web site hit counter A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children

Availability: Ready to download

A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children is a companion to its predecessor published by Oyate, Through Indian Eyes: The Native Experience in Books for Children. A compilation of work by Native parents, children, educators, poets and writers, A Broken Flute contains, from a Native perspective, 'living stories,' essays, poetry, and hundreds of reviews of ' A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children is a companion to its predecessor published by Oyate, Through Indian Eyes: The Native Experience in Books for Children. A compilation of work by Native parents, children, educators, poets and writers, A Broken Flute contains, from a Native perspective, 'living stories,' essays, poetry, and hundreds of reviews of 'children's books about Indians.' It's an indispensable volume for anyone interested in presenting honest materials by and about indigenous peoples to children.


Compare

A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children is a companion to its predecessor published by Oyate, Through Indian Eyes: The Native Experience in Books for Children. A compilation of work by Native parents, children, educators, poets and writers, A Broken Flute contains, from a Native perspective, 'living stories,' essays, poetry, and hundreds of reviews of ' A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children is a companion to its predecessor published by Oyate, Through Indian Eyes: The Native Experience in Books for Children. A compilation of work by Native parents, children, educators, poets and writers, A Broken Flute contains, from a Native perspective, 'living stories,' essays, poetry, and hundreds of reviews of 'children's books about Indians.' It's an indispensable volume for anyone interested in presenting honest materials by and about indigenous peoples to children.

30 review for A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Doris Seale's and Beverly Slapin's A Broken Flute is an in all ways wonderful and informative resource of reviews of and for the plethora of past and present North American English language children's books featuring Native American/Native Canadian characters and themes, storylines (and indeed and for and to me most essentially and importantly, A Broken Flute has also been put together, has been edited and penned by Native American scholars and activists). Not necessarily a book that one would l Doris Seale's and Beverly Slapin's A Broken Flute is an in all ways wonderful and informative resource of reviews of and for the plethora of past and present North American English language children's books featuring Native American/Native Canadian characters and themes, storylines (and indeed and for and to me most essentially and importantly, A Broken Flute has also been put together, has been edited and penned by Native American scholars and activists). Not necessarily a book that one would likely ever consider actually reading from cover to cover, I have used my personal copy of A Broken Flute repeatedly over the past seven or so years to peruse reviews of Native American and/or Canadian themed novels, picture books and such that I was reading and where I was wondering whether my own critical feelings especially with regard to potential and possible cultural appropriation issues by authors who are clearly not of Native American or Canadian background were shared by the authors and editors of A Broken Flute (and usually, for the most part, this has indeed and sadly unfortunately been very much the case, namely that my negativity or discomfort towards or with a given tome were more often than not and for the most part shared by the authors and editors of A Broken Flute, and often much more vehemently than with and for me). Now while I therefore do consider A Broken Flute a necessary (and essential) resource and research manual for the Native American experience in books for children, I do have to offer the necessary caveat that this book is most definitely and heavily slanted against non Native American or Canadian authors making use of Native American culture, lore and thematics in their works, in their children's books (and thus, while there are only very rarely vehemently negative and critical reviews of children's books penned by Native American/Canadian authors, an overwhelmimg majority of reviews of children's books penned by non Native authors are indeed and definitely highly critical, and at times even rather nastily so). But while there might thus and obviously be a sense of discomfort encountered when reading many of the reviews presented in A Broken Flute (especially since some of the most loved and appreciated Caldecott and Newbery award winning children's books of both the not so recent and the recent past have been reviewed not only critically but at times with a tendency towards anger), I for one am glad to have had the opportunity to read these musings and to have become confronted with and made aware of the uncomfortable but important truth that Native American thematics, Native American lore has been and is often still used by non Native American children's authors and often without adequate thought to cultural appropriation, without the acknowledgement and listing of relevant sources, and with scant regard of the problematics of perpetuating tired and bitter-tasting cultural and ethnic stereotypes. Very highly recommended, and in my opinion, A Broken Flute is indeed a reference manual that truly needs and deserves a place in most if not all libraries!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shomeret

    This was an illuminating volume. It not only criticizes books that are racist and/or inauthentic, it also reviews books that are useful and authentic. I wonder if there is an equivalent critique of books on Native American subjects for an adult audience. I would like to read it. I learned about terms regarded as offensive. In some cases, it was not obvious to me that certain terms would be offensive. I think that I define these terms differently. I still don't understand why saying that medicine This was an illuminating volume. It not only criticizes books that are racist and/or inauthentic, it also reviews books that are useful and authentic. I wonder if there is an equivalent critique of books on Native American subjects for an adult audience. I would like to read it. I learned about terms regarded as offensive. In some cases, it was not obvious to me that certain terms would be offensive. I think that I define these terms differently. I still don't understand why saying that medicine people "chant" is offensive. In my religious community chanting is very sacred. The word is not considered insulting at all. Some of the writers that are subjected to criticism are well-known and highly respected authors. One is actually a favorite of mine. She is Jane Yolen whose book Encounter is considered highly offensive. I have never read Encounter, but when I read that the point of view character is a Taino girl visionary who isn't believed, it occured to me that Yolen had re-cast the Trojan seer, Cassandra, as a Native American. The review of Encounter accuses Yolen of blaming the Taino for failing to believe the protagonist's visions. In the story of Cassandra, the Trojans couldn't be blamed for disbelieving her because the God Apollo was responsible. If Yolen conceived her Taino viewpoint character as another Cassandra it probably never occurred to her that readers would think she was blaming the Taino. I suppose that given this possibility, Yolen could be criticized for inappropriately imposing a European myth on a Native American culture like the novels mentioned in this book that have shoe horned Native American legends into the matrix of the story of Cinderella. I can see why this is wrong. Some cultural icons or archetypes don't translate cross-culturally. I noticed the repetition of "write what you know" and the criticism of imagination in the portrayal of Native societies. Normally, I am a huge supporter of the imaginative approach to writing, but there is abundant evidence in A Broken Flute of the harm a writer's imagination can do by portraying Native Americans inaccurately. The self-concept of Native children who read these books can be injured even though the authors never intended any harm. The sensitive non-Native author needs to consider this in writing about Native American themes in children's literature.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    "A Broken Flute" is a vital reference volume for librarians who work in collection development, particularly children's librarians and school library media specialists. It is true that a librarian can't always control what is already on his or her shelves, but a reference source like this can be incredibly helpful when making weeding decisions and when trying to expand collections of children's Native American fiction. I am currently completing my MSLS and have referred to this source many times "A Broken Flute" is a vital reference volume for librarians who work in collection development, particularly children's librarians and school library media specialists. It is true that a librarian can't always control what is already on his or her shelves, but a reference source like this can be incredibly helpful when making weeding decisions and when trying to expand collections of children's Native American fiction. I am currently completing my MSLS and have referred to this source many times when trying to determine whether a certain book is appropriate for storytime or whether I should look for another version of a particular folktale. Many popular works of Native American fiction for children are decried in this book for cultural insensitivity, and it's worth knowing as a librarian which volumes in your collection may be problematic.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Salsabrarian

    A valuable resource for librarians and educators full of extensive essays and reviews on youth literature that depicts Native American cultures. Readers will initially be taken aback that some of their favorite authors, illustrators and go-to titles get slammed in no uncertain terms. But they will also discover titles that are valuable and respectful. A particularly useful essay is "A Guide for Evaluating Photoessays." After perusing even a few of the writings in "Broken Flute," readers will eva A valuable resource for librarians and educators full of extensive essays and reviews on youth literature that depicts Native American cultures. Readers will initially be taken aback that some of their favorite authors, illustrators and go-to titles get slammed in no uncertain terms. But they will also discover titles that are valuable and respectful. A particularly useful essay is "A Guide for Evaluating Photoessays." After perusing even a few of the writings in "Broken Flute," readers will evaluate relevant children's books with a clearer eye.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Harsh Kumar

    An amazing fiction but the last twist at their cousins house was an unexpected one. I didn't liked that. Rest of the story is nice. An amazing fiction but the last twist at their cousins house was an unexpected one. I didn't liked that. Rest of the story is nice.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vickiw

    Incredibly important book to read, I'm going to keep this book in mind when making choices in book displays and orders for the library going forward. Incredibly important book to read, I'm going to keep this book in mind when making choices in book displays and orders for the library going forward.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Herrera

    Title: Seale, D., & Slapin, B. (2005). A broken flute: the Native experience in books for children. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press ;. Name: Brittany Herrera Type of Reference: Bibliography Description: A great resource for finding literature about Native Americans. Students will be interested in finding several books, short stories, and poems related to Native Americans. Review: A Broken Flute should be considered by all to be the new bible for help in evaluating literature about Native Americans. Title: Seale, D., & Slapin, B. (2005). A broken flute: the Native experience in books for children. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press ;. Name: Brittany Herrera Type of Reference: Bibliography Description: A great resource for finding literature about Native Americans. Students will be interested in finding several books, short stories, and poems related to Native Americans. Review: A Broken Flute should be considered by all to be the new bible for help in evaluating literature about Native Americans. Even if you can't find a particular volume mentioned, this book contains so much information about what is and what isn't considered appropriate that you will learn something just by going through the process of looking. A Broken Flute is thoughtfully created and interestingly laid out. And it is not a list of recommended books and books to avoid; it is a great deal more. This 463-page tome begins with poignant personal stories about encounters with "Bad Books" and with other purveyors of stereotypes: television, misinformed teachers, hurtful children, and whole educational systems. These essays come from Native children, teachers, librarians, parents, authors, and others. Woven throughout the book is a wide range of poems and stories of personal experiences, memories, and emotions. Many sections of the book are joined together with such stories and poetry. The first section of reviews is organized by topic. These common-to-Indian-book topics include things you might expect, such as books about Ishi, arts and crafts books, and books about the California missions, Thanksgiving, Kokopelli, dreamcatchers, and Coyote. The topics also include Indian children's writing, photoessays of Indian children, and books of poetry. Helpfully, the last section of reviews is organized by author, making it easy to look up specific books. It was clear that reviewers tend to look thoroughly at the books being reviewed. They critique content for, among other things, accuracy, interest and believability, and they appraise the "voice" of the text and take notice of illustrations. The reviews themselves--sometimes humorous and sometimes beautifully written--don't mince words. When appropriate, the reviews can be harsh. They can be biting. They can be painfully honest. In the process, they educate. Many of the reviews are written by Native people, so the reader can hear, firsthand, how some books make an Indian person feel. This is a book that should be in every library and classroom. It's available from Oyate in Berkeley. Citation Review: Supahan, S. (2006). A Broken Flute: The Native Experience in Books for Children. [Review from the book A broken flute: The native experience].News From Native California, 20(1), 14.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    An excellent resource for anyone purchasing or teaching books about Native Americans for children.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris Heim

    This book is a hefty but amazing resource for teachers who teach about First Nations people. There are some excellent essays in it, but it is mostly a comprehensive list of titles and authors of books related to the Native people of North America, and more importantly, reviews of each one to help ferret out the high quality books from the stereotyping ones. Keep in mind that it was published in 2005 and is out of print, and at its scarcity and 400-plus pages, it won’t be cheap. But it’s a resour This book is a hefty but amazing resource for teachers who teach about First Nations people. There are some excellent essays in it, but it is mostly a comprehensive list of titles and authors of books related to the Native people of North America, and more importantly, reviews of each one to help ferret out the high quality books from the stereotyping ones. Keep in mind that it was published in 2005 and is out of print, and at its scarcity and 400-plus pages, it won’t be cheap. But it’s a resource worth owning for educators who teach about Native North American cultures. Get ready to cross check your classroom libraries and teacher resources!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    Any one who works with children in an academic capacity - teachers, after school programs, librarians - should be able to evaluate the books and media they present. Representation of Native Americans has long been overlooked and is a much needed area of study.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Moiraplageugmail.Com

    the book is an excellent resource for librarians, teachers, and anyone interested in N.A. views.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joann

    Excellent reference (also essays and reviews of children's books that have Native American themes, topics, characters) Excellent reference (also essays and reviews of children's books that have Native American themes, topics, characters)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Farhat Parween

    No

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mitul Shethwala

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vishal

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sudhir Kumar

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shamkar Jg

  19. 4 out of 5

    Holly Hildebrant

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vishnu

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angad

  22. 5 out of 5

    Agrima Chopra

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne Von Bloch

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leeloo

  25. 4 out of 5

    Durga

  26. 5 out of 5

    SMRUTI RANJAN

  27. 5 out of 5

    Furqan Qamar

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ksaisandeep

  29. 4 out of 5

    Purnapramati

  30. 4 out of 5

    Firoza

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.