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Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History

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In this picture book biography, the late New York Times bestselling author Walter Dean Myers and acclaimed artist Floyd Cooper take readers on an inspiring journey through the life of Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass was a self-educated slave in the South who grew up to become an icon. He was a leader of the abolitionist movement, a celebrated writer, an esteemed spea In this picture book biography, the late New York Times bestselling author Walter Dean Myers and acclaimed artist Floyd Cooper take readers on an inspiring journey through the life of Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass was a self-educated slave in the South who grew up to become an icon. He was a leader of the abolitionist movement, a celebrated writer, an esteemed speaker, and a social reformer, proving that, as he said, “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” The story of one of America’s most revered figures is brought to life by the text of award-winning author Walter Dean Myers and the sweeping, lush illustrations of artist Floyd Cooper.


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In this picture book biography, the late New York Times bestselling author Walter Dean Myers and acclaimed artist Floyd Cooper take readers on an inspiring journey through the life of Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass was a self-educated slave in the South who grew up to become an icon. He was a leader of the abolitionist movement, a celebrated writer, an esteemed spea In this picture book biography, the late New York Times bestselling author Walter Dean Myers and acclaimed artist Floyd Cooper take readers on an inspiring journey through the life of Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass was a self-educated slave in the South who grew up to become an icon. He was a leader of the abolitionist movement, a celebrated writer, an esteemed speaker, and a social reformer, proving that, as he said, “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” The story of one of America’s most revered figures is brought to life by the text of award-winning author Walter Dean Myers and the sweeping, lush illustrations of artist Floyd Cooper.

30 review for Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    BLACK LIVES MATTER Audible (https://stories.audible.com) have made available a selection of free audiobooks categorised as "Hear My Story". Some are own voices stories while some, like Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History, are non-fiction. They are aimed at kids but anyone should listen to them to get better educated about race issues. No one is born racist but we can also learn to be anti-racist by picking up books like this. This audiobook has such a powerful message: "reading could ma BLACK LIVES MATTER Audible (https://stories.audible.com) have made available a selection of free audiobooks categorised as "Hear My Story". Some are own voices stories while some, like Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History, are non-fiction. They are aimed at kids but anyone should listen to them to get better educated about race issues. No one is born racist but we can also learn to be anti-racist by picking up books like this. This audiobook has such a powerful message: "reading could make a difference in how a person lived." It is only 18 minutes long but very insightful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Outstanding biography of Frederick Douglass by the late Walter Dean Myers. Powerful illustrations by Floyd Cooper.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    In this moving picture-book biography of an American icon, two-time Newbery Honor winning author Walter Dean Myers spins an engrossing and ultimately uplifting tale of a courageous and thoughtful man whose personal actions greatly affected the course of history. Born a slave in 1818, Frederick Douglass, or Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, as he was known as a young person, grew to maturity in Maryland, where he slowly became aware of the importance of reading, as a means of liberating himse In this moving picture-book biography of an American icon, two-time Newbery Honor winning author Walter Dean Myers spins an engrossing and ultimately uplifting tale of a courageous and thoughtful man whose personal actions greatly affected the course of history. Born a slave in 1818, Frederick Douglass, or Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, as he was known as a young person, grew to maturity in Maryland, where he slowly became aware of the importance of reading, as a means of liberating himself. Teaching himself to read in secret, because learning was forbidden to slaves, he eventually escaped to the North in 1838. Once there, he settled in New Bedford, Massachusetts, and became involved in the Abolitionist Movement. Speaking publicly, publishing his memoir, involving himself in political debate, Douglass used words to help write the history of his country, and of the world... Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is an engaging, educational, and deeply engrossing new examination of a famous figure from American and world history, one which explores its subject, appropriately enough, through the lens of reading, writing and the use of words in general. The narrative is structured in such a way that the reader comes away with both an appreciation for the course of Douglass' life, and a sense of how he fits into the larger course of American history. The artwork by Floyd Cooper, who has won a Coretta Scott King Award for his illustrations, is gorgeous, capturing in sepia-toned oil paintings the various important scenes from Douglass' life. The afterword includes a timeline of Douglass' life, a bibliography, and the text of the manumission letter that set him free. Recommended to anyone looking for new picture-book biographies, or books about Frederick Douglass, slavery, and/or Abolitionists.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Copy provided by Young Adult Books Central The first sentence of this book sets the stage for Douglass' impact on history: "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America." This is a great lesson for children of all ages to learn, especially since Douglass was such a great example of a man taking charge of his own destiny. Douglass was a bright child, and learned to read after the wife Copy provided by Young Adult Books Central The first sentence of this book sets the stage for Douglass' impact on history: "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America." This is a great lesson for children of all ages to learn, especially since Douglass was such a great example of a man taking charge of his own destiny. Douglass was a bright child, and learned to read after the wife of his owner saw him paying close attention to the lessons she was teaching her own children.These lessons came to a halt quickly after they were discovered, but Douglass was smart enough to know that if reading made him unfit to be a slave, then the best thing he could do was to learn to read! Douglass also stood up to another owner and was sent to do back breaking work at a shipyard, but used his wiles to work his way to the north and to freedom. There, he educated himself and made alliances with people who could help him improve his own situation as well as the situation of African Americans. This picture book tells Douglass' story succinctly but completely, and Cooper's illustrations are reason enough for the larger format of this book. The text is sophisticated enough for middle grade readers, but short and simple enough that this could be read aloud even to younger children. Myers' years of writing experience show clearly in his beautiful and motivational depiction of this influential leader. Cooper has illustrated such an impressive range of biographies, from Satchmo to Langston Hughes to Michael Jordan, that there should be some sort of curated collection of his work. He has done other picture books, on a wide variety of topics relating to Civil Rights and African American history. His pictures are always warm and evocative, adding new layers to whatever text they accompany. Myers must have left a significant number of works unfinished at his death, and it is a gift to see a new title from him. Readers who enjoy picture book biographies or who are looking to gather information on the early civil rights activities will enjoy and learn a lot from The Lion Who Wrote History.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    The late Walter Dean Myers shows readers the upbringing of American hero, Frederick Douglass. Douglass was born a slave in Maryland. He was first taught about reading by the mistress of the house, but she soon stopped teaching him. Frederick grew up helping to care for the family who owned him and learned from the children of the family how to speak clearly. He also learned the differences between his life as a slave and their plans for happy futures. So Douglass taught himself to read. He was h The late Walter Dean Myers shows readers the upbringing of American hero, Frederick Douglass. Douglass was born a slave in Maryland. He was first taught about reading by the mistress of the house, but she soon stopped teaching him. Frederick grew up helping to care for the family who owned him and learned from the children of the family how to speak clearly. He also learned the differences between his life as a slave and their plans for happy futures. So Douglass taught himself to read. He was hired out to work in the shipyards where he met sailors who were free black men. He fell in love with a free woman and made his way North to freedom, posing as a sailor. Once free in the North, he started to speak out against slavery, becoming the legendary orator he is famous for being. Myers draws a complete picture of Douglass here. He shows readers the differences between slavery and freedom with a clarity that is vastly helpful. He doesn’t linger on the violence of slavery but it is also not lessened or ignored. He strikes just the right balance for a young audience. As the book continues, one sees Douglass grow up, learn many things and then not only head to freedom himself but argue that slavery should be abolished. There is real courage on these pages, risks taken for a real life, and an understanding that Douglass himself was an incredible individual. The illustrations by award-willing Cooper are exceptional. Done with erasers and oils on board, they have a beautiful texture to them, almost hazy with the historical significance of what they are depicting. There are images of love, others of violence, others of freedom newly found. As Douglass grows up on the pages he becomes more and more the icon visually as well. Strong and important, this picture book biography is inspiring. Appropriate for ages 7-9.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    Wow! Great illustrations and fabulous text to introduce young people to this great man and all of the choices he made in order to create a life for himself and to open doors for others. I cannot recommend this one highly enough.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Great book, but NO MENTION THAT HE LIVED AND IS BURIED IN ROCHESTER. As a fellow Rochesterian, I take great offense at this. Not really. This book is solid all around. Well done.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Someone should send a copy of this to the current White House staff. Just so, you know, they have some specifics on the good work that Douglass is doing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    The late author, a five-time Coretta Scott King Award winner, begins this book by explaining: “This is the story of how one man’s careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America.” Douglass was born into slavery in 1818. He watched how the white children lived where he was a slave, and he wanted to have the same opportunities they did to build a good life for himself. His owner would not let his wife teach Frederick to rea The late author, a five-time Coretta Scott King Award winner, begins this book by explaining: “This is the story of how one man’s careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America.” Douglass was born into slavery in 1818. He watched how the white children lived where he was a slave, and he wanted to have the same opportunities they did to build a good life for himself. His owner would not let his wife teach Frederick to read along with the other children because “[t]eaching a slave to read will make him unfit to be a slave.” So Frederick reasoned that learning to read is what he must do to change his life. And he set out to do so however and whenever he could. The book outlines his eventual escape from slavery at age 20, his work for both abolition of slavery and for women’s rights, the writing of his autobiography in 1845, and his decision not to join John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry. The actions he took both during and after the Civil War are also briefly covered. At the end of the book, there is a timeline and small bibliography. Illustrator Floyd Cooper has won multiple awards for his artwork. He uses a technique he calls “a subtractive process” by painting an illustration board with oil paint, and then applying an eraser to the paintings. The result lends warmth and texture to his pictures. Evaluation: Myers chose an unusual selection of facts to highlight about Douglass’s life. I have to admit I prefer the children’s book on Douglass by Doreen Rappaport (my review is here). But the two books don’t overlap that much, and so could definitely be used not only to complement one another, but more importantly to demonstrate how histories by different authors paint different pictures of their subjects.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shaye Miller

    I missed this picture book biography by Walter Dean Myers back when it was published, so I was thrilled when one of our tri-college libraries ordered a copy. The artwork is detailed and inviting, following Douglass from his birth as a slave until he served the United States government in Washington and as consul-general in Haiti. Children and adults will appreciate the storyline and the beauty of the illustrations. “Frederick listened carefully to the Auld children. They spoke clearly and directl I missed this picture book biography by Walter Dean Myers back when it was published, so I was thrilled when one of our tri-college libraries ordered a copy. The artwork is detailed and inviting, following Douglass from his birth as a slave until he served the United States government in Washington and as consul-general in Haiti. Children and adults will appreciate the storyline and the beauty of the illustrations. “Frederick listened carefully to the Auld children. They spoke clearly and directly, and he knew that it was because they had also read the words they used. He felt that reading could make a difference in how a person lived.” The back matter includes a timeline of Frederick Douglass’s Life, a Bibliography, and a copy of the document signed by Auld officially freeing Frederick Douglass. The artist used erasers & oils on board to create the illustrations for this book. For more children's literature, middle grade literature, and YA literature reviews, feel free to visit my personal blog at The Miller Memo!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cara Byrne

    "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America." Myers' tells the story of Douglass' life with vivid storytelling, and Cooper provides wonderful illustrations. A great picture book biography of Douglass. "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America." Myers' tells the story of Douglass' life with vivid storytelling, and Cooper provides wonderful illustrations. A great picture book biography of Douglass.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This is a really nice introduction to Frederick Douglass. I would have appreciated a few more notes in the back, but the inclusion of his master's letter setting him free was really interesting. I'd never seen anything like that before. This is a really nice introduction to Frederick Douglass. I would have appreciated a few more notes in the back, but the inclusion of his master's letter setting him free was really interesting. I'd never seen anything like that before.

  13. 5 out of 5

    June

    Simple introduction to Frederick Douglass, covers importance of reading, escape, support of women's rights, meeting with John Brown... Simple introduction to Frederick Douglass, covers importance of reading, escape, support of women's rights, meeting with John Brown...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America. Premise/plot: This is a picture book biography of Frederick Douglass by Walter Dean Myers. My thoughts: I enjoyed the narrative very much. Douglass' story is compelling, and, I believe Myers was able to do it justice. Frederick watched as the Auld children received an education. He listened as they excitedly shared their First sentence: This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America. Premise/plot: This is a picture book biography of Frederick Douglass by Walter Dean Myers. My thoughts: I enjoyed the narrative very much. Douglass' story is compelling, and, I believe Myers was able to do it justice. Frederick watched as the Auld children received an education. He listened as they excitedly shared their ideas and dreams with friends. Theirs sounded like a good life, and he wanted the same chance to build a good life for himself. If learning to read would make him unfit to be a slave, then that's what Frederick would do: He made the courageous decision to learn to read. It would be very difficult, because slaves were not allowed to go to school or have books to practice reading. When he could, he borrowed books from the young white friends he sometimes played with. He picked up old newspapers and flyers he found in the street. Anything that contained precious words was important to Frederick. Not only could he tell of his experiences, but he could speak with an eloquence that stirred the souls of his audience. Douglass was often asked by the abolitionist society to speak at their meetings. Some people who heard him could hardly believe that he had ever been a slave. They wondered if all the black people working in the fields or on Southern plantations had the potential of this tall and handsome young man. The careful and wise decisions made by Frederick Douglass--to learn to read, to escape from slavery, to speak out for justice for all Americans, and to aid the Union Army--had helped to write American history. In telling Douglass' story, much of American history is touched upon. These are complex not simple subjects, yet, they're clearly and concisely presented to young readers. I also really LOVED the illustrations.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Douglass is an important figure in American History. This book shows all he did, not just for blacks and slaves. There was a missed opportunity for an extended metaphor--the only reference to the subtitle comes at the very end of the book. I would have liked it to have been woven throughout the story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Earl

    This doesn’t come out until 2017 but I feel like this will one of those talked-about books next year. With text by the late Walter Dean Myers about the remarkable life of Frederick Douglas and to pair it with Floyd Cooper’s beautiful illustrations, how can it not be?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christy Dang

    Though there are plenty of picture books about slavery with the majority that carries a hopeful message about freedom and determination, Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History still manages to captivate a reader's attention. The story follows Douglass' life and details major moments in his life from his escape to his rise to fame. Right from the first page, the first line immediately pulls the reader in with its poignant message: "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and Though there are plenty of picture books about slavery with the majority that carries a hopeful message about freedom and determination, Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History still manages to captivate a reader's attention. The story follows Douglass' life and details major moments in his life from his escape to his rise to fame. Right from the first page, the first line immediately pulls the reader in with its poignant message: "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America." With this particular slave narrative, it focuses on how despite being enslaved, Douglass DID have power over his life; this power was in the form of making certain choices which lead him to freedom. Many would find this line to be empowering and inspirational especially since Douglass also improved others' lives along with his. Certainly some readers can negatively interpret this line to say that all slaves could have easily freed themselves with the right amount of hard work. However this line does present a thought-provoking discussion about this line's meaning in relation to how much autonomy slaves had. As the story continues, it details Douglass' early life as a slave and how he made the choice to learn how to read despite its risks. Myers brilliantly yet succinctly explain why Douglass makes the choice to read because "the ability to read would expose slaves to ideas and information that would make them unhappy being 'owned' by someone else. If learning to read would make him unfit to be a slave then that's what Frederick would do." Douglass' decision to read would later contribute to his freedom and success. After this, though Meyers does not graphically describe the abuse towards slaves, he again succinctly yet effectively describes what Douglass struggled through. After his escape, his rise to fame as an eloquent speaker gains the attention of abolitionist societies; he is then invited to speak at the seminal Seneca Falls Women's Rights Convention. Next the story describes his interaction with radical abolitionist John Brown which I felt was a bit unnecessary because it did not seem to relate to the rest of the story. After Douglass meets with President Lincoln during the Civil War to urge him to enlist black soldiers and the story fastforwards to the end where later served in the US government and in Haiti as a consul-general. The story ends with a line that echoes the first line: "The careful and wise decisions made by Frederick Douglass -to learn to read, to escape from slavery, to speak out for justice for all Americans, and to aid the Union Army -had helped to write American history." I would recommend this book for upper elementary students because there is a good amount of text, but not too difficult for them to read through. Meyers' prose is simple, but written with so much weight and meaning that is able to concisely convey what he wants to get across. By doing this, he is able to easily explain more difficult concepts like slavery and its effects to his young audience. He is also able to tie the inspirational message he states from the beginning throughout the entire story. The illustrations are also beautifully drawn and reflects a similar style to Meyers' writing style: simple, but impactful. My only complaint is sometimes there is a bit too much text on one page which could make the children a bit bored or intimidate them and John Brown's role in Douglass' life was not very fleshed out as to why this was important. But other than, this picture book is excellent!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is a children's picture book written by Walter Dean Myers and illustrated by Floyd Cooper. It is a cursory biography about the life of Frederick Douglass and his life and times. February, at least in my part of the world is Black History Month, which I plan to read one children's book that pertains to the subject everyday this month. Therefore, I thought that this book would be apropos for today. Frederick Douglass was an American social reformer, abo Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is a children's picture book written by Walter Dean Myers and illustrated by Floyd Cooper. It is a cursory biography about the life of Frederick Douglass and his life and times. February, at least in my part of the world is Black History Month, which I plan to read one children's book that pertains to the subject everyday this month. Therefore, I thought that this book would be apropos for today. Frederick Douglass was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery writings. In his time, abolitionists described him as a living counter-example to slaveholders' arguments that slaves lacked the intellectual capacity to function as independent American citizens. Northerners at the time found it hard to believe that such a great orator had once been a slave. Myers' text is rather simplistic, straightforward, and informative. The biography was written well and told the inspirational history of a slave boy, who taught himself how to read and write as a slave to become one of the most influential icons for abolitionists. Cooper's illustrations are wonderfully drawn and depicted the narrative extremely well. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. It chronicles the life of Frederick Douglass from his humble begins as a slave to the icon he had become when he escaped from slavery. Frederick Douglass serves as an inspiration for doing anything and everything in his power to make his dreams come true – even if it seemed impossible at the time. All in all, Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is a wonderful brief biography about an amazing icon in Frederick Douglass.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    “This is the story of how one man’s careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America.” Frederick understood at an early age that knowledge and the ability to read was the key to becoming a free man. He was determined to teach himself to read. He was inspired by the free black men he met when he was working in the shipyards. In order to get to freedom, Frederick posed as a free black sailor and his well-spoken responses to “This is the story of how one man’s careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America.” Frederick understood at an early age that knowledge and the ability to read was the key to becoming a free man. He was determined to teach himself to read. He was inspired by the free black men he met when he was working in the shipyards. In order to get to freedom, Frederick posed as a free black sailor and his well-spoken responses to the conductor (and seaman’s papers) persuaded the man to let him on the train. Once free, Frederick spoke against slavery and in favor of women’s rights. His words had a powerful affect on those who heard them. A solid, narrative biography that includes a timeline and a small bibliography for further reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Edie

    What a gift to have another book by this thoughtful and powerful writer, so aptly paired with the illustrations by Floyd Cooper who has chosen a soft, almost washed background dominated on my pages by the presence of Douglass. Myers traces his life from it's early days, points out his understanding of the importance of reading and ability to talk like an educated person (using that skill to aid in his escape) and the experiences that informed his later life. We know he is strong of mind and body What a gift to have another book by this thoughtful and powerful writer, so aptly paired with the illustrations by Floyd Cooper who has chosen a soft, almost washed background dominated on my pages by the presence of Douglass. Myers traces his life from it's early days, points out his understanding of the importance of reading and ability to talk like an educated person (using that skill to aid in his escape) and the experiences that informed his later life. We know he is strong of mind and body (besting his owner in a would be beating) and also open to thinking of the cause of others, notably women's rights. A biography with broad appeal making a heroic figure very human and illustrated in a way that suggests the legendary nature of the man.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ricki

    We bought this book in 2017 when it first came out, and we read it again and again and again. My kids love to listen and learn about one of the most brilliant people to have ever lived. His story is incredibly inspiring. Even as a young boy, Douglass defied the world and never took no as an answer. The details of his story within this book show children (and adults) that they must push for what is right and commit to changing the world for the better. This book belongs in every classroom (and no We bought this book in 2017 when it first came out, and we read it again and again and again. My kids love to listen and learn about one of the most brilliant people to have ever lived. His story is incredibly inspiring. Even as a young boy, Douglass defied the world and never took no as an answer. The details of his story within this book show children (and adults) that they must push for what is right and commit to changing the world for the better. This book belongs in every classroom (and not just relegated to the classroom library). It should be shared collectively and purposefully with kids. Full review with teaching tools: http://www.unleashingreaders.com/?p=2... (available after July 7, 2020)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul Stone

    Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is a nonfiction picture book about a famous speaker Frederick Douglass. In this book it talks about the trials he was faced with growing up a African American. This book also teaches the importance of reading and writing. I like this book because of the message of once you're a reader you can never have that taken away from you. One of the key points he has is once you learn to read, you will forever be free. Reading is very important. I would use thi Frederick Douglass: The Lion Who Wrote History is a nonfiction picture book about a famous speaker Frederick Douglass. In this book it talks about the trials he was faced with growing up a African American. This book also teaches the importance of reading and writing. I like this book because of the message of once you're a reader you can never have that taken away from you. One of the key points he has is once you learn to read, you will forever be free. Reading is very important. I would use this book in my classroom because of what I said earlier about the message. It's important to show kids how important reading really is. I think this book does a great job of showing how life changing it can really be.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Kotkin

    Text: 5 stars Illustrations: 5 stars Worthy picture book biography of Frederick Douglass. Both text and illustrations do justice to this important and inspirational historical figure. I expect this book will be lauded come award time, which is especially fitting given that it is the last manuscript of the late Walter Dean Myers. Teaming him up with Floyd Cooper was a smart decision. A bit wordy by today's picture book standards, but the text flows well and sustains interest. Page layouts are super Text: 5 stars Illustrations: 5 stars Worthy picture book biography of Frederick Douglass. Both text and illustrations do justice to this important and inspirational historical figure. I expect this book will be lauded come award time, which is especially fitting given that it is the last manuscript of the late Walter Dean Myers. Teaming him up with Floyd Cooper was a smart decision. A bit wordy by today's picture book standards, but the text flows well and sustains interest. Page layouts are superb and accommodate all that text with prowess. Includes a timeline, bibliography, and a copy of Douglass's "free papers."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    This an exceptionally well-paced, informative biography for young readers. The early pages have little text, and by the time there is more for a parent to read, young readers are happy to sit while you keep telling Frederick Douglass' story. The author presents his ideas in a way that children can understand, but without talking "down" to them. Highly recommended for anyone looking for an inspirational biography. This an exceptionally well-paced, informative biography for young readers. The early pages have little text, and by the time there is more for a parent to read, young readers are happy to sit while you keep telling Frederick Douglass' story. The author presents his ideas in a way that children can understand, but without talking "down" to them. Highly recommended for anyone looking for an inspirational biography.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Monique

    Frederick Douglass has always been one of my heroes. He knew that reading was his way out of slavery. He realized that as he made his way out of bondage, he had to do something to assist others. Douglass spoke against “the man and the system” to unveil the wrongs that he saw first hand. While the story carefully sheds light on the life of Fredrick Douglass, the illustrations are even more powerful. This is a book for 3-5 graders that all should read. Absolutely awe-inspiring.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Tully

    "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America." With this opening line, Walter Dean Myers tells the inspiring story of Frederick Douglass, succinctly but still including many defining moments. Douglass's story is beautifully illustrated, as well as well told. "This is the story of how one man's careful decisions and many accomplishments not only made his own life better but in many ways changed the history of America." With this opening line, Walter Dean Myers tells the inspiring story of Frederick Douglass, succinctly but still including many defining moments. Douglass's story is beautifully illustrated, as well as well told.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    Reviewing for Mock Caldecott Awards. The illustrations are very muted but certainly lovely. This was an interesting biography of Frederick Douglass' life. The most interesting fact, to me, was that he changed his last name from Bailey in order to keep the slave catchers from finding him. Reviewing for Mock Caldecott Awards. The illustrations are very muted but certainly lovely. This was an interesting biography of Frederick Douglass' life. The most interesting fact, to me, was that he changed his last name from Bailey in order to keep the slave catchers from finding him.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Serenity

    An excellently written picture book biography of Frederick Douglass. More appropriate for intermediate grades than primary, it would be a very good readaloud for Black History Month, or as part of a Civil War unit.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Holland

    Wonderful biography of Frederick Douglass, his search for an education, and ultimate search for freedom. Written by Walter Dean Myers, an amazing black author, this book emphasizes the important accomplishments of Frederick Douglass, and his impact on the history of the United States.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gps

    Well done illustrated history of the list of this American hero, Frederick Douglass. a little bit too wordy for an illustrated book, but illustrations are beautifully executed, and text is quite informative.

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