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Human cloning. Technology evolves faster than we do. The law shields us from our worst temptations. But the opportunity is there, dangling just out of reach—perfection and ascension… or delusion and destruction. In this collection of clone-themed stories, ten of today’s top speculative fiction writers explore our morality, our built-in societal restraints, and reflect upon Human cloning. Technology evolves faster than we do. The law shields us from our worst temptations. But the opportunity is there, dangling just out of reach—perfection and ascension… or delusion and destruction. In this collection of clone-themed stories, ten of today’s top speculative fiction writers explore our morality, our built-in societal restraints, and reflect upon our state of grace. Similar is not necessarily the same. “CLONES: The Anthology” features stories from Amazon bestselling authors Rysa Walker (the CHRONOS series), R.D. Brady (the Belial series), Susan Kaye Quinn (the Singularity saga), Best American Science Fiction notable Samuel Peralta (Faith), and USA Today Bestselling and Multi-Award Winner P.K. Tyler, plus five more of today’s top authors in speculative and science fiction. “CLONES: The Anthology” is Book 1 of the 2 Book Frontiers of Speculative Fiction


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Human cloning. Technology evolves faster than we do. The law shields us from our worst temptations. But the opportunity is there, dangling just out of reach—perfection and ascension… or delusion and destruction. In this collection of clone-themed stories, ten of today’s top speculative fiction writers explore our morality, our built-in societal restraints, and reflect upon Human cloning. Technology evolves faster than we do. The law shields us from our worst temptations. But the opportunity is there, dangling just out of reach—perfection and ascension… or delusion and destruction. In this collection of clone-themed stories, ten of today’s top speculative fiction writers explore our morality, our built-in societal restraints, and reflect upon our state of grace. Similar is not necessarily the same. “CLONES: The Anthology” features stories from Amazon bestselling authors Rysa Walker (the CHRONOS series), R.D. Brady (the Belial series), Susan Kaye Quinn (the Singularity saga), Best American Science Fiction notable Samuel Peralta (Faith), and USA Today Bestselling and Multi-Award Winner P.K. Tyler, plus five more of today’s top authors in speculative and science fiction. “CLONES: The Anthology” is Book 1 of the 2 Book Frontiers of Speculative Fiction

30 review for Clones: The Anthology

  1. 4 out of 5

    Karen’s Library

    I was really pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed this compilation of stories about clones. I never realized I was a fan of clones until now. I had a few favorites, The Replacement Husband, Like No Other, B.E.G.I.N. and Splinter among them. A couple of stories had great surprise endings! As a huge fan of Rysa Walker's Chronos Files, I loved reading Splinter about Kiernan's POV(/s) of Kate's rescue in 1893 and the exploration of being splintered. Well done!! Thanks for the advance copy in exch I was really pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed this compilation of stories about clones. I never realized I was a fan of clones until now. I had a few favorites, The Replacement Husband, Like No Other, B.E.G.I.N. and Splinter among them. A couple of stories had great surprise endings! As a huge fan of Rysa Walker's Chronos Files, I loved reading Splinter about Kiernan's POV(/s) of Kate's rescue in 1893 and the exploration of being splintered. Well done!! Thanks for the advance copy in exchange for an honest review!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lynda Dickson

    CLONES is a collection of eleven science fiction and speculative fiction stories by ten authors. Ostensibly about clones, these stories are also so much more. They deal with spirituality, creationism, and what it actually means to be human. In "The Replacement Husband" by Nathan M. Beauchamp, Jasmine receives her husband's clone replacement fifteen months after his death. He is implanted with memories of only the last three years of his life, but he has no memory of the most important event in th CLONES is a collection of eleven science fiction and speculative fiction stories by ten authors. Ostensibly about clones, these stories are also so much more. They deal with spirituality, creationism, and what it actually means to be human. In "The Replacement Husband" by Nathan M. Beauchamp, Jasmine receives her husband's clone replacement fifteen months after his death. He is implanted with memories of only the last three years of his life, but he has no memory of the most important event in their lives. This story takes an interesting look at what it means to really be human. In "Like No Other" by Daniel Arthur Smith, genetically modified human beings are the target of a protest march. Yoshiko tries to protect her little sister, who turns out to be more than just her sister. This story explores prejudice and discrimination. In "Awakening" by Susan Kaye Quinn, Amara is one of twelve "sisters" with identical DNA but with their own different cybernetic "mothers". They are all under the care of Mother Superior, an ascender (human enhanced by nanites), and are cloistered until their "awakening". But are they just a small part of a much larger experiment? This story explores spirituality and life after death. In "Eve’s Children" by Hank Garner, Dr Lexi Danvers gets ready to reveal the truth about our existence. But to what lengths will people go to stop her? This story is an interesting look at the origins of life. In "Black Site" by Michael Patrick Hicks, Papa creates a series of clones of himself in an effort to discover the secret to man's origin. This is another story exploring the origin of life. "Fahrenheit 1451" by Samuel Peralta is named after the temperature at which human bodies burn. This is my favorite story, with great writing creating a sense of urgency. This story examines the cruelty of scientific experimentation. In "All These Bodies" by P. K. Tyler, the Mezna clone Echechi bodies which they inhabit. However, only the most perfect survive, while the rest are recycled as nutrients to produce more clones. What happens when one of these bodies starts having independent thoughts? This story explores eugenics and individuality. In "B.E.G.I.N. " by R. D. Brady, an elite secret government group tracks alien sightings with the aim of re-engineering alien technology. But now they want to re-engineer more than just the technology. This story deals with the ethics of scientific experimentation. In "Splinter" by Rysa Walker, Kieran has the CHRONOS gene and the ability to time travel. He and his multiple splinters are on a mission to save their wife Kate from a serial killer. This story explores the effects of time travel. In "The Vandal" by Joshua Ingle, a member of the Sect breaks into Chase and Alice's home. But his is one face they never expected to see. This story explores the concept of nature versus nurture. "Confessional" by Daniel Arthur Smith is a story told in three parts. In each part, each of Eli's successive clones in branded a terrorist and sentenced by Mother to termination. But has Eli's latest incarnation finally uncovered the reason behind Mother's inflexible behavior? This story deals with the consequences of autocracy. These stories may all deal with clones or genetically altered humans, but they parallel the way anyone who is perceived as different is treated. Even though most of these stories are set in worlds already featured in books by the authors, the stories stand on their own and, if anything, encourage the reader to explore these worlds further. After each story, the author provides an insight into their story. My favorites are "The Replacement Husband", "Like No Other", "Fahrenheit 1451", and "Splinter", which I found to be the most emotional and thought-provoking stories in this collection. This is a great anthology that might just introduce you to your next favorite author. I received this book in return for an honest review. Full blog post: https://booksdirectonline.blogspot.co...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan

    Time for one of those lengthy pieces of honesty I sometimes start my reviews with – but don’t worry, I will get to the review shortly! Okay, so I’m not entirely sure how I came to have this. I have been downloading far too many free books as of late, and through this I have ended up subscribed to a number of author’s email updates. There are but a handful I can recall actually clicking the ‘join’ button with. Nevertheless, unless the emails are exceptionally annoying, I have kept my subscription. Time for one of those lengthy pieces of honesty I sometimes start my reviews with – but don’t worry, I will get to the review shortly! Okay, so I’m not entirely sure how I came to have this. I have been downloading far too many free books as of late, and through this I have ended up subscribed to a number of author’s email updates. There are but a handful I can recall actually clicking the ‘join’ button with. Nevertheless, unless the emails are exceptionally annoying, I have kept my subscription. One such subscription is PK Tyler (that’s right guys, one of the authors in this anthology). Their emails were interesting enough to keep me around, and they weren’t bombarding my inbox fifty times a day. All was good. Then things got better. One day I opened up my email to find a disheartening message regarding their advance read team. It turns out they hadn’t been reviewing like they should have been. Thus, a new team was being created. As I was actively interacting with the emails I was receiving, I was automatically added to the advance read team. Now, I would like to admit I have yet to read any of PK Tyler’s books. My to-read list is longer than my read list, with my subdivision of ‘to-read owned’ approaching the one thousand books mark. Due to this, I often find myself reading authors I know and love. However, I’m always more than happy to give a new author a try – and when things are advance reads I make sure I read them when I get the chance. So it was, I jumped into this anthology. I admit, it took me longer to read than I had hoped for. However, this has nothing to do with the stories – it is all to do with me. I decided to start reading during a busy period, during the dreaded exam period. It’s never the wisest of moves. Thus, it took me a while to get through these ones. But they were more than worth it. Some of the stories were better than others, but all were deserving of at least a three star rating. In fact, the average was three stars, but there were some four stars within the collection. What was really amazing, though, was the variety within the stories. They all went in completely different directions after being given the word ‘clones’, each creating something unique. All stories are well written. All stories are worth reading. Hell, I’m going to go on and look for more by these authors, as they are all more than worth reading. Give it a read – you won’t regret it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scott Wieczorek

    Title - Clones: The Anthology Author(s) - Nathan M. Beauchamp R. D Brady Hank Garner Michael Patrick Hicks Joshua Ingle Samuel Peralta Susan Kaye Quinn Daniel Arthur Smith P.K. Tyler Rysa Walker Editor(s) - Jessica West Stars - Five Takeaway - Highly recommend it. A can't miss for sci-fi fans! **First, let me state that I received a free copy of this work in exchange for an honest review** I have to admit that I was excited when approached to review Clones: The Anthology. The work reso Title - Clones: The Anthology Author(s) - Nathan M. Beauchamp R. D Brady Hank Garner Michael Patrick Hicks Joshua Ingle Samuel Peralta Susan Kaye Quinn Daniel Arthur Smith P.K. Tyler Rysa Walker Editor(s) - Jessica West Stars - Five Takeaway - Highly recommend it. A can't miss for sci-fi fans! **First, let me state that I received a free copy of this work in exchange for an honest review** I have to admit that I was excited when approached to review Clones: The Anthology. The work resonates with some of my own stories which deal with genetic engineering, cloning, and synthetic humanoids (e.g. Awakening, Boon's Arrival). But at the same time, I was also a little nervous about what the content would be. A whole compilation of stories about clones? I almost expected some kind of Star Wars knock-off, or the same tired old stories of cloned dinosaurs, or wars. Thankfully, I couldn't have been more wrong. Instead of delving into the cliché drudgery that floods the market of clone wars and cloned monsters, Clones: The Anthology takes a fresh look at the subject, addressing more sociological and esoteric issues such as the ethics of cloning, anti-clone racism, fanatical extremism, adapting to life with a cloned family member, and even the origins of sentient life in our universe. I found these stories inspiring, and invigorating, leaving me wanting more. Each story comes with a unique perspective on the topic of cloning. From Black Site's Lovecraftian themes, to the moral and ethical issues of a clone's development and assimilation into human society, as portrayed in The Vandal, to the time-altering quantum paradoxes presented in Splinter, the stories engaged me and held my interest. Most of them pulled me in right away and wouldn't let me go. I have to say that I am not disappointed in any of the stories in this anthology (usually I find one or two bombshells). In fact, some of these stories could be built upon and expanded into whole new science-fiction worlds for the authors to explore, they are that well defined and developed. If the authors did, I would definitely want to buy the books. As far as negatives go, I can't say that I really have any complaints. This book was well-edited, and each story well-written. I believe each author brought their strengths to bear in their works, and put their best foot forward. Usually with an Indie-pub anthology, or novel, there is always a typo or awkward something somewhere. I can say that I am pleased to report that I did not catch any in Clones: The Anthology. However, that may also be because I got so wrapped in the stories that I finished the whole anthology in about three days--it was that good! The bottom line: Would I recommend this anthology to others for purchase? Absolutely. This anthology is a can't miss if you like science fiction. I also want to watch each of the individual contributors to see what new they may have coming in the near future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ernie Howard

    Anthologies are a perfect way to read some of your favorite authors in one sitting. Clones is full of beautifully written stories. Some scary, because the subject matter are things that could happen in the not to distant future. This is a very entertaining book, with a beautiful cover. You can't go wrong with Clones. Anthologies are a perfect way to read some of your favorite authors in one sitting. Clones is full of beautifully written stories. Some scary, because the subject matter are things that could happen in the not to distant future. This is a very entertaining book, with a beautiful cover. You can't go wrong with Clones.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nadine Matheson

    Clones: The Anthology is a new collection of short stories by ten writers who are rising to the top of the speculative fiction genre. The writers have been brought together by Daniel Arthur Smith to give their own unique take on the theme of clones. There are times as readers where we can approach an anthology with a sense of dread, hoping that there are at least a couple of gems within the collection, however, within Clones: the anthology that sense of dread is unfounded. Given the subject matt Clones: The Anthology is a new collection of short stories by ten writers who are rising to the top of the speculative fiction genre. The writers have been brought together by Daniel Arthur Smith to give their own unique take on the theme of clones. There are times as readers where we can approach an anthology with a sense of dread, hoping that there are at least a couple of gems within the collection, however, within Clones: the anthology that sense of dread is unfounded. Given the subject matter of clones, there is no sense of repetition as you end one short story and begin another. However, what was a common trait within the stories was the theme that although the most basic of human emotions, love, fear and desire were not lost there is an uncomfortable sense that human life is disposable and has become part of a throw away culture of ‘don’t worry - we’ll get another one.’ The morality question of cloning, although remaining unanswered, is perfectly explored in The Vandal by Joshua Ingle. Each story is well written and all ten writers have produced engrossing and thought provoking stories. Some are dark with an overwhelming sense of characters surrendering to their fates and others are filled with a bare sprinkling of hope in a misguided effort to retrieve what they’ve lost. What is paramount is that there is a sadness that permeates this collection. My personal favourites were The Replacement Husband by Nathaniel M. Beauchamp, Fahrenheit 1451 by Samuel Peralta, Black Site by Michael Patrick Hicks and Splinter by Rysa Walker. However, what really stood out for me was the serialised story, Confessional, by Daniel Arthur Smith. Confessional, which is broken down into three parts, manages to, somehow, perfectly encapsulate wealth of human emotions with a tightly written speculative fiction thriller. It was suspenseful, provocative and an absolute page turner and I wish that it was longer. * Review originally published on www.spectrumbooks.co.uk

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fred Douglis

    This anthology is a mixture of a number of stories, some set in the "universes" of authors with established characters and/or technologies, some standalone. I think on the whole I liked the standalone stories better, because they were more easily understood by the uninitiated, but the anthology in its entirety is a strong collection with a lot of interesting and thought-provoking pieces. I read an early release of the anthology after responding to a facebook note from one of the authors in the co This anthology is a mixture of a number of stories, some set in the "universes" of authors with established characters and/or technologies, some standalone. I think on the whole I liked the standalone stories better, because they were more easily understood by the uninitiated, but the anthology in its entirety is a strong collection with a lot of interesting and thought-provoking pieces. I read an early release of the anthology after responding to a facebook note from one of the authors in the collection, Rysa Walker. She invited a few readers to preview it in respond to an honest review. I really enjoyed her story, "Splinter," primarily because it was in the familiar "Chronos" universe of her storytelling. I would be curious to know how it would be understood as a standalone story, read by someone unfamiliar with the time-travel hook or the characters. Similarly, "All These Bodies" is from the "Mezna" stories, which I'm not familiar with. I did feel like it held together well stand-alone and I plan to check out that set of novels as a result of reading this one. I would say a couple of my other favorites from the anthology are "The Replacement Husband" and "The Vandal". Both are particularly thought-provoking, the first because of the really interesting plot device and the second because it weaves together cloning and issues of social justice. I rather felt the Bern with that one. One more worth highlighting is "B.E.G.I.N.", about cloning aliens. It really put me in the head of the lead character. This anthology introduced me to a number of new authors, which I imagine is its purpose. Even if in this case the "money well spent" line is not applicable, it was most definitely "time well spent" and I look forward to more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cmoore

    This book really showcases Daniel Arthur Smith's work... as an editor and writer. Daniel has an awesome short serialized collection (Confessional) in three parts, which frames all the other works... thus making the structure of the book unique. I want to reiterate, I really appreciate a serialized collection and in this case it's all in one, the only delay involves how fast can you read to the end! I didn't enjoy all the stories but the ones I liked were lots of fun... what I like about collectio This book really showcases Daniel Arthur Smith's work... as an editor and writer. Daniel has an awesome short serialized collection (Confessional) in three parts, which frames all the other works... thus making the structure of the book unique. I want to reiterate, I really appreciate a serialized collection and in this case it's all in one, the only delay involves how fast can you read to the end! I didn't enjoy all the stories but the ones I liked were lots of fun... what I like about collections like this is that you can take 10 authors, tell 'em "Clones," and you get 11 (there are 11 stories) different, Way different, perspectives and stories. WOW! As an example, there is a story that involves time travel (one of my favorite tropes by the way), and then another dealing with alien DNA, or a wife trying to cope with a replacement husband... Is he still the same? So get the book and see what you think!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Diana in SC

    I love the idea for this anthology. Clones have always fascinated me in science fiction. So far, I have read "All These Bodies" by PK Tyler. It was a hauntingly wonderful short story. The story immediately sucked me in and transported me to a future world where a clone is trying to survive and keep his memories. The prose was very evocative, and I got like I was in the mind of the clone. This was the first story I have read by PK Tyler, and I definitely will read Moore of her work soon. The story I love the idea for this anthology. Clones have always fascinated me in science fiction. So far, I have read "All These Bodies" by PK Tyler. It was a hauntingly wonderful short story. The story immediately sucked me in and transported me to a future world where a clone is trying to survive and keep his memories. The prose was very evocative, and I got like I was in the mind of the clone. This was the first story I have read by PK Tyler, and I definitely will read Moore of her work soon. The story made me think and feel. I wonder which species' memories became dominant in the clone person. I will update my review when I read more of it. I received a free copy of the ebook from one of the authors in return for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    PJ Lea

    An exceptional anthology of short stories about clones. A vast array of circumstances, exciting plots and believable characters. A book to be recommended for SciFi fans and a good opportunity to find new authors.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lorena

    This anthology was really well done, though the stories were darker than what I generally prefer to read, and some were quite violent. Doesn't anyone write hopeful, optimistic scifi anymore? Apparently not, at least not when clones are the topic. That's the only reason I couldn't rate this higher than a 4, because I found the stories intriguing and well-written, and I don't recall any typos or other editorial problems. I definitely enjoyed some of the stories more than others. I didn't hate any o This anthology was really well done, though the stories were darker than what I generally prefer to read, and some were quite violent. Doesn't anyone write hopeful, optimistic scifi anymore? Apparently not, at least not when clones are the topic. That's the only reason I couldn't rate this higher than a 4, because I found the stories intriguing and well-written, and I don't recall any typos or other editorial problems. I definitely enjoyed some of the stories more than others. I didn't hate any of them, but some were a bit too dark for me, and some were too predictable. Michael Patrick Hicks' somewhat Lovecraftian "Black Site" was clever, but too gory for me. I still feel a bit queasy thinking about it! The stories that surprised me the most were "Awakening" by Susan Kaye Quinn and "All These Bodies" by P.K. Tyler. I also enjoyed the philosophical questions brought up in Joshua Ingle's "The Vandal." If you're really sensitive to violence, you should probably give this a pass. Otherwise, if you enjoy scifi and perhaps the occasional horror story, give it a chance. I suspect you'll like at least some of the stories. Note that I received a free copy of the book from one of the authors in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rhi

    It's been a long time since I've read an anthology and liked each of the novellas included. I wasn't sure what to expect with this anthology and I found each of the short stories by turns intriguing, thought-provoking, and/or disturbing. In fact, I couldn't put it down. Confessional, broken into three parts, also breaks up the anthology. As your first introduction to the anthology, Part I certainly sets the tone. It also ends the anthology beautifully. Since each of the stories included are true It's been a long time since I've read an anthology and liked each of the novellas included. I wasn't sure what to expect with this anthology and I found each of the short stories by turns intriguing, thought-provoking, and/or disturbing. In fact, I couldn't put it down. Confessional, broken into three parts, also breaks up the anthology. As your first introduction to the anthology, Part I certainly sets the tone. It also ends the anthology beautifully. Since each of the stories included are true short stories, I hesitate to describe each one, for fear of spoiling someone. I was impressed that each of these authors were able to write a fully realized short story - which is not an easy task. Even my least favorite of them - The Vandal - made an interesting philosophical argument. The stories run the gamut in exploring the concept of clones and it was refreshing to see how the authors took the theme and ran with it, often in ways that at first glance have nothing to do with clones. If you have any interest in speculative fiction when it comes to clones, this is an anthology for you. NB: I received a copy of the anthology in exchange for an honest review. This didn't affect my opinion in any way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark Morris

    I always come to anthologies with a little reservation. Usually there are a few stories I love, some I enjoy, and often a few I'd skip through, not feeling a connection with the narrative or the characters. This one was a big surprise to me. I galloped through the book in two days, enjoying it over the weekend that coincided with the English summer in May of 2016. And I enjoyed every story. I'll not relate my feelings about every story – as I said, I loved them all – but Awakening by Susan Kaye I always come to anthologies with a little reservation. Usually there are a few stories I love, some I enjoy, and often a few I'd skip through, not feeling a connection with the narrative or the characters. This one was a big surprise to me. I galloped through the book in two days, enjoying it over the weekend that coincided with the English summer in May of 2016. And I enjoyed every story. I'll not relate my feelings about every story – as I said, I loved them all – but Awakening by Susan Kaye Quinn, Eve's Children by Hank Gardner, All These Bodies by P. K. Tyler and Splinter by Rysa Walker were my particular favourites, but they were all excellent and I'll be sure to reread this collection again. I'm sure that most people will find that they'll enjoy at least half of the stories here, since the writers have all found their own individual ways to interpret the given theme, giving a well-balanced and comprehensive collection of dissimilar clone tales. Please note - I received a digital copy of this book as an ARC from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest appraisal.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I will update the review as I slowly get through the various stories. 5 STARS: I obviously went for Awakening by Susan Kaye Quinn first. She's a personal favorite of mine. ;) Plus, knowing that it takes place in the Singularity universe (The Legacy Human), I may have gotten a little giddy. Creative? Without a doubt! Each of the short stories from the Singularity series have all been loosely linked together, though usually don't contain overlapping characters. They simultaneously offer a unique vi I will update the review as I slowly get through the various stories. 5 STARS: I obviously went for Awakening by Susan Kaye Quinn first. She's a personal favorite of mine. ;) Plus, knowing that it takes place in the Singularity universe (The Legacy Human), I may have gotten a little giddy. Creative? Without a doubt! Each of the short stories from the Singularity series have all been loosely linked together, though usually don't contain overlapping characters. They simultaneously offer a unique view of the same world. Now I'm doubly excited to read the third book! I hope all these new characters play a part! The story can be read as a standalone, but it would be greatly expanded by reading the first two books first. There are brief hints at the overall plot, but nothing that would be frustrating for first-time readers. Admittedly, this story was a little heartbreaking. Sister Amara's world is unbelievably small. She's part prisoner, part science experiment, trapped in an Ascender facility with her sister clones. The cold injustice of how they are treated is gripping. I spent the whole book looking for a way out for the sisters. 4 STARS: The Replacement Husband by Nathan M. Beauchamp - This was a new author for me. I definitely enjoyed the writing style, though a little predictable. Jasmine's husband has died in an accident, but his clone will have almost all the same memories. Cloning humans isn't a new concept, but I felt like Beauchamp was able to give it a unique spin. I wish this one was longer! Definitely an author I'll have to watch out for. 4.5 STARS: Next up was All These Bodies by P.K. Tyler. I have read a few short stories by P.K. Tyler before, and have always been pleasantly surprised. Or rather not surprised? Because now I have high expectations of her! She has yet to disappoint. :P The best thing about All These Bodies is that it leads into her upcoming novel! YAY! I will most definitely be following this one into the rest of the story. Parts of it were a little vague, leaving me wondering about alien species and interstellar travel, but that only whet my appetite for more! It's the creepiest of the bunch so far, and it's pulling me further into the anthology... 3 STARS: Eve's Children by Hank Garner. I felt like there was a much larger story looming in the shadows, and I really wish I could catch more of a glimpse. The clones theme was largely hinted at, but if I were to read this story out of context, I would have lost the story's meaning. 4 STARS: Black Site by Michael Patrick Hicks. Gross. Sooooo deliciously gross. The graphic descriptions are exactly what I needed to get the complete imagery of this story. I'm gonna slap a mature audience warning on this one. Much darker than the other stories so far. 4 STARS: Like No Other by Daniel Arthur Smith. This one almost managed to slip past me, and it wasn't until I looked back over the Contents that I noticed this poor story back at the beginning. And I'm so glad I went back for it! Like No Other is told from the perspective of a young girl, living in a world where genetic manipulation and cloning are everyday occurrences. Though it may be commonplace, the science is not accepted by all. The story held a certain innocence, in that a child can not possibly grasp the full meaning, and the reasons for what is happening. The author captured that innocence perfectly. We are never given the little girl's name, which holds a very powerful message about identity. I really wish there was more to this story, or at least some kind of epilogue, to give me a wider view of the world and a possible happy, if not satisfying, outcome. 4.5 STARS: Fahrenheit 1451 by Samuel Peralta. Two words: Too. Short. I absolutely loved the author's writing style, and I was pulled in by the teasing plot. But that's the problem! I was pulled in! And then I wasn't given enough! GAH! The ending was so abrupt, it felt like running full-tilt into a brick wall. There's nothing left for me to do but shake it off... and beg the author to tell me more. 4 STARS: B.E.G.I.N. by R.D. Brady. This one was a lot more centered around the military than the previous stories. It was an intense viewpoint to take, and the politics behind cloning are undoubtedly realistic, though fictitious. In fact, there was a large amount of fact put into the story, and it was obvious that some serious author research happened. Very excited to read the sequel, A.L.I.V.E. 5 STARS: Splinter by Rysa Walker: Woooo! I think I may have found a new favorite author! This isn't about clones in the traditional sense, but it involves time travel!! Notoriously difficult to keep timelines and paradoxes in line, Rysa has managed to create a unique set of time travel rules that, quite simply, blew my mind! There is zero chance of me not digging into her Chronos series to get the rest of that story!! 2 STARS: The Vandal by Joshua Ingle: I'm sorry to say this wasn't my favorite. It's a very deep discussion between a husband and wife, arguing nurture vs. nature. Chase and Alice are woken up in the middle of the night by an intruder, who happens to be Chase's younger clone. They then get into a dispute over what to do with said intruder. Chase argues that his clone has only become a criminal because of how he was raised, and that his decisions are therefore not entirely his own. Can he be held to blame for his actions? 4 STARS: Confessional by Daniel Arthur Smith: This one was unique, even among all of the other original stories in this collection. Confessional is told in three parts, spread out through the book, and each scene is over all too soon. My curiosity is most definitely piqued, and I would love to know more... but at the same time, I'm enjoying coming up with the backstory surrounding these brief glimpses.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    Every now and then a short story anthology entices me. With appealing subject matter and authors I appreciate, Clones is such an anthology. Similar is not necessarily the same. Ten authors each put their own spin on this basic tenet. The stories are varied in their definitions of clones, their origins, their uses and in how they are viewed by others. The purpose of clones may be to re-define humanity, establish a new humanity or find humanity’s origin. I like some, but not all stories. Everyone w Every now and then a short story anthology entices me. With appealing subject matter and authors I appreciate, Clones is such an anthology. Similar is not necessarily the same. Ten authors each put their own spin on this basic tenet. The stories are varied in their definitions of clones, their origins, their uses and in how they are viewed by others. The purpose of clones may be to re-define humanity, establish a new humanity or find humanity’s origin. I like some, but not all stories. Everyone will have their own favorites. I’ve chosen a couple of the stories that were my favorites in the collection to highlight here today. All These Bodies by P.K. Tyler In All These Bodies, the reader follows a clone while it wonders about what it sees happening. It seems to be increasing its awareness of its surroundings. At the same time, the clone has no idea that the increased awareness is significant. Or that its awareness actually increases. All These Bodies is a fascinating look inside an emerging mind of what could very well be a science-induced evolutionary step for its race. B.E.G.I.N. by R.D. Brady When Dr. Alice Leander’s theoretical approach to cloning comes to the attention of the government, she goes to work for the Biological Experiment of Genetic Interaction Nexus – B.E.G.I.N. While the actual cloning subject is not at all what she expected, Alice will do everything she can to make sure the project succeeds and the clone survives. Alice brings the human touch to the experiment when everyone else around her has an agenda. Of all the stories in this collection, B.E.G.I.N. is what I would consider to be the most robust. The character of Alice is well developed with a back story, a husband and a baby on the way. And there is no need to wonder about the government’s motivation behind the B.E.G.I.N. project, dealing with the increased alien presence in the US. B.E.G.I.N. introduces a story that I will be interested in following in Ms. Brady’s follow up novel A.L.I.V.E., anticipated later this year. Other authors included in this anthology are: Rysa Walker, Daniel Arthur Smith, Susan Kaye Quinn, Samuel Peralta, Nathan M. Beauchamp, Hank Garner, Michael Patrick Hicks, and Joshua Ingle. Clones: The Anthology invites the reader to examine the idea of recreating humanity in its own image. Good or bad. Right or wrong. Better or worse. Ten different authors. Ten very different stories. Good reading! P.K. Tyler provided a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Originally posted at Whiskey With My Book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    Clones. I think we all have a notion or two that springs to the forefront of our minds when we hear this word, but give it to a group of talented authors and you get this superb and very diverse speculative fiction anthology that is bound to make you think and re-think the concept of clones. I sat down with this book expecting to read a story or two while I had few moments of coveted quiet and ended up reading it from start to finish. I thoroughly enjoyed every story in this collection, somethin Clones. I think we all have a notion or two that springs to the forefront of our minds when we hear this word, but give it to a group of talented authors and you get this superb and very diverse speculative fiction anthology that is bound to make you think and re-think the concept of clones. I sat down with this book expecting to read a story or two while I had few moments of coveted quiet and ended up reading it from start to finish. I thoroughly enjoyed every story in this collection, something that surprised me since that is a rare occurrence for anthologies and me, so I will leave my ramblings about a few that really stuck with me and had me re-reading and then pondering them long after I put my kindle down. “All These Bodies” by P.K. Tyler – I think I’ve read this one at least three times so far and I catch something or get a new perspective each time. One race cloning another as a vehicle for its own survival, the clone sentient of both its bodies race and the fact that it was made to be filled (host) and serve the purpose of another race. Survival of the host race, survival of the inhabiting race, self-awareness within a clone, where do loyalties lie? An expertly written story that drew me in and left me wanting more. “B.E.G.I.N.” by R.D. Brady – This one spoke to both the mother and conspiracy theory lover in me. Aliens, cloning, hybrids, government cover-ups and an intelligent female protagonist, I was riveted from page one. It pulled at my heartstrings and really made me think about what I would have done in the same situation. And the ending, I should have seen it coming, but it surprised me nonetheless and had me hoping it didn’t really end there. “Black Site” by Michael Patrick Hicks – Where do we come from? A question most everyone has asked themselves at one time or another, well, in this story the answer is sought through genetics and cloning and what is discovered is far scarier than my imaginings. A deftly written thrill ride that kept me intrigued and guessing all the way to the end. (P.S. This would make a great sci-fi movie, kept envisioning it as one as I read.) “Like No Other” by Daniel Arthur Smith – A subtle and beautifully written story on humanity, prejudice, innocence and love. I don’t know what to say about this other than it touched me and made my heart both heavier and lighter. Overall, an intelligent, imaginative, expertly crafted anthology for science fiction lovers and anyone wanting new takes on the topic of clones. I will definitely be re-reading this collection and looking into the other writings of the contributing authors.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gaele

    Speculative fiction, for me, almost always came through one author, and now I’m on the second or third collection that she’s contributed to. This collection, Clones, is taking a technology first well-known with Dolly the Sheep, and now extending that to humanity. Scientifically, I’m fascinated with (and have been for years) the great wealth of knowledge that was gained in that first ‘hooves on the ground’ cloning. I’m less excited by the prospect, however minimal, of actually creating genetic co Speculative fiction, for me, almost always came through one author, and now I’m on the second or third collection that she’s contributed to. This collection, Clones, is taking a technology first well-known with Dolly the Sheep, and now extending that to humanity. Scientifically, I’m fascinated with (and have been for years) the great wealth of knowledge that was gained in that first ‘hooves on the ground’ cloning. I’m less excited by the prospect, however minimal, of actually creating genetic copies of humans, or parts of them. So that’s all the information and attitude I arrived with when starting this collection, and I’m not sure my thoughts have changed. From presenting best to worst case scenarios, a time travel option that will test even the limits of this dedicated Dr. Who fan, the stellar storytelling and unique premises contained within these pages are not to be missed. My entrée into this collection was All These Bodies by P.K. Tyler – a story that, as always, brings wonderful writing, solid imagery and unique character voices. Working with perceptions and questions as the main character encounters and questions ‘how things are done’ A prequel of sorts to an upcoming novel (The Jakkatu Vector), this will whet appetites for more. (I can share that I read a very early version of the above mentioned book, and think, from my limited perspective, that it is something that fans of spec fic and sci fi will Love It) Two other stories that I read in the collection before putting it aside and promising myself to pick it up later were The Replacement Husband by Nathan Beauchamp and Fahrenheit 1451 by Samuel Peralta. These two just intrigued from title alone, and after reading them I was left speechless. Using familiar and unfamiliar references, pushing scientific and societal boundaries, challenging morals, ethics and perceptions, and providing every moment in a world that is plausible and nearly tactile. A wonderful read that deserves your time.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    When I was asked to read Clones: The Anthology in exchange for an honest review, I was a little worried that the anthology would be too "sciency" for me. While I love all types of science fiction, I don't know a lot about clones. However, after reading this amazing collection of stories, I know now that my worries were premature. While science is obviously a big part of each story, it doesn't take away from each or make it difficult to understand the concepts presented. I wanted to write about a When I was asked to read Clones: The Anthology in exchange for an honest review, I was a little worried that the anthology would be too "sciency" for me. While I love all types of science fiction, I don't know a lot about clones. However, after reading this amazing collection of stories, I know now that my worries were premature. While science is obviously a big part of each story, it doesn't take away from each or make it difficult to understand the concepts presented. I wanted to write about a few of my favorites (but I could go on all day because ALL of the stories are terrific) "Splinter" by Rysa Walker: I love the idea of time travel creating clones of yourself. A man is attempting to rescue someone he loves over and over and over again, each time creating another version of himself. I loved the conversations he has with himself too. I can't wait to look into more of Rysa's work. "Confessional" by Daniel Arthur Smith: This story is broken up into pieces throughout the anthology. Absolutely unique and awesome! It says in the story description that Confessional is based on an RPG where each decision equals death (s0 you can't win). "The Replacement Husband" by Nathan M. Beauchamp: This one was interesting. Can you imagine that when your significant other died, an exact copy of them would be delivered soon after? Would it be the same? Probably not. But all things are not as they seem. Like I said, I could go on and on about the talent in this anthology. It's a wonderful collection of stories that are often more gruesome than happy, but I love that. I don't always need a happy ending as long as the story is well written. Happy Book-birthday Clones: The Anthology!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Teri

    The concept of clones has always fascinated me - would they be exactly alike in personality, preferences, habits, etc? So when I was offered a chance to read this anthology, well... need I say more? All of these stories were fascinating and thought-provoking in their own right, but some that stuck with me are listed below. The Replacement Husband by Nathan M. Beauchamp: How weird would that be - your husband dies and is replaced by his clone several months later. Him, but not him, and Jasmine's t The concept of clones has always fascinated me - would they be exactly alike in personality, preferences, habits, etc? So when I was offered a chance to read this anthology, well... need I say more? All of these stories were fascinating and thought-provoking in their own right, but some that stuck with me are listed below. The Replacement Husband by Nathan M. Beauchamp: How weird would that be - your husband dies and is replaced by his clone several months later. Him, but not him, and Jasmine's thoughts and actions displayed that confusion. A nice twist at the end. Black Site by Michael Patrick Hicks: After reading many of his works, I'm quite a fan of this author and Black Site is a wonderfully dark and descriptive tale - a thrilling marriage of sci-fi and horror. Awakening by Susan Kaye Quinn: I've had a couple of this author's books in my TBR pile for quite a while, so I was excited to read this short story. After learning Awakening takes place in the world of one of these books, I've moved it up several notches. Somewhat heartbreaking, but I'm anxious to know more about this world. Splinter by Rysa Walker: Time-travel? Yes, please. Don't let your attention wander while reading this one - you may need to take notes on the time line - but sooo worth it! The Vandal by Joshua Ingle: A nature versus nurture story that will make you think. Even more interesting when it involves clones. Outstanding diverse perspectives on the subject of clones - highly recommend for sci-fi fans! I received a digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lene Blackthorn

    It's been a long time since I last read such a good sci-fi book. Endless options of using the same main theme clearly show in this diverse anthology. Each story is different, unique, stimulating your brain, keeping you think, raising emotions or simply devouring the reader into the unconquered field of imaginative future worlds, universes or dimensions. Style, language, landscapes and characters vary so that you will never feel bored. Conspirational theories and scientific future visions implante It's been a long time since I last read such a good sci-fi book. Endless options of using the same main theme clearly show in this diverse anthology. Each story is different, unique, stimulating your brain, keeping you think, raising emotions or simply devouring the reader into the unconquered field of imaginative future worlds, universes or dimensions. Style, language, landscapes and characters vary so that you will never feel bored. Conspirational theories and scientific future visions implanted into book reality are a temptation one should definitely give a try. I literally flew through the anthology, utterly eager for more, fairly surprised it is already over. For me the pace reached lightspeed. One big positive point also goes to the order of stories and whole arrangement of the book. From the stories included, I particularly liked The Replacement Husband, Eve's Children or B.E.G.I.N. However, there is certainly something worth falling for each one. Recommended to all sci-fi readers. I was provided with a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

    This was a good book. It was full of stories from a lot of sci-fi authors known to me that have written wonderful stories. The Clones' stories are no different. Some are shocking, some are sad, some truly believable or unbelievable, depending how you look at it. All great in their own unique ways. Although, there were one or two I didn't care for but that is my taste. I think every anthology is full of great stories by authors you may want to look up and read some more of their work. Clones made This was a good book. It was full of stories from a lot of sci-fi authors known to me that have written wonderful stories. The Clones' stories are no different. Some are shocking, some are sad, some truly believable or unbelievable, depending how you look at it. All great in their own unique ways. Although, there were one or two I didn't care for but that is my taste. I think every anthology is full of great stories by authors you may want to look up and read some more of their work. Clones made me want to do just that. A great book with great authors offering great stories to read. Now, I purposely didn't get into the meat of any story as I think a reader should be able to make up his own thoughts about the stories. To anyone looking for great sci-fi stories Clones is a great book. And even if sci-fi isn't your thing I still think you might find a story or two (or three) to enjoy. Thanks to PK Tyler for an ARC for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Some of my favorite authors contributed to this book. I expected to find a lot of well-written entertainment and was not disappointed. The appeal of anthologies, at least for me, is the variety. I'm sure to like at least some of the stories, and I consider the book pretty good if I enjoy more than half of it. My score on this one was nearly two thirds - yes, I did math - so it's definitely a winner. I won't discuss the individual selections as plenty of other reviews have already covered them all Some of my favorite authors contributed to this book. I expected to find a lot of well-written entertainment and was not disappointed. The appeal of anthologies, at least for me, is the variety. I'm sure to like at least some of the stories, and I consider the book pretty good if I enjoy more than half of it. My score on this one was nearly two thirds - yes, I did math - so it's definitely a winner. I won't discuss the individual selections as plenty of other reviews have already covered them all. Of the eleven stories, I loved seven of them. I'd rate each of them at five stars, and the whole book at 4.5 stars. Two of the stories I enjoyed were by authors I had not read before now. More books to find! That's part of the fun of reading collections. I can certainly recommend this one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kel (Faerie-bookworm)

    Title: Clones: The Antholoty Author: Many Genre: Sci-Fi Format: Ebook Pages: 256 Rating: 4.5 Heat: 0 Thoughts: This was a great collection of little clone stories that made you think about the pros and cons of cloning. There were stories that were very futuristic, scary, and had very probable issues that could arise if we did clone people. I really enjoyed the twists that some of them had and the arguments for and against following this path of technology. I think this would be a great book for d Title: Clones: The Antholoty Author: Many Genre: Sci-Fi Format: Ebook Pages: 256 Rating: 4.5 Heat: 0 Thoughts: This was a great collection of little clone stories that made you think about the pros and cons of cloning. There were stories that were very futuristic, scary, and had very probable issues that could arise if we did clone people. I really enjoyed the twists that some of them had and the arguments for and against following this path of technology. I think this would be a great book for discussions, like book clubs, since so many different ideas are brought to light in each story. Please note that I received a complimentary copy of this work in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Trisha Perry

    A awesome compilation of authors brought together to weave some of the most beautiful and wonderful tales of cloning, and the world surrounding it. This is a book that you will want to reread time and time again because each time you do you find something different or a new perspective to see a story in and it will be totally different and new each time. I love these anthologies and chronicles, sure I buy them because some of my favorite authors have stories in them but the best part is the new A awesome compilation of authors brought together to weave some of the most beautiful and wonderful tales of cloning, and the world surrounding it. This is a book that you will want to reread time and time again because each time you do you find something different or a new perspective to see a story in and it will be totally different and new each time. I love these anthologies and chronicles, sure I buy them because some of my favorite authors have stories in them but the best part is the new and equally wonderful authors I find each time read one of these awesome books. If you have never tried one and are in any way interested or curious in cloning I know you will find these stories fun and interesting as I did.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Reader By The Mountains

    In all honesty, I love books that come together as a package deal. With this anthology, I was able to experience different emotions and feels throughout. With these books, I was able to fall in love with sci-fi all over again with clones. The top ten stories are featured in this book and though I didn't like some, the ones that I did end up reading were awesome. Like I said, you will experience an array of emotions throughout this book and it is definitely different with every story. So make sure In all honesty, I love books that come together as a package deal. With this anthology, I was able to experience different emotions and feels throughout. With these books, I was able to fall in love with sci-fi all over again with clones. The top ten stories are featured in this book and though I didn't like some, the ones that I did end up reading were awesome. Like I said, you will experience an array of emotions throughout this book and it is definitely different with every story. So make sure that you are buckled in for the ride. Thanks much to the wide variety of authors that I got to experience. -Amy's Review Obsession

  26. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    Daniel Arthur Smith picked the ideal theme for this anthology. Cloning provides a rich vein of creative gold from which the authors involved have mined an array of very varied tales. That's the strength of this collection. You've got Susan Kaye Quinn's religion tinged science fiction tale, Hank Garner's Twilight Zone-esque collision of science and faith , a mind twisting time travel story from Rysa Waker, Michael Patrick Hicks' superb Lovecraftian horror tale (my personal favourite), and more. Ev Daniel Arthur Smith picked the ideal theme for this anthology. Cloning provides a rich vein of creative gold from which the authors involved have mined an array of very varied tales. That's the strength of this collection. You've got Susan Kaye Quinn's religion tinged science fiction tale, Hank Garner's Twilight Zone-esque collision of science and faith , a mind twisting time travel story from Rysa Waker, Michael Patrick Hicks' superb Lovecraftian horror tale (my personal favourite), and more. Every one of the stories offers a different take on the core concept and every one was well written and entertaining. Highly recommended.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    I haven't read this entire anthology yet, though I plan to. For now, I do want to review P.K. Tyler's story, "All These Bodies." I found the story interesting and the m.char. believable. The story itself had a very Ayn Rand feel to it. In fact it reminded me a lot of the individual vs. hive-mind mentality from Rand's Anthem. I was drawn right into the story and felt like I was experiencing the emotions of the m.c. I truly enjoyed reading this short story and look forward to reading more of Tyler I haven't read this entire anthology yet, though I plan to. For now, I do want to review P.K. Tyler's story, "All These Bodies." I found the story interesting and the m.char. believable. The story itself had a very Ayn Rand feel to it. In fact it reminded me a lot of the individual vs. hive-mind mentality from Rand's Anthem. I was drawn right into the story and felt like I was experiencing the emotions of the m.c. I truly enjoyed reading this short story and look forward to reading more of Tyler's upcoming series! *I received this book for free in return for my honest review.*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I really enjoyed this anthology.The standouts for me are the Replacement Husband by Nathan M Beauchamp.The author drew me in and delivered an unexpected twist..Eves Children by Hank Garner was intriguing and the ending delivered much to ponder.Like No Other by Daniel Arthur Smith was heartbreaking and beautifully written.I love reading anthologies because I always find stories by authors I already enjoy.And at least a few new ones to add to my TBR list.I received a copy of this book in exchange I really enjoyed this anthology.The standouts for me are the Replacement Husband by Nathan M Beauchamp.The author drew me in and delivered an unexpected twist..Eves Children by Hank Garner was intriguing and the ending delivered much to ponder.Like No Other by Daniel Arthur Smith was heartbreaking and beautifully written.I love reading anthologies because I always find stories by authors I already enjoy.And at least a few new ones to add to my TBR list.I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lori Hammons

    This is not my usual genre of book but I found each story about cloning fascinating. Many points of view on how it happens, why, how it's used, etc. I think my favorite ones were All These Bodies, where a clone become sentient, but his creator's don't realize it until the clone takes charge; and B.E.G.I.N., where a mother's loves creates and comforts a hybrid clone who does not live long and then she figures out how to do it again with success. This is not my usual genre of book but I found each story about cloning fascinating. Many points of view on how it happens, why, how it's used, etc. I think my favorite ones were All These Bodies, where a clone become sentient, but his creator's don't realize it until the clone takes charge; and B.E.G.I.N., where a mother's loves creates and comforts a hybrid clone who does not live long and then she figures out how to do it again with success.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Seamus

    I love short story anthologies & this is no exception! What Daniel Arthur Smith has done here, assembling together a bunch of top-notch excellent indie writers, is simply tremendous. Freaky, strange stories dealing the moral rights and wrongs of copying genes for cloning in a very possible, very near future. How might it work positively and what might go wrong?

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