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Stories can be powerful. In 1719, Elizabeth Goose of Boston Massachusetts published a collection of rhyming spells as a children's book, creating a spellbook of terrifying power. The Librarian of that age managed to dispose of all copies of the book except one, which remained in the possession of Elizabeth Goose and her family, temporarily averting any potential disaster. H Stories can be powerful. In 1719, Elizabeth Goose of Boston Massachusetts published a collection of rhyming spells as a children's book, creating a spellbook of terrifying power. The Librarian of that age managed to dispose of all copies of the book except one, which remained in the possession of Elizabeth Goose and her family, temporarily averting any potential disaster. However, strange things are happening, A window washer in San Diego who was blown off his elevated perch by a freak gust of wind, but miraculously survived by landing on a canopy over the building entrance. A woman in rural Pennsylvania who was attacked by mutant rodents without any eyes. And, a college professor in England who somehow found herself trapped inside a prize pumpkin at a local farmer’s market. Baird and her team of Librarians suspect that the magic of Mother Goose is again loose in the world, and with Flynn Carson AWOL once again, it is up to Cassandra, Ezekiel, and Stone to track down the missing spellbook before the true power of the rhymes can be unleashed.


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Stories can be powerful. In 1719, Elizabeth Goose of Boston Massachusetts published a collection of rhyming spells as a children's book, creating a spellbook of terrifying power. The Librarian of that age managed to dispose of all copies of the book except one, which remained in the possession of Elizabeth Goose and her family, temporarily averting any potential disaster. H Stories can be powerful. In 1719, Elizabeth Goose of Boston Massachusetts published a collection of rhyming spells as a children's book, creating a spellbook of terrifying power. The Librarian of that age managed to dispose of all copies of the book except one, which remained in the possession of Elizabeth Goose and her family, temporarily averting any potential disaster. However, strange things are happening, A window washer in San Diego who was blown off his elevated perch by a freak gust of wind, but miraculously survived by landing on a canopy over the building entrance. A woman in rural Pennsylvania who was attacked by mutant rodents without any eyes. And, a college professor in England who somehow found herself trapped inside a prize pumpkin at a local farmer’s market. Baird and her team of Librarians suspect that the magic of Mother Goose is again loose in the world, and with Flynn Carson AWOL once again, it is up to Cassandra, Ezekiel, and Stone to track down the missing spellbook before the true power of the rhymes can be unleashed.

30 review for The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths. Quirky, fun, and fast-paced, this second installment of The Librarians series is another action-packed story, which captures the feel of the TNT series while adding its own unique touches. Definitely, a must read for fans of show and an entertaining read for anyone. Stories have power. In 1719, Elizabeth Goose published a collection of rhyming spells as a children’s book, creating a spellbook of terrifying power. The Librarian of that age managed to dispose of al Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths. Quirky, fun, and fast-paced, this second installment of The Librarians series is another action-packed story, which captures the feel of the TNT series while adding its own unique touches. Definitely, a must read for fans of show and an entertaining read for anyone. Stories have power. In 1719, Elizabeth Goose published a collection of rhyming spells as a children’s book, creating a spellbook of terrifying power. The Librarian of that age managed to dispose of all copies of the book except one, which remained in the possession of Elizabeth Goose and her family, temporarily averting any potential disaster. Now, strange things are happening around the world . . . Baird and her team of Librarians suspect that the magic of Mother Goose is again loose in the world, and with Flynn AWOL—again—it is up to Cassandra, Ezekiel, and Stone to track down the missing spellbook before the true power of the rhymes can be unleashed. As a media tie-in, the obvious attraction of this book is for fans of the television show to get another fix of their Librarians. And so, above all, Greg Cox main job is to spin a narrative which captures the overall tone of the show, mixing in the right humor, quirky adventures, and group dynamics to appeal to fans everywhere. And for the most part, this novel accomplishes all those things. The concept of the Mother Goose Rhymes as powerful spells falling into the wrong hands is an exciting one, one which allows the author to separate our four characters, sending Eve, Ezekiel, Cassandra and Jake Stone out to complete their own separate parts of the adventure. These four different points of view allowing each character to strut their stuff, get their own time in the spotlight, and showcase their own unique personalities and strengths. We are even given some one-on-one time with Jenkins, as well as getting a better understanding of the Library, which quickly becomes a character in itself; the antics going on therein with some of its lively exhibits producing many of the funniest moments of the entire book. The only weakness of the narrative is probably the fact that it does separate our favorite librarians so much. Like most stories about groups, one of the magical qualities of the tv series is the group dynamics; how these people play off one another, bumbling and stumbling their way together through each hairy raising adventure. And here they were not together a large majority of the time. Chapter after chapter were the wonderful camaraderie and group humor was mostly missing. Certainly, this aspect of the show wasn’t completely absent, but I would have enjoyed a bit more of the Librarians together taking on the world. Well- written, fun, and capturing the feel of the Librarians television series, The Mother Goose Chase is a great way for fans of the show to get another fix of their favorite action adventure series, or for newcomers to experience the quirky escapades of the world’s coolest librarians. I received an advanced reading copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. I’d like to thank them for allowing me to receive this review copy and inform everyone that the review you have read is my opinion alone.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bob/Sally

    The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase is a solid second entry in the literary annals of The Librarians, a fun follow-up by Greg Cox to last year's The Librarians and The Lost Lamp. Having already proven his grasp of the characters and their world, he's free to be a bit more playful this time around. It does lack the tension of the first, coming across as more a comedy of errors than a real life-and-death pursuit, but that's pretty much in keeping with the pacing of the series itself. This tim The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase is a solid second entry in the literary annals of The Librarians, a fun follow-up by Greg Cox to last year's The Librarians and The Lost Lamp. Having already proven his grasp of the characters and their world, he's free to be a bit more playful this time around. It does lack the tension of the first, coming across as more a comedy of errors than a real life-and-death pursuit, but that's pretty much in keeping with the pacing of the series itself. This time around, we discover that the original Mother Goose nursery rhymes were actually a dangerous spell book, one that was split apart and entrusted to three different descendants as part of the Mother Goose Treaty of 1918. A century later, it appears as if the planned demolition of a Mother Goose themed amusement park has prompted a return to the magic nursery rhymes. "I don't plan, I act. I go by rhyme, not reason. I do as the spirit moves me. I am my own muse, the one true Mother Goose. No plans for me, only inspired flights of fancy!" As a whole, the book is rather silly, but in an altogether clever way. Cox expands upon the verses we all know so well, going back to their darker, more sinister origins, and using them to serve as clues to a trio of treasure hunts. While all of this is going on, Colonel Baird and Jenkins are left to guard the Library itself from a hungry treasure chest, in a room-to-room battle that involves a lion, a unicorn, Excalibur, and more. As for Flynn, he's largely absent for this one, but the twist explaining why makes for an interesting finale. If you're a fan, and can't wait for the new season to begin this fall, The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase is a great fix for riding out the wait. Originally reviewed at Beauty in Ruins Disclaimer: I received a complimentary ARC of this title from the publisher in exchange for review consideration. This does not in any way affect the honesty or sincerity of my review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    All Things Urban Fantasy

    Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy. THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE, the second in The Librarians series, follows our intrepid Librarians as they fight a Mother Goose who is intent on ending the world. Sounds like pretty standard Librarian fare, yes? While it definitely fits the Librarian playbook, THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE is entertaining, action-packed and even has a reveal at the end that I didn't see coming. I didn't feel that this installation in The Librari Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy. THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE, the second in The Librarians series, follows our intrepid Librarians as they fight a Mother Goose who is intent on ending the world. Sounds like pretty standard Librarian fare, yes? While it definitely fits the Librarian playbook, THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE is entertaining, action-packed and even has a reveal at the end that I didn't see coming. I didn't feel that this installation in The Librarians series was as good as the previous book, THE LIBRARIANS AND THE SEARCH FOR THE LOST LAMP. It felt a little more forced to me. However, that doesn't mean it wasn't a fun read. I feel like you're getting exactly what you would expect from a book based on a TV show - the characters all match up with their TV personas and the references to prior adventures on the TV show are ever-present. The new characters introduced certainly shook things up a bit, and I really enjoyed how each Librarian was paired with a different person who ended up helping them out as they tried to resolve the situation. There is a little less interaction between the main characters, however, as they are separated for most of the book, so if that is the main draw for you, you might be a little disappointed. Since THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE is based on a TV show, and it is the second in a series, it does assume a bit of prior knowledge of the world and the characters, though there are frequent references to main character traits and any information needed about past adventures is definitely explained. It wouldn't be too difficult to pick this one up without having any prior knowledge of the show, and if you like stories with a little bit of mythology (as some of the full Mother Goose rhymes are discussed) this one would fit the bill. If you're a fan of The Librarians TV show, THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE is something you should pick up. It's a quick read (though it took me a little while to get immersed into the world again) and it should tide you over while you're waiting for season 4 of the TV show to air. If not already a fan, I'd suggest starting with book one and going from there. Sexual content: N/A

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anindita, A Bohemian Mind at Work

    Fun and entertaining, The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase by Greg Cox is a fast-paced lightweight fantasy-adventure that won't let you skim through pages or be bored at any moment. I had watched Noah Wyle's TV films of The librarians as I was a fan of Indiana Jones and my husband suggested those three tv movies close to the underlying theme of a fun hero looking for magical artifacts. I had no idea about the TV series before I bumped into a discussion in one Facebook forum this year. Luckil Fun and entertaining, The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase by Greg Cox is a fast-paced lightweight fantasy-adventure that won't let you skim through pages or be bored at any moment. I had watched Noah Wyle's TV films of The librarians as I was a fan of Indiana Jones and my husband suggested those three tv movies close to the underlying theme of a fun hero looking for magical artifacts. I had no idea about the TV series before I bumped into a discussion in one Facebook forum this year. Luckily, the book was available for request on Netgalley and the publishers were kind enough to approve a read. The humor and pace are set early in the novel and don't undergo any significant alteration throughout the rest. The multiple POV narrative structure with specific quests and puzzles gives the book a game like feel which I rather enjoy. Additionally, this book has a healthy dose of adorable quirkiness. The language and writing style is hearty and fun and meant for any age group (my opinion). A book based on something that has already been on TV is like walking backward wth a video camera. Chances are, the scenes of special effects won't be as visual or exciting enough. Greg Cox did a fantastic job in reducing my fears within the first few pages of the book. I have an old copy of the Mother Goose rhymes (shopped in that little old bookstore after my daughter was born) so it helped. If you don't have an image of a scarf-wearing goose humming children's rhymes inside your head, no sweat. Just google. My recommendation Four Bohostars for a delightful read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sandra (LadyGrey Reads)

    Review coming soon

  6. 4 out of 5

    Deanie Nelder

    The Mother Goose Treaty was mentioned in an episode of The Librarians, and this book takes it further. Descendants of the original "Mother Goose" are being attacked by nursery rhymes (a farmer's wife has to fend off three blind mice, etc.). But worse of all, a modern-day "Mother Goose" is trying to reunite the three parts of the original storybook, which will have world-ending consequences. Greg Cox has crafted another Librarians book that could be an episode of the series. He's got the character The Mother Goose Treaty was mentioned in an episode of The Librarians, and this book takes it further. Descendants of the original "Mother Goose" are being attacked by nursery rhymes (a farmer's wife has to fend off three blind mice, etc.). But worse of all, a modern-day "Mother Goose" is trying to reunite the three parts of the original storybook, which will have world-ending consequences. Greg Cox has crafted another Librarians book that could be an episode of the series. He's got the character voices down perfectly, plus he put in a little easter egg for Christian Kane's previous series (in one sentence his Librarians character Jake mentions providing "leverage.") It's a really great book that makes me miss a really great show.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley and voluntarily reviewed it. I am a big fan of the tv series The Librarians, so when I was browsing netgalley one day and saw a book for the series I immediately hit request! This is a great book for fans of the tv series. As I already watched the first two seasons of the tv series I was easily able to visualize everything. There is a short recap and explanation of things and characters, but I think you might be a little los I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through netgalley and voluntarily reviewed it. I am a big fan of the tv series The Librarians, so when I was browsing netgalley one day and saw a book for the series I immediately hit request! This is a great book for fans of the tv series. As I already watched the first two seasons of the tv series I was easily able to visualize everything. There is a short recap and explanation of things and characters, but I think you might be a little lost if you start this without knowing anything from the series first. I was impressed by how well the author brought these familiar characters alive in the book. The book had the same tone, style and feeling as the series. It was like watching an episode, but then in your head instead of on an a screen. It was a lot of fun to read and experience a Librarians adventure in a slightly different way. The author really handled the universe well and make it come alive and feel familiar for those who watched the series. And it was such a good adventure as well. This book is centered around Mother Goose, As I am Dutch I didn't know of most of the nursery rhymes used in this book sadly, but the ones that are applicable are all written out, so that helped a lot. It was fun to read. There are some good twists and I like how the librarians always use their smarts and knowledge to solve any troubles they run into. There are some interesting puzzles and mysteries for them to solve and they all seemed well thought out. In this book we got multiple point of views, which worked well. The librarians split up and we switch to their different point of views and Colonel Baird her point of view as well. And we even get a chapter from Jenkins his point of view too, which was great. The three librarians all have their own unique personality, and I like how different they are, but they also work well together. In this book we get to see their personalities in action really well and each of their puzzle seems to be fit well for that librarian their specific talents. To summarize: This was a very well written and enjoyable read. I really like the Librarians tv series and this book managed to capture the essence and same feel of the series, but then in book form. I am really impressed by how well it was written and how spot on the descriptions and character actions were. I could very vividly imagine how everything looked like due to having seen the series first. Those who haven't seen the series first might be a bit lost when reading this as there's only a small amount of recap. The story was an enjoyable one filled with puzzles, mysteries and some nice twists and turns in true Librarians style. It's written in multiple point of views which really works. Reading this book left me with a happy feeling and eager to watch season 3 soon. And I hope I can get my hands on book 1 in this series eventually as well, as the author did a great job bringing the Librarians to book form.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Melliane

    3.5/5 Mon avis en Français My English review I liked the first book and it is true that I was curious to discover a new adventure of our librarians. Flynn seems to have disappeared for the moment and so we turn to the others for this new story. Mother Goose is known for her spellbook but it’s been a long time since no one has heard of her. Yet, when her descendants find themselves trapped by her stories, our librarians separate to investigate on the spot. Between a woman who was found in a giant p 3.5/5 Mon avis en Français My English review I liked the first book and it is true that I was curious to discover a new adventure of our librarians. Flynn seems to have disappeared for the moment and so we turn to the others for this new story. Mother Goose is known for her spellbook but it’s been a long time since no one has heard of her. Yet, when her descendants find themselves trapped by her stories, our librarians separate to investigate on the spot. Between a woman who was found in a giant pumpkin, another who was attacked by mutant rats, or one who was carried away by a gust, our heroes will have to face new dangers. I was curious to see how our three characters would manage to settle their stories. Each one, on their part, they will have to investigate the events to find the missing manuscripts. Moreover, they do not know the real identity of the new Mother Goose, which will not necessarily help in their research. I confess, however, that I did not expect such a revelation at the end of the story! It was a real surprise! I had a good time overall. It was interesting to fall into a story I did not know about and to find all the characters again.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia McIvers

    I had expected to really enjoy this book - a book about stories! Fun! Or not. OK story, but drop the ! from Fun. But the characters were all pretty shallow, and so was the plot. Not looking for the rest of the series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality I read The Librarians and the Lost Lamp a couple of weeks ago, and I really enjoyed it because it felt so much like an episode of the show, including all of the madcap adventure and especially all of the banter. I had a great time, just as I do when I watch The Librarians. It was fun! But The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase felt like it was more of a strain. The Librarians, of course, are always a bit strained in the midst of yet another hair-raising c Originally published at Reading Reality I read The Librarians and the Lost Lamp a couple of weeks ago, and I really enjoyed it because it felt so much like an episode of the show, including all of the madcap adventure and especially all of the banter. I had a great time, just as I do when I watch The Librarians. It was fun! But The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase felt like it was more of a strain. The Librarians, of course, are always a bit strained in the midst of yet another hair-raising case, but there was something about this one that made it feel like a strain for the reader, too. Or at least this reader. Fair warning, I may get a bit meta here. It’s hard to review a media tie-in novel without some references to the media it ties into, and how it “feels” related to how the original feels, And works. I would say or doesn’t work but the fact is that a person for whom the original does not work is unlikely to read novels based on it. My 2 cents. Part of what makes The Librarians work as a show is their marvelous team dynamic. The Librarians and their Guardian are a close knit team and also kind of a family. What they do is designed to be a bit outside the mundane world, and they of necessity have bonded together. Along with Jenkins, the combination archivist, caretaker and zookeeper of the Library and the Library Annex in Portland they work out of. On the one hand, parts of this story provide a marvelous and much broader view of just how big, how strange, and how magical the Library’s collections truly are. Nobody wants the job of cleaning the pen that holds the Goose that Lays the Golden Eggs, but it’s a dirty job and somebody has to do it. Usually Jenkins. On that other hand, the Librarians spend a lot of this story on separate parts of the quest. This group is stronger when it’s together. It’s also funnier and occasionally more heartwarming when it’s together. So for this reader story lost some of its steam when it separated the group, Also the way they were split up felt a bit contrived. Their separate quests seem to rely on their weaknesses more than their strength, and the individuals they were paired up with instead felt like contrivances designed to teach them each something rather than get the job done. As usual, my 2 cents and your mileage may vary. And the action got a bit bogged down as it split into four separate stories, which at times felt a bit repetitious. The concept that Mother Goose was not only real but a powerful witch who encoded her spells into nursery rhymes fits right into the mythos of the Library. That her magic could get out of hand if left in the hands of the “wrong people” could make an episode or a great story. But the way that this one wrapped up, which unfortunately I did see coming a mile away, fell flat. Again, at least for this reader. So, as much as I love The Librarians, I didn’t have nearly as much fun with Mother Goose as I did with the Lost Lamp. Escape Rating C+: The scenes where Eve and Jenkins are chasing several of the Library’s more colorful (and volatile) exhibits around the Library are hilarious. My personal favorite is when Jenkins throws Arthur’s Crown at the Sword Excalibur and tells it to play “Keep Away” with the King of Beasts and the Unicorn. Eve’s solution to the problem of the Dead Man’s Chest was also lot of fun. But the gang spends too much time not being a gang, and I missed the way they play off of each other much too much.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Melissa's Eclectic Bookshelf

    5 REASONS TO READ THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE You love The Librarians TV series and want more – The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase is incredibly faithful to the spirit of television series. If I didn’t know better I would swear that I was reading the script for an upcoming episode. You’ve watched one or all three of the Librarian movies and are curious about how the TV series compares – This book will give you a great idea of what the television version of The Librarians is li 5 REASONS TO READ THE LIBRARIANS AND THE MOTHER GOOSE CHASE You love The Librarians TV series and want more – The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase is incredibly faithful to the spirit of television series. If I didn’t know better I would swear that I was reading the script for an upcoming episode. You’ve watched one or all three of the Librarian movies and are curious about how the TV series compares – This book will give you a great idea of what the television version of The Librarians is like. Greg Cox does an amazing job of capturing the essence of the show. You loved shows like Warehouse 13 and Eureka – I swear that Warehouse 13 is a sibling to The Librarians…so very similar in the basic story line but equally sweet and funny due to the difference in the cast of characters. You enjoy stories with an interestingly diverse (in interests and behavior) cast of characters – All of the Librarians and their guardian are such interesting and unique characters. I can’t imagine how boring this story would have been had they all been Flynn Carson. You love reads that mix genres – The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase is a great mix of action and adventure, mystery, magic, and humor. Bottom Line: The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase was a quick and quirky read that will be sure to please both fans of the movies/television show and fans of fun treasure hunt type stories alike. Although in my opinion this book is better enjoyed if you are familiar with the shows, you in no way need to have any prior experience ..and you can jump in mid-series should you so desire! Cox does a great job of setting the story up and introducing the characters for those not already a part of this fandom 🙂

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase by Greg Cox is the second book in The Librarians trilogy. Eve Baird along with Cassandra Cillian, Jake Stone, and Ezekiel Jones have just returned to the Library annex in Portland, Oregon after another successful mission. They are all off to relax when the Clippings Book (and the Librarians miniature versions) start acting up. A professor in Northumberland wakes up inside a pumpkin, a tree trimmer in Miami gets carried away by a freaky wind, a librarian The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase by Greg Cox is the second book in The Librarians trilogy. Eve Baird along with Cassandra Cillian, Jake Stone, and Ezekiel Jones have just returned to the Library annex in Portland, Oregon after another successful mission. They are all off to relax when the Clippings Book (and the Librarians miniature versions) start acting up. A professor in Northumberland wakes up inside a pumpkin, a tree trimmer in Miami gets carried away by a freaky wind, a librarian in Ohio found three mice without eyes in her kitchen (and she attacked them with a butcher knife), and Mother Goose’s Magic Garden, an amusement park, is about to be demolished. Jenkins believes that the 1918 Mother Goose Treaty has been broken. In the 1700s Elizabeth Goose created a spellbook that ended up getting published. The Librarian at that time rounded up all the copies except one which remained with the family. It ended up getting divided into three sections for the three different factions of the Goose family in 1918. It seems that a descendant has decided to stage a coup and claim all three copies to enact a horrible spell. Stone, Cassandra, and Ezekiel each take a different clipping and set off. Eve and Jenkins have their hands full in the Library. Mother Goose’s magic has set off the goose that lays the golden egg. They need to catch it and return it to its cage before more magical items start acting up. Just another typical day for the Librarians and their Guardian! Join Eve, Ezekiel, Stone, Jenkins and Cassandra on another magical adventure in The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase. The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase is bewitching. Greg Cox captured the quirky character’s personalities perfectly (for those of you who watch the show) as well as the Library. I could just envision the Library from the written descriptions. I found the book to be well-written, engaging, and entertaining. I thoroughly enjoyed the humor in this story. I found myself laughing out loud many times while reading The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase (especially when Jenkins was trying to capture the goose and Eve with Dead Man’s Chest). The book has a fast pace that never slacks. The description of Mother Goose was spot on from the children’s books. I give The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase 5 out of 5 stars. I do wish, though, that the mystery had not been so easy to solve. One clue was all I needed to identify the responsible party. The book is written with four points-of-view (Cassandra, Stone, Ezekiel, and Eve) which works for this book. It is not confusing or complicated. If you have not watched the show or the movies, you can read the book. The author provides the backstory needed. I think it does help, though, to have watched the show. As I read the book, I could picture it in my head. I have not had the opportunity to read The Librarians and The Lost Lamp (first book in trilogy), but I have moved it to the top of my TBR pile.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Allen Steele

    This was not as good as his first, however it was a decent read. The young librarians find themselves in trouble again, this time in battle against an ancient treasure chest, spiders, a maze of a house & a large flying goose. Just barely saving the world from complete destruction. (Not being overly dramatic here.)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    A good read, much like the tv series upon which it is based...fun.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aj

    Reads just like one of the tv episodes. I'll be letting my 10 year old read it, as there is nothing inappropriate in its pages. Reads just like one of the tv episodes. I'll be letting my 10 year old read it, as there is nothing inappropriate in its pages.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marla

    Enjoyed it as much as the first one. My favorite part was getting to hear more about the Library when Jenkins and Eve were running around in it. And the jetpack got used!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    In the same vein as The Librarian movies which I loved. A decent story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/th... The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase The Librarians, Book #2 By Greg Cox ISBN: 9780765384140 Author’s Website: http://www.gregcox-author.com/ Brought to you by OBS reviewer Omar Summary: For millennia, the Librarians have secretly protected the world by keeping watch over dangerous magical relics. Cataloging and safeguarding everything from Excalibur to Pandora’s Box, they stand between humanity and those who would use the relics for evil. Stories can be pow http://openbooksociety.com/article/th... The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase The Librarians, Book #2 By Greg Cox ISBN: 9780765384140 Author’s Website: http://www.gregcox-author.com/ Brought to you by OBS reviewer Omar Summary: For millennia, the Librarians have secretly protected the world by keeping watch over dangerous magical relics. Cataloging and safeguarding everything from Excalibur to Pandora’s Box, they stand between humanity and those who would use the relics for evil. Stories can be powerful. In 1719, Elizabeth Goose of Boston Massachusetts published a collection of rhyming spells as a children’s book, creating a spellbook of terrifying power. The Librarian of that age managed to dispose of all copies of the book except one, which remained in the possession of Elizabeth Goose and her family, temporarily averting any potential disaster. However, strange things are happening, A window washer in San Diego who was blown off his elevated perch by a freak gust of wind, but miraculously survived by landing on a canopy over the building entrance. A woman in rural Pennsylvania who was attacked by mutant rodents without any eyes. And, a college professor in England who somehow found herself trapped inside a prize pumpkin at a local farmer’s market. Baird and her team of Librarians suspect that the magic of Mother Goose is again loose in the world, and with Fynn Carson AWOL once again, it is up to Cassandra, Ezekiel, and Stone to track down the missing spellbook before the true power of the rhymes can be unleashed. Review: The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase starts with Colonel Eve and the Librarians, Stone, Cassandra, and Ezekiel, are trying to recover a Greek alabaster of the Goddess Artemis from a frat party at a university, while running from the Calydonian Boar who was summoned after the idol was used at the party. Once the Idol is safe at the Library, the team decides that they need a good night’s sleep to recover, but the universe has a different idea and magic clipboard comes to life with four different locations. The first is an older woman who was attacked by mutant rats with no eyes; next a schooler was found and rescued from inside a giant pumpkin; then a tree cutter survives being flown in the air and landing safely; lastly an article mentions that the Mother Goose theme park is being schedule for demolition. The Librarians and their Guardian each take a location, Cassandra the tree cutter, Stone the scholar in the pumpkin, Ezekiel the older woman, and Eve decides to go to the theme park after they come to the conclusion that all articles are related because they are rhythms from the Mother Goose rhythm book. Now the Librarians are on a quest to find the original Mother Goose book that contains the full rhythms and spells written down by a familiar of the previous entity that wore the title of Mother Goose. Divided in three parts, the librarians and their Guardian have to split up to find the missing pieces and solve who is the mysterious impostor Mother Goose who threatens to destroy the world. I loved the Librarians. I have been watching the show for some time and I liked the first book written by Greg Cox. In this case, I liked the used of fables and childhood rhythms, I have always liked when stories incorporate our childhood stories and create something different. I liked to read these characters using the writing of Cox and he made the characters similar to the TV show, but at the same time a little different. I liked the storytelling that the author uses. In this installment, the story line stays in the same time line, compare to the previous book. But still, we get to read through the POV of the different characters. Like the name says, the Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase, the story uses a lot of the childhood rhythms of the Old Mother Goose book. We read, “Jack and Jill”, “Three Blind Mice”, “Rock-a-bye, baby, in the tree top…”, “Simple Simon”, “The Crooked man”, and others more. But my favorite of all Mother Goose rhythms is: “Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall; All the king’s horses and all the king’s men Couldn’t put Humpty together again.” Who doesn’t like Humpty Dumpty? Well, the Librarians had a lot of fun with all these rhythms and their effects on the world. Like the TV show, the story contains a lot of funny scenes and jokes around the story line. You can even find some hidden jokes related to the characters and the actors that portray them. *Spoilers* Stone says “Leverage”. If you are a fan of the TV Show The Librarians or of the work of Greg Cox, then I recommend The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase. Here we find the mighty librarians and their Guarding trying to save the world once, but with a touch of twisted nostalgic childhood stories. *OBS would like to thank the publisher for supplying a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  19. 5 out of 5

    Annemieke / A Dance with Books

    I received a copy of this book through Netgalley from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The Librarians is of course a title that will be catching to us readers. If you did not know, The Librarian was first a movie with a few sequels starring Noah Wyle. Movies I loved despite how cheesy they were in parts. A few years ago this movie inspired a tv show called The Librarians with three new Librarians while still having Noah Wyle’s character Flynn appear from time to time. This book is I received a copy of this book through Netgalley from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The Librarians is of course a title that will be catching to us readers. If you did not know, The Librarian was first a movie with a few sequels starring Noah Wyle. Movies I loved despite how cheesy they were in parts. A few years ago this movie inspired a tv show called The Librarians with three new Librarians while still having Noah Wyle’s character Flynn appear from time to time. This book is an extra story set inside this world, and already the second one by Greg Cox. I’ll be honest and say I have not had the chance to see all seasons or episodes of The Librarians tv show. So I was very curious if this book would still be a good read for me. The answer is yes. You do need a working knowledge of the world and a bit of an idea of the characters but that is to be expected when reading this type of book. But other than that it is easy to read for those of us who have not been able to see a lot of the tv show. You also do not need to have read the first novel. The writing in this book was solid giving us some more details and perhaps small bits of insights on the inner workings of the characters. I think my only complaint would be that this book is written as an episode of the show. It could be inserted in the show easily. The drawback of that is that this doesn’t always work in book form. For most of the book we follow Baird but we get the point of view of all main characters and the targets mentioned in the synopsis at some point. They split up in the middle of the book where we switch to another character every chapter. It pulled me out of the story of that moment here and there. I also have to say that the start is really predictable story wise. I don’t think this is necessarily the authors fault but the formula of the show. Like I said what works on the screen doesn’t always work in book form. But the predictability eased out a little nearing the ending. I did guess that twist though! The most important element however is how well the characters and the feel match up with the actual show. And that was done rather well. I could picture our characters pulling certain facial expressions. These characters all have their own quirkiness. I mostly could appreciate some of the thoughts characters had about each other, especially the three librarians. In that regard I would have preferred or would love to see a book entirely in the point of view of one of them with a lot more depth in thoughts. But one can’t get everything. As a whole though this book exceeded by expectations. After having read various types of tv show novelizations I have had some duds. But I was happily surprised by the writing and characterization of the show. And I think this is a great book to stand next to the series for the fans.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Van (Short & Sweet Reviews)

    Disclosure: I received a review copy from the publisher in exchange for a honest review. I still haven’t gotten around to watching The Librarians, the show in which the book is based on. But I have been enjoying this series nonetheless. The Librarians and The Mother Goose Chase was a fun addition to the series and this time the main theme and problem involves well known nursery rhymes. The book is littered with tons of nursery rhymes from The Three Blind Mice, Jack and Jill and Humpty Dumpty to Disclosure: I received a review copy from the publisher in exchange for a honest review. I still haven’t gotten around to watching The Librarians, the show in which the book is based on. But I have been enjoying this series nonetheless. The Librarians and The Mother Goose Chase was a fun addition to the series and this time the main theme and problem involves well known nursery rhymes. The book is littered with tons of nursery rhymes from The Three Blind Mice, Jack and Jill and Humpty Dumpty to name a few. And who would’ve thought that putting Humpty Dumpty back together again would be so sinister! Literally end-of-the-world, we’re talking earth shattering proportions here! The Librarians and The Mother Goose Chase was entertaining and had hilarious dialogue/banter but it was missing that spark, that was found in the first book. I believe the reason was the lack of interaction between the characters. In the first book ,the entire team worked together and was for the most part in every other scene together. This time around the team splits up and are paired off with descendants of the Original Mother Goose in search of the three nursery volumes. There was a good amount of action and chase scenes but it didn’t feel as urgent and exciting. I felt that everything came together and the problem was solved too easily. I was hoping to be on the edge of my seat but I found myself loosing interest every now and again. While there were certainly highs and lows, my favorite part is learning about the history of Mother Goose, it was very intriguing. I also loved the idea of the original volumes of the nursery rhymes as spell books, that was unique take. All in all, The Librarians and The Mother Goose Chase was a good read. The ending was one of the biggest surprise reveal that I did not see coming and thought it was super clever of Cox. If you’re a fan of the show or Urban Fantasy; I think you’d enjoy this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Review originally published at Book of Bogan. I was not familiar with the television show The Librarians before reading this book, although I don't think it left me at a disadvantage, because I pretty quickly bought into the idea behind the series, as it reminded me of another television series I very much enjoyed called Warehouse 13, which was in a similar vein. While I thought this was an interesting idea, where The Mother Goose Chase went with it rubbed me the wrong way. I am not a big fan of Review originally published at Book of Bogan. I was not familiar with the television show The Librarians before reading this book, although I don't think it left me at a disadvantage, because I pretty quickly bought into the idea behind the series, as it reminded me of another television series I very much enjoyed called Warehouse 13, which was in a similar vein. While I thought this was an interesting idea, where The Mother Goose Chase went with it rubbed me the wrong way. I am not a big fan of the retold fairytale trend that is going on at the moment, but I'm willing to give anything a go once. The book involves a small team of experts in the supernaturalish trying to recover the three parts of a mysterious spellbook, hidden by the heirs of Mother Goose. They are competing with dastardly enemies, and their deadly and unique minions. And if that was it, I would be right on board with that, but unfortunately the author had created a rod for their own back by setting up the gimmick of nursery rhymes as magic spells, which made some parts of the book much more complicated or contrived than needed. While I enjoyed the characters and the interplay between them, and their interactions with the various villains who are littered throughout the story was playful and interesting, and they definitely kept me reading where I otherwise might have stopped for other reasons. I found it difficult to decide where the book is pitched - the ideas seem aimed at a YA audience, but some of the language and ideas are a bit more adult. I think the book will appeal to fans of the show, as well as people with more of an interest in the retold fairytale style of book. I received a review copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ☘Tara Sheehan☘

    This is the 2nd in a series based on the TNT television show, The Librarians, which also spawned a few movies. It’s an action-packed story written with a fast pace that will have you quickly turning the pages. If you’ve never seen the show you won’t have to worry about being lost but it might add a new television show to your watching list as it expertly captured the fun and humor of TNT’s offering. I had not read the first book in this series but love the movies and television show, particularly This is the 2nd in a series based on the TNT television show, The Librarians, which also spawned a few movies. It’s an action-packed story written with a fast pace that will have you quickly turning the pages. If you’ve never seen the show you won’t have to worry about being lost but it might add a new television show to your watching list as it expertly captured the fun and humor of TNT’s offering. I had not read the first book in this series but love the movies and television show, particularly since I’m a huge Christian Kane fan, so I was a little apprehensive about how this would turn out. Thankfully Greg Cox captured most of what made the visual version so good with its snappy dialogue and quirky characters. Since this is a book and not bound by the same constraints visual media is Cox was able to add more depth, facts, detailed scene work and whimsical elements which add another layer of excitement to a set of stories that already set the bar pretty high. The book was entertaining and is a good fix for when the show is between seasons but can’t replace the magic the actors create on screen. Although Cox did a good job having the literary characters act like their visual counterparts as well as mimic their dialogue patterns, he still can’t encapsulate their mannerisms, tone of voice and other parts the actors bring to the stories. I’d still recommend checking it out. As a fan of Chris Colfer’s Land of Stories which takes childhood nursery rhymes and turns them upside down, I found the similar idea in Cox’s book of using something we’re all familiar with to make it a little bit more fun.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karsyn

    Received from NetGalley for my honest review Completed 10/19/17 288 page ebook This was the 2nd book in the Librarians series, the same as the TV show. While I am not current on the show, I have watched it, and watching the show is pretty pivotal to reading the books. You COULD read the books without the show, but you'd be missing the little nuances, plus they reference things that happened on the show frequently. In this story, Mother Goose is trying to destroy the world, to create a new one. The L Received from NetGalley for my honest review Completed 10/19/17 288 page ebook This was the 2nd book in the Librarians series, the same as the TV show. While I am not current on the show, I have watched it, and watching the show is pretty pivotal to reading the books. You COULD read the books without the show, but you'd be missing the little nuances, plus they reference things that happened on the show frequently. In this story, Mother Goose is trying to destroy the world, to create a new one. The Librarians are flung out to different corners of the world to trace down 3 parts of a Mother Goose book before Mother Goose herself. I really enjoyed this story. It was typical of the Librarians and an interesting story. The characters are very well done to reflect their tv counterparts and I actually listened to the audiobook of this, and the narrator did a really good job of bringing the characters to life. Her Ezekiel and Cassie were especially good, she sounded like a female version of Ezekiel, and she had all Cassies mannerisms and the way she talks down pat. Baird & Stone weren't as good, but probably because they aren't as unique. My favorite parts were definitely the house in Miami, though it was all enjoyable. The house was unique though and the kind of thing I like, puzzles in puzzles and I liked each time the story went to it. Satisfying, if a bit predictable, ending. Good for any Librarian fans. Setting = B Plot = A Conflict = B+ Characters = B+ Theme = A

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sheldon Wiebe

    Greg Cox is a chameleon. Whether he's writing one of the many iterations of Star Trek, taking on the infinite wonder of Warehouse 13, or the awkward incursions of magic in The Librarians, he always captures the form of source material and then takes it to interesting new places. With The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase, Cox turns nursery rhymes into devastating magic and posits that a recombined book of the original Mother goose nursery rhymes might gives its owner the power to reboot the un Greg Cox is a chameleon. Whether he's writing one of the many iterations of Star Trek, taking on the infinite wonder of Warehouse 13, or the awkward incursions of magic in The Librarians, he always captures the form of source material and then takes it to interesting new places. With The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase, Cox turns nursery rhymes into devastating magic and posits that a recombined book of the original Mother goose nursery rhymes might gives its owner the power to reboot the universe to her own liking - by putting Humpty Dumpty back together again, no less!. Librarians Ezekiel Jones, Cassandra Cillian and Jake Stone - along with their Guardian, Col. Eve Baird - find themselves chasing someone calling herself Mother Goose and seeking the three hidden parts of that book. Mother Goose Chase gives each a challenge worthy of Librarians; inserts one of the stranger cameos for original Librarian (at least in this time period) Flynn Carsen and gives the immortal Mr. Jenkins an occasional conniption fit. Following the show's template, each character has a solo mission that goes awry - forcing the team to regroup and face the ultimate challenge together. (It's a solid construction that worked since the classic Justice Society ofamerica comics in the '40s, so it's no wonder that, under the masterful writing of Greg cox, it works beautifully here. Highly recommended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael J.

    Fun, escapist entertainment. Good use of nursery rhymes and clever treasure hunts. Greg Cox is noted for writing novelizations of popular movies (Godzilla, The Dark Knight Rises, etc). He also writes original fiction based on licensed properties and series characters. This is based on the TNT television series - The Librarians. Cox takes the premise of the show (an ancient agency that gathers powerful and dangerous magical artifacts and keeps them safe from human and supernatural interference) a Fun, escapist entertainment. Good use of nursery rhymes and clever treasure hunts. Greg Cox is noted for writing novelizations of popular movies (Godzilla, The Dark Knight Rises, etc). He also writes original fiction based on licensed properties and series characters. This is based on the TNT television series - The Librarians. Cox takes the premise of the show (an ancient agency that gathers powerful and dangerous magical artifacts and keeps them safe from human and supernatural interference) and builds an original story revealing around the Mother Goose nursery rhymes. He separates the team of librarians and pairs them with secondary characters of his own creation. A smart move, as it allows the writer a bit more artistic freedom, which Cox takes ample advantage of. The hiding places of three volumes of lost Mother Goose stories are clever, especially the mansion of mazes and puzzles. There's a surprise twist near the end of the book. I expected to be entertained by reading this, and I was. I also appreciated the skill of Cox at adapting this material. This book serves as a good template for any writers who want to learn how to write original works based on established characters.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    A novelization of the popular TV show which is an offshoot of ‘The Librarian’ made-for-TV movies with Noah Wyle. The TV show and the books mainly focus on his assistants as they find and gather magical and unusual relics to protect them from misuse by unwary or unscrupulous humans. It seems our beloved Mother Goose rhymes are really magic spells. One of her ancestors is using them against other family members to gain control of the title and power and the battle is centered in an old Mother Goose A novelization of the popular TV show which is an offshoot of ‘The Librarian’ made-for-TV movies with Noah Wyle. The TV show and the books mainly focus on his assistants as they find and gather magical and unusual relics to protect them from misuse by unwary or unscrupulous humans. It seems our beloved Mother Goose rhymes are really magic spells. One of her ancestors is using them against other family members to gain control of the title and power and the battle is centered in an old Mother Goose Magic Garden park. Footnote: 1) The description of the abandoned condition of the Magic Garden reminds me of a Fairyland park that I used to go to in Tampa, Florida. It was worn and forgotten and last time there it’d been torn down and partially replaced by an amusement park and modern zoo. Lots of memories from there, but kids today want more excitement. 2) Mr. Wiltshire’s crooked house is probably a take-off of the Winchester Mystery house in San Jose, California. Same situation only that Mrs. Winchester is female. Fave scenes: Cassandra working on the virtual Goose family tree, the goose poop rain, Cassandra solving the Puzzle House and the bulldozer.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    **I won a contest and received a free copy of this book from the publisher which does not affect my review of the book.** The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase by Greg Cox Fans of the TNT television series, The Librarians, are going to love this book. Reading the book is as close as you can get to watching an episode of the television show, without it actually being an episode of the show. All the characters from the televison series are present; Colonel Eve Baird, Cassandra Cillian, Jake Ston **I won a contest and received a free copy of this book from the publisher which does not affect my review of the book.** The Librarians and the Mother Goose Chase by Greg Cox Fans of the TNT television series, The Librarians, are going to love this book. Reading the book is as close as you can get to watching an episode of the television show, without it actually being an episode of the show. All the characters from the televison series are present; Colonel Eve Baird, Cassandra Cillian, Jake Stone, Ezekiel Jones, Jenkins, Flynn and the action is fast-paced from the very beginning. Problems are solved using historical data (with some made up data) and following the geneology of the original Mother Goose to her modern day descendants. I really liked how the author, Greg Cox, did a great job of keeping the characters and the story true to each character and the actions they would choose to make from the television series. I am looking forward to reading more books in this series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    thebookiereviewer

    The librarians are out on a new adventure. The tea mis up looking to protect humanity from a new threat, Mother Goose’s rhymes. Which just happens to be powerful spells that are not to fall on the wrong hands. This is such a fantastic book for anyone who loves Indiana Jones, Night at the museum or The Librarians movies and tv serie alike. This was such an amazing read! it had been so long since I read a book that had me entertained. The charactarization is fantastic. I absolutely enjoyed the sto The librarians are out on a new adventure. The tea mis up looking to protect humanity from a new threat, Mother Goose’s rhymes. Which just happens to be powerful spells that are not to fall on the wrong hands. This is such a fantastic book for anyone who loves Indiana Jones, Night at the museum or The Librarians movies and tv serie alike. This was such an amazing read! it had been so long since I read a book that had me entertained. The charactarization is fantastic. I absolutely enjoyed the story, it was funny, mysterious and the pace the story kept was great. Cox doesn't certainly not disapoint the readers. The different povs are on poing, the characters are great and the library is amazing what is there not to love? 100% recommended Disclaimer: I got a copy from netgalley for my honest review

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joanie

    I thoroughly enjoyed the first book in The Librarians Series by Cox and was just as satisfied with his second outing. He provided an entertaining and fast-moving plot and once again did a magnificent job of staying true to the personalities of the characters in both their mannerisms and speech. On more than one occasion I found myself wishing they would adapt this book for one of the television episodes. My lone negative comment concerns some of the obvious typos and editing errors, including a I thoroughly enjoyed the first book in The Librarians Series by Cox and was just as satisfied with his second outing. He provided an entertaining and fast-moving plot and once again did a magnificent job of staying true to the personalities of the characters in both their mannerisms and speech. On more than one occasion I found myself wishing they would adapt this book for one of the television episodes. My lone negative comment concerns some of the obvious typos and editing errors, including a glaring error on the synopsis that appears on the back cover. All of that said, those errors in no way take away from the story itself, and I believe that while this will be most appreciated by those who are fans of the show, those who simply enjoy a light fantasy/mystery novel are sure to find it equally entertaining.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Annie (Putt)

    As much of a fun ride as this book was, it was very obviously a tie-in to the show. Few people could pick this book up and read it without having watched The Librarians. It was worth a read once, but this would have worked much better as an episode, though I get why they chose other things to focus on. Truthfully, I'm not even sure I would recommend this to Librarians fans as it offered nothing to the main story line. As it was in between seasons/episodes, it was hard to pinpoint exactly when thi As much of a fun ride as this book was, it was very obviously a tie-in to the show. Few people could pick this book up and read it without having watched The Librarians. It was worth a read once, but this would have worked much better as an episode, though I get why they chose other things to focus on. Truthfully, I'm not even sure I would recommend this to Librarians fans as it offered nothing to the main story line. As it was in between seasons/episodes, it was hard to pinpoint exactly when this took place without having rewatched the whole show recently. I'm assuming it took place between season two and three, but I could be wrong, but that's my point: it didn't ad anything to the overarching story of magic being free and the Knights or Morgan le Fey or anything. So, an enjoyable read, but not something I will pick up again.

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