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The gospel of Jesus Christ is always situated within a particular cultural context. But how should Christians approach the complex relationship between our faith and our surrounding culture? Should we simply retreat from culture? Should we embrace our cultural practices and mindset? How important is it for us to be engaged in our culture? And how might we do that with disc The gospel of Jesus Christ is always situated within a particular cultural context. But how should Christians approach the complex relationship between our faith and our surrounding culture? Should we simply retreat from culture? Should we embrace our cultural practices and mindset? How important is it for us to be engaged in our culture? And how might we do that with discernment and faithfulness? William Edgar offers a rich biblical theology in light of our contemporary culture that contends that Christians should indeed, must be engaged in the surrounding culture. By exploring what Scripture has to say about the role of culture and by gleaning insights from a variety of theologians of culture including Abraham Kuyper, T. S. Eliot, H. Richard Niebuhr, and C. S. Lewis Edgar contends that cultural engagement is a fundamental aspect of human existence. He does not shy away from those passages that emphasize the distinction between Christians and the world. Yet he finds, shining through the biblical witness, evidence that supports a robust defense of the cultural mandate to "be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it" (Genesis 1:28). With clarity and wisdom, Edgar argues that we are most faithful to our calling as God's creatures when we participate in creating culture. IVP Instructor Resources forthcoming.


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The gospel of Jesus Christ is always situated within a particular cultural context. But how should Christians approach the complex relationship between our faith and our surrounding culture? Should we simply retreat from culture? Should we embrace our cultural practices and mindset? How important is it for us to be engaged in our culture? And how might we do that with disc The gospel of Jesus Christ is always situated within a particular cultural context. But how should Christians approach the complex relationship between our faith and our surrounding culture? Should we simply retreat from culture? Should we embrace our cultural practices and mindset? How important is it for us to be engaged in our culture? And how might we do that with discernment and faithfulness? William Edgar offers a rich biblical theology in light of our contemporary culture that contends that Christians should indeed, must be engaged in the surrounding culture. By exploring what Scripture has to say about the role of culture and by gleaning insights from a variety of theologians of culture including Abraham Kuyper, T. S. Eliot, H. Richard Niebuhr, and C. S. Lewis Edgar contends that cultural engagement is a fundamental aspect of human existence. He does not shy away from those passages that emphasize the distinction between Christians and the world. Yet he finds, shining through the biblical witness, evidence that supports a robust defense of the cultural mandate to "be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it" (Genesis 1:28). With clarity and wisdom, Edgar argues that we are most faithful to our calling as God's creatures when we participate in creating culture. IVP Instructor Resources forthcoming.

30 review for Created and Creating: A Biblical Theology of Culture

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tori Samar

    Goodness, this book stretched my brain a lot. There is so much to be gained in reading it, but be forewarned: you need to be willing to think, and to think carefully. Speaking for myself, I'll have to read this at least a few more times in order to fully "get it." But based on what I did "get" during my first read-through, I'm willing to say this book has an abundantly worthy message. Certainly, the church does not have a clear consensus on how Christians ought to relate to culture. Some say enga Goodness, this book stretched my brain a lot. There is so much to be gained in reading it, but be forewarned: you need to be willing to think, and to think carefully. Speaking for myself, I'll have to read this at least a few more times in order to fully "get it." But based on what I did "get" during my first read-through, I'm willing to say this book has an abundantly worthy message. Certainly, the church does not have a clear consensus on how Christians ought to relate to culture. Some say engage with it. Some say redeem it. Some say avoid it, lest you get led into worldliness. Some say oppose it (When's the last time you read or heard someone say Christians needs to be 'countercultural'? For me, it was just yesterday!). Dr. Edgar's thesis is that cultural engagement is "the fundamental calling for the human race" (p. 87). I'll be honest, that thesis made me squirm a little bit. Alarm bells of "This is a slippery slope" sounded in my head. But I decided to give Dr. Edgar a fair hearing. I'm glad I did. I think Dr. Edgar does a phenomenal job demolishing the false dichotomies to which many Christians hold regarding culture. First, life does not really operate according to categories of sacred vs. secular. This is an unfortunate view that makes the Christian teachers, artists, carpenters, business owners, doctors, etc., of this world look and feel terribly inferior to the full-time pastors and missionaries. God has use for all of us in His multi-faceted creation, and He intends for all of us to glorify Him in our vocations. Furthermore, since Christ is the authority over all things and everything belongs to God, cultural pursuits (by this, Dr. Edgar means pursuits involving the arts, social justice, family, education, etc.) have immense value as means of glorifying and worshiping God. And please take note, Dr. Edgar is fully aware of the horrific effects of sin on the world around us. He is not advocating for a foolish "deep-dive" into culture that ignores the seduction of worldliness (by the way, Dr. Edgar correctly shows how culture and the world/the-world's-system are not quite synonymous) and sin's corruption of creation. But what he is trying to help us realize is that cultural pursuits are a worthwhile part of the Christian life. Another false dichotomy Dr. Edgar takes apart is that of earthly vs. spiritual. He has serious concerns about the outlook that dogmatically says "[c]ultural pursuits are worldly. At best they are a distraction from the most noble pursuits; at worst they are raw idolatry" (p. 98). As Dr. Edgar points out, such a view is so spiritually-oriented, that those who hold it are just existing in this world until they make it safely to heaven. Sadly, they are missing out on the richness of life that God supplies. Of course—of course—God's kingdom and righteousness take first priority. I cannot stress this enough (nor can Dr. Edgar). But seeking first the kingdom is not the same thing as entirely avoiding "earthly" cultural pursuits. By God's grace, if we can hold our priorities correctly (seek first the kingdom), we can glorify God in both. Please, let's not live as if the ungodly world/unbelievers are the only ones allowed to engage in culture. Yes, sin has corrupted culture. We need to be ever-mindful of that lest we fall into a trap. But since when do true Christians just sit back and let sin and Satan have their way? Dr. Edgar, in writing this book, certainly does not want us to treat culture as the great "lost cause." Engage. Be salt. Be light. Participate in and shape your culture in ways that glorify God. Honestly, there's so much more I ought to say in order to call this a full review of Created & Creating. But this review does need to end sooner or later. And as I mentioned earlier, my brain got a workout reading this book, so there are some aspects of it I don't even think I'm ready to review yet. Nevertheless, I'd like to think I have at least scratched the surface of some of the very good, very important messages in this book. If you're willing to make the effort, I do think it is worth your time to read it. P.S. The cover definitely deserves five stars. It's gorgeous! (Read for the 2017 Tim Challies Christian Reading Challenge: A book published in 2017)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Sheth

    For a book that John Frame calls "the most thorough and the most solidly biblical contribution to the current discussion of Christ and culture", I found this to be neither thorough, nor solidly biblical. Edgar has accurately outlined the essence of what a transformational biblical theology of culture might look like from a Reformed perspective, but has failed to do the significant exegetical and scholarly work to develop and defend his views. In a time when there are many views on the relationsh For a book that John Frame calls "the most thorough and the most solidly biblical contribution to the current discussion of Christ and culture", I found this to be neither thorough, nor solidly biblical. Edgar has accurately outlined the essence of what a transformational biblical theology of culture might look like from a Reformed perspective, but has failed to do the significant exegetical and scholarly work to develop and defend his views. In a time when there are many views on the relationship between Christianity and culture, my expectation was that this would wrestle with competing views on a more comprehensive level. Edgar makes quite a few claims throughout the book that don't follow with exegesis or answers to objections. One example of this would be the substance of the Noahic covenant as a redemptive or common covenant. Here, Edgar interacts solely with Meredith Kline, and only gives a couple paragraphs to explaining his divergence for the well-received view that the Noahic covenant was a common covenant with a preservative, non-redemptive substance. Immediately, Edgar affirms the Noahic covenant as substantially redemptive and moves on. This example is a microcosm of how Edgar approaches many contested theological views throughout his biblical theology. At best, Edgar's book can be classified as an "introduction" to a biblical theology of culture. But one should not mistake this book as being as comprehensive as other recent biblical theologies related to culture, like David VanDrunen's Divine Covenants and Moral Order.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Edgar's central thesis is that the cultural mandate in Gen 1:26-31 as reiterated throughout redemptive history and culminating in the Great Commission in Matt 28 is the central calling of humanity. For Edgar, cultural engagement is the human response to the divine call to enjoy and develop the world that God has generously given to his image bearers. This book is a biblical theology that lays the foundation but does not dive into specific ways in which Christians ought to engage with different a Edgar's central thesis is that the cultural mandate in Gen 1:26-31 as reiterated throughout redemptive history and culminating in the Great Commission in Matt 28 is the central calling of humanity. For Edgar, cultural engagement is the human response to the divine call to enjoy and develop the world that God has generously given to his image bearers. This book is a biblical theology that lays the foundation but does not dive into specific ways in which Christians ought to engage with different aspects of culture, just that we must! He takes an optimistic transformationist view in how the church should relate to culture. I especially liked the chapter on how culture in the afterlife gives impetus for our cultural engagement now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Flynn Evans

    Edgar calls Christians to recognize the importance of the cultural mandate in the realities of the New Covenant. By our redemption through Christ, we are now able to fulfill the command to rule over creation and bring it to its realization in the inaugurated kingdom of God.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Ligon

    I once heard a sermon that contained a lot of good information about the text. At the end, though, the preacher basically said, "Let the Holy Spirit apply this to your hearts" and quit without making any application himself. It was kind of a disappointing experience. Reading Created and Creating gave me a similar feeling. While it contains a lot of good content and thought, the author was very reticent to draw his own conclusions or follow those conclusions toward practical application. Basicall I once heard a sermon that contained a lot of good information about the text. At the end, though, the preacher basically said, "Let the Holy Spirit apply this to your hearts" and quit without making any application himself. It was kind of a disappointing experience. Reading Created and Creating gave me a similar feeling. While it contains a lot of good content and thought, the author was very reticent to draw his own conclusions or follow those conclusions toward practical application. Basically, all William Edgar leaves us with is his belief that there shouldn't be a dichotomy between the sacred and the secular in culture. This conclusion may be accurate but is quite limited. To be honest, it may be my fault that I didn't get this book; it was fairly academic and some of it may have gone over my head. Nevertheless, I think I would have benefited more if Edgar's theology of culture had been fleshed out a bit more and brought to the world where we live. This book is effective in its explanation of the historical views of culture held by Christian theologians over the years. I appreciated that section and learned from it. Overall, though, this book's conclusions are too limited to be very helpful for me. I received a digital copy of this book for free from the publisher and was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are entirely my own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    E

    This book was okay. Edgar makes a strong case that Christians should be involved in culture (and yet I wonder, is there really anyone arguing the opposite? sure you have the wacky "two kingdom" folks, but even they surely read books and watch television and have ideas about what makes for good art, politics, etc. as Christians). The book was annoying because it presents itself as a "biblical theology" but spent a giant portion of the book talking about theories of culture--Matthew Arnold, T. S. E This book was okay. Edgar makes a strong case that Christians should be involved in culture (and yet I wonder, is there really anyone arguing the opposite? sure you have the wacky "two kingdom" folks, but even they surely read books and watch television and have ideas about what makes for good art, politics, etc. as Christians). The book was annoying because it presents itself as a "biblical theology" but spent a giant portion of the book talking about theories of culture--Matthew Arnold, T. S. Eliot, etc. etc. This was at times interesting, but wasn't what I was looking for. The actual biblical theology section was fine, although a little shallow. Edgar has an annoying tendency (which he admits in the epilogue) of avoiding specific illustrations or applications of his points (this would make for a bad sermon, and it certainly makes for a weak book). So it's hard to fully agree or disagree with him, since, as we know, the devil is in the details. So the book is a decent look at the "cultural mandate" (God's instructions to Adam and Eve in the garden), but if you're looking for wise Christian instruction and counsel concerning how to interact meaningfully with the surrounding culture, you'd better look elsewhere (after reading this, I suppose).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: Explores the idea of "culture" from secular and Christians perspectives, explores the biblical basis for the culture mandate and continued cultural engagement, and the arguments raised against this idea. Ever since the publication of Andy Crouch's Culture-Making, there has been a renewed interest among many in engaging one's culture, "seeking the peace and prosperity of the city" (Jeremiah 29:7). What William Edgar adds to this discussion is a biblical exploration of the basis Christians Summary: Explores the idea of "culture" from secular and Christians perspectives, explores the biblical basis for the culture mandate and continued cultural engagement, and the arguments raised against this idea. Ever since the publication of Andy Crouch's Culture-Making, there has been a renewed interest among many in engaging one's culture, "seeking the peace and prosperity of the city" (Jeremiah 29:7). What William Edgar adds to this discussion is a biblical exploration of the basis Christians have for cultural engagement. Edgar offers this definition of culture engagement, which also gives you a sense of the thesis of the book: "Cultural engagement is the human response to the divine call to enjoy and develop the world that God has generously given to his image bearers. Culture includes the symbols, the tools, the conventions, the social ties, and all else contributing to this call. Cultural activity occur in a historical setting, and is meant to improve the human condition.  Because of the fall, culture can, and has become sinister. Christ's redeeming grace moves culture in the right direction, ennobles it, and allows it to extend the realm of God's shalom, his goodness, his justice, his love" (pp. 233-234). After an introductory chapter looking at definitions of culture, and the ideas of cultivation in scripture, Part One looks at the leading secular and Christian thinkers who have contributed to the discuss. There are Matthew Arnold, Marx, the anthropologists and sociologists like E. B. Tylor and Max Weber, and functionalists like A. R. Radcliffe-Brown and Malinowski. He then considers Christian voices including Eliot, H. Richard Niebuhr, Lewis, Kuyper, and Klaas Schilder, who first coined the term "culture mandate." Part Two engages the objections raised to the culture mandate.  First he explores the contra mundum passages that seemingly set the gospel against the world and imply that cultural pursuits are distractions or simply idolatrous. Second is the idea that life in the world is spiritual resistance and conflict. The world is not our friend. And finally, it's all going to burn. In these chapters, he acknowledges the force of these criticisms and yet distinguishes between the real consequences of the fall, and the defaced but not destroyed image of God in humans. In the final chapter in Part Two, he looks at the cosmic character of Christ's redemptive work, portrayed both in Colossians 1:15-20, and in the Magnificat of Mary. The redemption covers all things in creation and human society. Part Three then works these ideas out more fully. First Edgar considers the "cultural mandate" given the first couple before the fall--fruitfulness and dominion. He then traces how this was both worked out and marred in a post-fall world, how Israel anticipates the redemptive work of Christ. The chapter on culture in the new covenant makes an important argument for Christ's great commission being a fulfillment and deeper implementation of the culture mandate, sending disciples to the dispersed nations, announcing God's kingdom, discipling them to do all Christ has commanded in all of life--essentially a culture mandate for a redeemed world, anticipating the new heaven and earth. The last chapter in this part considers the afterlife, a culturally rich life enjoyed in the presence of God, at the great banquet of the bride with all the nations, and ruling and reigning and restoring. Edgar's brief epilogue points the way for further study, and how the study of the biblical cultural mandate lays the groundwork for human flourishing that is proximate, awaiting the final redemption of all things. Edgar in this book lays the groundwork for Christians joyfully pursuing Christ in "every good endeavor," to use Tim Keller's phrase. This is important for many Christians who refrain from these endeavors because they seem "worldly," or pursue them, but do not see them as an integral part of a faithful Christian life. Edgar helps us see that the culture mandate is not opposed to the great commission, or superseded by it, but rather is fulfilled through it. In sum, Edgar helps us see all of life, and life's possibilities through the eyes of Christ. How different life might be when everything matters!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Thaddeus

    Good Development of a Biblical Theology of Culture I found many things in this book helpful in looking at how the theme of culture is developed and addressed in scripture’s overall redemptive narrative. It does not necessarily address much prescriptive deductions about how we now as Christians are to live in specific spheres of life and culture - but that is not the main purpose of this book. It does however, help the reader to see the overarching narrative of scripture as the author traces the t Good Development of a Biblical Theology of Culture I found many things in this book helpful in looking at how the theme of culture is developed and addressed in scripture’s overall redemptive narrative. It does not necessarily address much prescriptive deductions about how we now as Christians are to live in specific spheres of life and culture - but that is not the main purpose of this book. It does however, help the reader to see the overarching narrative of scripture as the author traces the themes of culture and the cultural mandate all throughout scripture from beginning to end. In this, it is very helpful. However, I could see how someone may pick up the book and be disappointed if they were not aware of what its goal is. Overall, it is quite readable - thought at some points I found it felt like a little bit of a slug to press through (which is why I gave it 4 stars). The first half of the book was more helpful to me. The second half started to feel a bit slow and repetitive as the author traces the same themes throughout scripture. However, this was still useful - though I might have preferred a more abridged version at times. It was quite helpful though to see how the cultural mandate is repeated and reaffirmed throughout redemptive history and culminates in the consummation as it is fulfilled and finds its ultimate end in the Heavenly City. This wouldn’t necessarily be a book I’d recommend to the average lay-person. I think it is probably better suited towards pastors, teachers and leaders (or the avid biblical theology nerd). The lack of practical application makes it a tough read at times - however, for the one looking for helpful background to then move towards how this biblical theology of culture should influence our practice in church and Christian life, this would be a great resource! Definitely worth checking out if you’re in that category. I read it in preparation for teaching a class on faith and culture and found several gems and good food for thought.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Kidwell

    Created and Creating A Biblical Theology of Culture by William Edgar InterVarsity Press IVP Academic Arts & Photography, Christian Pub Date 02 Jan 2017 I am voluntarily reviewing a copy of Created and Creating through the publisher and Netgalley: This book points out that culture does not always bring about positive features, often it brings about images of poverty and hunger. Terry Eagleton said that culture is not only what we live by, but what we live for. This book goes on to talk about issues such as Created and Creating A Biblical Theology of Culture by William Edgar InterVarsity Press IVP Academic Arts & Photography, Christian Pub Date 02 Jan 2017 I am voluntarily reviewing a copy of Created and Creating through the publisher and Netgalley: This book points out that culture does not always bring about positive features, often it brings about images of poverty and hunger. Terry Eagleton said that culture is not only what we live by, but what we live for. This book goes on to talk about issues such as racial equality. The author points out that Cultural Involvement along with worship the fundamental calling of the human race. Created and Creating deals with the relationship between Christian Faith and Culture. Five out of five stars. Happy Reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sean Grogan

    Part Three of the book is worth the cost of the whole thing, but I did have to push a bit to get there. The first a chapter or two gives an interesting taxonomy of various views on culture, both secular and religious, but it felt disconnected from the rest of the book. Part two covers various objections to the central thesis and the scripture used therein. Part three is where the thesis is truly fleshed out and the true "biblical theology of culture" actually happens. I'm just a little bummed th Part Three of the book is worth the cost of the whole thing, but I did have to push a bit to get there. The first a chapter or two gives an interesting taxonomy of various views on culture, both secular and religious, but it felt disconnected from the rest of the book. Part two covers various objections to the central thesis and the scripture used therein. Part three is where the thesis is truly fleshed out and the true "biblical theology of culture" actually happens. I'm just a little bummed this was only 60 or so pages of the ~240 pages.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Couch

    How is the Christian to respond to the cultural pressures and shifts on him? The answer is surprisingly straightforward: be what God created you to be. However, history has a habit of obscuring God's purposes in creation. And we, William Edgar takes great care to review what others have said about faith and culture before examining the biblical texts. He is very thorough. He is also very careful in what he writes. The book, therefore, requires hard work from the reader. Edgar wants his readers to How is the Christian to respond to the cultural pressures and shifts on him? The answer is surprisingly straightforward: be what God created you to be. However, history has a habit of obscuring God's purposes in creation. And we, William Edgar takes great care to review what others have said about faith and culture before examining the biblical texts. He is very thorough. He is also very careful in what he writes. The book, therefore, requires hard work from the reader. Edgar wants his readers to read what he has written and think about it for themselves. But it is worth the effort.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Has some really interesting concepts throughout it. The overall thesis is pretty neat, which is claiming that cultural creation and interaction is one of the major things Christ-followers should be aiming for. I really love the idea that creation and redemption go hand-in-hand. It does have that thing though where it is clearly aimed towards academics, hence the language gets pretty redundant and points that could be made in one page are made in like 10. That's just how academics roll though. Go Has some really interesting concepts throughout it. The overall thesis is pretty neat, which is claiming that cultural creation and interaction is one of the major things Christ-followers should be aiming for. I really love the idea that creation and redemption go hand-in-hand. It does have that thing though where it is clearly aimed towards academics, hence the language gets pretty redundant and points that could be made in one page are made in like 10. That's just how academics roll though. Good book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I am not Reformed (Calvinistic) per se, but I've always appreciated the approach of many Reformed theologians to culture, compared to that of Christians who seek isolation from mainstream culture. This being said, I enjoyed Edgar's book and found it to be quite foundational for me. Although it could sometimes be pretty dry and I wish there was more application, it was a good read for me. I am not Reformed (Calvinistic) per se, but I've always appreciated the approach of many Reformed theologians to culture, compared to that of Christians who seek isolation from mainstream culture. This being said, I enjoyed Edgar's book and found it to be quite foundational for me. Although it could sometimes be pretty dry and I wish there was more application, it was a good read for me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Patchin

    An excellent review and development of theology of culture. Edgar's vision is for engagement with culture while trusting in the already/not yet of Christ's redemption and focus on the disciple-making responsibility of Christian teaching and community. An excellent review and development of theology of culture. Edgar's vision is for engagement with culture while trusting in the already/not yet of Christ's redemption and focus on the disciple-making responsibility of Christian teaching and community.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Schmidt

    A bit tough to get into, but the last 4 chapters of the book were well-worth it. A helpful look at how the cultural mandate goes hand in hand with the Great Commission and how Scripture teaches us how to lovingly, thoughtfully, and biblically engage with culture.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Youngkin

    Seminary professor William Edgar has written a superior book here, centered on a biblical understanding of culture and how we are to relate to it. I work in advocacy for pro-family policies quite a bit and I believe this scriptural underpinning would be essential to our work. Highly recommended.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Markin

    Edgar does a great job at showing the the call for Christians to be active in their culture. Not many applications of how To do it, but he shows from the Bible that this is something that is required of all believers. I really enjoyed his portion on Jesus and the coins to Caesar.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I found Edgar's lectures a bit clearer, but this book is a very good study in the transformationist approach to cultural engagement. I found Edgar's lectures a bit clearer, but this book is a very good study in the transformationist approach to cultural engagement.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Hatt

    A must read for any Christian interested in cultural engagement

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt Taylor

    I would give it three stars for... The intro made it seem like it was going to be less academic, then it became very academic. But four stars for the thoroughness of content.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laurent Dv

    three part : analysis modern conceptions of culture (christians and non christians), exegesis of the contra mundum verses and a positive development of a biblical theology of culture. short book that could be more long, shortcut and sometimes strange exegesis, could interact with Beale's exegesis of Genesis 1 and more with Kline on that. three part : analysis modern conceptions of culture (christians and non christians), exegesis of the contra mundum verses and a positive development of a biblical theology of culture. short book that could be more long, shortcut and sometimes strange exegesis, could interact with Beale's exegesis of Genesis 1 and more with Kline on that.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cat Caird

    There is no doubt that William Edgar has done a lot of research for this book. While reading it, it felt very academic in it's style and the author goes to great lengths to unpack the history and philosophies behind culture. It is also an in-depth, rich book delving into the Christians response to culture, which proves to be very interesting and will enhance the readers understanding of our own culture and how faith interacts with it. It's worth reading, especially if you want to go deeper and f There is no doubt that William Edgar has done a lot of research for this book. While reading it, it felt very academic in it's style and the author goes to great lengths to unpack the history and philosophies behind culture. It is also an in-depth, rich book delving into the Christians response to culture, which proves to be very interesting and will enhance the readers understanding of our own culture and how faith interacts with it. It's worth reading, especially if you want to go deeper and further in your understanding of the role of biblical theology in culture.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  24. 5 out of 5

    Josh Jackson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katie Johnson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ross Neir

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ryan J.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Josh Valdix

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Lau

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Parrett

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