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Betty Zane: By Zane Grey - Illustrated

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books “But what can women do in times of war? They help, they cheer, they inspire, and if their ca How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books “But what can women do in times of war? They help, they cheer, they inspire, and if their cause is lost they must accept death or worse. Few women have the courage for self-destruction. "To the victor belong the spoils," and women have ever been the spoils of war.” ― Zane Grey, Betty Zane Betty Zane was a strong, young frontier woman living in a man's world. In this, Zane Grey's first novel, Betty and her brothers live in Fort Henry, West Virginia and are key figures in one of the last battles of the Revolutionary War.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books “But what can women do in times of war? They help, they cheer, they inspire, and if their ca How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books “But what can women do in times of war? They help, they cheer, they inspire, and if their cause is lost they must accept death or worse. Few women have the courage for self-destruction. "To the victor belong the spoils," and women have ever been the spoils of war.” ― Zane Grey, Betty Zane Betty Zane was a strong, young frontier woman living in a man's world. In this, Zane Grey's first novel, Betty and her brothers live in Fort Henry, West Virginia and are key figures in one of the last battles of the Revolutionary War.

30 review for Betty Zane: By Zane Grey - Illustrated

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Zane Grey has fallen into a certain amount of "disfavor" in recent times as his stories aren't precisely PC. In other words the stories of conflict between the Indians/Native Americans and the settlers are told with sides being represented at times, but with the settlers presented as the good guys. Without the self flagellation over how bad the settling of the "new world" was the books get a thumbs down from some. If we can move beyond that and accept the fact that it happened and that all the se Zane Grey has fallen into a certain amount of "disfavor" in recent times as his stories aren't precisely PC. In other words the stories of conflict between the Indians/Native Americans and the settlers are told with sides being represented at times, but with the settlers presented as the good guys. Without the self flagellation over how bad the settling of the "new world" was the books get a thumbs down from some. If we can move beyond that and accept the fact that it happened and that all the settlers weren't native haters (yes Lew Whetzel was vengful against the native peoples but then his familly was wiped out in an earlier massacre, it at least explains some of the attitude). Zane Grey (a descendant of the real Betty Zane) understood that the wars on the frontier were bloody on both sides with little quarter given or asked on either side. When entire families were wiped out hate took over for those on both sides. The wars spread for many reasons beside the settlers simply being there. The British paid the native peoples for scalps and in the end left them high and dry with the loss of the continent. The blood spilled left wounds, scars, and pain that wouldn't heal. This is a fictionalized story of a real family, a real woman. The only draw back I see to the actual writing, is something that has more to do with the passing of time than anything else and that's Grey's long and somewhat drawn out discriptions. My father once said he could spend three pages describing a tree. It's not quite that bad...but there is a lot of description.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    After reading some science fiction from the 1930s, I was feeling nostalgic about the Zane Grey westerns that I read when I was in junior high and high school. They were part of my mother's collection and when I had finished all of hers, I began searching for more of Grey's novels. They are pretty formulaic. There is always a romance between a feisty, headstrong young woman and a man who doesn't feel worthy of her because he is "just" a cowboy or a frontiersman or whatever. This story is actually After reading some science fiction from the 1930s, I was feeling nostalgic about the Zane Grey westerns that I read when I was in junior high and high school. They were part of my mother's collection and when I had finished all of hers, I began searching for more of Grey's novels. They are pretty formulaic. There is always a romance between a feisty, headstrong young woman and a man who doesn't feel worthy of her because he is "just" a cowboy or a frontiersman or whatever. This story is actually about a historical woman, an ancestress of Grey's. But the details of her private life are unrecorded by history, so he re-wrote her life in his usual pattern. The headstrong gal always needs some convincing and there is always a communication foul-up that must be overcome. True love always wins in the end. Gack. But he does write some beautiful descriptions of the environment his characters live in and its obvious that he loved natural beauty. What horrifies me now, as an adult, is the blatant racism against both blacks and Indians. The last little bit of this book states that Indians will, in time, disappear. If you are of European descent, these are very romantic stories of the settlement of the United States. If you have any Indian heritage, this would be a horrifying example of the treatment of your ancestors. I remember being troubled by these issues even as a teen reader. I still have a soft spot for these novels, despite their drawbacks.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    If you like old west this is the book for you. Betty Zane is a not so well known heroine of the Revolutionary War. I love the story of Betty Zane and so will you. She taught me to not be afraid of death. People may kill your body but they can't kill your soul. It was full of fun, suspense and very clean read. I gotta say I enjoyed it. The Writing was Definantly good. It's not the horribly catchy can't-put-down-for-anything kind of writing, but there were no big noticable flaws. It's well-written If you like old west this is the book for you. Betty Zane is a not so well known heroine of the Revolutionary War. I love the story of Betty Zane and so will you. She taught me to not be afraid of death. People may kill your body but they can't kill your soul. It was full of fun, suspense and very clean read. I gotta say I enjoyed it. The Writing was Definantly good. It's not the horribly catchy can't-put-down-for-anything kind of writing, but there were no big noticable flaws. It's well-written. Overall: Enjoyable. Recommended for 12+

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    The first novel of the prolific writer of (mostly) Westerns is not a Western, per se, but a frontier novel set in the Virginia-Ohio area, a novel based on historical references and family traditions from Grey's own family. It concerns the titular Betty Zane, a real-life antecedent of Grey's, who with her family fought the Indian and British forces trying to wipe out the revolutionary colonists on the then-western edge of American "civilization." The story takes place largely in 1782 and tells re The first novel of the prolific writer of (mostly) Westerns is not a Western, per se, but a frontier novel set in the Virginia-Ohio area, a novel based on historical references and family traditions from Grey's own family. It concerns the titular Betty Zane, a real-life antecedent of Grey's, who with her family fought the Indian and British forces trying to wipe out the revolutionary colonists on the then-western edge of American "civilization." The story takes place largely in 1782 and tells relatively true accounts of the young woman Betty Zane and her heroic effort to save her family from a massive attack. Published in 1903, the book is relatively well-written, with a fairly compelling narrative, but it is also a piece of its time, replete with condescension toward the female characters, dehumanizing terms for the Indian characters, and occasional bouts of flowery romantic language, particularly in the scenes between Betty and the two men who love her. But Grey, even in his first novel, manages to convey some of the grittiness of the frontier, and he brings his great-grand-aunt to comparatively vivid life. Grey wrote over 100 novels, some of them quite a bit more famous than this, his first, and he is renowned as a remarkable story-teller. This isn't a bad start, for him, or for anyone who wants to tackle his massive output.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    One of the best things about being in a book club is that you are forced to read books that you wouldn't normally read. Naturally, this means that sometimes you are pleasantly surprised by a particular selection and sometimes the selection is a total dud that completely validates your reasons for never having wanted to pick it up in the first place. The cover on this edition alone would have been enough reason for me to not pick this book up. I know, I know, "Never judge a book by its cover," bu One of the best things about being in a book club is that you are forced to read books that you wouldn't normally read. Naturally, this means that sometimes you are pleasantly surprised by a particular selection and sometimes the selection is a total dud that completely validates your reasons for never having wanted to pick it up in the first place. The cover on this edition alone would have been enough reason for me to not pick this book up. I know, I know, "Never judge a book by its cover," but seriously, the cover on this book is so off-putting. And, I will say there are some stereotypes throughout Betty Zane, but let's remember that this book was written 110 years ago when people's attitudes and perceptions were different. I was actually impressed that Zane Grey's characterizations weren't more over the top. So, despite the Native American stereotypes and the melodramatic purple prose, I found this book to be extremely charming. I liked the depictions of early pioneer life. I liked the bits of action and warfare as well as the bits of romance. I really liked the setting because it's so close to home for me. It's so strange to think of Ohio and West Virginia as being the frontier, but there was a time when this land was all wilderness. Before reading this book I would never have picked up a Zane Grey book but now I'd consider reading more of them. Thanks, book club!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mustang USMC

    A Make no mistake, this book is a classic. Gray, an artist in every sense strives to tell the story of his ancestors, and he accomplishes this as only Zane Gray can.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elinor

    It's difficult to know how to rate this book, so I chose the middle ground. It is interesting, dramatic, well-written, and as far as I know, based on historical fact. It is also so darned racist that it was often hard to read, as the author continuously refers to the indigenous population as redskins and murdering savages. However, I don't believe in revisionist history, and this is clearly how the early settlers (very early, in this case -- in the 1700s they were still trying to establish a foo It's difficult to know how to rate this book, so I chose the middle ground. It is interesting, dramatic, well-written, and as far as I know, based on historical fact. It is also so darned racist that it was often hard to read, as the author continuously refers to the indigenous population as redskins and murdering savages. However, I don't believe in revisionist history, and this is clearly how the early settlers (very early, in this case -- in the 1700s they were still trying to establish a foothold in what is now Ohio) thought, felt, and spoke about the local population. I remember receiving this book for Christmas when I was about 12 years old, and how much I admired the plucky Betty Zane who ran a gauntlet of gunfire to save the day during a battle between the settlers holed up in the fort, and the natives trying to drive them out. I didn't realize at the time that this was Zane Grey's very first novel, and he chose to tell the story of his own colourful ancestors. It's definitely worth a read if you can stomach the language. It's certainly a reminder of how attitudes have changed since then.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Wood

    The writing seems a little stiff at first but this ultimately figures into the charm of the tale. I really enjoyed these hardy characters and the matter-of-fact way they go about life and death, the very serious and silly ways they battle courtship and love. There is a uniqueness to the frontier tale, something like detachment. The characters can come across as reckless with their own lives, and then a feeling will come forth and you'll be reminded how very human they are. I think it's a nice re The writing seems a little stiff at first but this ultimately figures into the charm of the tale. I really enjoyed these hardy characters and the matter-of-fact way they go about life and death, the very serious and silly ways they battle courtship and love. There is a uniqueness to the frontier tale, something like detachment. The characters can come across as reckless with their own lives, and then a feeling will come forth and you'll be reminded how very human they are. I think it's a nice reminder of how people change and how much they stay they same. Good stuff. I can tell how much he enjoyed writing the story. It sort of comes off the page.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This book was totally different to what I normally read, but despite its slightly different style (the first book by this author and written in 1903) it definitely worked for me and really enjoyed it. It is even more interesting as in this book Betty Zane was one of his antecedents. There are two other books in the Frontier trilogy and have downloaded them from Amazon. All 3 books are free as copyright has expired. If you want something different with a great female lead who was ahead of her tim This book was totally different to what I normally read, but despite its slightly different style (the first book by this author and written in 1903) it definitely worked for me and really enjoyed it. It is even more interesting as in this book Betty Zane was one of his antecedents. There are two other books in the Frontier trilogy and have downloaded them from Amazon. All 3 books are free as copyright has expired. If you want something different with a great female lead who was ahead of her time, read this one! 4.5 Stars

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    No political correctness here. It makes you appreciate how far we have come as a society in respecting and appreciating other races and cultures. The story is interesting, but the style of writing is very dramatic and romantic. Also, the story, at least the love-interest part, is historically inaccurate.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy "the book-bat"

    Interesting look at Ohio and West Virginia history. I think I was particularly interested because I live in the area the book was set in.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hollie D

    Enjoyable historical novel about Fort Henry and the lesser known heroine of the Revolutionary War, Betty Zane. We listened to this and thoroughly enjoyed it. My favorite aspect of this novel is the authentic portrayals of manliness and womanliness. This is my favorite quote from the book: "In the silence which ensued after these words the men looked at each other with slowly whitening faces. There was no need of words. Their eyes told one another what was coming. The fate which had overtaken so Enjoyable historical novel about Fort Henry and the lesser known heroine of the Revolutionary War, Betty Zane. We listened to this and thoroughly enjoyed it. My favorite aspect of this novel is the authentic portrayals of manliness and womanliness. This is my favorite quote from the book: "In the silence which ensued after these words the men looked at each other with slowly whitening faces. There was no need of words. Their eyes told one another what was coming. The fate which had overtaken so many border forts was to be theirs. They were lost! And every man thought not of himself, cared not for himself, but for those innocent children, those brave young girls and heroic women. A man can die. He is glorious when he calmly accepts death; but when he fights like a tiger, when he stands at bay his back to the wall, a broken weapon in his hand, bloody, defiant, game to the end, then he is sublime. Then he wrings respect from the souls of even his bitterest foes. Then he is avenged even in his death. But what can women do in times of war? They help, they cheer, they inspire, and if their cause is lost they must accept death or worse. Few women have the courage for self-destruction. "To the victor belong the spoils," and women have ever been the spoils of war." At times the author does get preachy (when he drones on about how the Indians wouldn't have behaved so brutally if the white men hadn't introduced them to alcohol) but, overall it is an accurate account of pioneer life during the Revolutionary War. Full of love, war, courage, and bravery ... both my husband and I enjoyed it equally.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I thoroughly enjoyed this action packed book about Betty Zane. This is loosely based on actual events, and it is written extremely well, as are all of Zane's books. Each of his books is a learning experience for me. The strong characters inspire me to emulate them in many cases. I thoroughly enjoyed this action packed book about Betty Zane. This is loosely based on actual events, and it is written extremely well, as are all of Zane's books. Each of his books is a learning experience for me. The strong characters inspire me to emulate them in many cases.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bobby

    Regarding what others refer to as supposed "racism" in this 1903 novel, there is none of a malignant sort. A Eurocentric viewpoint was in keeping with the times and is rather benign here. Zane portrays a respectful and wary fascination and fear of the "Other" and of the untamed wilderness itself that the Indians represent. Keep in mind that settlers and natives were often (not always) enemies and were involved in centuries-long struggles in which the natives had the powerful upper hand until the Regarding what others refer to as supposed "racism" in this 1903 novel, there is none of a malignant sort. A Eurocentric viewpoint was in keeping with the times and is rather benign here. Zane portrays a respectful and wary fascination and fear of the "Other" and of the untamed wilderness itself that the Indians represent. Keep in mind that settlers and natives were often (not always) enemies and were involved in centuries-long struggles in which the natives had the powerful upper hand until the later years. It's ridiculous to fault an author and novel of a past time period reflecting the conventions of the time period. Even today racial preference is a part of human nature whether white people are one of the parties or not, and whether overly sensitive modern readers can admit it or not. *****spoilers below***** Inspired by the history of his his great-aunt, I certainly hope the real Betty Zane wasn't as insufferably stuck-up as Zane Grey's title character. I was annoyed by how most of the men in the story made fools of themselves in her beautiful but snooty presence. She does, however, redeem herself by a stark and unsolicited act of bravery. This book takes quite a while to get to the exciting climax of the Indian and British attack on the fort, but it is worth waiting for.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I first read this book as a little girl (from Ohio) :O) - it was one of my mother's books. I loved it so much I read it again, and again. This is the most often re-read book I own. I'm 32 years old and every once in awhile, I'll pull it back out and read it again. A great testement to a great novel to be re-read over and over again - cover to cover - over the years. It has everything, adventure, romance & historical reference. I first read this book as a little girl (from Ohio) :O) - it was one of my mother's books. I loved it so much I read it again, and again. This is the most often re-read book I own. I'm 32 years old and every once in awhile, I'll pull it back out and read it again. A great testement to a great novel to be re-read over and over again - cover to cover - over the years. It has everything, adventure, romance & historical reference.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Danzaiss

    First of a trilogy, followed by Spirit of the Border and The Last Trail. More historical fiction than the typical western expected from the author. Because it was written in 1903, a reader should expect racism aligned with the time. The author took a few liberties with the historical facts. All-in-all, a good read; it'd be 3 1/2 stars if I could give a half. First of a trilogy, followed by Spirit of the Border and The Last Trail. More historical fiction than the typical western expected from the author. Because it was written in 1903, a reader should expect racism aligned with the time. The author took a few liberties with the historical facts. All-in-all, a good read; it'd be 3 1/2 stars if I could give a half.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Fine old west story representing the time the old west was West Virginia. This isn’t a cowboy story, it’s a Revolutionary War patriot story. The background of the book is interesting, in that Betty Zane, a real life hero in one of the last battles in the Revolutionary War is an ancestor of Zane Grey, the author of this book. Grey introduces this background in the beginning of this audiobook. I was also impressed, as I have been in the past, that Grey’s book doesn’t seem to have aged badly. If so Fine old west story representing the time the old west was West Virginia. This isn’t a cowboy story, it’s a Revolutionary War patriot story. The background of the book is interesting, in that Betty Zane, a real life hero in one of the last battles in the Revolutionary War is an ancestor of Zane Grey, the author of this book. Grey introduces this background in the beginning of this audiobook. I was also impressed, as I have been in the past, that Grey’s book doesn’t seem to have aged badly. If someone were to tell me this book was written in the 1950s, I could believe it. It has the feel of many of the Young Adult and mystery books from that era. Grey seems to have written at a level and with a style that seemed more appropriate for later decades. It’s an easy read, and again, I understand the popularity of Westerns likely built on this way of writing. I also liked the story. Grey goes into some detail on the planning of the “heroic action” that Betty Zane accomplishes at the end of the book. There’s some strategy in avoiding being killed by Indians and Red Coats that are besieging you with muskets. Strangely, the strategy is similar to a broken field run in football – you can almost hear a coach in a football movie saying the same thing. It was the little details like this, and the typical rounding out of the characters to include some romance, that made this easy to read and enjoy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

    Betty Zane, a fictionalized narrative of an ancestor who heroically saved Fort Henry in 1782, was one of Zane Grey's first attempts at writing, and, in fact, his first novel. He accomplished this feat using the pattern he studied from Owen Wister's The Virginian. This is the first novel of a historical trilogy that begins with Betty Zane, and continues on with Spirit of the Border, a story of the Indian Fighter, Lewis Wetzel, and concludes in The Last Trail, a narrative of the life of Jonathan Z Betty Zane, a fictionalized narrative of an ancestor who heroically saved Fort Henry in 1782, was one of Zane Grey's first attempts at writing, and, in fact, his first novel. He accomplished this feat using the pattern he studied from Owen Wister's The Virginian. This is the first novel of a historical trilogy that begins with Betty Zane, and continues on with Spirit of the Border, a story of the Indian Fighter, Lewis Wetzel, and concludes in The Last Trail, a narrative of the life of Jonathan Zane. Regardless of the reaction of many critics regarding Mr Grey's first attempt, I found the novel to be engaging, and well written. He told the story in such a way, that the reader is able to identify with the characters, and to become emotionally involved in their trials. Although this may not be my favorite book by this author, I found it to be much more polished than many of the attempts of today's published writers. As always, even in this initial attempt, Grey had the ability to describe certain scenes that become indelible into the mind of any serious reader, particularly as he describes the historical siege of Fort Henry. When Grey first attempted to publish Betty Zane, he was met with rejection which plunged him into despair. However, as his ancestors of old, he refused to resign himself to failure, and, instead, gathered the funds to self-publish this first novel, which spearheaded his career. I am glad that he did.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Coleen

    First off, I really enjoy Zane Grey. The Indians [Native Americans] and the settlers / soldiers / hunters are authentic. What the reader will appreciate is that there were no good or bad settlers, nor were there good or bad Indians -- as a Group. There were repeated attempts on both sides to reach peace agreements and repeated attempts to get along, but history dictates what really happened. As to Betty, Grey describes her as the real deal. A pretty young woman who is attracted by men. And they a First off, I really enjoy Zane Grey. The Indians [Native Americans] and the settlers / soldiers / hunters are authentic. What the reader will appreciate is that there were no good or bad settlers, nor were there good or bad Indians -- as a Group. There were repeated attempts on both sides to reach peace agreements and repeated attempts to get along, but history dictates what really happened. As to Betty, Grey describes her as the real deal. A pretty young woman who is attracted by men. And they are indeed attracted to her. And yet, she can run [and outrun men] and ride horses [and outride men on horses]. She is not afraid of danger and does what needs to be done despite peril to herself. Her one fault perhaps is that she does not see peril on occasion and has to be yanked into safety. This is an OLD book that I have had for many years, dated 1940. As I read it, I recalled that I had read it previously many years ago, but that did not detract from my enjoyment. ANY Zane Grey is a great find and worth reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt Kelland

    I always had a fondness for Zane Grey when I was younger, so I was happy to find this copy of his first novel. It was astonishing to realize that it's actually based on the true story of one of his ancestors. The reality is, it's not very good. It's okay, but it lacks the sweeping power of books like Riders of the Purple Sage. The characters are often irritating in their primness, and it takes forever to get to the main part of the story, the siege where Betty saves the fort. And Grey really str I always had a fondness for Zane Grey when I was younger, so I was happy to find this copy of his first novel. It was astonishing to realize that it's actually based on the true story of one of his ancestors. The reality is, it's not very good. It's okay, but it lacks the sweeping power of books like Riders of the Purple Sage. The characters are often irritating in their primness, and it takes forever to get to the main part of the story, the siege where Betty saves the fort. And Grey really struggles with his depiction of the Native Americans: he is clearly very sympathetic to them and is appalled by their treatment at the hands of the whites, but he still refers to them throughout as "savages" and has high praise for white characters whose main preoccupation and joy is killing them. But it's still worth a read if you want to see how the Western genre evolved from dime novels to literature.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd

    This is a story of pioneer families involved in the first “western expansion” in America. It takes place during the Revolutionary War time period. Pioneers from the east have started a new settlement on the Ohio River in what today is Wheeling, West Virginia. The author traces many of his ancestors to the people at the center of this story. The title character, Betty Zane is at the center of the romantic aspect of this story as well as some heroic action taken during an Indian attack on Fort Hen This is a story of pioneer families involved in the first “western expansion” in America. It takes place during the Revolutionary War time period. Pioneers from the east have started a new settlement on the Ohio River in what today is Wheeling, West Virginia. The author traces many of his ancestors to the people at the center of this story. The title character, Betty Zane is at the center of the romantic aspect of this story as well as some heroic action taken during an Indian attack on Fort Henry. The migration of white people into Indian country created conflicts and tension between the races. Since the Revolutionary War is part of the story, the British become involved as allies of the Indians. The action scenes are well written with vivid, lively descriptions. It is an adventure yarn pass along as family folklore that is put into a fuller context of that time period that brings the challenges of early pioneers and those stories to life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I'm not sure I'd call this a western since it takes place in Ohio, but compared to Virginia, where some of the characters were born, yep, it's a western. Also it was written in 1903. That presents problems as to some of the word choices (the N-word) and situations (with Native Americans). Maybe they were true, but of course, this book is written from the white man-s viewpoint. It is very melodramatic (partially due to the narrator, partially the writing). I was just waiting for fair Betty to be ti I'm not sure I'd call this a western since it takes place in Ohio, but compared to Virginia, where some of the characters were born, yep, it's a western. Also it was written in 1903. That presents problems as to some of the word choices (the N-word) and situations (with Native Americans). Maybe they were true, but of course, this book is written from the white man-s viewpoint. It is very melodramatic (partially due to the narrator, partially the writing). I was just waiting for fair Betty to be tied to the railroad tracks and yell, "Help me! Help me!" Some of the language seemed too formal. At one point someone said something like, "Once we commence to fish..." Commence to fish??? This is my first Zane Grey. I read it for my library's book discussion. I guess it's an insight into the beginnings of my home state.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I finished this book mostly out of curiosity and to give me something to gauge future Zane Grey books I read against. The story and writing was probably very true to its time, but there is quite a bit of racist and sexist language in this. Betty is the herione of the book, but she is made to be overly emotional and unable to think clearly when handsome men are around. In addition, I listened to this through our libraries OverDrive system, and I was really disappointed that the male reader couldn I finished this book mostly out of curiosity and to give me something to gauge future Zane Grey books I read against. The story and writing was probably very true to its time, but there is quite a bit of racist and sexist language in this. Betty is the herione of the book, but she is made to be overly emotional and unable to think clearly when handsome men are around. In addition, I listened to this through our libraries OverDrive system, and I was really disappointed that the male reader couldn't do a decent voice for Betty - the title character. I mean, come on, that should be the biggest requirement in casting a reader!! Parents: The N word is used several times, other racist slang is used, there are a couple of mentions of people longing to get home to their plantations with slaves, and women are definitely for show and to support their men.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jim Fulner

    I also didn't like this audio book. Granted it did what I needed it to do, provide as a relief during my endless audio books on how to get more money, but that's all it did good. returnreturnIt sounded great, like an old western but telled from the girls perspective. Well Apparently that means following around some lady who wants every man to want to marry her, but if they try to, she acts like she's returnoffended.returnreturnIT did start out interesting with perspectives on the Indians that di I also didn't like this audio book. Granted it did what I needed it to do, provide as a relief during my endless audio books on how to get more money, but that's all it did good. returnreturnIt sounded great, like an old western but telled from the girls perspective. Well Apparently that means following around some lady who wants every man to want to marry her, but if they try to, she acts like she's returnoffended.returnreturnIT did start out interesting with perspectives on the Indians that didn't sound like the were written in the 19th century, but hey by the end they came to prove that treating Indians like people was foolish nonsense of liberal women, not the truth. returnreturnCertainly won't be reading the rest of this

  25. 5 out of 5

    Richard Koerner

    A thoroughly enjoyable read, particularly so since I am originally from Ohio and went to school in the southeastern portion. The Ohio River and Wheeling are well known to me. I enjoyed the fact that this book was based on the family of Zane Grey. I was not expecting to enjoy this first book of the e-book collection I bought, but it was a nice, easy read. I find the life depicted on the frontier and the views of the British, the native Americans, and the settlers fascinating as well as the intera A thoroughly enjoyable read, particularly so since I am originally from Ohio and went to school in the southeastern portion. The Ohio River and Wheeling are well known to me. I enjoyed the fact that this book was based on the family of Zane Grey. I was not expecting to enjoy this first book of the e-book collection I bought, but it was a nice, easy read. I find the life depicted on the frontier and the views of the British, the native Americans, and the settlers fascinating as well as the interactions between them. It is also nice that despite the place women had in society, to see women in roles of importance to society and to the survival of the frontier life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Randy Tramp

    Set in the Ohio Valley in the early 19th century, tells the story of the early American settlers of the area as they struggle to settle the land and of their clashes with the Indians. Betty Zane, a fictionalized narrative of an ancestor who heroically saved Fort Henry in 1782, was Zane Grey's first novel. He accomplished this feat using the pattern he studied from Owen Wister's The Virginian. Descriptions put me into the story. I could feel the cold rain. The warm fireplace. A fast-running creek. Set in the Ohio Valley in the early 19th century, tells the story of the early American settlers of the area as they struggle to settle the land and of their clashes with the Indians. Betty Zane, a fictionalized narrative of an ancestor who heroically saved Fort Henry in 1782, was Zane Grey's first novel. He accomplished this feat using the pattern he studied from Owen Wister's The Virginian. Descriptions put me into the story. I could feel the cold rain. The warm fireplace. A fast-running creek. Inside an Indian camp, then an escape from the camp. I grew to know the characters. Betty is stubborn, feisty, and determined. The author put me in the wild west.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Violet

    I have read a lot of Zane Grey as well as other western writers, and he is still my favorite of those. He always has just a bit of romance in an otherwise rough life of the west. This story is about the Zane family, notably Isaac Zane and his Indian wife as well as Johnathon Zane and Lew Wetzel, but the book was probably named after Betty who made a brave foot run to get gun powder during their siege. A great read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shary

    I was expecting a historical novel about Betty Zane, but instead got a romance novel. The language is very flowery and love is always in the air. One of the reasons I like historical novels is that it is a memorable way to learn, but if Wikipedia is to be believed, very few of the details of the novel are based on facts. I look forward to our book club discussion, to be held at the local historical society.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Peg Lotvin

    Zane Grey's first novel. Situated on the Ohio River in what became Wheeling, West Virginia is a little enclave of pioneers scratching out a living while nervously holding off the Indians of the region. Betty Zane is the only sister among several brothers, but she is as brave and as spirited as any of the men. Of course she finds true love among the handsome men at the fort but the descriptions of life and the natural world around them is the best part of the story. Zane Grey's first novel. Situated on the Ohio River in what became Wheeling, West Virginia is a little enclave of pioneers scratching out a living while nervously holding off the Indians of the region. Betty Zane is the only sister among several brothers, but she is as brave and as spirited as any of the men. Of course she finds true love among the handsome men at the fort but the descriptions of life and the natural world around them is the best part of the story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    I really liked this book. It had romance, adventure, and interesting characters. Loosely based on a true story of the author’s ancestors during the pre-revolutionary and revolutionary war time, I found the author’s style and descriptions enjoyable to read. Published in 1903, there is no political correctness. I believe the writing was probably very true to its time. There is quite a bit of racist and sexist language throughout. It makes me happy to see how far we have come since then.

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