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When Reza Aslan’s bestseller Zealot came out in 2013, there was criticism that he hadn’t addressed his Muslim faith while writing the origin story of Christianity. In fact, Ross Douthat of The New York Times wrote that “if Aslan had actually written in defense of the Islamic view of Jesus, that would have been something provocative and new.” Mustafa Akyol’s The Islamic Jesu When Reza Aslan’s bestseller Zealot came out in 2013, there was criticism that he hadn’t addressed his Muslim faith while writing the origin story of Christianity. In fact, Ross Douthat of The New York Times wrote that “if Aslan had actually written in defense of the Islamic view of Jesus, that would have been something provocative and new.” Mustafa Akyol’s The Islamic Jesus is that book. The Islamic Jesus reveals startling new truths about Islam in the context of the first Muslims and the early origins of Christianity. Muslims and the first Christians—the Jewish followers of Jesus—saw Jesus as not divine but rather as a prophet and human Messiah and that salvation comes from faith and good works, not merely as faith, as Christians would later emphasize. What Akyol seeks to reveal are how these core beliefs of Jewish Christianity, which got lost in history as a heresy, emerged in a new religion born in 7th Arabia: Islam. Akyol exposes this extraordinary historical connection between Judaism, Jewish Christianity and Islam—a major mystery unexplored by academia. From Jesus’ Jewish followers to the Nazarenes and Ebionites to the Qu’ran’s stories of Mary and Jesus, The Islamic Jesus will reveal links between religions that seem so contrary today. It will also call on Muslims to discover their own Jesus, at a time when they are troubled by their own Pharisees and Zealots.


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When Reza Aslan’s bestseller Zealot came out in 2013, there was criticism that he hadn’t addressed his Muslim faith while writing the origin story of Christianity. In fact, Ross Douthat of The New York Times wrote that “if Aslan had actually written in defense of the Islamic view of Jesus, that would have been something provocative and new.” Mustafa Akyol’s The Islamic Jesu When Reza Aslan’s bestseller Zealot came out in 2013, there was criticism that he hadn’t addressed his Muslim faith while writing the origin story of Christianity. In fact, Ross Douthat of The New York Times wrote that “if Aslan had actually written in defense of the Islamic view of Jesus, that would have been something provocative and new.” Mustafa Akyol’s The Islamic Jesus is that book. The Islamic Jesus reveals startling new truths about Islam in the context of the first Muslims and the early origins of Christianity. Muslims and the first Christians—the Jewish followers of Jesus—saw Jesus as not divine but rather as a prophet and human Messiah and that salvation comes from faith and good works, not merely as faith, as Christians would later emphasize. What Akyol seeks to reveal are how these core beliefs of Jewish Christianity, which got lost in history as a heresy, emerged in a new religion born in 7th Arabia: Islam. Akyol exposes this extraordinary historical connection between Judaism, Jewish Christianity and Islam—a major mystery unexplored by academia. From Jesus’ Jewish followers to the Nazarenes and Ebionites to the Qu’ran’s stories of Mary and Jesus, The Islamic Jesus will reveal links between religions that seem so contrary today. It will also call on Muslims to discover their own Jesus, at a time when they are troubled by their own Pharisees and Zealots.

30 review for The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steve Watson

    Akyol closes his book with these words. "As Muslims, who are latecomers to this scene, we have disagreements with both Jews and Christians. But we have major agreements as well. With Jews, we agree a lot on God. With Christians, we agree that Jesus was born of a virgin, that he was the Messiah, and that he is the Word of God. Surely, we do not worship Jesus, like Christians do. Yet sill, we can follow him. In fact, given our grim malaise and his shining wisdom, we need to follow him." (215) As tw Akyol closes his book with these words. "As Muslims, who are latecomers to this scene, we have disagreements with both Jews and Christians. But we have major agreements as well. With Jews, we agree a lot on God. With Christians, we agree that Jesus was born of a virgin, that he was the Messiah, and that he is the Word of God. Surely, we do not worship Jesus, like Christians do. Yet sill, we can follow him. In fact, given our grim malaise and his shining wisdom, we need to follow him." (215) As two examples of how contemporary Muslims can follow Jesus without worshiping him, Akyol says that Jesus' teaching on Kingdom - "The Caliphate is within you" - could help contemporary Muslims embrace a vision of God's reign that is more interior, less tied to nationalism and militarism. The other powerful example of contextualizing Jesus' teaching is, in Akyol's words, "The Shariah is made for man." Jesus could help religious people, as he originally did, embrace a more holistic, less literal approach to law that would be better promote human flourishing. Akyol gets to this conclusion by way of two points he develops, with clear and accessible prose, supported by considerable scholarship, both Christian and Muslim. One is that Islam is a closer cousin to Christianity than both traditions have generally acknowledged. In fact, Akyol closely reviews the theory and evidence that Islam - either through direct influence or through divine revelation - could be a further development of a Jewish form of Christianity, in which Jesus is honored as a messianic teacher and prophet, without being worshiped as part of the triune godhead. Muslims, after all, honor Jesus as a word of God, a prophet, a miracle-performer, a son of the virgin Mary, and one who will come again to restore all things. The second and related point is that Jesus can continue to serve as a guide and teacher and prophet, not just to the world at large, but specifically to the Muslim world. The West generally, and Christendom in particular have ironically made it much more difficult for Muslims to do this. A defining question for Muslims (and indeed, for much of the world) over the past two centuries has been how to relate to an aggressively powerful, colonial West. Understandably, defensiveness and hostility have resulted, rather than dialogue and reflection. Thankfully, Muslims need not consider Jesus a product of the West. A Palestinian Jew, born to a people group oppressed by a Western empire themselves, Jesus' teaching and legacy and prophetic voice are not the property of the Western world or even of Christendom. Muslims can embrace Jesus as their guide and teacher and prophet as well. Much more could be said. As a non-Muslim who is deeply committed to the Way of Jesus, I find Akyol's treasure trove of scholarship and perspective fascinating and hopeful. I'll close, though, with one more quotation, this one from a Jesus-oriented, 20th century Egyptian Muslim, Khalid Muhammad Khalid. "He is the love which knows no hatred, he is the peace that knows no disquiet, and he is the salvation that does not perish. And when all this is realized on earth, then at the same time, the return of Christ is realized. This is the Christ who will return, and whose return the Messenger prophesied: peace, love, truth, the good and beauty. With the truthful Messenger, we declare: 'Christ, not Barabbas, the true not the false, love not hatred, peace not war, life not destruction.'" (215) I follow and worship Jesus, but anyone who can view Jesus on such terms, regardless of the details of their theology, I will be glad to call friend and brother.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris Coray

    Amazing As a LDS student of religion who has lived in Damascus and Jordan this was absolutely fascinating and true to what I learned living among Muslims

  3. 5 out of 5

    Roger DeBlanck

    Akyol brings great intellection and acumen to his inspiring study of how Jesus links together the three Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. His research begins with reminding us how the Jews have never wavered in their trust in God who first sent Moses to lead them out of bondage, and so the Jews also believed God would again deliver to them a Messiah from the Davidic order to save them from Roman rule. As a Muslim, Akyol sees the historical Jesus as much more than a zealot asp Akyol brings great intellection and acumen to his inspiring study of how Jesus links together the three Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. His research begins with reminding us how the Jews have never wavered in their trust in God who first sent Moses to lead them out of bondage, and so the Jews also believed God would again deliver to them a Messiah from the Davidic order to save them from Roman rule. As a Muslim, Akyol sees the historical Jesus as much more than a zealot aspiring to confront Roman authoritarianism. In fact, he contends that the Jesus of Christianity withstood time and elevated over the centuries precisely because, as the New Testament says, he sought to revive and reform the faith of his people, his first followers—the Jews. Jesus’s status also elevated over time, Akyol says, because he had the capability to perform miracles beyond a mere zealot and because he also shared “a message that went beyond its historical context and appealed to the timeless aspirations of humanity.” Akyol points out that when Jesus healed others, he told them it was their faith, and not him, that made them well, which meant their faith in Abraham and their faith in their Judaic tradition, and it was Jesus who became a prophetic voice within that tradition. Akyol indicates how the Gospels reveal how even Jesus himself did not think he was leading a new religion, but rather he saw himself as coming both to fulfill Jewish law and to reinterpret it with reformist ideas that minimized obsessive rules and details. His ideas for reform focused on moral teachings and on one’s personal conduct of motives, actions, and intentions in life. Jesus led a revolution for people to lead a spiritual life of good deeds, which transcended Jewish law and moved beyond specific religious boundaries so that he could reach people other than only the Jews. This reformist message, Akyol says, is what made Jesus’s appeal so endearing over time. Akyol explains how the Jewish disciples probably saw Jesus as a redeemer of Israel, but not as a divine Son of God. The Jews believed Jesus came in the name of the Lord, and so he was not a blasphemer against the Jewish God. Therefore, Jesus’s first followers understandably did not abandon his message, but instead worked endlessly to preserve it. After Jesus’s passing, his eldest brother James became the leader of the movement Jesus left behind. James’s epistle in the New Testament, however, focuses almost exclusively on guiding Jesus’s followers to show their devotion to God and to obey God’s law through their examples of conduct and their actions, which needed to model the faith of Jesus. In this way, Jesus did not lead a new religion, but rather he sought a revision of Judaism. The followers of Jesus and James, henceforth, saw their Messiah as the last great Jewish prophet, not as a Son of God. Akyol makes clear that Christianity, as it is known worldwide today, comes more from the efforts of Paul than from the way James sought to preserve Jesus’s legacy. It was after Paul’s miraculous experience of seeing Jesus on the way to Damascus that led to Paul’s relentless work to spread the “Good News” about Jesus. It was, therefore, Paul who founded Christianity as we know it today, and it is Paul who was the first Christian as we would define one’s allegiance to Christianity today. Whereas James emphasized one’s works and deeds instead of only one’s faith in Jesus, Paul focused primarily on one’s need to have faith exclusively in Jesus Christ. For Akyol, Pauline Christianity began the real movement that divinized Jesus as the Son of God. Paul’s efforts flourished because he had the opportunity to spread the divinization of Jesus within the widespread openness of paganism throughout the Roman world—a time and place where gods and men were understood as having the ability to interact with one another. The more Christianity distanced itself from its Jewish roots and planted its theology in the Roman and Hellenistic world, the more divinized Jesus became. Akyol relates how each of the four Gospels kept increasing the language of divinity to assert and persuade that Jesus was in fact the Son of God, a divine spirit. By the early 4th Century, Christianity had, indeed, conquered Rome with the conversion of Emperor Constantine. As for the advent of Islam, it began in the early 7th Century when Muhammad received the recitations from God, which he then shared throughout Mecca. Muhammad’s message focused on asking his followers to return to monotheism through their surrender and love of one God. This devotion to a singular God needed to replace the polytheism that had developed throughout Arabia with tribes choosing to worship any number of the hundreds of different idols stored in the Ka’aba. Akyol explains how Muhammad, similarly to Jesus, did not seek to invent a new faith, but rather he shared the truth of wanting his people to return to worshipping the one true and almighty God of mercy and compassion in the Abrahamic tradition of monotheism. In this way, both Christianity and Islam helped spread Abrahamic monotheism. Akyol recounts how Islam flourished and gained followers because of its intense focus on personal salvation through one’s love of God and one’s devotion to a dutiful life of righteous behavior and action. In short, Islam’s message focused on an individual’s good works and not on an individual’s exclusive reliance on faith alone for salvation. Islam’s message of inclusiveness also allowed it to flourish because it embraced the monotheism of both Judaism and Christianity as kindred faiths and, therefore, allied faiths. The Qur’an accepts Jews and Christians as “People of the Book” and the Qur’an also confirms the Torah and the Gospels. In fact, the Islamic community was open to everyone. Muhammad made pacts, covenants, and treaties with both Christians and Jews. In showing how Muslims and Christians lived peacefully together, Akyol points out how contemporary discord between the two religions is not fueled by Islam’s teachings, but by political grievances against the West, which have led radicals and extremists to read Islamic texts with negligent interpretations. Likewise, anti-Semitism has resulted from the Arab-Israeli conflict and the Israelis occupation of Palestine and not from anything advocated in the teachings of Islam. Akyol keeps his focus on the lineage of monotheism, and he clearly explains how God delivered His Word to Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and Muhammad. He calls this a reflection of “the continuity of the same revealed wisdom that comes from the same God.” He shows how the Qur’an is in many ways like the Torah. Both explain how God revealed His Word to mortal men, with Him giving the Torah to Moses and the Qur’an to Muhammad, each of whom then shared God’s law and truth with their people about how to lead a righteous life. Similarly, both faiths made no acknowledgement of the Trinity, of saints, or of original sin. Instead, both focused on rules of diet, dress, and justice. Moreover, both placed precedence on almsgiving, devotion to God, and the abandonment of worshipping idols and images. Akyol presents how the Qur’an accepts the Jewish prophets before it embraces Jesus as a reformer within Judaism, where he offered a message of less austere observance to restrictive laws. The Qur’an honors Jesus with the distinction of the Messiah—meaning he was a messenger and servant on Earth of God’s Word, but not a Son. Therefore, Akyol sees the Qur’an as “middle ground” between the Jews who see Jesus as a legitimate Messiah, but not as a Son, and the Christians who honor him for carrying the Word of God, but also as a divine man. Akyol says that the Qur’an sustains its middle position between Judaism and Christianity by honoring Jesus as a Messiah with a profound message about how we should place faith in God and also place emphasis on how our actions pave the way for our salvation. Akyol explains how both Islam and Judaism have parallel views of Jesus as a distinguished prophet and as the awaited Messiah, but not as a divine Son of God. Both embrace traditions of salvation through an individual’s combined action and faith, and not on faith alone. Both speak of either choosing good or evil, and both emphasize the monumental importance of Moses. The Qur’an is, however, profound in expressing its views on religious differences by stating that God intended these differences so that we have to learn to understand and compete with each other in goodwill as different nations and communities because in the end God will explain why he intended these differences among us. In showing the timeless connections between Islam and Christianity, Akyol explains how Mary is revered over every other woman in Islam. She is the only woman with a Surah named after her, and her name appears 34 times in the Qur’an, compared to 19 in the New Testament. Moreover, the stories of Mary are nearly parallel in how they are told within the Bible and the Qur’an. Although Islam elevates Jesus as a great prophet, Akyol makes clear how the way Jesus is seen in the Qur’an is as a man strengthened with the Holy Spirit. Because of this strength, Jesus is profoundly revered in Islam. The Qur’an distinguishes him as the Messiah, which means he is someone touched by the blessings of God, someone who is a servant and messenger of God on Earth, and someone who God sent to deliver a divine message to the children of Israel. Moreover, he is someone who God sent not to found or create a new faith, but rather to bring new guidance and some liberality to the truth and the laws of the faiths that had been previously revealed. Therefore, the Qur’an has great respect for the Torah and the Gospels. In short, the Qur’an serves as guidance and a reminder to humans to have faith in God and to do good deeds. Furthermore, Akyol shows how the Qur’an’s “Islamic Christology” distinguishes Jesus as possessing the “Word” of God and the “Spirit” of God as a messenger on Earth. In Islam, Jesus is a son of God’s message, not the literal Son of God. He is divinely inspired and breathes divinity, but he still remains mortal. Jesus is the son of Mary, not of God. Because God strengthened Jesus with the Holy Spirit, he became a holy agent on Earth. Akyol makes evident that only through the evolution and development of the Trinity over several centuries did the concept of a triune God become defined. This started with the Council of Nicaea in 325 CE, but the full doctrine that established and accepted the concept of the Trinity as truth did not occur until 381 CE at the Council of Constantinople. In focusing on the similarities among the Abrahamic faiths, Akyol points out how the Qur’an and Islamic literature make many references to the Second Coming of Jesus. In addition, the Qur’an calls for Muslims to learn and seek knowledge from the preceding scriptures of the Torah, the Psalms, and the Gospels, all of which the Qur’an confirms. Just as the teachings of Jesus gave the Jews guidance, Akyol says that Jesus can offer “reformist guidance” to everyone, including Muslims. Jesus was a reformer who recognized “the negative consequences of blind literalism” to religious law. With his remarkable research, intellection, and open-mindedness, Akyol’s inspiring study of the lineage of Jesus among Jews, Christians, and Muslims resonates around a reminder for every religion to abstain from proclaiming that their beliefs hold absolutism. Perhaps Jesus’s greatest teaching was to warn us against casting the first stone because how can any of us believe ourselves so righteous, innocent, sinless, and absolute above everyone else. Akyol acknowledges how we can all learn from the teachings of Jesus, regardless whether we commit to Judaism, Christianity, or Islam.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rick Edwards

    Akyol gives us an excellent read--a book that's thoroughly researched, thoughtful, and well written. He spells out areas of agreement and disagreement between Christians and Muslims regarding Jesus, and highlights the importance attributed to "Prophet Jesus" in the Qur'an and the hadiths of Prophet Muhammad. He's an Islamic exegete who also is very knowledgeable about the New Testament and the evolution of orthodox Christian doctrine about Jesus--the two natures, the Trinity, and more. He is fam Akyol gives us an excellent read--a book that's thoroughly researched, thoughtful, and well written. He spells out areas of agreement and disagreement between Christians and Muslims regarding Jesus, and highlights the importance attributed to "Prophet Jesus" in the Qur'an and the hadiths of Prophet Muhammad. He's an Islamic exegete who also is very knowledgeable about the New Testament and the evolution of orthodox Christian doctrine about Jesus--the two natures, the Trinity, and more. He is familiar with the Q document, the sayings gospel source of Jesus' teachings shared by Luke and Matthew. Essential to his perspective is a conviction that Jewish Christianity, which pretty much died away in the century or so following the destruction of Jerusalem in C.E. 70, found a lasting expression in Islam. I highly recommend the book for those seeking better to understand Islam and/or wanting a refresher regarding the divisions among early Christians. Regrettably, Akyol damns Paul as the source of all that Islam considers wrong in trinitarian faith, and asserts that nothing of Jesus' teaching finds its way into the letters of the apostle. In any case, read the book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yaman Hukan

    Very rich and extremely thought provoking, even for someone like me who was brought up in a fairly conservative muslim family and was already taught all about the story of Jesus from an Islamic perspective. The book establishes astonishing similarities between the Islamic view of Jesus and that of the community of Jewish Christians, and presents so many examples that support the claim. The last chapter which explores the theme of what muslims can learn from Jesus in specific is in my view a must Very rich and extremely thought provoking, even for someone like me who was brought up in a fairly conservative muslim family and was already taught all about the story of Jesus from an Islamic perspective. The book establishes astonishing similarities between the Islamic view of Jesus and that of the community of Jewish Christians, and presents so many examples that support the claim. The last chapter which explores the theme of what muslims can learn from Jesus in specific is in my view a must read for every muslim today, especially the parts that explore the Herodians and Zealots in a modern Islamic context, and the the part on the Islamic Caliphate. Highly recommended

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mona Haddad

    As a Muslim I found the book very interesting to read. Although I might not agree with the author on everything, I have learned to love Jesus more and it gave me a better perspective on the similarities between the three religions discussed. The references used show that the author tried to be as objective as possible, however I found some of the ideas he put forward didn't really come from legitimate sources. What I liked most about the book was the comparisons drawn by the author between the o As a Muslim I found the book very interesting to read. Although I might not agree with the author on everything, I have learned to love Jesus more and it gave me a better perspective on the similarities between the three religions discussed. The references used show that the author tried to be as objective as possible, however I found some of the ideas he put forward didn't really come from legitimate sources. What I liked most about the book was the comparisons drawn by the author between the obstacles facing Muslims today and the obstacles that were facing the Jews when Jesus was sent to them and how the answer to today's problem can be inspired from Jesus's teachings.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Antonio

    The author is true muslim believer but he has also gone long way in order to get to know Jewish and Christian Bible. He found great many points where all major abrahamic religions are in agreement. The biggest one is the person of Jesus Christ. The book is great learning opportunity for Jews, Christians and Muslims, as well as the point of agreement in order to start inter religious communication. So this is my assessment of the book The Islamic Jesus by Mustafa Akyol according to my 8 criteria: The author is true muslim believer but he has also gone long way in order to get to know Jewish and Christian Bible. He found great many points where all major abrahamic religions are in agreement. The biggest one is the person of Jesus Christ. The book is great learning opportunity for Jews, Christians and Muslims, as well as the point of agreement in order to start inter religious communication. So this is my assessment of the book The Islamic Jesus by Mustafa Akyol according to my 8 criteria: 1. Related to practice - 4 2. It prevails important - 4 stars 3. I agree with the read - 3 stars 4. not difficult to read (as for non English native) - 3 stars 5. Too long (more than 500 pages) - short and concise (150-200 pages) - 4 stars 6.Boring - every sentence is interesting - 4 stars 7. Learning opportunity - 5 stars 8. Dry and uninspired style of writing - Smooth style with humouristic and fun parts - 3 stars Total score 3.75 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Patrick W.

    No major article of faith separates Moses, Jesus and Muhammad. It was Paul who created disagreement between Judaism, Christianity and Islam. That, in a nutshell, is the overriding message of Mustafa Akyol’s insightful and accessible study, The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims. Akyol, a visiting fellow at the Freedom Project at Wellesley College, outlines the historic consistency of the three Abrahamic religions. The author notes that the Qu’uran acknowledges No major article of faith separates Moses, Jesus and Muhammad. It was Paul who created disagreement between Judaism, Christianity and Islam. That, in a nutshell, is the overriding message of Mustafa Akyol’s insightful and accessible study, The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims. Akyol, a visiting fellow at the Freedom Project at Wellesley College, outlines the historic consistency of the three Abrahamic religions. The author notes that the Qu’uran acknowledges the Law and the Prophets of the Jewish faith and accepts Jesus as the Jewish Messiah. In the three decades after the occupying Roman army brutally executed Jesus by crucifixion, Jesus’ brother James, who was a priest at the Temple in Jerusalem, led Jesus’ followers who comprised a sect within the larger Jewish faith, not a separate religion. In fact, Akyol takes pains to point out the strong similarity between Jewish Christianity and Islam. Gentile Christianity, however, was a different matter. Paul, who spread the Jesus movement among Gentiles between the late 30s and early 60s of the Common Era, ignored the actual teachings of the man Jesus and instead focused on his role as the divine Christ who died for the world’s sins and was resurrected. It was Paul, a Hellenized Jew and Roman citizen, who proclaimed that Jesus was one-third of a triune God. The authors of the four Gospels, writing 40 to 70 years after the crucifixion and in the decades after Rome crushed the Jewish revolution, seized on Paul’s theology to transcend Israel’s defeat at the hands of the empire. “Throughout his 13 letters, which make up almost one-third of the New Testament, Paul never quoted a saying from Jesus—not even a single one,” Akyol notes. “In this new religion, what got reinterpreted would be not only the teaching of Jesus, but also his very self,” he says of the Gentile church, which focused on the universal atonement for sins achieved by Christ’s death and resurrection. Jewish Christians, on the other hand, “were more interested in Jesus’ teachings than in the meaning of his death.” Muslims, like their cousins the Jews, can accept chosen men as “sons of God’ but not as a divine Son of God. The Qu’uran refers to Jesus as the Son of Mary, and accepts the virgin birth, but rejects any notion that God physically impregnated Mary. Many Muslims do see Jesus as the Word of God, and even as the Spirit. But they view the Trinity as “a very un-Abrahamic idea that violates the absolute oneness of God.” Akyol draws many parallels between the three faiths. In one startling comparison, he recalls the outrage that the conquering Roman general Pompey created when he entered the Holy of Holies in the Jerusalem Temple, hoping to see the Jewish God. Jews considered it blasphemy for the Gentile to enter the sacred space. Similarly, when U.S. Marines entered a mosque in Iraq in 2004, newspapers throughout the world carried a photograph of the soldiers walking on a sacred carpet in their boots. Unwittingly, the Marines had delivered an outrageous insult to Islam. Perhaps more importantly, the author illustrates the political and theological links between Jews in the time of Jesus and Muslims in the 21st century. Noting the prevalence of numerous sects within Judaism 2,000 years ago, Akyol postulates that they generally fell into two camps, the Herodians and the Zealots. The Herodians played the hand they were dealt (i.e. Roman occupation) whereas the Zealots actively demanded new cards. The Sicarii, an offshoot of the Zealots, went even further, assassinating Romans and even Jewish collaborators. Similarly, the vast majority of modern-day Muslims seek to work cooperatively with people of other faiths to live in peace. But Islam has its own Zealots, who take a more confrontational approach. Sadly, it also has its own Sicarii, who resort to violence. Akyol still holds out hope that Judaism, Christianity and Islam can live together in peace. “Perhaps we can recall that Jesus, a great prophet of Islam, called for the exact same kind of reform in Judaism at a time when Jews were exactly like us. Jesus can, in other words, become a source of inspiration for the much-sought transformation in Islam.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Zachary

    Examines the theological similarities between the Qur'an and pieces of the New Testament, as well as several early Jewish-Christian texts, and attempts to trace such paths of influence. Engaging from start to finish. Highlights the influence of Paul's legacy on early Christianity,his differences with James and the Jerusalem church; and above all discusses the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic ideas about Jesus and the nature of his mission. Examines the theological similarities between the Qur'an and pieces of the New Testament, as well as several early Jewish-Christian texts, and attempts to trace such paths of influence. Engaging from start to finish. Highlights the influence of Paul's legacy on early Christianity,his differences with James and the Jerusalem church; and above all discusses the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic ideas about Jesus and the nature of his mission.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adnan

    Author tries to bring Christianity, Judaism and Islam closer together around joint figure of Jesus. Well researched with powerful messages.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samar Dahmash Jarrah

    he wrote in 2017. Despite Studying Christianity in the early 2000’s Mustafa could not write about it at the time. He was prompted to do so after a friend wrote a book in 2014 about Jesus, it was a historical evaluation of who he was, the conclusion of which was that Jesus was a zealot, a Jewish fighter against Roman rule in 1st century Palestine. Mustafa wanted to write about how Islam understands Jesus, not explain how Quran or hadith describes him, but show that Islam’s understanding of Jesus he wrote in 2017. Despite Studying Christianity in the early 2000’s Mustafa could not write about it at the time. He was prompted to do so after a friend wrote a book in 2014 about Jesus, it was a historical evaluation of who he was, the conclusion of which was that Jesus was a zealot, a Jewish fighter against Roman rule in 1st century Palestine. Mustafa wanted to write about how Islam understands Jesus, not explain how Quran or hadith describes him, but show that Islam’s understanding of Jesus resonates with Christian tradition. Mustafa explains that Muslims believe in Jesus in an interesting way, we disagree with Jews in that we think Jesus was the messiah, Judaism does not accept him as their messiah, Christians accept Jesus but worship him, see him as god incarnate, so Muslims fall in the middle they accept him as a prophet and messiah but still see him as human. Jewish Christians are people who believe in Jesus as the messiah, and Christianity then developed further. Islam’s views on Jesus are in line with those of the Jewish Christians’. The Islamic Jesus follows the intriguing connection between Jewish Christianity and Islam and how we can interpret it in different ways. Mustafa points to more similarities between the two beliefs, Mary is named 34 times in the Quran and is the only woman mentioned by her name, Quran talks about her being a virgin mother, one of the core beliefs in Christianity, but that it did not mean Jesus was god, this is also true for Jewish Christians, they believe Jesus was born of a virgin, but they did not believe this made him divine. listen to Mustafa talking to me about his books http://samarjarrah.com/en/radio-shows...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zippergirl

    Interesting and accessible to open-minded readers of all faiths, and nonbelievers alike. Akyol explores the shared roots of the Torah, the Gospels (canonical and otherwise), and the Qur'an, and the relevancy of the lessons of Jesus to each. Interesting and accessible to open-minded readers of all faiths, and nonbelievers alike. Akyol explores the shared roots of the Torah, the Gospels (canonical and otherwise), and the Qur'an, and the relevancy of the lessons of Jesus to each.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Spuckler

    The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims by Mustafa Akyol is a Muslim's look at Jesus in both a historical and religious sense. Akyol studied political science a Bogazici University in Istanbul. He is a journalist and author of several books on Islam and Turkish politics. He is currently a contributor to the New York Times and considers himself a classic liberal. This also contributes to his ability to discuss religion in an open and less critical sense than on The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims by Mustafa Akyol is a Muslim's look at Jesus in both a historical and religious sense. Akyol studied political science a Bogazici University in Istanbul. He is a journalist and author of several books on Islam and Turkish politics. He is currently a contributor to the New York Times and considers himself a classic liberal. This also contributes to his ability to discuss religion in an open and less critical sense than one would expect. Akyol starts his book with what seems to be a chance encounter with Christian missionaries, handing out copies of the New Testament, in his native Turkey. Rather than tossing it into the recycling bin, he reads it in an analytical manner. Keeping his beliefs in mind he begins to underline sections that match his Islamic beliefs in blue and those that didn’t in red. Despite a lot of red, he noticed quite a bit of blue. The blue was most evident in the Epistle of James (brother of Jesus) and least evident in Paul’s writing. Many outside of Islam would wonder why a Muslim would care about Jesus. There was, a few years ago, the interview of Reza Aslan on Fox News concerning his book Zealot -- "Why would a Muslim be interested in the founder of Christianity?" was asked. Jesus is an important prophet in Islam second to only Mohammed. He was also the most powerful prophet in Islam having the power of life -- raising Lazareth. Even Mary, the mother of Jesus, is mentioned more times in the Koran than in the Bible. Jesus is, indeed, an important part of Islam; He is just not God. Akyol's thesis on Jesus begins with his reading of the Epistle of James. In the early days of Christianity, there was not a single version of the religion. Two different factions existed. James at the Church of Jerusalem worked with the Jewish population and Paul with the gentiles. James’ Epistle does not mention the death, resurrection, or divinity of Jesus. Paul, who had not met Jesus during his life, takes up the issue of divinity and the pre-existence of Jesus. James fits well with Islamic prophet Jesus. Paul’s version does not fit well with the single God entity of Islam. Looking at the Gospels and when they were written Akyol notes the growing divinity of Jesus as time passes. Mark, the earliest Gospel presents a much less divine Jesus than the last gospel written, John. Islamic Jesus presents Jesus as he is recorded in the Koran and the traditional beliefs of Jesus. The Koran, however, has many holes in the life of Jesus mainly because it is not written as a narrative like the New Testament. It is a document that records the recitation of God’s will and law. This is explained in detail in the section on Islam. Towards the middle of the book, Akyol uses noncanonical Gospels to explore more commonalities between the two versions of Jesus. This leads the reader to wonder if perhaps Islam was influenced by the noncanonical Gospels or that those Gospels were influenced by Islam. I found that to be the weakest part of his argument only because some of these texts have been rejected as authentic works. All in all, a very well done exploration and comparison of Jesus as seen by two religions. The author does not try to convince the reader of the truth of his version Jesus but rather presents his information and discoveries. Needless to say, the book is very well documented with almost a quarter of the book being cited sources and references. As someone who does not embrace either religion, I found the book fascinating.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Altaf Hussain

    I am writing an average long review of a book after months. Thanks to this isolation period. I am having a feeling that I really like reviewing books that I read. So here is the review of "The Islamic Jesus" by Mustafa Akyol. I bought this book from #KIBF 2019 randomly. The title of the book made me to buy it. I am glad that I bought it. Comparative religion always excites me. It's always fun to read relationships between religions and analysis of them. The relationship between all three Abrahami I am writing an average long review of a book after months. Thanks to this isolation period. I am having a feeling that I really like reviewing books that I read. So here is the review of "The Islamic Jesus" by Mustafa Akyol. I bought this book from #KIBF 2019 randomly. The title of the book made me to buy it. I am glad that I bought it. Comparative religion always excites me. It's always fun to read relationships between religions and analysis of them. The relationship between all three Abrahamic religions is beautifully explained in it. This book can be divided into two parts. The first part focuses on proving that Prophet Jesus (PBUH) came to the Jews to renew their faith. To bring them to the right path and not to bring a new religion. Author gives all the references in two ways; doctrinal and historical. In doctrinal perspective, he argues that there was nothing new that requires birth of a new religion that Jesus PBUH addressed that wasn't addressed before to Jews from Prophets like Moses, Jacob, David etc. In historical perspective, he shows the comparison between Jewish Christianity (Those who follow James the Just, brother of Jesus PBUH) and Paulian Christianity ( Those who follow St. Paul's version). Jewish Christianity can be defined as an ideology that believed in Moses and all the prophets before him and after him and considered Jesus PBUH as one of the prophets of Yahweh (The God) who came to Jews as a Prophet. In second part, author develops the relationship between Jewish Christianity and Islam. This part connects Jews and Christians with the followers of Muhammad SAWW. I was not a novice to the whole concept. Following Reza Aslan's books, especially Zealot, and his talks helped me to grasp the heavy content in the book. As Reza says, "Judaism and Christianity are not adversaries to Muslims, but rather intrinsic parts of the entire Islamic belief system." So, this book furthered my this belief. I really enjoyed reading this book. I highly recommend it to you, if you have interest in knowing religions. 5/5 for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Argum

    Interesting premise, but lacks some expertise and knowledge. The beginning and end are great, but the middle focusing on ties to Jewish Christianity relies heavily on Protestant conceptions of Jesus and apocrypha that postdates Islam in many cases. I personally believe that if more Americans and Westerners knew about Islam for what it actually is and says there would be less strife and hatred directed at Muslims. I think that realizing that Jesus is an important Quranic figure is a great entry p Interesting premise, but lacks some expertise and knowledge. The beginning and end are great, but the middle focusing on ties to Jewish Christianity relies heavily on Protestant conceptions of Jesus and apocrypha that postdates Islam in many cases. I personally believe that if more Americans and Westerners knew about Islam for what it actually is and says there would be less strife and hatred directed at Muslims. I think that realizing that Jesus is an important Quranic figure is a great entry point to this. But for example to say that Christianity differs from Judaism and Islam in believing in faith alone and disregarding works is wildly inaccurate outside of Protestantism - Catholics and Orthodox Christians would whole heartedly agree as would the Bible - Faith without works is dead. My second issue is with the proof texts used to show Jewish Christians and a separate church at Jerusalem run by James that was squashed by Paul is like Bart Ehrman run amok. Using apocryphal texts is fine and many were excluded because they lacked content not because of error, but using ones that postdate Islam to say see this survived is nonsense. An example is the finding of a church with a palm tree dedicated to Mary to prove the Quranic Nativity story. He doesn't say much about this church's history, but referring to it as Byzantine is a clue. It was built around the time of Muhammed. It was also later turned into a mosque. This isn't proof of anything. Mr Akyol does a lovely job of explaining Islamic Jesus. He should have stopped there. He isn't exactly arguing with a straw man because Protestants exist, but his historical ties and presentation of Christian history is flawed by his reliance on a subset of Christian thinking. Worth reading but with a grain of salt

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Mathews

    There is a lot to like about The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims by Mustafa Akyol. It's the kind of research book I adore, the bibliography long and thorough, as the text runs so smoothly that you almost believe the whole book was written from original sources. I tip my hat to a writer who narrates in a way that doesn't interrupt one's train of thought with myriad, if imaginary, footnotes. Much of this material, I knew; some, I had forgotten. I've never re There is a lot to like about The Islamic Jesus: How the King of the Jews Became a Prophet of the Muslims by Mustafa Akyol. It's the kind of research book I adore, the bibliography long and thorough, as the text runs so smoothly that you almost believe the whole book was written from original sources. I tip my hat to a writer who narrates in a way that doesn't interrupt one's train of thought with myriad, if imaginary, footnotes. Much of this material, I knew; some, I had forgotten. I've never read any of the information presented from the perspective of a Muslim; yet, that one difference was an eye-opener although Akyol was not tough about leaning either towards the Muslim point of view, nor even his own, in speaking of today's current events. I love comparing and contrasting Jewish and Gentile Christianity; nevertheless, I had never factored in all the sects, their histories (or their differences) with the rise of Islam (with its own sects) through the prophet Mohamed. I appreciated that the The Islamic Jesus pointed out the differences as well as the similarities of the viewpoints of the people of the Book concerning the life and works of Jesus (his purpose) and tied that information in with our, often cloudy, perspective of today's world problems. I have a better understand of underlying modern currents of thought after digesting this material, as well as a different mindset, and something like a newborn appreciation for the reasons behind the animosity, now and through the centuries, among the Muslims, the Jewish, and Christianity itself.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Deirdre Good

    In this new and timely book, the journalist Mustafa Akyol makes a convincing case for linking traditions about religious practice in Islam to performances and beliefs about Jesus evident in the New Testament and in Jewish Christian gospels and writings of the second, third, and fourth centuries CE. The surprising result is a picture of Islam and Christianity in which shared practices and convictions open up a world in common scarcely visible e.g. in media coverage of these two religious traditio In this new and timely book, the journalist Mustafa Akyol makes a convincing case for linking traditions about religious practice in Islam to performances and beliefs about Jesus evident in the New Testament and in Jewish Christian gospels and writings of the second, third, and fourth centuries CE. The surprising result is a picture of Islam and Christianity in which shared practices and convictions open up a world in common scarcely visible e.g. in media coverage of these two religious traditions today. Muslims need to follow Jesus, the author concludes. By noting that Christian tradition is not monochromatic, and that there are a variety of views about Jesus in the New Testament and early Christian traditions for several centuries after Jesus’ death, Mustafa Akyol points out through careful readings both of the English text and sound scholarship what it is all too easy for Christians to overlook, namely, that Torah-observant followers of Jesus, were not, as the Acts of the Apostles would have us believe, a tiny minority swept aside by the rising tide of gentle Christianity led by Stephen and then by the apostles Peter and Paul as they broke from Judaism. No, indeed; in Antioch, Edessa, and Syria, Jewish Christian followers of Jesus continued not as a heretical minority but to flourish openly. The epic view of Acts that all roads lead to Rome, is simply untenable. The Paul of Acts is not the Paul of the Epistles. Christianity in fact expanded in the first century CE eastwards into Armenia and Syria, and to the south into ancient Nubia, Ethiopia, and Africa.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Areeb Rizvi

    A thorough, deeply informative and well researched book. Dove deep into the depths of Jesus Christ and his (often forgotten) importance in Islam. Occasionally there were portions where certain arguments felt hollow, the overall essence of the book has strong scholarly value. It highlights various agreements and disagreements between modern day Christianity and Islam, and indulges itself in highlighting the forgotten Jewish Christianity and its striking similarities to the Qu'ran. It's conclusion A thorough, deeply informative and well researched book. Dove deep into the depths of Jesus Christ and his (often forgotten) importance in Islam. Occasionally there were portions where certain arguments felt hollow, the overall essence of the book has strong scholarly value. It highlights various agreements and disagreements between modern day Christianity and Islam, and indulges itself in highlighting the forgotten Jewish Christianity and its striking similarities to the Qu'ran. It's conclusion was strong and thought-provoking and tied the entire book together into action. My only major criticism of the book would be the lack of proper characterization of Prophet Muhammad (saww). Perhaps it's my own personal bias talking but there were glimpses where it felt that he was not properly represented and was shown mildly "inferior" to Prophet Isa (a.s) to perhaps gain the attention of a Christian reader, even though the Islamic interpretation states otherwise. For example, on its conclusion, it stated that "Prophet Muhammad emphasized justice and using the sword, and Jesus emphasized mercy and upholding peace". This took me by surprise as this is misleading on the account of Prophet Muhammad (saww) being shown as a relatively more "violent" prophet being an advocate of the sword when this could not be further from the truth.

  19. 5 out of 5

    The RK

    I really liked this book, and have nominated it my best new read of 2019. I found it to be valuable, informative,and thought- provoking. I loved the opportunity to read more about Jesus’ teachings, and how these were received by different faith communities. It was especially heartening to reflect on how much I have in common with people of supposedly different faiths. That said, I don’t buy all of the author’s ideas wholesale. I have seen zero evidence to support the author’s assertion that Musli I really liked this book, and have nominated it my best new read of 2019. I found it to be valuable, informative,and thought- provoking. I loved the opportunity to read more about Jesus’ teachings, and how these were received by different faith communities. It was especially heartening to reflect on how much I have in common with people of supposedly different faiths. That said, I don’t buy all of the author’s ideas wholesale. I have seen zero evidence to support the author’s assertion that Muslims in general (y’know, one bigoted monolithic whole) somehow downplay the teachings of Isa (Alayhis Salam - Peace be upon him). Because when I think ‘Muslim’ or think of Muslim traditions, I think of Muhammad (SAW) and his clear love and reverence for Jesus and Mary. Surely I myself, as a practicing Muslim, am reading this book because I also share that love and reverence? Second, I’m not sure I see myself as personally living in the context of first century Nazareth or Jerusalem. Even with my faith, I think I am pretty firmly living in the context of 21st Century London. One cannot, and should not, deliberately pick examples from the lunatic fringe, and think that this is somehow representative of the whole.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sieglinde

    It was actually an enjoyable read. He was digging a bit for his proofs but it was certainly food for thought. His main premise is the the Koran was influenced by resident Jewish Christians. These are Christians who remained Jewish. If you have not read about the division of the church between James, the brother of Jesus and Paul, you may want to read up on that also. The version of Jesus in the Koran is of a great teacher who also had special powers given him by God but not the son of God. The M It was actually an enjoyable read. He was digging a bit for his proofs but it was certainly food for thought. His main premise is the the Koran was influenced by resident Jewish Christians. These are Christians who remained Jewish. If you have not read about the division of the church between James, the brother of Jesus and Paul, you may want to read up on that also. The version of Jesus in the Koran is of a great teacher who also had special powers given him by God but not the son of God. The Muslims do believe in the virgin birth but warn against worshipping Mary or Jesus. You will learn that the Muslims have great respect for Jesus and Mary. The author is a moderate Muslim and strikes me as very spiritual person.

  21. 5 out of 5

    James Klagge

    An interesting perspective. What I most enjoyed was the discussion about the early Jewish-Christianity led by James, brother of Jesus, which was displaced by Paul's Gentile-Christianity. The traces of this exist in the NT Letter of James, hints in Acts, and in later non-canonical writings, known mostly through the attacks on them as heretical. The relevance for this book is that the Islamic view of Jesus gives him a very high place, short of calling him God or literally son of God, just as the e An interesting perspective. What I most enjoyed was the discussion about the early Jewish-Christianity led by James, brother of Jesus, which was displaced by Paul's Gentile-Christianity. The traces of this exist in the NT Letter of James, hints in Acts, and in later non-canonical writings, known mostly through the attacks on them as heretical. The relevance for this book is that the Islamic view of Jesus gives him a very high place, short of calling him God or literally son of God, just as the early Jewish-Christians seem to have done. I don't know how academically respectable the claims of this book are on this subject, but it made for intriguing ideas and an interesting read. Just the kind of ideas I enjoy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Helaine

    A very readable and enlightening book for those of us who know little of what the Quran contains. Mustafa Akyol underlines the similarities among the Jewish, Christian and Muslim religions--particularly as to Jesus. Along with this info, is a condensed history of the Jesus Movement and the many groups that evolved from it, including the major split between James, brother of Jesus who continued Jesus mission to the Jews and Paul, who preached to the Gentiles. Possibly it would do us well to take A very readable and enlightening book for those of us who know little of what the Quran contains. Mustafa Akyol underlines the similarities among the Jewish, Christian and Muslim religions--particularly as to Jesus. Along with this info, is a condensed history of the Jesus Movement and the many groups that evolved from it, including the major split between James, brother of Jesus who continued Jesus mission to the Jews and Paul, who preached to the Gentiles. Possibly it would do us well to take Akyol's initial approach when he was handed a copy of the Bible on the streets of Istanbul: sit down with our blue and red pencils and mark what is similar in the Quran and the Bible.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Written by a Turkish journalist, this book looks at Jesus in both Islam and Christianity, and compares the two. The author clearly has good intentions, and tries to be fair to believers of both religions, but I thought when he talked about Christianity, he tended to rely on scholars who had an obvious agenda and made distorted arguments. A lot of the material about Islam was familiar to me already. I thought the last chapter of the book, where he compares contemporary Islam to 1st century Judais Written by a Turkish journalist, this book looks at Jesus in both Islam and Christianity, and compares the two. The author clearly has good intentions, and tries to be fair to believers of both religions, but I thought when he talked about Christianity, he tended to rely on scholars who had an obvious agenda and made distorted arguments. A lot of the material about Islam was familiar to me already. I thought the last chapter of the book, where he compares contemporary Islam to 1st century Judaism and Christianity, was the strongest and most creative. I also thought that his arguments were often not logical and scattered.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jérémie Cascales

    A really good book! Mustafa Akyol replaced Jesus in the context of the Quran where He (Jesus) is sometimes forgotten from it but still essential to understand the Caliphate (Kingdom of God) and the Shariah (the way of Islam). M. Akyol share the links with the Jewish Christian who inspired Muhammad and of course the Quran. I love, as Christian, to understand and to read someone who wants to bring unity instead of division in the plan of God for humanity... through Jesus! A really good introduction A really good book! Mustafa Akyol replaced Jesus in the context of the Quran where He (Jesus) is sometimes forgotten from it but still essential to understand the Caliphate (Kingdom of God) and the Shariah (the way of Islam). M. Akyol share the links with the Jewish Christian who inspired Muhammad and of course the Quran. I love, as Christian, to understand and to read someone who wants to bring unity instead of division in the plan of God for humanity... through Jesus! A really good introduction for the Quran in parrallele with the Torah, the Bible, and the apocryphe all along the history! Recommend it to bring clarity, understanding, to build up the humanity through Jesus

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kiki

    An excellent book. The scholarship is superb and the analyses thoughtful. It provides a deep and thorough look at Islam's teachings and ponderings on Jesus, as well as the forms of Christianity and even pagan ideas about Jesus and Mary that would have existed at the birth of Islam in the world of Mohammed's time, especially in his immediate surroundings in Arabia. It also provides a convincing argument that Jesus is the link through which the three great monotheisms of the world can come togethe An excellent book. The scholarship is superb and the analyses thoughtful. It provides a deep and thorough look at Islam's teachings and ponderings on Jesus, as well as the forms of Christianity and even pagan ideas about Jesus and Mary that would have existed at the birth of Islam in the world of Mohammed's time, especially in his immediate surroundings in Arabia. It also provides a convincing argument that Jesus is the link through which the three great monotheisms of the world can come together in meaningful conversation.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charlie Miksicek

    Surprisingly good. Talks about the parallels between early Jewish Christianity (the Jesus - James tradition) and Islam. I didn't realize how many mentions of Jesus and Mary are in the Quran. It also helped me realize how much the teachings of Paul, who never met Jesus (except maybe in a vision), influenced what most people think of as Christianity today. I had intended to just browse it to get basic insights, but I pretty much read it straight through. A must for anyone interested in the history Surprisingly good. Talks about the parallels between early Jewish Christianity (the Jesus - James tradition) and Islam. I didn't realize how many mentions of Jesus and Mary are in the Quran. It also helped me realize how much the teachings of Paul, who never met Jesus (except maybe in a vision), influenced what most people think of as Christianity today. I had intended to just browse it to get basic insights, but I pretty much read it straight through. A must for anyone interested in the history of religions.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ladonna

    I teach the subject of World Cultures in high school and we do an extensive unit on the Middle East. I knew that Muslims recognized Jesus as a Jewish prophet, but little more. This book broadened my understanding of the connections between Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The author is well versed in the Koran and presents his views in a clear, detailed way that allows people with exposure to one of the religions to follow his train of thought. I don't agree with everything he says about Jesus, I teach the subject of World Cultures in high school and we do an extensive unit on the Middle East. I knew that Muslims recognized Jesus as a Jewish prophet, but little more. This book broadened my understanding of the connections between Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The author is well versed in the Koran and presents his views in a clear, detailed way that allows people with exposure to one of the religions to follow his train of thought. I don't agree with everything he says about Jesus, however, his viewpoint is interesting and I appreciate his candor.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Terrence L.

    Highly recommended reading! Just finished the Kindle version of The Islamic Jesus. Now I’m going to order the hardback version to read again in greater detail and highlight passages. This is a remarkable book that is well thought out filled information and reverence sources for all statements. Beautifully composed and compelling arguments for his conclusions. A must read for anyone of the Muslim, Christian or Jewish faith. This really makes you step back think and see a broader picture.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Rose

    The Islamic Jesus by Mustafa Akyol is an eye opening look at Jesus from a Muslim. We are shown Jesus from an Islamic and historical perspective. I liked how it showed what the Jews of the time would consider a messiah. It also showed similarities between the three abrahamic religions. This is a great book for anyone wanting to learn more about Jesus and how he impacted not only Christianity but Islam as well.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jorian

    Historically, this book is great. I have learned a lot about the historic similarities between Christianity, Judaism and the Islam and I am grateful to know them now. For me, it changed my perspective on how Muslims perceive their faith. However, as the author mentions a couple of times, he is a muslim himself and it is clear that, though he knows a lot, he doesn't really touch the main message of Christianity. Historically, this book is great. I have learned a lot about the historic similarities between Christianity, Judaism and the Islam and I am grateful to know them now. For me, it changed my perspective on how Muslims perceive their faith. However, as the author mentions a couple of times, he is a muslim himself and it is clear that, though he knows a lot, he doesn't really touch the main message of Christianity.

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