web site hit counter Selling Women's History: Packaging Feminism in Twentieth-Century American Popular Culture - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Selling Women's History: Packaging Feminism in Twentieth-Century American Popular Culture

Availability: Ready to download

Only in recent decades has the American academic profession taken women’s history seriously. But the very concept of women’s history has a much longer past, one that’s intimately entwined with the development of American advertising and consumer culture.    Selling Women’s History reveals how, from the 1900s to the 1970s, popular culture helped teach Americans about the acco Only in recent decades has the American academic profession taken women’s history seriously. But the very concept of women’s history has a much longer past, one that’s intimately entwined with the development of American advertising and consumer culture.    Selling Women’s History reveals how, from the 1900s to the 1970s, popular culture helped teach Americans about the accomplishments of their foremothers, promoting an awareness of women’s wide-ranging capabilities. On one hand, Emily Westkaemper examines how this was a marketing ploy, as Madison Avenue co-opted women’s history to sell everything from Betsy Ross Red lipstick to Virginia Slims cigarettes. But she also shows how pioneering adwomen and female historians used consumer culture to publicize histories that were ignored elsewhere. Their feminist work challenged sexist assumptions about women’s subordinate roles.    Assessing a dazzling array of media, including soap operas, advertisements, films, magazines, calendars, and greeting cards, Selling Women’s History offers a new perspective on how early- and mid-twentieth-century women saw themselves. Rather than presuming a drought of female agency between the first and second waves of American feminism, it reveals the subtle messages about women’s empowerment that flooded the marketplace.     


Compare

Only in recent decades has the American academic profession taken women’s history seriously. But the very concept of women’s history has a much longer past, one that’s intimately entwined with the development of American advertising and consumer culture.    Selling Women’s History reveals how, from the 1900s to the 1970s, popular culture helped teach Americans about the acco Only in recent decades has the American academic profession taken women’s history seriously. But the very concept of women’s history has a much longer past, one that’s intimately entwined with the development of American advertising and consumer culture.    Selling Women’s History reveals how, from the 1900s to the 1970s, popular culture helped teach Americans about the accomplishments of their foremothers, promoting an awareness of women’s wide-ranging capabilities. On one hand, Emily Westkaemper examines how this was a marketing ploy, as Madison Avenue co-opted women’s history to sell everything from Betsy Ross Red lipstick to Virginia Slims cigarettes. But she also shows how pioneering adwomen and female historians used consumer culture to publicize histories that were ignored elsewhere. Their feminist work challenged sexist assumptions about women’s subordinate roles.    Assessing a dazzling array of media, including soap operas, advertisements, films, magazines, calendars, and greeting cards, Selling Women’s History offers a new perspective on how early- and mid-twentieth-century women saw themselves. Rather than presuming a drought of female agency between the first and second waves of American feminism, it reveals the subtle messages about women’s empowerment that flooded the marketplace.     

33 review for Selling Women's History: Packaging Feminism in Twentieth-Century American Popular Culture

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bob Cat

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Sahin

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katie Hanes

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Forsee

  6. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

  7. 5 out of 5

    Theremin Poisoning

  8. 5 out of 5

    Biblio Files (takingadayoff)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lex

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gianna Mosser

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cass

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dеnnis

  15. 5 out of 5

    K.O.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  17. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  18. 5 out of 5

    Holly Lau

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

  22. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Allison Beer

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kat Davis

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deb Lavelle

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Buckmiller

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  29. 4 out of 5

    Quinn Albert

  30. 5 out of 5

    J.T. Glover

  31. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  32. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  33. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Maciel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.