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Micrographia: Historic Microscope Images Coloring Book (Historic Images, #1)

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Explore the beauty of fleas, fungi, and fluids with these historic illustrations of some of the earliest microscope images. This 8.5 x 11 inch coloring book contains every plate from Robert Hooke's 1665 publication Micrographia in high resolution. Each illustration is printed on one side of the page, with a brief quote from Micrographia and room for notes on the other side Explore the beauty of fleas, fungi, and fluids with these historic illustrations of some of the earliest microscope images. This 8.5 x 11 inch coloring book contains every plate from Robert Hooke's 1665 publication Micrographia in high resolution. Each illustration is printed on one side of the page, with a brief quote from Micrographia and room for notes on the other side. Robert Hooke (1635-1703) is somewhat obscure today, due in part to the enmity of his famous, influential, and extremely vindictive colleague, Sir Isaac Newton. Yet Hooke was perhaps the single greatest experimental scientist of the seventeenth century. His reputation in the history of biology largely rests on his book Micrographia, published in 1665. Using his compound microscope and illumination system, he observed organisms as diverse as insects, sponges, bryozoans, foraminifera, and bird feathers. Micrographia was an accurate and detailed record of his observations, illustrated with magnificent drawings. (Thanks to Ben Waggoner http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/...)


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Explore the beauty of fleas, fungi, and fluids with these historic illustrations of some of the earliest microscope images. This 8.5 x 11 inch coloring book contains every plate from Robert Hooke's 1665 publication Micrographia in high resolution. Each illustration is printed on one side of the page, with a brief quote from Micrographia and room for notes on the other side Explore the beauty of fleas, fungi, and fluids with these historic illustrations of some of the earliest microscope images. This 8.5 x 11 inch coloring book contains every plate from Robert Hooke's 1665 publication Micrographia in high resolution. Each illustration is printed on one side of the page, with a brief quote from Micrographia and room for notes on the other side. Robert Hooke (1635-1703) is somewhat obscure today, due in part to the enmity of his famous, influential, and extremely vindictive colleague, Sir Isaac Newton. Yet Hooke was perhaps the single greatest experimental scientist of the seventeenth century. His reputation in the history of biology largely rests on his book Micrographia, published in 1665. Using his compound microscope and illumination system, he observed organisms as diverse as insects, sponges, bryozoans, foraminifera, and bird feathers. Micrographia was an accurate and detailed record of his observations, illustrated with magnificent drawings. (Thanks to Ben Waggoner http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/...)

35 review for Micrographia: Historic Microscope Images Coloring Book (Historic Images, #1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

    This is a fun and educational book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    My second foray into the world of Molly Barda was as enjoyable as the first. I missed a development in her life, namely getting married to the successful, hunky and brilliant chef Donnie, which makes her now stepmom to the odious Davison, who is at least away at college. Not. He returns and makes life irritating just after she’s discovered a body, jumped to some conclusions, got herself into a technological mess with her grant-funded investigation into attitudes to bio-tech, and partied with som My second foray into the world of Molly Barda was as enjoyable as the first. I missed a development in her life, namely getting married to the successful, hunky and brilliant chef Donnie, which makes her now stepmom to the odious Davison, who is at least away at college. Not. He returns and makes life irritating just after she’s discovered a body, jumped to some conclusions, got herself into a technological mess with her grant-funded investigation into attitudes to bio-tech, and partied with some of the main antagonists. The body count gets higher, Molly gets let off the hook and despite assuming she is investigating to save other ‘innocent’ suspects, she really doesn’t do much except guess. There is plenty of inter-faculty rivalry, or at least tension in the college, as usual, and the development of Molly’s personal problems gets a lot of airtime. In fact it really isn’t a cosy mystery but a well-written soap opera with occasional bodies. Well, that means it is a soap opera, judging from what I hear about the soaps on UK tv. For anyone who has no idea what Hawaii is like, this gives insights into its less glamorous side – like high winds and damp, not to mention the odd subterranean lava flow. It’s a very entertaining series. Thank you to the author for the free review copy as part of your blog tour.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  4. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lloyd

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  7. 5 out of 5

    Frankie Bow

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robin Leslie Coxon

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jacky

  10. 5 out of 5

    amy

  11. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  12. 4 out of 5

    V

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  14. 4 out of 5

    Terry Pearson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Charity Montry

  16. 5 out of 5

    SALLY WHITE

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  18. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Agnes

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sheri L.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol McFarlane

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Kennedy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chelene

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

  31. 5 out of 5

    Manuel

  32. 4 out of 5

    Keith Dixon

  33. 5 out of 5

    Lena

  34. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Morris

  35. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Gordon

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