web site hit counter American Revolution: A History From Beginning to End (One Hour History Revolution Book 2) - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

American Revolution: A History From Beginning to End (One Hour History Revolution Book 2)

Availability: Ready to download

American Revolution The American Revolution, which took place between 1765 and 1783, was an uprising by British colonists in North America against the rule of Great Britain. The colonists were fighting for rights they felt they deserved, not only as British citizens, but as human beings. The belief that rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness were God given American Revolution The American Revolution, which took place between 1765 and 1783, was an uprising by British colonists in North America against the rule of Great Britain. The colonists were fighting for rights they felt they deserved, not only as British citizens, but as human beings. The belief that rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness were God given and not dependent upon any government or ruler gave the revolutionaries the courage to fight against overwhelming odds and eventually win their freedom. Inside you will read about... ✓ A Series of Oppressions ✓ Death and Taxes ✓ Out of Many, One ✓ War in Earnest ✓ Voices of Liberty ✓ Independence And more! The new government they created for the United States of America would be unlike anything seen before in world history, and their fight has continued to change the world to this day.


Compare

American Revolution The American Revolution, which took place between 1765 and 1783, was an uprising by British colonists in North America against the rule of Great Britain. The colonists were fighting for rights they felt they deserved, not only as British citizens, but as human beings. The belief that rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness were God given American Revolution The American Revolution, which took place between 1765 and 1783, was an uprising by British colonists in North America against the rule of Great Britain. The colonists were fighting for rights they felt they deserved, not only as British citizens, but as human beings. The belief that rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness were God given and not dependent upon any government or ruler gave the revolutionaries the courage to fight against overwhelming odds and eventually win their freedom. Inside you will read about... ✓ A Series of Oppressions ✓ Death and Taxes ✓ Out of Many, One ✓ War in Earnest ✓ Voices of Liberty ✓ Independence And more! The new government they created for the United States of America would be unlike anything seen before in world history, and their fight has continued to change the world to this day.

30 review for American Revolution: A History From Beginning to End (One Hour History Revolution Book 2)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    This was a fun little recap of the American Revolution that I found via a post on Reddit. It’s part of a series of 1 hour history books, and it was nice to get that quick overview of things without having to devote 30 hours to a full-on history book. There were some omitted words and small errors in the text, but overall it was good. I’d never heard this before, but it’s really badass: “Let us convince every invader of our freedom.” —Samuel Adams I can only imagine someone racking a shotgun while This was a fun little recap of the American Revolution that I found via a post on Reddit. It’s part of a series of 1 hour history books, and it was nice to get that quick overview of things without having to devote 30 hours to a full-on history book. There were some omitted words and small errors in the text, but overall it was good. I’d never heard this before, but it’s really badass: “Let us convince every invader of our freedom.” —Samuel Adams I can only imagine someone racking a shotgun while saying that. I know they didn’t have shotguns then but still. Just let me have this.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Young Kim

    Despite its il-organized form’at (Kindle Location numbers and page numbers are mixed up), this is all in all a good book with brief, but clear messages to the readers with relatively balanced and honest interpretation of the US history. Yet, before we close the book, as always we should check some lines together, especially about the significance of French role in the American War of Independence, whose decisive role’s been often forgotten since we tend to focus more on our American heroes. 1. Par Despite its il-organized form’at (Kindle Location numbers and page numbers are mixed up), this is all in all a good book with brief, but clear messages to the readers with relatively balanced and honest interpretation of the US history. Yet, before we close the book, as always we should check some lines together, especially about the significance of French role in the American War of Independence, whose decisive role’s been often forgotten since we tend to focus more on our American heroes. 1. Part of Bigger Conflict between the World’s Two Giants of the Time (Kindle Location 27) ...leading to the French being driven completely out of North America by 1763. Everyone thinks that the Seven Years’ War (a.k.a. the French and Indian War) completely destroyed the French influence in North American Continent. If so, why the newly-born U.S. government had to buy Louisiana territory in 1803 from Paris, not from London? The power of grand army of France conquered the entire European Continent in a matter of a few years of time once it was unleashed with the French Revolution because it was well-supplied from its massive overseas colonies. We tend to think of Great Britain when it comes to the global hegemony of the time during the American Revolution, but not yet until 1815. It was still France, which was the global hegemon since it took the title from Spain in the mid-17th century. Still the British challenge against the century-long French hegemony was ongoing, and since the British were quite successful in that early stage of the war, the French Bourbon monarchy was looking for a useful ally. (Kindle Ed., p. 20) ...impressed by the American victory, the French chose finally to openly enter the war in support of the rebellious American colonies and declared war on Great Britain. When French allies including Spain and the Netherlands joined the American cause, the revolution became a world war. The American Revolution (1776), unlike the French Revolution (1789), which followed after the massive crop-failure in the 1780s, didn't happen because the American Colonists were desperate-hungry like the French people. And it was directly caused by the Seven Years' War. If we extend so-called the Seven Years’ War to the American Independence War, as the first round of the 2nd Global War (1758-1815), Great Britain didn't win that round. Still the French prevailed with the United States seceding from Great Britain, and France herself keeping the huge Louisiana Territory (twice bigger than the early United States, twenty times larger than the first 13 Colonies), west of the newly-independent nation hostile towards her arch-enemy Great Britain, thus natural friend to France. Let's not forget that the Unites States, siding with Napoleon's French Empire, fought the British during the Napoleonic War. We just remember it in a different "name", a.k.a. the War of 1812 in the US history. (Kindle Ed., p. 24) ...French entrance into the war against Great Britain... This was the sheer point of the French monarch about the war: Against Great Britain. As a matter of fact, if we approach the event from global point of view, it was more like the American entrance into the French war against the rising hegemonic power Great Britain. (Kindle Ed., p. 25) France had been a clandestine ally of the American revolutionaries since the beginning of the war by secretly sending supplies, but in June of 1778 France officially recognized America as an independent nation and declared war on Great Britain. Spain and the Netherlands followed France’s lead, also declaring support for the Americans, leaving Great Britain standing alone against an alliance of European powers and the Continental Army... As I said, if it was an extension of the Seven Years' War, Great Britain didn't fulfill its goal as planned yet. It was still France, and the country had been secretly backing the Americans from the beginning since it was a fight against the British challenge. (Kindle Ed., pp. 27-29) In the fall of 1781, the French navy and the American Continental Army tightened the noose around the British forces. The French navy, including the whole of France’s Caribbean fleet under Francois Joseph Paul, the comte de Grasse, defeated the powerful British navy sailing under Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Graves in the Battle of Chesapeake Bay. This gave France command of the sea lanes around Virginia, and allowed for reinforcing of the French and American troops under Lafayette. When Nathaniel Green, American commander of the Continental Army in the south, forced General Cornwallis and the majority of the British Army to the Yorktown Peninsula in Virginia, the blockade by the French navy kept the British from escaping by sea, and also prevented any hope of reinforcements arriving. This cooperative effort by ground forces and naval assets became known as the Siege of Yorktown...The British force was effectively penned in, with the Continental Army and French ground forces on one side and an angry ocean afloat with French battleships on the other. The French and Colonial troops set up and began bombarding the British position. The French naval power pushed the British Navy like a cat forcing the mouse into a corner. Yet somehow we don't wanna call the French Navy at the time the master of the global waters. (Kindle Ed., pp 30-31) ...The official ceremony of the surrender took place on October 19th, 1781. With the entire complement of the Continental Army on one side of the road and the French forces lining the other, the defeated British contingent numbering over seven thousand soldiers marched toward the American commander to give their surrender. General Washington had denied General Cornwallis’s request that the army be allowed the traditional Honors of War, which meant they would march out with dignity, their flags yet waving, with shouldered arms and with the band playing an American marching tune, because the general had denied this honor to the troops under Benjamin Lincoln when the British had taken Charleston. Instead, the surrendering army would march to the tune of “The World Turned Upside Down” with their flags bundled and their weapons reversed in shame. General Cornwallis, commander of the British forces in North America, did not attend the ceremony, claiming illness. Instead, the General’s second General O’Hara was given the task. Upon approach, General O’Hara at first attempted to offer his sword to Lieutenant General the Comte de Rochambeau, whose troops were arrayed behind him in full French military regalia. Rochambeau directed O’Hara to General Washington, who, in turn, indicated that the surrender would be accepted by his second in command, Major General Benjamin Lincoln... Two fresh points: One, we tend to think the song meant it was a victory on the old, most powerful empire in the world at the time. However, we must not forget that it was the British, who sang the song of “The World Turned Upside Down”, not the Americans, and to the British it simply meant the pitiful rebel army beating their government rule, probably the second most powerful ruling government in a long hegemonic conflict with the most powerful at the time: Bourbon-France. Even from both sides’ common point, the British and the Americans, here the “world” that turned upside down meant the old system within Great Britain, not literally the whole world, because the rebels won the civil war against their old ruler, the British government and its authority controlling the society. Two, see how the British surrendered to the French General, so that French General directed it to the Americans, like a gift from their ally supporting their country like a big brother. Did the British army really surrender to the Americans or the French at that moment? We should think again if the way we've been taught in America has been really interpreted with fair balance, or it’s simply been too “American” making us feel good. 2. Despite the Recent Reinterpretation of the George Washington Myth in US History... (Kindle Ed., pp 42-44) ...Although many in Congress suggested titles for the office that mimicked the pomp observed in European courts, such as “His Majesty the President,” “His Exalted Highness,” “His Elective Highness,” and even “Most Illustrious and Excellent President,” George Washington felt that the country had had enough of titles and insisted upon simply, “Mr. President.” Washington also avoided any of the trappings associated with royalty that he could easily have assumed. He wore no crown or other “royal dress,” instead wearing the clothing he would have worn as a wealthy businessman...He approved the bill that established a permanent location for the nation’s capital by forming the District of Columbia so that the capital would not belong to any one state, but to all...Knowing that his term in office would serve to set a precedent for future government he retired from public office, establishing the standard of the presidential two term limit that has only been set aside once in the history of the United States. Washington returned to Mount Vernon, his Virginia estate, to live out his life as the gentleman farmer he had always considered himself...Washington served his country as a soldier, as a military leader, a congressional representative, a contributor to the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, and as the first President. He also served, unofficially, as an example of what the leader of a free nation should be. He was offered the chance to rule as a king, but chose instead to serve as a citizen...The nation mourned the loss of a great national hero, and even the British fleet paid tribute to his memory while the French observed an official ten day mourning period. Not to mention France busy in the middle of the French Revolutionary War, but the enemy state Great Britain did that too? George Washington was indeed a good example to all his future successors and was respected in many civilized countries. 3. Modern Guerilla Warfare: Champion of the New Military Tactics (Kindle Ed., pp. 16-17) In an attempt to regain momentum in the war, General Washington planned an audacious attack on Britain’s paid Hessian mercenaries. Knowing that the Hessians would celebrate the Christmas holiday and be unprepared for battle, Washington arranged an attack on the British stronghold in Trenton, New Jersey. Forces of the Continental Army crossed the partially frozen Delaware River in shifts on the night of December twenty-fifth, using whatever crafts they could find along the shore. Once across, they stealthily surrounded the British position and readied themselves to attack. The attack resulted in an overwhelming victory for the Continental Army. The tactics was the very early stage and model of modern guerrilla warfare. (Kindle Ed., p. 19) ...Under the command of General Gates, the Continental Army moved north, towards the oncoming British. They set up fortifications on the defensible Bemis Heights near Saratoga, where the terrain created a funnel through which British troops would have to pass. The two armies faced off on September 19th, 1777. Action began when advanced scouting parties led by Daniel Morgan’s men, largely frontiersmen skilled in woodlands combat, and the light infantry troops commanded by Henry Dearborn came in contact with an advance company of General James Hamilton’s forces. Initially attacking the British force by use of marksmen sniping from locations in the surrounding forest, Morgan’s men were able to quickly eliminate most of the officers in the opposing company... This early guerrilla tactics was considered dishonorable among the European noble commanders at the time. (Kindle Ed., p.20) The Battle of Saratoga was a much needed victory for the Continental Army. For the first time, the British were convinced that the Americans were a respectable foe... This is a wrong nationalistic interpretation of our time: Although we hate to accept it, the truth is that the Red Coats called the Americans “disgraceful, sneaky rats.” But can we really call it disgraceful? The conventional tactics, where two lined-up musketeers exchanged deadly bullets until one of the line was annihilated, was just inhumane. The British military leaders called the Americans targeting the commanding officers first in the British lines dishonorable and barbaric, but the common-enlisted soldiers were just numbers or objects to be wasted for the noble-born officers? What was more inhumane, the old tactics or the new? And today, after all, we all use that very new tactics taking cover and sniping to protect the men’s lives on our side, although the new modern tactics would still entail many casualties with the advance of industrial-modern weaponry like machine-guns or shells. 4. Nation Born upon a Firm Christian Foundation (Kindle Ed., p. 12) ...direct opposition to the cherished Western tradition of the divine right of kings to rule, as representatives of God’s will on Earth. It was a direct rejection of the British monarchical government as unnatural and unjustly founded. Further, the claim that the common man did have rights granted by their Creator apart from laws of man was revolutionary. By their Creator: The United States is officially a Christian nation, and that cannot change; the country was founded upon the very idea of freedom from God upon all mankind, so it ensures the religious freedom, but the nation itself settles firmly in Christian foundation. BTW, why they keep on calling George III a tyrant? It was the British Parliament, which were in real power since the Glorious Revolution of 1688 in England. The English monarchy’s been like a symbol without actual power ever since, hasn’t it? 5. Balanced and Honest Interpretation of the US History (Kindle Ed., pp. 12-13) The assertion of unalienable rights enshrined in the founding document of the United States is controversial from the start in a nation where slavery was legal and upheld. Slaves across the colonies understood the contradiction between the high principles in the statement and the reality of their daily lives. Hundreds took this as an announcement of their own right to freedom and escaped from slavery. Slaves owned by Thomas Jefferson and even George Washington escaped, starkly underlining the hypocrisy written into the nation’s consciousness. After the powerful Preamble, the Declaration goes on to detail a list of oppressions that King George had unjustly visited upon the American colonies...In summary, British rule was depriving the colonists of the freedoms they felt were theirs by natural right, and they were therefore justified in declaring independence from that rule. As I’ve mentioned it many times, the very cause of political action's only for those who were fighting to replace the old rules with the new of their own. (Kindle Ed., pp. 45-46) The United States of America, a nation born out of bloody battle and a fierce desire for independence, has grown from its humble beginnings to become a leading power in the world...the United States has often struggled to live up to the lofty ideals of its founding. Eighty seven years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the thirteenth president of the United States Abraham Lincoln gave a speech honoring the soldiers who fought in another battle on American soil... To make all their sacrifices and bloodshed worth, we must not stop making the country better. We are getting better, right? (Kindle Ed., p. 47) ...the delay in correcting it, remain a divisive force in American culture in spite of great strides towards the cherished ideal woven into the country’s identity...a society based on individual liberty and natural rights, safeguarded by laws to prevent tyranny and ruled by the people for the people. Though their efforts did not result in a perfect government and mistakes were made that have impacted the nation for centuries, they created an entirely new form of government based on the will of the people... It is a very honest assessment on the author’s part, and that’s why this book deserves to be highly rated. 6. A Little Lesson and message to the Korean People (Kindle Ed., p. 31) ...General Washington sent a messenger to Philadelphia to inform the Continental Congress of the victory, and the entire town celebrated for days... Nothing was wrong with the Americans requesting a foreign power for a help. Without the French intervention there wouldn’t be the great nation United States we know today. It was brilliant diplomatic success on American part to have a great power like France as a partner. I am a Korean-American, who’s studied Korean history in the country. The Koreans’ requests for allied interventions during the Great East Asian War and Korean War were not bad calls either under the situations. The Korean countrymen in general take the cases as national shame, but I don’t think they have to.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Be Dozier

    Good overview of the American Revolution I was looking for a brief refresher of the American Revolution and this served me well. It is more than a list of dates and battles - though the major ones are included. It also has the backstory of the Constitution and its legacy. Due to the self imposed limited space, much has to be condensed or left out. However, for a rapid refresher or overview, I found this excellent.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Madelon

    I started reading this yesterday, not because the first public impeachment hearing of trump was going to occur today but because I have become increasingly convinced that all Americans (myself included) certainly could use a refresher in their country's history. Imagine my surprise while listening to the opening statement of George Kent, who currently serves as Deputy Assistant Secretary in the European and Eurasian Bureau at the U.S. Department of State, refer to the assistance of European nati I started reading this yesterday, not because the first public impeachment hearing of trump was going to occur today but because I have become increasingly convinced that all Americans (myself included) certainly could use a refresher in their country's history. Imagine my surprise while listening to the opening statement of George Kent, who currently serves as Deputy Assistant Secretary in the European and Eurasian Bureau at the U.S. Department of State, refer to the assistance of European nations during the American Revolution. It makes me feel a little prescient right about now. In these busy, and highly fraught times, most of us do not have the time to read massive history books. It is my experience that even when time might permit, daily life dissipates the inclination to do so. For this reason, I started reading the offerings of Hourly History because they provide an excellent overview into people, places, and events. I have been pleasantly surprised to learn new things from each one that I have read. Perhaps my biggest takeaway from AMERICAN REVOLUTION came not from the accounts of battles but from the way in which the issue of slavery was handled. The following excerpt shows both the American and British view on the subject. "In October of 1775, Parliament officially declared war on the American Colonies. During this time, the Continental Congress in Philadelphia decides to ban black soldiers, whether slave or free, from serving in the Continental Army because Southern slave owners were against arming black Americans. Britain took advantage of this stand taken by the colonists to issue a proclamation freeing any slaves or indentured servants, regardless of color, who join the British army. This resulted in a rash of slaves rushing to support the British cause against the already outnumbered Americans." To this day, there is controversy about all men being created 'equal' as this excerpt shows: "The assertion of unalienable rights enshrined in the founding document of the United States is controversial from the start in a nation where slavery was legal and upheld. Slaves across the colonies understood the contradiction between the high principles in the statement and the reality of their daily lives. Hundreds took this as an announcement of their own right to freedom and escaped from slavery. Slaves owned by Thomas Jefferson and even George Washington escaped, starkly underlining the hypocrisy written into the nation’s consciousness." I was particularly astonished to read: "The issue of slavery was deemed too controversial to be solved by the Congress of the Confederation." And, further down the same page: "The compromise here was that the power to regulate the slave trade would move from the purview of the states to the central government after twenty years. In this way, the current situation was retained, but a forced reevaluation was stipulated for the future." We know for a fact that nothing was resolved after twenty years. To many, the issue remains unresolved today. We struggle with the idea of all men (I would say persons) are created equal almost on a daily basis. It may not seem that a book designed to be read in about an hour could evoke such consideration, but this one surely does. This crash course might lead to a deeper study of not only the origins of the United States of America, but to a study of where we are today.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    A very concise and objective historical account of the American Revolutionary period. Is well written and can likely be ascertained and understood by both young students in the earlier stages of their academic careers or, as was the case here, be very useful and serviceable for anyone interested in the basic environment, main figures, events and conditions surrounding the colonists revolt from the ruling British Empire and how it eventuated into a newly formed independent nation and government u A very concise and objective historical account of the American Revolutionary period. Is well written and can likely be ascertained and understood by both young students in the earlier stages of their academic careers or, as was the case here, be very useful and serviceable for anyone interested in the basic environment, main figures, events and conditions surrounding the colonists revolt from the ruling British Empire and how it eventuated into a newly formed independent nation and government unlike any in prior history. Essentially, this is a great foundation of the major events and areas of perceived oppression that, through a war of several years, evolved into the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution.

  6. 5 out of 5

    J Layne

    Interesting—It struck me that the French gave their unstinting support to the rebel American colonies, and this book makes the astute observation that the French did not gain much in the treaties of the Peace of Paris. In fact, their support of the American cause had left their treasuries drained, and their economic situation was a factor in the French Revolution a few years later. I very much enjoyed and learned from reading this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vince Pillig

    Good recap little short . I think a little more explanation on common sense . Also greater explanation on why the 10 amendments were added to the Constitution . When I read the Federalist papers I realize that the schools do not teach much about why 10 amendments were added . This is an important factor in our Constitution .

  8. 5 out of 5

    Richlyn C Clements

    A good summary of the major events of the war. I was looking for a. Quick summary. This book fit the bill. It was well presented especially the patriotic quotes. Tied to the period.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gary L. Blodgett

    Concise and well presented. I have now completed 10 books by Hourly History. I have been a history buff for over 60 years and am of the opinion one gets the lessons and information from this series needed to be well informed.

  10. 4 out of 5

    James A. wilks, Jr.

    Good Quick Read Informative, concise and factual. It's a good read for the important events and people involved in the American Revolution. Doesn't contain a lot of filler or detail. Good Quick Read Informative, concise and factual. It's a good read for the important events and people involved in the American Revolution. Doesn't contain a lot of filler or detail.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Raymond Medrano

    A snapshot of our nation's birth and developmment I enjoyed this book very much. In a brief manner we are reminded of how our nation was shaped. It points out many of the people who were responsible. Every student should be familiar with this book. A snapshot of our nation's birth and developmment I enjoyed this book very much. In a brief manner we are reminded of how our nation was shaped. It points out many of the people who were responsible. Every student should be familiar with this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Derinzy

    Pretty good synopsis Enjoyable read. If you enjoy revolutionary history the author sums it up in very little amount of space. God Bless this Great Country.

  13. 4 out of 5

    George Polansky

    Good resource book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michele Lenig

    Well done Considerate this book a must read for all high school civics classes. I would recommend it for that sort of application.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Patitz

    A well studied depiction of the settlers revealing reasonable explanations of how and how well areas were settled and developed.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Parker

    Long struggle Looking back non-white males did not get the right U.K. vote until 1869 and women until 1920. And 200 hundred years later the struggle still continues but we expect nations around the world to get it right out of the gate. We need to show more patience with countries like Iran and Eastern Europe.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Fleming

    Short but good I enjoyed this a quick read; but it left out the southern campaign in its entirety as well as the Spanish help of Bernardo.Galvez w the Mississippi and Florida,West and East. Fine for those who want basics!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Terrence Whitter

    1 hour bitesize I could have done with these short books on history when I was studying in school. I really enjoyed reading it and learnt some things that I never knew about America.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Very brief and basic overview of the American Revolution. Great for middle-school kids.

  20. 5 out of 5

    mr p r henden

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emily Berg

  23. 4 out of 5

    William

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mr. Book

  25. 5 out of 5

    Esha Gupta

  26. 5 out of 5

    Manohar Karamballi

  27. 4 out of 5

    DAVID J LOGAN SR

  28. 5 out of 5

    Heather Swanson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marc Shefelton

  30. 5 out of 5

    LUK CHI HUNG

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.