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Music was one of the first casualties of the Iranian Revolution. It was banned in 1979, but it quickly crept back into Iranian culture and politics. The state made use of music for its propaganda during the Iran-Iraq war. Over time music provided an important political space where artists and audiences could engage in social and political debate. Now, more than thirty-five Music was one of the first casualties of the Iranian Revolution. It was banned in 1979, but it quickly crept back into Iranian culture and politics. The state made use of music for its propaganda during the Iran-Iraq war. Over time music provided an important political space where artists and audiences could engage in social and political debate. Now, more than thirty-five years on, both the children of the revolution and their music have come of age. Soundtrack of the Revolution offers a striking account of Iranian culture, politics, and social change to provide an alternative history of the Islamic Republic. Drawing on over five years of research in Iran, including during the 2009 protests, Nahid Siamdoust introduces a full cast of characters, from musicians and audience members to state officials, and takes readers into concert halls and underground performances, as well as the state licensing and censorship offices. She closely follows the work of four musicians--a giant of Persian classical music, a government-supported pop star, a rebel rock-and-roller, and an underground rapper--each with markedly different political views and relations with the Iranian government. Taken together, these examinations of musicians and their music shed light on issues at the heart of debates in Iran--about its future and identity, changing notions of religious belief, and the quest for political freedom. Siamdoust shows that even as state authorities resolve, for now, to allow greater freedoms to Iran's majority young population, they retain control and can punish those who stray too far. But music will continue to offer an opening for debate and defiance. As the 2009 Green Uprising and the 1979 Revolution before it have proven, the invocation of a potent melody or musical verse can unite strangers into a powerful public.


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Music was one of the first casualties of the Iranian Revolution. It was banned in 1979, but it quickly crept back into Iranian culture and politics. The state made use of music for its propaganda during the Iran-Iraq war. Over time music provided an important political space where artists and audiences could engage in social and political debate. Now, more than thirty-five Music was one of the first casualties of the Iranian Revolution. It was banned in 1979, but it quickly crept back into Iranian culture and politics. The state made use of music for its propaganda during the Iran-Iraq war. Over time music provided an important political space where artists and audiences could engage in social and political debate. Now, more than thirty-five years on, both the children of the revolution and their music have come of age. Soundtrack of the Revolution offers a striking account of Iranian culture, politics, and social change to provide an alternative history of the Islamic Republic. Drawing on over five years of research in Iran, including during the 2009 protests, Nahid Siamdoust introduces a full cast of characters, from musicians and audience members to state officials, and takes readers into concert halls and underground performances, as well as the state licensing and censorship offices. She closely follows the work of four musicians--a giant of Persian classical music, a government-supported pop star, a rebel rock-and-roller, and an underground rapper--each with markedly different political views and relations with the Iranian government. Taken together, these examinations of musicians and their music shed light on issues at the heart of debates in Iran--about its future and identity, changing notions of religious belief, and the quest for political freedom. Siamdoust shows that even as state authorities resolve, for now, to allow greater freedoms to Iran's majority young population, they retain control and can punish those who stray too far. But music will continue to offer an opening for debate and defiance. As the 2009 Green Uprising and the 1979 Revolution before it have proven, the invocation of a potent melody or musical verse can unite strangers into a powerful public.

50 review for Soundtrack of the Revolution: The Politics of Music in Iran

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amin

    Best piece of writing ever on this topic

  2. 5 out of 5

    D

    This book was tougher to get through than I had hoped. The history and facts can be quite heavy and tedious at points, but the second half of the book picked up a bit -- hearing from diverse artists and their experience playing music in Iran was the personal connection I was looking for. I was so fascinated by the topic and I'm glad that this book exists! I would love to read more about this topic. This book was tougher to get through than I had hoped. The history and facts can be quite heavy and tedious at points, but the second half of the book picked up a bit -- hearing from diverse artists and their experience playing music in Iran was the personal connection I was looking for. I was so fascinated by the topic and I'm glad that this book exists! I would love to read more about this topic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    Siamdoust presents both political and musical developments in post-revolutionary Iran and shows how and why the two are connected. I particularly appreciated her insights into the censorship process. She is not a musicologist, so it’s unfair of me to wish for musical analysis, but it would have made the book even richer.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Madelyn Husted

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lexi Reese

  6. 4 out of 5

    Morad

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    Jovany Agathe

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    780.955 S519 2017

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    Mersedeh Mehrtash

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    Drew Pinkley

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