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Working closely with Moebius Productions in France, Dark Horse is putting the work of a master storyteller back in print--with some material in English for the first time! Stel and Atan are interstellar investigators trying to find a lost space station and its crew. When they discover the mythical paradise planet Edena, their lives are changed forever. The long out-of-prin Working closely with Moebius Productions in France, Dark Horse is putting the work of a master storyteller back in print--with some material in English for the first time! Stel and Atan are interstellar investigators trying to find a lost space station and its crew. When they discover the mythical paradise planet Edena, their lives are changed forever. The long out-of-print Edena Cycle from Moebius gets a deluxe hardcover treatment! Moebius's World of Edena story arc comprises five chapters--Upon a Star, Gardens of Edena, The Goddess, Stel, and Sra--which are all collected here. A storyboard artist and designer ("Alien, Tron, The Fifth Element," among many others) as well as comic book master, Moebius's work has influenced creators in countless fields.


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Working closely with Moebius Productions in France, Dark Horse is putting the work of a master storyteller back in print--with some material in English for the first time! Stel and Atan are interstellar investigators trying to find a lost space station and its crew. When they discover the mythical paradise planet Edena, their lives are changed forever. The long out-of-prin Working closely with Moebius Productions in France, Dark Horse is putting the work of a master storyteller back in print--with some material in English for the first time! Stel and Atan are interstellar investigators trying to find a lost space station and its crew. When they discover the mythical paradise planet Edena, their lives are changed forever. The long out-of-print Edena Cycle from Moebius gets a deluxe hardcover treatment! Moebius's World of Edena story arc comprises five chapters--Upon a Star, Gardens of Edena, The Goddess, Stel, and Sra--which are all collected here. A storyboard artist and designer ("Alien, Tron, The Fifth Element," among many others) as well as comic book master, Moebius's work has influenced creators in countless fields.

30 review for The World of Edena

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Stel and Atan find a space station abandoned and go looking for the crew. One flying blue pyramid later, they find themselves on the paradisaical planet of Edena... Sometime back in the pre-Internet age, I read about Moebius in Marvel Age when Marvel was adapting the Airtight Garage for their Epic imprint. Then I forgot about it since the closest comic shop was fifty miles away and I was a kid with no money anyway. Decades later, this popped up on sale during the shit show that was Amazon Prime D Stel and Atan find a space station abandoned and go looking for the crew. One flying blue pyramid later, they find themselves on the paradisaical planet of Edena... Sometime back in the pre-Internet age, I read about Moebius in Marvel Age when Marvel was adapting the Airtight Garage for their Epic imprint. Then I forgot about it since the closest comic shop was fifty miles away and I was a kid with no money anyway. Decades later, this popped up on sale during the shit show that was Amazon Prime Day. I snapped it up. The story starts fairly simply. Two investigators are looking for a space station. Some crazy shit happens and they wind up on a paradise named Edena. Other crazy shit happens and soon they're crossing planets and exploring dreams within dreams to find one another again. There was so much to like about this. Parts of the story serve as a warning on over-reliance on technology and processed food. Stel and Atan start out looking androgynous. It's not apparent Atan is actually female until they're forced to eat the native fruit of Edena. From there, there is a misunderstanding and things go pear-shaped. While I found the story very engaging, the art is fucking spectacular. There's nothing else like it. It's simultaneously simple and intricate. It's not often you see a forest scene in a comic with hundreds of differentiated trees in it. The coloring and Moebius' unique style make for a grand reading experience. I'm not one to use images in reviews but here is just one panel that I really liked. There are hundreds more I liked as much. I can't say enough good things about this. The art is gorgeous. The Dark Horse Library edition is built to stand the test of time, which is a good thing since I plan on rereading it quite a few times. Five out of five stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    Mœbius had a dream. at first it was a flight of fancy, easy to follow, easy to explore this strange lovely world with our strange lovely protagonists... like children they were, traveling through these beautiful natural settings, learning, growing. and so as children grow, they grew, into woman and man. and so an apple ate, a sundering, a fall. into the excitements and pitfalls of gender, into the complicated and treacherous systems of adulthood, of government, of behavior. the strange l Mœbius had a dream. at first it was a flight of fancy, easy to follow, easy to explore this strange lovely world with our strange lovely protagonists... like children they were, traveling through these beautiful natural settings, learning, growing. and so as children grow, they grew, into woman and man. and so an apple ate, a sundering, a fall. into the excitements and pitfalls of gender, into the complicated and treacherous systems of adulthood, of government, of behavior. the strange loveliness turned inevitably darker, an excursion into confusion, a dream become nightmare... a cacophonous and absurd nightmare, full of odd colorful creatures lording it over each other, afraid of the world, the human touch become toxic, the touch of the world become death. from nightmare then into hallucination: gender roles become mythopoeic roles, identity become elastic, the human condition become illusion, life itself become oneiric. change is the only constant. the story itself is of course oneiric, its core ethereal, its surface astral. the planes of matter and thought meet, convulse, transform, and then are reborn... into prosaic reality. such is life? and so perhaps a happy ending, after all of the nightmares. I preferred the tranquility of the earlier parts of the dream, but who am I to judge? this is a Mœbius dream, not mine.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    The story became more and more incoherent as it went on.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sebastien

    Phenomenal work. But I guess there is a soft warning I have to give, I want everyone to love Moebius, or at least hope they can discover appreciation of his work, but I don't think Moebius is for everyone (style and taste wise). I think if you are into comics it is easier to dig his work, especially if you appreciate the craft of drawing and illustration. This guy is one of the tops of all time in terms of art. The precision, clarity and surety of line, beautiful perspectives, gorgeous compositi Phenomenal work. But I guess there is a soft warning I have to give, I want everyone to love Moebius, or at least hope they can discover appreciation of his work, but I don't think Moebius is for everyone (style and taste wise). I think if you are into comics it is easier to dig his work, especially if you appreciate the craft of drawing and illustration. This guy is one of the tops of all time in terms of art. The precision, clarity and surety of line, beautiful perspectives, gorgeous compositions... he does it all. Also enjoy the coloring work. He keeps things simple, yet detailed, and that is because he knows exactly where to place the right mark. Which is incredible, you can analyze each and every panel and marvel at this guy's skill. It is breathtaking. I would def recommend checking out his work, especially if you like comics. Even if you don't end up liking it, his work has been pretty important and influential so it's nice to check out given its place as cultural and comics touchstones. In terms of story and narrative this is a bit out there, like most of Giraud's sci-fi work. I thought it was neat, super imaginative, funky, kept me on my toes and I was very curious to see where the story was going. I wouldn't be surprised though if some readers find the narrative frustrating, obtuse, and a bit too new-agey. I read Moebius comics for the art tbh, but the story here is quite excellent and superbly imaginative. Lots of weird mysteries, great world-building, interesting characters and villains, solid social commentary, interchanges between reality and dreamworlds, good pacing... I can't help but think of Winsor McCay's work (Little Nemo) when I read this. I suspect he had a lot of influence on Moebius. Moebius is kind of in the class of comics like Otomo's Akira, Miyazaki's Nausicaa. Great artists, amazing skill, beautiful lines, compositions. These 3 are probably tops to me, along with Lastman (by Vives, Sanlaville, and Balak) which I just love, has a bit of a looser style but it is actually the one I connect with the most as it has a more contemporary vibe (which makes sense since I'm part of the same generation so it speaks to me a bit more in terms of cultural zeitgeist). The thing I love with all these guys is their art has strong 2-d feel, you can see the hand of the artist, the linework is perfect (to me!) and the artists can't hide behind fancy digital coloring and modeling (even though Lastman is all done digitally from what I understand, it still operates under that older analog style). The linework is the linework and it stands or dies on its own. Some modern comics are super digital in look, and while there is a lot of this work I really really really like, I will never get over the style of work as practiced by Moebius. I like seeing the artist's hand. And I'm so glad Dark Horse is publishing a bunch of Giraud's works. It's frustratingly hard to find. Waiting with impatience for their next Moebius collections! in the meantime am going to read some of his Blueberry comics (western he did), have never read am curious to see what it is like. If nothing else the art will be great and also a wonderful opportunity to see him depicting beautiful landscapes of the southwest :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Moebius's art is simplistic but stunning. The World of Edena tells the story of Stel and Atan a couple of space travelers who crash land on a mysterious world and are transported to an Eden like world. There they encounter a repressed society they struggle to overthrow. The last chapter was very confusing and had no resolution. It felt like the closing chapter was missing from the book. Received an advance copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Moebius's art is simplistic but stunning. The World of Edena tells the story of Stel and Atan a couple of space travelers who crash land on a mysterious world and are transported to an Eden like world. There they encounter a repressed society they struggle to overthrow. The last chapter was very confusing and had no resolution. It felt like the closing chapter was missing from the book. Received an advance copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    ΕιζΝιnΕ

    It's inconceivable to me that the 'Edena' or 'Stell & Atan' books were never collected in Moebius' life-time; but it's just one of the more obvious examples of the strange disconnect between his critical and popular esteem, and the large portion of his oeuvre that has remained obscure, hard-to-find, and untranslated for English readers. As a kid, I discovered his art in ads from back-issue Marvel titles, featuring art from the now highly-prized 'Epic' collections of Moebius' stories. 'Epic' was It's inconceivable to me that the 'Edena' or 'Stell & Atan' books were never collected in Moebius' life-time; but it's just one of the more obvious examples of the strange disconnect between his critical and popular esteem, and the large portion of his oeuvre that has remained obscure, hard-to-find, and untranslated for English readers. As a kid, I discovered his art in ads from back-issue Marvel titles, featuring art from the now highly-prized 'Epic' collections of Moebius' stories. 'Epic' was a line of 'Mature Reader' titles, a prototype for DC's 'Vertigo' line. Launched in the mid-eighties, it emulated 'Heavy Metal', the English version of 'Metal Hurlant', exporting the revolutionary Bande Dessinee art that I found both alien and immensely appealing. My love for Tintin comics, both as a kid and later in my comic reading development, no doubt contributed to my obsession with these mysterious artists. Ads showing off the covers from Epic's 'Blueberry' collections made the deepest impression, with their beautiful depictions of the American Southwest, combining clean, bold lines with his signature 'topographical' style of hatching, giving the arroyos and mesas a geographic realism I'd never seen in American comics, and beautifully painted colors that made Marvel's regular line seem crude in comparison. Then I made a fateful back-issue find: the entire 4-issue 'Epic' run of The Airtight Garage; suffice it to say, my young mind was blown. The other artists whose artistic brilliance solidified my love for European comics: Francois Schuiten, Vittorio Giardino, and Liberatore. Schuiten's covers and dream-like illustrations for 'Les Cites Obscures', his decades-long collaboration with writer Benoit Peeters, and one of the greatest achievements in the comics medium, produced an impact equal to that of Moebius' artwork. It would be a decade later before I started tracking down these books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nate D

    I've read bits of Moebius before, and naturally marveled at his artwork an broad influence for years, but this is my first foray into his extended-form work. And unlike his well-known collaborations with Jodorowsky and other contemporaries, this is all his own story, a slow dive from a simple set up through increasingly complex layers of reality. The story concerns two interstellar repairpersons (initially genderless, in a technological biologically-altered future) for whom a routine mission ope I've read bits of Moebius before, and naturally marveled at his artwork an broad influence for years, but this is my first foray into his extended-form work. And unlike his well-known collaborations with Jodorowsky and other contemporaries, this is all his own story, a slow dive from a simple set up through increasingly complex layers of reality. The story concerns two interstellar repairpersons (initially genderless, in a technological biologically-altered future) for whom a routine mission opens into the unexpected, a recapturing of lost simplicities on a mysterious mythic lost planet at the center of the universe. These simpler earlier chapters rapidly unfold into a dense play of dystopian and utopian worlds as our two protagonists individuate and lose each other across time and space, advancing by a rhythm of uncertainty and exposition, where assurances are constantly undercut an reformed. This is not by any means a space opera, but something much more conceptual, that Moebius developed over almost 20 years. In that rhythm of plot reformation, though, something gets a little lost: my preferred character, though always of prime relevance to the story, shifts from actor, to somnambulant force of unwitting change, to some archetypal dream-ideal (which makes sense given the focus on subjective interiority here, but which is also something no one deserves to be shunted into). The ambiguity of the construction allows me to resist this reduction and find something more haunting in it, much to the creator's credit, but I realize I may also be looking for something that is not really in the story by the end. So, I love this, with frustration. I'd be more clear, but my love for this despite frustration deters me from desiring to warp your own experience by saying too much. The art, of course, is frequently gorgeous: a perfect simplicity of line and form rendered in brilliant color schemes. This also builds in richness, variation, and complexity throughout. At last, pointing off the page into something crystalline and eternal.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rif A. Saurous

    6 stars for the art, 3 stars for the story. Moebius's art is just stunningly good, over and over again, and he's at the height of his powers here. This is a gorgeous 2016 printing: big book, beautiful paper, I believe all the lettering was redone for this edition. The story is enjoyable but incredibly whack, in that French 70's and 80's sci-fi fantasy kind of way. Think 5th Element if they'd taken way more drugs and hadn't made much of an attempt to make it coherent enough for mainstream cinemati 6 stars for the art, 3 stars for the story. Moebius's art is just stunningly good, over and over again, and he's at the height of his powers here. This is a gorgeous 2016 printing: big book, beautiful paper, I believe all the lettering was redone for this edition. The story is enjoyable but incredibly whack, in that French 70's and 80's sci-fi fantasy kind of way. Think 5th Element if they'd taken way more drugs and hadn't made much of an attempt to make it coherent enough for mainstream cinematic audiences. The story revolved around two unsexed space travelers, Stel and Atan, who get stranded on a strange world named Pool Ball, and then eventually get transported to the world of Edena. Bizarrely, the first issue was actually written as a promotional gig for the car maker Citroen; Stel and Atan travel across Pool Ball in a classic Citroen which they happened to have stashed in their hold. Once they get to Edena, they are slowly transformed into archetypal male and female characters and get involved in a epic and sometimes comprehensible battle between good and evil. By the end, there are large portions that I couldn't tell whether they happened, whether they were dreams, or whether they were dreams within dreams. In dream narrative, it felt semi-coherent, but the art is the star. Did I mention the art? If you haven't read any Moebius, read The Incal first, where he does the art and Jodorowsky writes. It's still crazy but a little more brilliant. But if you liked that you're gonna like this. Did I mention the art?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nuno

    Great art, incomprehensible story. Don't expect to understand much. Great art, incomprehensible story. Don't expect to understand much.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Kind of like a serial of prog. rock album covers. Really fascinating setting and story. Unbelievable art.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    120119 much later addition: i tried to ‘look’ more than ‘read’ this time, to counter embedded literary prejudice. i have been told that the reading should be fast, just flipping through images, like watching movies, so decided to pretend this was only in french (or some language i cannot guess at...) and narrative coherence not important. in this way i can now say it is not no story, but truly should be thought as images telling the story, of dreams within dreams within dreams... i have always b 120119 much later addition: i tried to ‘look’ more than ‘read’ this time, to counter embedded literary prejudice. i have been told that the reading should be fast, just flipping through images, like watching movies, so decided to pretend this was only in french (or some language i cannot guess at...) and narrative coherence not important. in this way i can now say it is not no story, but truly should be thought as images telling the story, of dreams within dreams within dreams... i have always been impressed. i must have first read this as kid, dismissed it as comics, must now reaffirm my five... 290418 first review: friend comics illustrator riley rossmo has told me that french graphic art is often beautiful but the stories are not compelling. this is certainly the case here. but then we have disagreement about primary value of graphic work, or comics, in that he likes stories which i prefer in written form, in that i prefer images and stories that cannot be told any other way...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    This one started a bit slow but man when it got going did it ever! An absolute masterpiece!!! Weird scifi at its absolute best!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    "The World of Edena" is one of Moebius' less well known works compared to say "The Airtight Garage" or "The Incal". At the same time, it is one of the most interesting. Even though the series started with a glorified advertisement for the French automobile manufacturer Citroën, "The World of Edena" ends up as among Moebius' most personal works: It's not filtered through either a collaboration with Alejandro "The Holy Mountain" Jodorowsky as "The Incal" or the loose adaptation of Michael Moorcock "The World of Edena" is one of Moebius' less well known works compared to say "The Airtight Garage" or "The Incal". At the same time, it is one of the most interesting. Even though the series started with a glorified advertisement for the French automobile manufacturer Citroën, "The World of Edena" ends up as among Moebius' most personal works: It's not filtered through either a collaboration with Alejandro "The Holy Mountain" Jodorowsky as "The Incal" or the loose adaptation of Michael Moorcock's Jerry Cornelius cycle as in "The Airtight Garage" (with doses of Carlos Castañeda thrown in for good measure) yet just as ambitious and high minded as those. As a matter of fact, once the plot gets into going it quickly becomes an ambitious science-fiction/fantasy allegory for Moebius' own views on environmentalism, gender roles, psychology and a ton of other things that Moebius actually ends up developing in a less confusing and easier to follow plot than in "The Incal" even though the story is in some ways more abstract with less exposition. Come to think of it, the vaguely Gnostic religious themes I can recognise from "The Airtight Garage" and the rest of the "Major Grubert" series but done in a more mature way where Moebius has done more to synthesise his inspiration sources. The story also unfolds at a slower and more disciplined pace where it's clear that Moebius did much more to plan ahead. The artwork is some of Moebius' most impressive that I have ever seen. The contrasts between drab matte colours and bright sharp ones as well as the shading are all more well thought out and detailed than ever before in Moebius' oeuvre which makes the results quite breathtaking. Landscapes are also done in a more naturalistic style and with more attention to depth than in say "The Incal". Later on, when we see rural low-tech societies in contrast with the high-tech underground dystopian city, Moebius even gets the opportunity to draw some science-fiction/fantasy equivalents of the classic Western scenes he mastered in "Blueberry" under his birth name Jean Giraud. That said, I sometimes got a weird sense of deja vu when reading "Edena" because some of the design in the artwork shows Moebius now imitating 1980s science-fiction artwork already inspired by Moebius' own work in the 1970s. Eg when the Space Western stuff later on kind of reminds me of Tattooine in "Star Wars" on (more) hallucinogens. On a side note, there is also some amusing promotion of the raw food diet through the story several decades before the raw food movement became popular outside of New Age circles in so called real life. That type of New Agery is something you have to accept and deal with if you want to enjoy Moebius' more ambitious storytelling, even those done without Jodorowsky on board, and something Moebius had in common with many science-fiction authors of his generation. (eg Samuel Delany)

  14. 4 out of 5

    C. Varn

    Moebius's art is fantastic in this work; he begins with simple lines and designs and gets more complicated as the story progresses and complicates. However, his storytelling has much of the same allegorical nature of his frequent collaborator Alejandro Jodorowsky but is not as thematically coherent. The French, Metal Hurlant, aesthetic is clear, but the shifting of the setting and changes of the nature of the characters involved is not terribly convincing. Moebius's world-building and art power Moebius's art is fantastic in this work; he begins with simple lines and designs and gets more complicated as the story progresses and complicates. However, his storytelling has much of the same allegorical nature of his frequent collaborator Alejandro Jodorowsky but is not as thematically coherent. The French, Metal Hurlant, aesthetic is clear, but the shifting of the setting and changes of the nature of the characters involved is not terribly convincing. Moebius's world-building and art power through a lot of these narrative problems, but there is definitely a "making it up as we go along" feel to the work that actually doesn't seem to be as much of a keystone of his collaboration with Jodorowsky. Also this version is missing one of the Edena story arcs, Les Réparateurs, which may make some of the plot jumps make more sense, but since I have not read it and it does not seem to be translated, I cannot speak to it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    A series that sadly grew less good with each new volume, but I'm glad to have at least seen the later chapters, finally, even if I'm not entirely sure on what happened in that last volume. In fact, I hope I misunderstood it because otherwise it's a lousy ending. (Although apparently there was a sixth volume that will be in the companion volume. Is it a continuation? A side story? Now I'm even more confused.) A series that sadly grew less good with each new volume, but I'm glad to have at least seen the later chapters, finally, even if I'm not entirely sure on what happened in that last volume. In fact, I hope I misunderstood it because otherwise it's a lousy ending. (Although apparently there was a sixth volume that will be in the companion volume. Is it a continuation? A side story? Now I'm even more confused.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    weird as always....

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This was a vast, wonderful and weird trip of a read. This is sort of an anthology just put out by Dark Horse comics of the major books in the "Edena" series created by Moebius (the nom de plume of French writer, cartoonist, and artist Jean Henri Gaston Giraud), whose work (if you're into this kind of thing) you might recognize from his comic "Blueberry," or the totally awesome, super softcore porny cartoon anthology film "Heavy Metal" among many other things. It tells the story of two interstell This was a vast, wonderful and weird trip of a read. This is sort of an anthology just put out by Dark Horse comics of the major books in the "Edena" series created by Moebius (the nom de plume of French writer, cartoonist, and artist Jean Henri Gaston Giraud), whose work (if you're into this kind of thing) you might recognize from his comic "Blueberry," or the totally awesome, super softcore porny cartoon anthology film "Heavy Metal" among many other things. It tells the story of two interstellar investigators and close friends Stel and Atan and their insane adventures through space. Their journey begins when they are assigned to try to determine the fate of the crew of a missing space station. There's definitely an air of political satire to the story as Stel and Atan encounter strange civilizations and mysterious new worlds and come to realizations about their own highly restricted world but honestly its just an acid trip of a space opera. Moebius has a really bright, lively sort of artdeco style. Its very minimalist and a lot of his panels and full page illustrations look like something you'd want to hang on your wall. The whole thing is just crazy and fun. There's a freedom to the narrative and you never know where its going next. I really took my time with this, not something that usually happens for me with graphic novels, but its the kind of epic adventure that you really want to experience not just plow through.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Dreams within dreams within dreams... in the added material of this collected edition Moebius admits to setting out on this story without knowing how he will finish it (or if he will even be able to). This does not turn out to be an issue. Though the plot wobbles early on, The World of Edena develops a distinct sense of purpose that consistently propels the story forward. Just as Stel awakens to the drive that his life has been missing; so also does Moebius seem to discover why this story must e Dreams within dreams within dreams... in the added material of this collected edition Moebius admits to setting out on this story without knowing how he will finish it (or if he will even be able to). This does not turn out to be an issue. Though the plot wobbles early on, The World of Edena develops a distinct sense of purpose that consistently propels the story forward. Just as Stel awakens to the drive that his life has been missing; so also does Moebius seem to discover why this story must exist. It is earnest in its clash between good and evil. It is determined, in the face of logic, to follows its emotions. Though at times near incomprehensible, each twist and turn somehow manages to reinforce this purpose. Follow your dreams. Embrace your humanity. Do not fear your sexuality. Cherish this paradise we are born in to. It all sounds hokey when written like that, but it’s far from it in the words and pictures of this World...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    The World of Edena is fascinating and surreal. It starts out as a science fiction story but evolves into a fantasy involving multiple levels of dreams. The artwork is colorful and expressive and compelling.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    This was the most unusual and yet the most amazing thing I've read all year. If you are a fan of the Saga series, you need to check this out. This was the most unusual and yet the most amazing thing I've read all year. If you are a fan of the Saga series, you need to check this out.

  21. 4 out of 5

    ion

    Feels like I just woke up from a strange and beautiful dream.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alabaster

    3.5 stars. The illustrations were gorgeous and masterful, the imagined worlds creative and fun to explore but the overall story trying to sew all these elements together was bland and unsatisfactory.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Was a little hard to follow.. not really sure I know what I just read, but it was entertaining so.. 3 stars

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    The plot got real crazy real quick! At first it seemed like it was going to be a straightforward space comic, but there were several major turns that each took the story in a whole new direction. The art is not as elaborate as some of the newer graphic series I read, but still some spectacular spreads and really cool imagery. I like the surreal and ultimately unresolved feeling of it all. I sense the influence on series like Saga.

  25. 5 out of 5

    B.E.N.

    Others have outline the strengths and weaknesses of this work better than I could, so I won't go too into that. What I will comment on, however, is the narrative side of things. I see several comments saying something to the effect that the storyline is not on par with the artwork (which may or may not be correct, that sort of stuff is subjective), and that it grows incomprehensible towards the end. It is this latter point I disagree with. The story and themes of Edena revolve around reality and Others have outline the strengths and weaknesses of this work better than I could, so I won't go too into that. What I will comment on, however, is the narrative side of things. I see several comments saying something to the effect that the storyline is not on par with the artwork (which may or may not be correct, that sort of stuff is subjective), and that it grows incomprehensible towards the end. It is this latter point I disagree with. The story and themes of Edena revolve around reality and dream, and layers of reality and dreams, the relationship between these concepts, and challenging such notions. It stands to reason, then, that stuff happens in this story that don't follow a rigid internal logic, because that's how dreams work. It can be challenging to follow, but honestly, if you've ever watched 'Inception' or other stories like that, you probably get the deal. Within the story of Edena, and following the stories of the main characters, we visit several settings that are frequently layers of reality and dream (although not as many as you might worry about), and some of these are temporary, while others follow the narrative all throughout. The main issue of the ending, however, in my opinion, is that it is, quite simply, cut short. Chapter 5 ends on what is apparently the ending, but which frankly feels like a cliffhanger for a non-existent chapter 6. This made it quite frustrating in my honest opinion. It feels like the crisis of the narrative reaches its climax, and then suddenly, within a few pages, we're told, rather than shown - by deeply unreliable sources at that - that everything is fine. If you've read the story, I suspect you too did not feel that this was the payoff you wanted, and that the last few passages sow more doubt than resolution. This is unfortunate, as we've come to know and care for the characters, their struggles and hopes. None of these really get a time to shine in the end. I'm left wondering whether this was entirely intentional on Moebius' part, to subvert our expectations of narrative structure and to fully embrace the issue of reality and dream by making it an unresolved ending, or whether he simply never got around to write the last part. A part where the journey of the different characters finally rejoin, the conflict resolved, and Moebius' self-expressed message of embracing the organic and natural comes to the fore. I am probably projecting my own ideas here, and in fairness I will never know. Still, I wish we'd seen them back where they wanted to be. Together.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Juju

    In this cycle of Edena stories that Moebius composed over decades, the late cartoonist created a canvas to explore his artistic and psychological frontiers. On the surface, this is a collection of stories about a pair of intergalactic repair people who are transported to a sprawling paradise world, Edena. The pair, Stel and Etan, are separated and find Edena populated by an advanced, though highly inhibited civilization, whose inhabitants march around in full body suits, paranoid of contaminatio In this cycle of Edena stories that Moebius composed over decades, the late cartoonist created a canvas to explore his artistic and psychological frontiers. On the surface, this is a collection of stories about a pair of intergalactic repair people who are transported to a sprawling paradise world, Edena. The pair, Stel and Etan, are separated and find Edena populated by an advanced, though highly inhibited civilization, whose inhabitants march around in full body suits, paranoid of contamination and exposure of their outer "organs" and ruled by a dictatorial though-form, the Paternum. Beneath the surface these stories explore also explore modern conveniences, our relation to the natural world, the function of dreams, gender dynamics, and various forms of control and liberation. This edition from Dark Horse is a fantastic oversize hardcover presentation for the exquisite, imaginative line work that Moebius was famous for, as well as providing some contextual introductions from Jean Giraud that help clarify these often surreal excursions. Moebius reveals in an introduction, that it was originally commissioned as a short 4 page story, which grew quickly from this seed into "Upon A Star," that he drafted in a creative trance. Each successive chapter is drawn in different style and explores different terrain, figuratively and creatively, with the last chapter "Sra" a great instance of the highly surreal dream comics that he was experimenting with in the early 2000's. It's exciting to finally dip further into the Moebius catalog, most of which has been sadly out of print in the US since the 90's, or just never published stateside in English editions. I was pleasantly surprised that the Edena Cycle is the source of several of my favorite images by Moebius. A version of one iconic image of Stel and Atan asleep under a tree from the "Gardens of Edena"(p. 90) was the serene and comforting background image on my laptop years ago during the winter/spring when my all-white cat companion passed away a few years ago. Finally reading the story this year I was surprised to find that pages later, a totemic pure white lion appears in the story, essentially the next morning. For me, it's a testament to Moebius' intuitive creative imagination that I was able to have this emotional coincidence come full circle from a random image downloaded from the internet. These stories and images reward both casual browsing and deeper exploration.

  27. 5 out of 5

    jenni

    reading this was like was having a weird trip on what you thought were semi-bunk drugs but that turned out to be the most intolerably potent psychoactives you could've ever acquired. updated 10/10/17: i just re-watched jodorowsky's dune and completely forgot that he and moebius were collaborators, and so i'm still swimming in the magic of jodorowsky's hypnagogic intention to produce that drug-like effect through the medium of cinema because by god did moebius put me down a literal trip into an u reading this was like was having a weird trip on what you thought were semi-bunk drugs but that turned out to be the most intolerably potent psychoactives you could've ever acquired. updated 10/10/17: i just re-watched jodorowsky's dune and completely forgot that he and moebius were collaborators, and so i'm still swimming in the magic of jodorowsky's hypnagogic intention to produce that drug-like effect through the medium of cinema because by god did moebius put me down a literal trip into an uncanny and at times disorienting, nauseating, hallucinatory valley of psychedelia and science fiction.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Right from the cover I was enamored of the art. The story is steeped in metaphor and stream-of-consciousness dream logic, so for those willing to be lead through a plot that has no singular meaning or explanation it can be very rewarding. There is a development in the art concurrent with the devolution of the sanity of the story so there’s a general feeling of heading into a world increasingly under the mastery of the artist and decreasingly understood by the reader. With this book, more so than Right from the cover I was enamored of the art. The story is steeped in metaphor and stream-of-consciousness dream logic, so for those willing to be lead through a plot that has no singular meaning or explanation it can be very rewarding. There is a development in the art concurrent with the devolution of the sanity of the story so there’s a general feeling of heading into a world increasingly under the mastery of the artist and decreasingly understood by the reader. With this book, more so than Incal I would venture, Moebius pushes comics into the realm of “art”.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Our dreams can only become real only when we fight the false oneiric messages and know how to wake up inside the dream, as Carlos Castaneda teaches. Fellini considered Moebius more important than Doré and Miyazaki created Nausicaä with his influence. Not so bad as letters of recommendation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    Moebius was a bomb of pure art and every day we see traces of the resulting fallout. He inspired many and although a lot came close, no one has yet managed to tap into that specific source of surrealism.

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