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The Witch Tree Symbol

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When a neighbor asks Nancy to accompany her to an old uninhabited mansion, she finds a witch tree symbol that leads her to Pennsylvania Dutch country in pursuit of a cunning and ruthless thief. The friendly welcome the girl sleuth and her friends receive from the Amish people soon changes to hostility when it is rumored that Nancy is a witch! Superstition helps her enemy i When a neighbor asks Nancy to accompany her to an old uninhabited mansion, she finds a witch tree symbol that leads her to Pennsylvania Dutch country in pursuit of a cunning and ruthless thief. The friendly welcome the girl sleuth and her friends receive from the Amish people soon changes to hostility when it is rumored that Nancy is a witch! Superstition helps her enemy in his attempt to get her off his trail, but Nancy persistently uncovers one clue after another to outwit her dangerous adversary. This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1955) is similar with minor revisions.


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When a neighbor asks Nancy to accompany her to an old uninhabited mansion, she finds a witch tree symbol that leads her to Pennsylvania Dutch country in pursuit of a cunning and ruthless thief. The friendly welcome the girl sleuth and her friends receive from the Amish people soon changes to hostility when it is rumored that Nancy is a witch! Superstition helps her enemy i When a neighbor asks Nancy to accompany her to an old uninhabited mansion, she finds a witch tree symbol that leads her to Pennsylvania Dutch country in pursuit of a cunning and ruthless thief. The friendly welcome the girl sleuth and her friends receive from the Amish people soon changes to hostility when it is rumored that Nancy is a witch! Superstition helps her enemy in his attempt to get her off his trail, but Nancy persistently uncovers one clue after another to outwit her dangerous adversary. This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1955) is similar with minor revisions.

30 review for The Witch Tree Symbol

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    So, basically, the best thing ever just happened to me. My daughter fell in love with Nancy Drew. I didn't think it would ever happen. I have spent the last three years “introducing” my middle child to the first book in the Nancy Drew series, The Secret of the Old Clock, only to watch her face crunch up in boredom and confusion. She actually said to me, at one point while I was reading, “Mom, it's like I don't even understand what anyone's saying.” *Wither* I called my therapist, and together we cam So, basically, the best thing ever just happened to me. My daughter fell in love with Nancy Drew. I didn't think it would ever happen. I have spent the last three years “introducing” my middle child to the first book in the Nancy Drew series, The Secret of the Old Clock, only to watch her face crunch up in boredom and confusion. She actually said to me, at one point while I was reading, “Mom, it's like I don't even understand what anyone's saying.” *Wither* I called my therapist, and together we came to terms with the fact that none of my children were going to have a relationship with the woman who taught me to love reading (you may think I'm referring to my mother here, but I actually mean Carolyn Keene). But, then, a few weeks ago, this same daughter watched a 2019 movie called Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase. And she fell in love. She loved the movie SO much, I had an epiphany. . . maybe I'm reading her the wrong Nancy Drew book? Turns out, book #2, The Hidden Staircase, was just creepy and weird enough to finally pull her in as a devotee. There's been no stopping us now. We've read five Nancy Drew mysteries in the past three weeks, but just when I thought it couldn't get better. . . my daughter said, “Mom, almost every Nancy Drew book takes place in a different state, and we're reading all over the U.S. Why don't we do a Reading Road Trip for kids my age, from every state?” Hey, what a great idea, honey! Why don't I add 50 more books to the 50 books I'm already reading this year, have a health crisis, AND move across the country to a new state, four months from now? Naturally, I agreed to do it. Because: clearly insane. So, here we are. Nancy Drew #33, The Witch Tree Symbol, takes place in the state of Pennsylvania, and offers a mystery that involves Amish people who, in Carolyn Keene's whitewashed world of 1955 talk like this: “Ya, but I go by the old ideas. This girl makes trouble, ain't?” Also, new vocabulary words for mother and daughter: fasnachts: super fattening German doughnuts schnitzing: not to be confused with the more popular shvitzing, but more like shvitzing with apples And. . . witch trees! Have you ever looked up “witch trees?” You should!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Delee

    3.5 Whenever I feel completely overwhelmed- I fall back on Nancy Drew. With my adult brain- she seems kind of silly and outdated...but still a comfort- because when I was reading her as a girl- things seemed so uncomplicated. I often wished to be the daughter of Carson Drew- sorry Dad- but I did. How many dads are there out there that would let their daughters be kidnapped and threatened 100s of times and still welcome the next mystery? Not many. Carson is the dad I always wished for- and in THE W 3.5 Whenever I feel completely overwhelmed- I fall back on Nancy Drew. With my adult brain- she seems kind of silly and outdated...but still a comfort- because when I was reading her as a girl- things seemed so uncomplicated. I often wished to be the daughter of Carson Drew- sorry Dad- but I did. How many dads are there out there that would let their daughters be kidnapped and threatened 100s of times and still welcome the next mystery? Not many. Carson is the dad I always wished for- and in THE WITCH TREE SYMBOL he didn't disappoint. Go ahead- put yourself in danger. No one will stop you. Not even Hannah Gruen. [image error] When neighbor, Mrs. Tenney asks Nancy to find her stolen antiques- Nancy jumps at the chance to solve her next mystery. [image error] ...and she calls on her best friends Bess and George to help her. No threats are going to keep her from the task at hand. [image error] Finding the stolen antiques- sends them to Amish country- and Nancy will not let rude questions and condescending opinions get in her way. [image error] Ahhhh Nancy- I knew there was a reason I loved you.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Honestly, this one's a bit of a dud. Nancy and her friends are tracking a thief of antiques, and the girls find themselves in an Amish community in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. So it makes sense that this nugget of the Nancy series is less fun than the rest. No one goes to Lancaster to have "fun." You go for the food and the quilts, and to experience silent Amish judgment leveled at you. I mean, hey, they'll let you visit their homes, and you can sashay around in your pants-suits (like an unmarried Honestly, this one's a bit of a dud. Nancy and her friends are tracking a thief of antiques, and the girls find themselves in an Amish community in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. So it makes sense that this nugget of the Nancy series is less fun than the rest. No one goes to Lancaster to have "fun." You go for the food and the quilts, and to experience silent Amish judgment leveled at you. I mean, hey, they'll let you visit their homes, and you can sashay around in your pants-suits (like an unmarried loose woman, shame on you!). But nonetheless, the families will let you borrow their horses and buggies (even though you crash the vehicle on the side of the road, you witch). But, yes, just be aware that most likely you'll be accused of witchcraft along the way, and the locals won't help you solve your case. One fun ironic moment occurs near the beginning, however! One Amish man, who casts aspersion upon Nancy and her "liberated" friends, who refuses their assistance to locate his own beloved missing daughter, is generally one of those "toxic" menfolk who borders on abusive . . . well, as soon as he is finished lecturing the girls, he immediately gets trampled by a bull. :-D

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    Nancy's car gets stolen yet again! Nancy's car gets stolen yet again!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Well! Nancy's #33 I think might just about be one I could call "favorite" - There are more descriptions of the community in which she is mixing and mingling. This one takes place in Pennsylvania, among the Dutch Amish community. Time is taken to explain the differences between the Church Amish ("who are comparatively modern and own automobiles and electrical appliances" - pg 27) and the House Amish ("who are very strict and do not believe in using any of these 'fancy' things - they feel that hard Well! Nancy's #33 I think might just about be one I could call "favorite" - There are more descriptions of the community in which she is mixing and mingling. This one takes place in Pennsylvania, among the Dutch Amish community. Time is taken to explain the differences between the Church Amish ("who are comparatively modern and own automobiles and electrical appliances" - pg 27) and the House Amish ("who are very strict and do not believe in using any of these 'fancy' things - they feel that hard work with the hands is much better for the health and the soul."). Interesting figures of speech are noted, too - I don't remember anything like that in any previous ND. . . she's pretty self-absorbed, culturewise, so these at-length observations of the cultural practices of others outside of her day-to-day life feels very exotic for an Nancy Drew adventure. Heavy, hearty tasty food is mentioned often and consumed often - more than I can recall being featured in any previous ND book - food and how it was prepared, everything just short of a recipe! On page 116 I believe Ned offers one of the most oblique proposals I have ever read (she pretends not to understand and threatens him with an Amish girl as bride). In addition to these treats, No. 33 has a plethora of hexes, painted, planted and implied all over the countryside and people. Curses seem to abound, and Nancy, of course, is branded a witch. The witch who solves the case! So, for the changes from the usual road, and the dash of gypsy thrown in, 4 stars. Deep fried and sprinkled with powdered sugar.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    The last time I read this I was about 8, so had managed to forget virtually all of this book. Nancy is asked to help a woman get to a house of a late relative where she has inherited half of the antiques in it (it's full of antiques), but when they get there, the antiques are gone. Then Nancy sees someone leaving the attic! Soon she has been asked to solve this case and she and her two 17 year old (I seem to remember her being 17 when I was a kid, but I could be wrong) friends have permission to The last time I read this I was about 8, so had managed to forget virtually all of this book. Nancy is asked to help a woman get to a house of a late relative where she has inherited half of the antiques in it (it's full of antiques), but when they get there, the antiques are gone. Then Nancy sees someone leaving the attic! Soon she has been asked to solve this case and she and her two 17 year old (I seem to remember her being 17 when I was a kid, but I could be wrong) friends have permission to drive to Amish country in Pennsylvania to work on this. There are lots of adventures and some dangerous narrow escapes! There are false leads and new clues, plus a missing Amish girl who has run away from a very strict father. One of the things I do want to mention that was done better than in many of the Amish fiction books I have read is the way whoever was writing this under the Carolyn Keene name was the Amish dialogue. If any Amish fiction authors manage to read this review (not very likely, but how can I predict?) read this book. For one thing, the word order is correctly misplaced by some of the speakers. Having grown up around German speakers and having heard the old line "Throw the horse over the fence some hay" many times (this makes sense in German if the articles are correct and means that you throw the hay over the fence), but in English it's just plain funny. For another thing, they don't randomly just throw in the odd PA "Dutch" words in odd ways, but use them for names of foods, etc, and then the author says "chust" for just but doesn't overdo this stuff.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David Allen Hines

    Even though I am a collector of Hardy Boys, I have picked up some Nancy Drews over the years, and I found this copy of of the original, longer 1950s version of The Witch Tree Symbol at a used book store. Nancy and her friends Bess and George head into Amish country in Pennsylvania, seeking to solve the mystery of some stolen antiques and a runaway Amish girl. This story is actually pretty good and still plausible despite its age, but this older version of the book includes a lot of German and Am Even though I am a collector of Hardy Boys, I have picked up some Nancy Drews over the years, and I found this copy of of the original, longer 1950s version of The Witch Tree Symbol at a used book store. Nancy and her friends Bess and George head into Amish country in Pennsylvania, seeking to solve the mystery of some stolen antiques and a runaway Amish girl. This story is actually pretty good and still plausible despite its age, but this older version of the book includes a lot of German and Amish words and expressions that I am guessing were edited out of the more modern shorter edition as well some politically incorrect characters such as a deaf-mute boy caracictured as "dumb." The story line is interesting, action-paced and still plausible even after more than 60 years. I think any fan of Nancy Drew will enjoy this book. While in many cases the older more original, longer books are better than the "modernized" shorter later titles I suspect in this case the more recent edition might be the better story and I plan to obtain it and find out!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    4 stars & 4/10 hearts. It was fascinating to see the Amish from an 1960s/1970s point of view. I really appreciated how the author added the Amish dialect & language. The mystery itself was fun, especially with the added challenge of everyone fearing Nancy. I really liked Marta & her storyline and how it fit in, too. Although the book kept refuting the idea that witches existed and that bad luck could come from hexes, I still took off 1 star just for the fact that all that is mentioned. I would h 4 stars & 4/10 hearts. It was fascinating to see the Amish from an 1960s/1970s point of view. I really appreciated how the author added the Amish dialect & language. The mystery itself was fun, especially with the added challenge of everyone fearing Nancy. I really liked Marta & her storyline and how it fit in, too. Although the book kept refuting the idea that witches existed and that bad luck could come from hexes, I still took off 1 star just for the fact that all that is mentioned. I would have enjoyed it more without that.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Whoever the ghostwriter was for this did a terrible job. I love mysteries, but I was so bored by the lack of plot twists. It’s established from the beginning that the thief was Roger Hoelt, so it was pretty much a matter of waiting around for Nancy to catch the guy. In general, the plot was just so dull. It seemed like the author’s sole goal was to stick in as many facts about Amish people as possible. The bulk of the story was Nancy vaguely wandering around in search of this lady’s stolen furni Whoever the ghostwriter was for this did a terrible job. I love mysteries, but I was so bored by the lack of plot twists. It’s established from the beginning that the thief was Roger Hoelt, so it was pretty much a matter of waiting around for Nancy to catch the guy. In general, the plot was just so dull. It seemed like the author’s sole goal was to stick in as many facts about Amish people as possible. The bulk of the story was Nancy vaguely wandering around in search of this lady’s stolen furniture. But she never actually ends up really getting anywhere. I swear, she spent more time eating pies and going to quilting circles than actually trying to solve the mystery. Also, there were a lot of filler events that added absolutely nothing to the plotline, such as Nancy (view spoiler)[getting slingshot hit by this little Amish boy and spending the rest of the day sleeping on the couch or Nancy saving another kid from getting hit by a beam (hide spoiler)] . I felt parts like these should have been cut out, so that the author could have developed the actual mystery aspect better. Overall, I was fairly disappointed by this. The writing seemed lazy and I thought that the ending was anti-climactic as well. The scene where Mr. Hoelt (view spoiler)[locks the girls in the attic and yells ‘you will die first!’ (hide spoiler)] came off as really cheesy. Maybe back in the day this was considered suspenseful, but I couldn’t stop myself from cracking up.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    This was probably the most half-assed book I've read so far in this series. I'd hoped for a treasure hunt or a lost inheritance or a mystery of some sort. What I got was a travelogue for the Pennsylvania Dutch and a few random words of German. No mystery, since the thief is known from the very beginning of the book. It's purely a pursuit, with no denouement, even. Nancy heads up to Pennsylvania Dutch country (where Amish people apparently believe in hexes?) to find stolen furniture. The Amish peo This was probably the most half-assed book I've read so far in this series. I'd hoped for a treasure hunt or a lost inheritance or a mystery of some sort. What I got was a travelogue for the Pennsylvania Dutch and a few random words of German. No mystery, since the thief is known from the very beginning of the book. It's purely a pursuit, with no denouement, even. Nancy heads up to Pennsylvania Dutch country (where Amish people apparently believe in hexes?) to find stolen furniture. The Amish people don't know why Nancy and B&G haven't started working on their dowry trunks yet; they've got the word "leddich" for a single person but I don't think there's a word for Lesbian. Ned suggests to Nancy that they wed because married Amish people ride in covered carriages. She plays dumb. I'm sure a modern translation would have some sort of "beard" punchline. ;-) Bess gets knocked out in a minor car crash (after hitting her head on the rearview mirror). Nancy gets knocked out cold and is out of commission for a day after a kid hits her with a slingshot (the foreshadowing is like an eighteen-wheeler on that one). In return she saves his life during a barn raising.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tabi34

    Ok, so this one was a bit odd. It wants to touch on the supernatural, but it doesn't. Nancy's a witch, no she's not. There are hexes and curses, no there's not. This story is a bit of a stretch. A lot of lead up and a rather pat ending. Blah blah blah. A couple things I noticed. There is a clear case of animal abuse - the criminal deliberately hits Togo with his car, but yet nothing is done about it. He even admits he did it out of spite. He steals Nancy's car, and we don't hear any charges bein Ok, so this one was a bit odd. It wants to touch on the supernatural, but it doesn't. Nancy's a witch, no she's not. There are hexes and curses, no there's not. This story is a bit of a stretch. A lot of lead up and a rather pat ending. Blah blah blah. A couple things I noticed. There is a clear case of animal abuse - the criminal deliberately hits Togo with his car, but yet nothing is done about it. He even admits he did it out of spite. He steals Nancy's car, and we don't hear any charges being brought against him on that crime either. These criminals can commit lots of crimes, but only get arrested for the first one. Wow. Dave and Burt make a quick appearance and Ned once again makes a comment about marriage. Nancy chooses to ignore the comment and changes the subject. Come on Nancy - you're not in school, you don't work, what are you waiting for? I hear in the latest ND series, Nancy has more romances - poor Ned - I guess he gets tired of playing second to a mystery. Well, it's on to number 34.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Woodman

    I read every single one of these growing up--I thought she was the bees knees

  13. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Nancy Drew chases a thief in this addition to this great book series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Giving it three stars out of nostalgia mostly.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Félise Esposito

    Nancy Drew in Amish country, what's not to love? Nancy Drew in Amish country, what's not to love?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Teen sleuth Nancy Drew, along with her two best friends Bess and George, are on the trail of an antiques thief. Nancy had been hired by a neighbor who inherited a home filled with valuable furniture but was horrified to see that some of the most expensive pieces had been stolen. Nancy finds a piece of paper with a witch tree symbol drawn on it possibly representing a hex from the Amish country of Pennsylvania. The three girls travel to Lancaster County and become embroiled in suspicion and fear. Teen sleuth Nancy Drew, along with her two best friends Bess and George, are on the trail of an antiques thief. Nancy had been hired by a neighbor who inherited a home filled with valuable furniture but was horrified to see that some of the most expensive pieces had been stolen. Nancy finds a piece of paper with a witch tree symbol drawn on it possibly representing a hex from the Amish country of Pennsylvania. The three girls travel to Lancaster County and become embroiled in suspicion and fear. The sinister thief has branded Nancy as a witch trying to divert attention to himself and to keep anyone from helping the young detective. Several times Nancy finds her life in danger but heroically follows all leads to the culprit. Even at my age these books are still fun. I don't think I ever noticed until this story just how many exclamation points are used throughout the story. After awhile they became quite a distraction!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    This is one of my favorites of the Nancy Drew series. Having lived near the Amana Colonies for many years, the Amish cultural elements of the story were very familiar. Also, working in a local ER for so many years, I remember the reputation of both the Amish and Mennonite patients were that if they came to the ER complaining of "a little cut," they might well have a severed limb. Whereas so many of our patients came in with minor complaints that were hardly emergencies, the Amish and Mennonites This is one of my favorites of the Nancy Drew series. Having lived near the Amana Colonies for many years, the Amish cultural elements of the story were very familiar. Also, working in a local ER for so many years, I remember the reputation of both the Amish and Mennonite patients were that if they came to the ER complaining of "a little cut," they might well have a severed limb. Whereas so many of our patients came in with minor complaints that were hardly emergencies, the Amish and Mennonites only came in for very serious problems and tended to minimize their issues. Anyway, I enjoyed the close to home nature of this adventure.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Enna Horn

    Quick reads and excellent palette cleansers. One of my personal favourites. Involves an exploration of the Amish countryside and a chase of a criminal we identify right away. It remains one of my favourite Nancy Drew mystery stories to this day. Although far from perfect, and taking into consideration their years of publication, it's a relief to read short and plot-filled novels with wide character casts who are more than tropes ( for me, at least. ) I never get tired of this one. Quick reads and excellent palette cleansers. One of my personal favourites. Involves an exploration of the Amish countryside and a chase of a criminal we identify right away. It remains one of my favourite Nancy Drew mystery stories to this day. Although far from perfect, and taking into consideration their years of publication, it's a relief to read short and plot-filled novels with wide character casts who are more than tropes ( for me, at least. ) I never get tired of this one.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    The illustrator just really decided to do their own thing apparently as the pictures never really match the text. For example Nancy is mentioned as wearing a dress which is important as she uses the skirt to solve the mystery however in the illustration she's wearing pants. The illustrator just really decided to do their own thing apparently as the pictures never really match the text. For example Nancy is mentioned as wearing a dress which is important as she uses the skirt to solve the mystery however in the illustration she's wearing pants.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Cooke

    This was my first ever Nancy Drew story -- my childhood tending more toward Hardy Boys and Tom Swift -- so I wasn't quite sure what to expect. What I found was... well, pretty much the same story structure as every other YA mystery novel from the 1950s. But with more housework. This particular book is set in Pennsylvania Amish country, and it treats the people of that area about how you would expect a book from its era. Quaint is the word, a simple people, who are friendly and open but also very This was my first ever Nancy Drew story -- my childhood tending more toward Hardy Boys and Tom Swift -- so I wasn't quite sure what to expect. What I found was... well, pretty much the same story structure as every other YA mystery novel from the 1950s. But with more housework. This particular book is set in Pennsylvania Amish country, and it treats the people of that area about how you would expect a book from its era. Quaint is the word, a simple people, who are friendly and open but also very suspicious. Interestingly enough, the difference in technology level is not nearly so pronounced in 1955 as it would be in 2019. The girls approach living with the Amish almost like they would staying with their grandparents. (It's interesting to note that the author, Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, was born in 1892 -- she likely grew up in an era where the Amish way of life was not that far removed from the rest of the world.) The characters are painted with broad strokes. There is Nancy, who is the Smart one; Bess, whose personality is Food; and Georgy, who is the Tomboy. Their respective boyfriends pop in for a couple of chapters, to participate in an action scene or two, but quickly disappear. What is remarkable about Nancy Drew, at least from the example of this volume, is how much agency is given to the protagonists. At virtually every point, Nancy is directing the course of the investigation, and her life, in a way that I had not previously seen in female characters from this time period. Even when she is captured and rescued by the police, they find her because she creates an S.O.S. device to draw attention. Her name is on the cover, and she acts like it. The story is what she makes it, not something that happens to her. An enjoyable read, and at some point I'd be happy to read another in the series.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In most Nancy Drew books, Nancy comes across a poor victim (usually a teenage girl or an elderly woman), realizes they won't accept charity and finds either their inheritance or stolen property, etc, so they can get a happy ending. This book starts the same, with both an older woman and a teenage girl ... but then it forgets about them. Instead, Nancy herself becomes the victim as the culprit spreads rumors that she's a witch. While Nancy has been impersonated and framed in previous books, this o In most Nancy Drew books, Nancy comes across a poor victim (usually a teenage girl or an elderly woman), realizes they won't accept charity and finds either their inheritance or stolen property, etc, so they can get a happy ending. This book starts the same, with both an older woman and a teenage girl ... but then it forgets about them. Instead, Nancy herself becomes the victim as the culprit spreads rumors that she's a witch. While Nancy has been impersonated and framed in previous books, this one felt harsher, possibly because of the scope of the defamation. Almost everyone Nancy meets is nice at first, until the culprit says 'she's a witch' and then they all shun her. I don't think the author meant to make the Amish look bad, but it can come across that way when only one family (notably, the family that has a car and telephone), actually believes Nancy over the culprit. I got the distinct impression that the author was not interested in the Amish ... but rather wanted Nancy to time travel to the Pioneer days and the Amish was a convenient way. That may explain why everyone is so superstitious, and why everything (Especially the food) has to be explained in so much detail. Either that or the author was really into the exotism of the Amish. I don't think the authors' research was very thorough. At one point, an Amish woman wants to take her horse and buggy home, and the police tell her to leave them until morning, and she does. While I have never owned a horse, it seems cruel to leave a horse hitched up to a buggy in the open with no food all night. Also, the ending is really unsatisfying. The police show up, catch culprit and get a confession on the literal last page. They don't tie up what will happen to the 'treasure' or what becomes of the stolen goods.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Suziey

    A new neighbor named Mrs. Tenney, asks Nancy to accompany her to an old family mansion in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Once there, Nancy and Mrs. Tenney discover that many of the mansion’s antique furniture has been stolen. Nancy invites Bess and George to help her track down the burglar. As they begin to investigate, Nancy is accused of being a witch and another mystery falls into her hands.  Nancy uncovers a clue at the mansion. A slip of paper with a strange witch tree symbol. There is some sup A new neighbor named Mrs. Tenney, asks Nancy to accompany her to an old family mansion in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Once there, Nancy and Mrs. Tenney discover that many of the mansion’s antique furniture has been stolen. Nancy invites Bess and George to help her track down the burglar. As they begin to investigate, Nancy is accused of being a witch and another mystery falls into her hands.  Nancy uncovers a clue at the mansion. A slip of paper with a strange witch tree symbol. There is some superstition surrounding the symbol. And when rumors fly that Nancy’s presence brings bad luck, investigating becomes more difficult. But Nancy isn’t hindered. Instead, it makes her work harder to uncover the culprit.  Nancy does catch the bad guy. And I am so damn happy. I mean, I knew she would. No doubt about that. But when Nancy first takes the case, this guy had the audacity to run over Nancy’s dog, Togo! On purpose!! So when he’s captured, I was thrilled. (Togo’s fine by the way).  Anyway, this story sent me down a rabbit hole. I watch a lot of PBS and there was once this documentary about people who had left the Amish community. It was all pretty fascinating. But I didn’t do any more research. Until now.  Overall, a good mystery in a setting I didn’t know much about. I love learning, so I enjoyed this story quite a bit.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    It's been almost two years since I last re-read a Nancy Drew book, and man - I forgot how much fun these are! Yes, they are extremely outdated, but reading these is like escaping to a much simpler time (albeit one with danger around every corner if you're Nancy). This particular adventure takes us to Amish country, which was such a treat for me. Of course poor Bess is still teased for always wanting to eat, but at least this time Nancy and George can't even help themselves because the food is so It's been almost two years since I last re-read a Nancy Drew book, and man - I forgot how much fun these are! Yes, they are extremely outdated, but reading these is like escaping to a much simpler time (albeit one with danger around every corner if you're Nancy). This particular adventure takes us to Amish country, which was such a treat for me. Of course poor Bess is still teased for always wanting to eat, but at least this time Nancy and George can't even help themselves because the food is so good. Nancy is still coyly dodging any attempts Ned makes to "tie her down", and at one point she explains to him that only married Amish can ride in an open buggy. When Ned responds that he hopes to have an open buggy soon, "Nancy pretended not to understand". Hahaha. I think it's about time I pick up where I left off two years ago and start re-reading these again!

  24. 4 out of 5

    MysteryReaderLee

    This book was really good! I liked how Nancy went into Amish country! I enjoyed reading this book! So in the beginning of the book, there is a woman who wants Nancy to go into a spooky old house with her to look at old furniture inside. The furniture is supposed to be super valuable. When they find out all the furniture is gone, it is up to Nancy to find it. The woman is convinced that someone in her family did it, but Nancy thinks different. The woman mentioned that she had let a furniture guy This book was really good! I liked how Nancy went into Amish country! I enjoyed reading this book! So in the beginning of the book, there is a woman who wants Nancy to go into a spooky old house with her to look at old furniture inside. The furniture is supposed to be super valuable. When they find out all the furniture is gone, it is up to Nancy to find it. The woman is convinced that someone in her family did it, but Nancy thinks different. The woman mentioned that she had let a furniture guy inside the house to look at the furniture. Nancy figures it was him. So she finds out he lives in Amish country. So Nancy and her friends take a trip there. While they are there, they meet a girl named, Manda who is returning home after she had ran away. So Nancy and her friends go over to her house to see how things are going. It turns out that Manda's strict father invited Manda home, but won't let anyone in the family talk to her. They also find out Manda is missing! So Nancy and her friends are on the case to find out where the missing furniture and Manda are!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jess Sohn

    The random assortment of vintage Nancy Drew novels in my possession have included some unexpected surprises. I particularly enjoy it when Nancy gets out of Riverside Heights and her comfort zone, and this one takes her into Pennsylvania Amish country - a more realistic departure for her and the gang than traveling internationally on a whim. I have to assume that the descriptions and characterizations of Amish life are reductive and stereotypical, per usual, but I thought it was pretty entertaini The random assortment of vintage Nancy Drew novels in my possession have included some unexpected surprises. I particularly enjoy it when Nancy gets out of Riverside Heights and her comfort zone, and this one takes her into Pennsylvania Amish country - a more realistic departure for her and the gang than traveling internationally on a whim. I have to assume that the descriptions and characterizations of Amish life are reductive and stereotypical, per usual, but I thought it was pretty entertaining to see everyone clashing and out of their element. Nancy Drew having to suffer "SHE BE A WITCH!" accusations is delightful. Bess eating a lot, the loser boy trio, idiotic thieving criminals, the usual tropes etc. including a lot of casually violent incidents found within, but the most unacceptable was her dog Toto being run over by a car in the beginning. Too far, "Carolyn Keene." Too far.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    I liked this story, even if I don't think the Amish believe in witches. Basically, a woman hires Nancy to find out what happened to her furniture inheritance and Nancy finds a witch tree symbol. This takes her to Pennsylvania Dutch country, where the bad guy decides to spread rumors that Nancy is a witch! Ned, Burt, and Dave show up briefly for their token one appearance per book. I love how the bad guy wastes time to paint the side of a barn in hopes of scaring off Nancy. That would work. The chara I liked this story, even if I don't think the Amish believe in witches. Basically, a woman hires Nancy to find out what happened to her furniture inheritance and Nancy finds a witch tree symbol. This takes her to Pennsylvania Dutch country, where the bad guy decides to spread rumors that Nancy is a witch! Ned, Burt, and Dave show up briefly for their token one appearance per book. I love how the bad guy wastes time to paint the side of a barn in hopes of scaring off Nancy. That would work. The characters are interesting and the portrayals of the Amish are varied, which was nice. Mrs. Glick is one amazing lady! The illustrations were done in the 70s are are atrocious and funny. Spoilers: I'm a little tired of the "bad guys captured off screen" ending.

  27. 5 out of 5

    John Love IV

    It's a fairly standard Nancy Drew story. It's good for younger readers who like mysteries that aren't too scary. I had read almost all of the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books when I was in 6th and 7th grade so this was mostly just to revisit my childhood a bit. The character development is done in previous books for the most part. It's a little on the thin side. Secondary characters are pretty thin as well. The plot, while fun, is obviously written for kids so don't expect an adult mystery here. It It's a fairly standard Nancy Drew story. It's good for younger readers who like mysteries that aren't too scary. I had read almost all of the Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books when I was in 6th and 7th grade so this was mostly just to revisit my childhood a bit. The character development is done in previous books for the most part. It's a little on the thin side. Secondary characters are pretty thin as well. The plot, while fun, is obviously written for kids so don't expect an adult mystery here. It is a nice introduction to mysteries for the younger ones and it's fun to go back and reread one of them every now and then.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    3.5 stars. Another solid Drew mystery-it's not a spoiler to say that Nancy always gets her man (or men, or men & women)! I really liked this mystery, this was a sort of back-to-basics Nancy Drew mystery that I really appreciated. I wish Mr. Drew and Hannah made more of an appearance. But otherwise this was a super fun read! Nancy (apparently) speaks excellent German, another accomplishment we can include on her extensive list. I recommend to fans of Drew mysteries, any looking to try a Nancy Dre 3.5 stars. Another solid Drew mystery-it's not a spoiler to say that Nancy always gets her man (or men, or men & women)! I really liked this mystery, this was a sort of back-to-basics Nancy Drew mystery that I really appreciated. I wish Mr. Drew and Hannah made more of an appearance. But otherwise this was a super fun read! Nancy (apparently) speaks excellent German, another accomplishment we can include on her extensive list. I recommend to fans of Drew mysteries, any looking to try a Nancy Drew mystery, or for young readers looking for some entry-level chapter books.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Challenges: RRRCs April 2019 - Summer (August/Pennsylvania); and, Create Your Own Readathon/Stacking the Series/Steeped in Books - Working List/Level 10b/Book 33. This was my favorite Nancy Drew and one of the last ones I read as a child when is was published in the mid-fifties. Fell in love with the Amish then and the symbols they displayed to make their barns pretty. So happy to have read it again as seventy-year-old me when first read as a seven-year-old me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    IrishFan

    This one was a bit more complicated than her usual stories, and I liked that. Also, Nancy had to work harder to get things to go her way in this book.

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