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The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask about Your Organization: An Inspiring Tool for Organizations and the People Who Lead Them

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With Peter Drucker's five essential questions and the help of five of today's thought leaders, this little book will challenge readers to take a close look at the very heart of their organizations and what drives them. A tool for self-assessment and transformation, answering these five questions will fundamentally change the way you work, helping you lead your organization With Peter Drucker's five essential questions and the help of five of today's thought leaders, this little book will challenge readers to take a close look at the very heart of their organizations and what drives them. A tool for self-assessment and transformation, answering these five questions will fundamentally change the way you work, helping you lead your organization to an exceptional level of performance. Peter Drucker's five questions are: What is our Mission? with Jim Collins Who is our Customer? with Phil Kotler What does the Customer Value? with Jim Kouzes What are our Results? with Judith Rodin What is our Plan? with V. Kasturi Rangan These essential questions, grounded in Peter Drucker's theories of management, will take readers on a exploration of organizational and personal self-discovery, giving them a means to assess how to be--how to develop quality, character, mind-set, values and courage. The questions lead to action. By asking these questions, readers can focus on why they are doing what they are doing in their work, and how to do it better. Designed for today's busy professionals, this brief, clear and accessible book will challenge readers to ask these provocative questions and it will stimulate spirited discussions and action within any organization, inspiring positive change and new levels of excellence, helping all to envision the future of theirs' or any organization.


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With Peter Drucker's five essential questions and the help of five of today's thought leaders, this little book will challenge readers to take a close look at the very heart of their organizations and what drives them. A tool for self-assessment and transformation, answering these five questions will fundamentally change the way you work, helping you lead your organization With Peter Drucker's five essential questions and the help of five of today's thought leaders, this little book will challenge readers to take a close look at the very heart of their organizations and what drives them. A tool for self-assessment and transformation, answering these five questions will fundamentally change the way you work, helping you lead your organization to an exceptional level of performance. Peter Drucker's five questions are: What is our Mission? with Jim Collins Who is our Customer? with Phil Kotler What does the Customer Value? with Jim Kouzes What are our Results? with Judith Rodin What is our Plan? with V. Kasturi Rangan These essential questions, grounded in Peter Drucker's theories of management, will take readers on a exploration of organizational and personal self-discovery, giving them a means to assess how to be--how to develop quality, character, mind-set, values and courage. The questions lead to action. By asking these questions, readers can focus on why they are doing what they are doing in their work, and how to do it better. Designed for today's busy professionals, this brief, clear and accessible book will challenge readers to ask these provocative questions and it will stimulate spirited discussions and action within any organization, inspiring positive change and new levels of excellence, helping all to envision the future of theirs' or any organization.

30 review for The Five Most Important Questions You Will Ever Ask about Your Organization: An Inspiring Tool for Organizations and the People Who Lead Them

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    The five most important questions are as follows... 1. What is our mission? 2. Who is our customer? 3. What does the customer value? 4. What are our results? 5. What is our plan? Here are some of my favorite thoughts from it... "You cannot arrive at the right definition of results with our significant input from your customers - and please do not get into a debate over that term. The danger is in acting on what you believe satisfies the customer. You will inevitably make wrong assumptions. Leadership s The five most important questions are as follows... 1. What is our mission? 2. Who is our customer? 3. What does the customer value? 4. What are our results? 5. What is our plan? Here are some of my favorite thoughts from it... "You cannot arrive at the right definition of results with our significant input from your customers - and please do not get into a debate over that term. The danger is in acting on what you believe satisfies the customer. You will inevitably make wrong assumptions. Leadership should not even try to guess at the answers, it should always go to customers a systematic quest for those answers." "Planning is not an event. It is the continuous process of strengthening what works and abandoning what does not, of making risk-taking decisions with the greatest knowledge of their potential effect, of setting objectives, appraising performance and results through systematic feedback, and making ongoing adjustments as conditions change." "If you have quick consensus on an important matter, don’t make the decision. Acclimation means nobody has done the homework. The organizations decisions are important and risky, and they should be controversial. Nonprofit institutions need a healthy atmosphere for dissent if they wish to foster innovation and commitment. nonprofits must encourage honest and constructive disagreement precisely because everybody is committed to a good cause." "Open discussion uncovers what the objections are." "Your commitment to self-assessment is a commitment to developing yourself and your organization as a leader. You have vital judgments ahead: whether to change the mission, whether to abandon programs that have outlived their usefulness and concentrate resources elsewhere, how to match opportunities with your competence and commitment, how you will build community and change lives. Self-assessment is the first action requirement of leadership: the constant reshaping, constant refocusing, never being satisfied." Question 1: What is our Mission? "Changing lives is always the starting point and ending point. A mission cannot be impersonal; it has to have deep meaning, be something you believe in- something you know is right. A fundamental responsibility of leadership is to make sure that everybody knows the mission, understand it, lives it." "The effective mission statement is short and sharply focused." "Every board member, volunteer, and staff person should be able to see the mission and say, 'Yes. This is something I want to be remembered for.'” "If a great opportunity does not fit your mission, then the answer must be 'Thank you, but no.'" "No matter how much the world changes, people still have a fundamental need to belong to something they can feel proud of." Question 2: Who Is Our Customer? ~Peter Drucker “'Who must be satisfied for the organization to achieve results?' When you answer the question, you define your customer as one who values your service, who wants what you offer, who feels it’s important to them." "The primary customer is the person whose life is changed through your work." S "Customers are never static. Their needs, wants, and aspirations will evolve. There may be entirely new customers you must satisfy to achieve results - individuals who really need the service, want the service, but not in the way in which it is available today. And there are customers you should stop serving because the organization has filled a need, because people can be better served elsewhere, or because you are not producing results." "Often, the customer is one step ahead of you. So you must know your customer - or quickly get to know them." "Nobody can guarantee your job. Only customers can guarantee your job. The best companies don’t create customers. They create fans. Our business is not to casually please everyone, but to deeply please our target customers." "An old Chinese proverb says, 'If you cannot smile, do not open a shop.'" Question 3: What Does The Customer Value? "Many organizations are very clear about the value they would like to deliver, but they often don’t understand the value from the perspective of their customers." Customers value an organization that seeks their feedback and that is capable of solving their problems and meeting their needs. Customers value a leader and a team who have the ability to listen and the courage to challenge the 'business-as-usual' environment, all in service of the yearnings of the customer." Question 4: What Are Our Results? "Each organization must identify its customers, learn what they value, develop meaningful measures, ad honestly judge whether, in fact, lives are being changed." "To abandon anything is always bitterly resisted. People in any organization are always attached to the obsolete-the things that should have worked but did not, the things that once were productive and not longer are. Abandoning anything is thus difficult, but only for a fairly short spell. Rebirth can begin once the dead are buried: six months later, everybody wonders, 'Why did it take us so long?'" Question 5: What Is Our Plan? "The mission transcends today but guides today, informs today. It provides the framework for setting goals and mobilizing the resources of the organization for getting the right things done." "To further the mission, there must be action today and specific aims for tomorrow." "Goals are overarching and should be few in number. If you have more than five goals, you have none. Goals flow from mission, aim the organization where it must go, build on strength, address opportunity, and taken together, outline your desired future." "Appraisal will be ongoing. The organization must monitor progress in achieving goals and meeting objectives, and above all, must measure results in changed lives. True self-assessment is never finished. Leadership requires constant resharpening, refocusing, never really being satisfied." "Planning is the process of translating the organization’s strategic or mission goals to a set of actionable programs, and tracing the path of how those within the organization would meet the goals. A plan, is the action agenda that is aimed at reaching the goal."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol Sente

    This is a wonderful concise and focused book guiding leaders of organizations on the five most important questions to ask of themselves and their organizations - 1. What is our mission? 2. Who is our customer? 3. What does the customer value? 4. What are our results? 5. What is our plan? It is written by the Leader to Leader Institute which was originally founded by management guru Peter Drucker. The current CEO is the most impressive Frances Hesselbein (amazing record of accomplishment with the Girl This is a wonderful concise and focused book guiding leaders of organizations on the five most important questions to ask of themselves and their organizations - 1. What is our mission? 2. Who is our customer? 3. What does the customer value? 4. What are our results? 5. What is our plan? It is written by the Leader to Leader Institute which was originally founded by management guru Peter Drucker. The current CEO is the most impressive Frances Hesselbein (amazing record of accomplishment with the Girl Scouts of America), and has contributions from names renown in leadership and business circles like Jim Collins, Philip Kotler and Jim Kouzes plus two I didn’t know Judith Rodin and V. Katsuri Rangan. The book is perfect for a quick refresher, for start-ups, for organizations who have lost their way due to changing environments, for leadership teams to discuss and for those new to leading organizations. There is no excuse not to read this 96 page book. I gave this book 4 rather than 5 stars only because it is so short and for those individuals who have been students of management and leadership for decades, it leaves the senses just a bit underwhelmed. Maybe because I have read several of these contributors’ full books and they provide so much more depth. Definitely an important read, particularly for the reasons listed above.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Moshe Mikanovsky

    Even if you know this already, not a bad reminder.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lyndell

    The late Peter Drucker, known as the father of modern management was a prolific writer who authored over 25 books. This 144 page book is a brief and easy to read treatise on the essentials of strategic management. While the original target audience of this work was the not for profit sector, this book is just as relevant to the world of business. Ducker’s premise is that there are five key questions every organization must answer in order to be successful. The five questions are: what is our mis The late Peter Drucker, known as the father of modern management was a prolific writer who authored over 25 books. This 144 page book is a brief and easy to read treatise on the essentials of strategic management. While the original target audience of this work was the not for profit sector, this book is just as relevant to the world of business. Ducker’s premise is that there are five key questions every organization must answer in order to be successful. The five questions are: what is our mission, who is our customer, what does the customer value, what are our results and what is our plan. According to Drucker, answering these five questions is the starting point for any organization in order to conduct an internal self-assessment as part of a strategic review or planning exercise. By going through this process, an organization will be forced to ask hard questions about their strategy and rethink the basis of how it competes. The book is not ground breaking or revolutionary. In fact it is likely that any MBA graduate or leader widely schooled in business strategy will be familiar with much of the material in this book. Nonetheless, many leaders fail to apply this material or simply forget about it over time. The value of Drucker’s writing is that he gives a step by step process to a much neglected review and planning exercise, explains the concepts clearly and succinctly while holding the reader’s hand along the way. Business and organizational strategy is a complex topic that is the subject of an uncountable number of books and research articles. Clearly, there are numerous more detailed and more recent books available. However, for someone looking for a quick how to guide – particularly the small business owner or not for profit organizational leader, Drucker’s Five Most Important Questions provides the perfect start.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Rodriquez

    This is a great little tool for any leader to take a step back and self-evaluate their organization and it's priorities. It's a REALLY quick read and a tool that leaders will have on their bookshelves to reference from time to time. This is a great little tool for any leader to take a step back and self-evaluate their organization and it's priorities. It's a REALLY quick read and a tool that leaders will have on their bookshelves to reference from time to time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Klein

    This was a short, quick book that I read as part of an assessment of a non-profit board I serve. I didn't think I would like it. Too business focused for the non-profit world--especially synagogues and other Jewish institutions. BUT I think it was exactly the right book. 5 questions: What is our mission? Who is our customer? What do our customers' value? How do we measure results? What is our plan? These are questions we all need to ask--especially in these turbulent times. Flexibility, creativity, be This was a short, quick book that I read as part of an assessment of a non-profit board I serve. I didn't think I would like it. Too business focused for the non-profit world--especially synagogues and other Jewish institutions. BUT I think it was exactly the right book. 5 questions: What is our mission? Who is our customer? What do our customers' value? How do we measure results? What is our plan? These are questions we all need to ask--especially in these turbulent times. Flexibility, creativity, being nimble, all important but need to go back to what do your customers, members, associates want, need and value. While this is a short book (120 pages), it will have a lifetime of impact.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Niels Philbert

    I will recommend reading some Drucker. It's a must, if you are working in a an organisation in modern society. Just skip this one. The book is part Druckers words and part reflections from five "thought leaders". The Drucker part is good. The thought leader part is too decoupled from the main text. I was curious to see if this short book would be a good introduction to Druckers work to recommend to new readers. It is not. Read "The Effective Executive" and/or "Managing Oneself" instead. I will recommend reading some Drucker. It's a must, if you are working in a an organisation in modern society. Just skip this one. The book is part Druckers words and part reflections from five "thought leaders". The Drucker part is good. The thought leader part is too decoupled from the main text. I was curious to see if this short book would be a good introduction to Druckers work to recommend to new readers. It is not. Read "The Effective Executive" and/or "Managing Oneself" instead.

  8. 5 out of 5

    M

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Very good book about organizational self assessment to ensure its success. The idea is to ask the following 5 questions: - what's our mission? - Who's out customer? - What does our customer value? - What are our results? - What's our plan? (has 5 elements: abandon, concentration, innovation, risk taking, analysis) Very good book about organizational self assessment to ensure its success. The idea is to ask the following 5 questions: - what's our mission? - Who's out customer? - What does our customer value? - What are our results? - What's our plan? (has 5 elements: abandon, concentration, innovation, risk taking, analysis)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Felicia

    Simplifying a difficult job When I think about trying to get my business started, running successfully and pleasing my clients, it seems daunting. This booked simplified the process for me. It consolidated it into a nice, tidy package. You just take one question at a time. It’s not a book you should try to rush through and I can see I’ll return to it as I grow my business.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vishalkumar

    An interesting book. Authors talk about 5 basic questions every employee/associate of an organization must ask or brainstorm while working. Though the questions look simple; however the context and answer of the questions might be complex. Exploring these questions will help to identify future direction, strategy and operations modification.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    What amazes me about Drucker is his foresight of business progression dating back to the 1940's. Everything he's written can be applied to modern day business strategy. The five questions will challenge everyone to look at their organizations through a different lens. What amazes me about Drucker is his foresight of business progression dating back to the 1940's. Everything he's written can be applied to modern day business strategy. The five questions will challenge everyone to look at their organizations through a different lens.

  12. 4 out of 5

    WR

    I thought it was useful to provide the questions as well as the additional perspectives from experts. But would add that it is VERY difficult to do this well.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    READ MAY 2017 While this is geared to non-profit organizations, the five questions apply to any organization.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Meegan

    Book was a quick read. Made some good points and I enjoyed it

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maïkel Vandorpe

    A decent book about mission and values

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eldon Phukuile

    Very good questions to help define your vision, purpose and strategy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    Quick read on great questions to ask to focus and drive an organization.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Itai Chitungo

    Here Drucker emphasis on the importance of understanding how the organization works so as to improve its performance

  19. 5 out of 5

    Luis Pavon

    What is our mission? Who is our customer? What does our customer value? What are our results? What is our plan?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emily D

    More nonprofit focused than expected. It’s great stuff, but nothing new or particularly earth shattering.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Sagastume

    A simple read but filled with great reminders

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve Vaughn

    I started to read this book, but realized i just wasn't interested in how to oganize and lead a non-profit organization. I expect is a good book, but too specialized for me. I started to read this book, but realized i just wasn't interested in how to oganize and lead a non-profit organization. I expect is a good book, but too specialized for me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emerson John Tiu Ng

    A nice book for every organization

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gene Z

    As the title suggests, this is a concise collection of inquiries to identify where your organization needs clarity. I found them useful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Suhel

    Mostly basic stuff because there has been plenty written and read about the five topics, though a good list of questions at the end it the book is useful

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dawid Pośliński

    Short introduction to build a great competitive organization via asking ourselfs few important questions.

  27. 4 out of 5

    James

    Quick read and lots of examples from the social sector. Bring your pen and paper. This is a workbook which requires brainstorming and exercise to get the best value from.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

    Great questions. The trick is in answering them well. This is a solid and quick read. For the curious, I've shared the questions below. They seem too obvious. That's because there are no tricky frameworks here, just honest, straightforward examination: 1. What Is Your Mission? 2. Who Is Your Customer? 3. What Does Your Customer Value? 4. What Are Your Results? 5. What Is Your Plan? Great questions. The trick is in answering them well. This is a solid and quick read. For the curious, I've shared the questions below. They seem too obvious. That's because there are no tricky frameworks here, just honest, straightforward examination: 1. What Is Your Mission? 2. Who Is Your Customer? 3. What Does Your Customer Value? 4. What Are Your Results? 5. What Is Your Plan?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Justin Mertes

    Short, sweet, and to the point. Drucker (and co.) make their arguments quickly in a way that is challenging, digestible, and actionable. Worth a read for anyone in leadership who is in a state of evaluation, or SHOULD be in a state of evaluation. The assessments in the back make the book even more practical, and it may be worth buying even just for those.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Less than an hour. Incredible.

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