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The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, May 1968 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #204)

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Lines of Power - short novel by Samuel R. Delany A Quiet Kind of Madness - novelette by David Redd The Wilis - short story by Baird Searles Gifts from the Universe - short story by Leonard Tushnet Beyond the Game - short story by Vance Aandahl Dry Run - short story by Larry Niven Books - column by Judith Merril Backward, Turn Backward - essay by Isaac Asimov


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Lines of Power - short novel by Samuel R. Delany A Quiet Kind of Madness - novelette by David Redd The Wilis - short story by Baird Searles Gifts from the Universe - short story by Leonard Tushnet Beyond the Game - short story by Vance Aandahl Dry Run - short story by Larry Niven Books - column by Judith Merril Backward, Turn Backward - essay by Isaac Asimov

9 review for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, May 1968 (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, #204)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leroy Erickson

    A couple of very good stories and all the others are above average. Samuel R. Delany - Lines of Power - 5 stars - I give it 5 stars for the technical ideas. It's a future where the world government has taken on the job of providing electricity and communications to the entire world, and required that it be made available to any place where at least a couple of dozen people are living. The results are good: major drops in unemployment and poverty. Some people still want to be isolated, though, and A couple of very good stories and all the others are above average. Samuel R. Delany - Lines of Power - 5 stars - I give it 5 stars for the technical ideas. It's a future where the world government has taken on the job of providing electricity and communications to the entire world, and required that it be made available to any place where at least a couple of dozen people are living. The results are good: major drops in unemployment and poverty. Some people still want to be isolated, though, and will fight to prevent the power lines from being run. A good story. (Note: the power and communications are provided by a single but multi-piece cable which provides electricity, telephone, radio and TV and a link to a world-wide computer system 'if you ever need a world-wide computer system'. Note that this is in May 1968. Prescience?) Baird Searles - The Wilis - 4 stars - A mild supernatural story about a ballet dancer who is told by her fiance that he is leaving her, and who then gives one last, grand performance. Very well written. Leonard Tushnet - Gifts From the Universe - 4 stars - The owner of a gift store discovers that a new store has opened up which has fantastic items for sale at ridiculously low prices, but requires payment in silver. The proprietor of this other store is very unusual, to say the least. Vance Aandahl - Beyond the Game - 4 stars - A young boy is required to take part in a game of dodge ball at his school, but is terrified of getting hit. He escapes into fantasy in order to leave this unpleasant real world. Larry Niven - Dry Run - 5 stars - A man is very depressed after his wife leaves him and, in retribution, kills their dog. It might be a trial run of actually killing her, he just can't decide. When he crashes his car, though, he has to prove what he really was thinking. It's Larry Niven so it's well written. Isaac Asimov - Science: Backward, Turn Backward--- - 4 stars - Why some planets and/or moons end up rotating backwards. David Redd - A Quiet Kind of Madness - 5 stars - A young woman, living alone in the northern wilderness, rejects any man's attempt to get close to her. One day she finds an unusual animal who is able to tell her only through her dreams about the world that he is from and how nice it would be if they could go there. An interesting story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    I’ve read Samuel Delaney’s “Lines of Power” at some point in the past. It’s a “Roads Must Roll”-style story about forcing electrical power on every community whether they want it or not, and the kind of people who would not want it—basically science fiction Hell’s Angels. Baird Searles’s “The Wilis” is a ghost story where the reader knows what’s going to happen before anyone in the story does. It takes place in the New York theater scene, specifically ballet. The oncoming train of impending doom I’ve read Samuel Delaney’s “Lines of Power” at some point in the past. It’s a “Roads Must Roll”-style story about forcing electrical power on every community whether they want it or not, and the kind of people who would not want it—basically science fiction Hell’s Angels. Baird Searles’s “The Wilis” is a ghost story where the reader knows what’s going to happen before anyone in the story does. It takes place in the New York theater scene, specifically ballet. The oncoming train of impending doom makes this one of the better stories. Larry Niven’s “Dry Run” is another where the reader knows what’s going on, and the point is finding out how it affects the ending. Another of the better is Leonard Tushnet’s “Gifts from the Universe”, about a distributor in the gift business coming across a gift shop that is too good to be true; the eccentric owner sells for very low prices—but only accepts real silver coins. When the main character decides to take on all of the shop’s inventory he gets more than he bargained for. Isaac Asimov’s “Science” column this issue takes on the reasons that some planets and moons orbit in different directions, and why some rotate in different directions. I suspect a lot of what we know has changed since he wrote that, but it was still very interesting.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Chatham

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pat Winter

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael Joseph Schumann

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Brooks

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dante

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Crowl

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