBOOK OF CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY " needs no commendation. For eighteen years it has been before the public; and twenty-three thousand copies of it have been sold. There is no better compendium of Divine truths, as expounded by John Wesley, than this. Mr. Field takes Methodism's first two theological tutors as his guides; and, in doing this, he has acted wisely and well; for, as teachers of Methodist doctrines, none of their successors have excelled them. Mr. Field's doctrinal definitions are comprehensive and yet pointed. They are singularly free from what is superfluous, and yet always intelligible; while the Scripture texts adduced in proof of them are irrefutable. From first to last, the author exhibits great calmness of mind and soundness of judgment. The book evinces very intensive and well-chosen reading. Its style is simple, terse, and lucid. Taken altogether, it is an exceedingly valuable production, and worthy of the clear head and Christian heart of its writer; and has been of great service to a large number of class-leaders, local preachers, and candidates for the Methodist ministry, and others. My business, however, is not to write a critique on the book of Mr. Field, but to make a few remarks respecting the emendations and additional notes of the Editor of the new edition now introduced to the reader's notice. The Rev. John C. Symons has no more need of a puff than has the Rev. Benjamin Field. His literary ability is well known, especially in the colonies of Australia; but a brief statement of what he has done in this new edition of the " Handbook of Christian Theology " can do no harm, if it does no good. The book consists of twenty chapters; Mr. Symons' emendations, with the exception of a few useful footnotes in subsequent pages, are wholly confined to the first five chapters Mr. Field's excellent chapter on " The Existence of God" has been omitted, and another on the same subject, and also an " Introductory " one, on the skeptical theories of the age, both by Mr. Symons, have been inserted in substitution. Regret may be felt at the loss of Mr. Field's chapter; but since his book was first published, in 1868, there have been such mischievous developments of the various forms of Rationalism as to make it, perhaps, desirable, if not important, to deal with them more fully than was done by Mr. Field nearly twenty years ago In the present edition, Pantheism, Agnosticism, Positivism, Secularism, Materialism, Deism, and Atheism are all carefully defined by Mr. Symons; and in Chapters 1 and 5 are very ably refuted. Chapter 2, on "Divine Revelation," has been greatly enriched by Mr. Symons' really learned notes, which indicate a course of reading, on this important subject, that Biblical students cannot follow without immense advantage to themselves. Mr. Symons' added notes on "The Inspiration of the Holy Scriptures," though not numerous, are valuable. In the chapter on "The Doctrine of the Holy Trinity," there are nearly five pages of new matter, on "The Nature and Attributes of God," which Mr. Field's book greatly needed; and there are also an equal number of pages introduced on the Resurrection of Christ, as the " crowning proof of the Divinity of His Person and Mission." All this new matter is important, and displays great ability. In Chapter 5, on "The Creation of the World," about six pages of new matter are introduced on the " Modern Theory of Evolution." In these pages Mr. Symons presents a careful statement of the pernicious errors now so prevalent. I have nothing more to say, or, at least, nothing more need be said. Mr. Symons greatly loved his friend Mr. Field, and has taken no unwarrantable liberties with the book he has newly edited. When the two friends meet in the kingdom of heaven, Mr.


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MR. FIELD'S " HANDBOOK OF CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY " needs no commendation. For eighteen years it has been before the public; and twenty-three thousand copies of it have been sold. There is no better compendium of Divine truths, as expounded by John Wesley, than this. Mr. Field takes Methodism's first two theological tutors as his guides; and, in doing this, he has acted wisely MR. FIELD'S " HANDBOOK OF CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY " needs no commendation. For eighteen years it has been before the public; and twenty-three thousand copies of it have been sold. There is no better compendium of Divine truths, as expounded by John Wesley, than this. Mr. Field takes Methodism's first two theological tutors as his guides; and, in doing this, he has acted wisely and well; for, as teachers of Methodist doctrines, none of their successors have excelled them. Mr. Field's doctrinal definitions are comprehensive and yet pointed. They are singularly free from what is superfluous, and yet always intelligible; while the Scripture texts adduced in proof of them are irrefutable. From first to last, the author exhibits great calmness of mind and soundness of judgment. The book evinces very intensive and well-chosen reading. Its style is simple, terse, and lucid. Taken altogether, it is an exceedingly valuable production, and worthy of the clear head and Christian heart of its writer; and has been of great service to a large number of class-leaders, local preachers, and candidates for the Methodist ministry, and others. My business, however, is not to write a critique on the book of Mr. Field, but to make a few remarks respecting the emendations and additional notes of the Editor of the new edition now introduced to the reader's notice. The Rev. John C. Symons has no more need of a puff than has the Rev. Benjamin Field. His literary ability is well known, especially in the colonies of Australia; but a brief statement of what he has done in this new edition of the " Handbook of Christian Theology " can do no harm, if it does no good. The book consists of twenty chapters; Mr. Symons' emendations, with the exception of a few useful footnotes in subsequent pages, are wholly confined to the first five chapters Mr. Field's excellent chapter on " The Existence of God" has been omitted, and another on the same subject, and also an " Introductory " one, on the skeptical theories of the age, both by Mr. Symons, have been inserted in substitution. Regret may be felt at the loss of Mr. Field's chapter; but since his book was first published, in 1868, there have been such mischievous developments of the various forms of Rationalism as to make it, perhaps, desirable, if not important, to deal with them more fully than was done by Mr. Field nearly twenty years ago In the present edition, Pantheism, Agnosticism, Positivism, Secularism, Materialism, Deism, and Atheism are all carefully defined by Mr. Symons; and in Chapters 1 and 5 are very ably refuted. Chapter 2, on "Divine Revelation," has been greatly enriched by Mr. Symons' really learned notes, which indicate a course of reading, on this important subject, that Biblical students cannot follow without immense advantage to themselves. Mr. Symons' added notes on "The Inspiration of the Holy Scriptures," though not numerous, are valuable. In the chapter on "The Doctrine of the Holy Trinity," there are nearly five pages of new matter, on "The Nature and Attributes of God," which Mr. Field's book greatly needed; and there are also an equal number of pages introduced on the Resurrection of Christ, as the " crowning proof of the Divinity of His Person and Mission." All this new matter is important, and displays great ability. In Chapter 5, on "The Creation of the World," about six pages of new matter are introduced on the " Modern Theory of Evolution." In these pages Mr. Symons presents a careful statement of the pernicious errors now so prevalent. I have nothing more to say, or, at least, nothing more need be said. Mr. Symons greatly loved his friend Mr. Field, and has taken no unwarrantable liberties with the book he has newly edited. When the two friends meet in the kingdom of heaven, Mr.

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