web site hit counter Bottleneckers: Gaming the Government for Power and Private Profit - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Bottleneckers: Gaming the Government for Power and Private Profit

Availability: Ready to download

Bottlenecker (n): a person who advocates for the creation or perpetuation of government regulation, particularly an occupational license, to restrict entry into his or her occupation, thereby accruing an economic advantage without providing a benefit to consumers. The Left, Right, and Center all hate them: powerful special interests that use government power for their own p Bottlenecker (n): a person who advocates for the creation or perpetuation of government regulation, particularly an occupational license, to restrict entry into his or her occupation, thereby accruing an economic advantage without providing a benefit to consumers. The Left, Right, and Center all hate them: powerful special interests that use government power for their own private benefit. In an era when the Left hates “fat cats” and the Right despises “crony capitalists,” now there is an artful and memorable one-word pejorative they can both get behind: bottleneckers. A “bottlenecker” is anyone who uses government power to limit competition and thereby reap monopoly profits and other benefits. Bottleneckers work with politicians to constrict competition, entrepreneurial innovation, and opportunity. They thereby limit consumer choice; drive up consumer prices; and they support politicians who willingly overstep the constitutional limits of their powers to create, maintain, and expand these anticompetitive bottlenecks. The Institute for Justice’s new book Bottleneckers coins a new word in the American lexicon, and provides a rich history and well-researched examples of bottleneckers in one occupation after another—from alcohol distributors to taxicab cartels—pointing the way to positive reforms.


Compare

Bottlenecker (n): a person who advocates for the creation or perpetuation of government regulation, particularly an occupational license, to restrict entry into his or her occupation, thereby accruing an economic advantage without providing a benefit to consumers. The Left, Right, and Center all hate them: powerful special interests that use government power for their own p Bottlenecker (n): a person who advocates for the creation or perpetuation of government regulation, particularly an occupational license, to restrict entry into his or her occupation, thereby accruing an economic advantage without providing a benefit to consumers. The Left, Right, and Center all hate them: powerful special interests that use government power for their own private benefit. In an era when the Left hates “fat cats” and the Right despises “crony capitalists,” now there is an artful and memorable one-word pejorative they can both get behind: bottleneckers. A “bottlenecker” is anyone who uses government power to limit competition and thereby reap monopoly profits and other benefits. Bottleneckers work with politicians to constrict competition, entrepreneurial innovation, and opportunity. They thereby limit consumer choice; drive up consumer prices; and they support politicians who willingly overstep the constitutional limits of their powers to create, maintain, and expand these anticompetitive bottlenecks. The Institute for Justice’s new book Bottleneckers coins a new word in the American lexicon, and provides a rich history and well-researched examples of bottleneckers in one occupation after another—from alcohol distributors to taxicab cartels—pointing the way to positive reforms.

44 review for Bottleneckers: Gaming the Government for Power and Private Profit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    A very good idea. A problem that is obvious once you read the book. Yet a tedious read. With lots of less relevant detail and yet many details missing. And what was the worst for me: using the same rhetoric of the moral high ground as the ones the book author points the finger at. So the book should have been more concise, and probably written with some outside help. Which does not make the issue less relevant.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ronald J.

    Great look at the deleterious effects of occupational licensing. It's a deep dive into various occupations whose associations run to the government always in the name of public safety and protecting the public, but the real reason is to limit competition. It explores alcohol distributors, casket makers vs. funeral homes, tour guides, hair braiders, interior designers (perhaps the most absurd license ever granted!), street vendors, food trucks, taxis, limos, and even self-help columnists. I enjoy Great look at the deleterious effects of occupational licensing. It's a deep dive into various occupations whose associations run to the government always in the name of public safety and protecting the public, but the real reason is to limit competition. It explores alcohol distributors, casket makers vs. funeral homes, tour guides, hair braiders, interior designers (perhaps the most absurd license ever granted!), street vendors, food trucks, taxis, limos, and even self-help columnists. I enjoyed the book because it gave you the backstory and the state's historical licensing laws, as well as how the courts ruled at each level. We can talk about gender issues in the workplace all we want, but what is the left saying about the abuse most small entrepreneurs endure from their own state government, barring them from earning a living? Most victims are immigrants AND women, trying to support their families, raise their children and make a positive contributions. These laws are a travesty, and thank heavens the good people at the Institute of Justice fight these everywhere, and have quite a success record!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Hansen

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrew McCreary

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Benson

  6. 4 out of 5

    Youcef

  7. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emily Bragg

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Peaton

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matt Gross

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  12. 4 out of 5

    Edg Latvia

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Dubin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Snow

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bill Peacock

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yalta

  18. 4 out of 5

    N

  19. 5 out of 5

    Randall Fockens

  20. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

  21. 4 out of 5

    Trenton

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tim Tyler

  23. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

  24. 5 out of 5

    J.P.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daviddalboyahoo.com

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dallas Schiegg

  27. 4 out of 5

    KK Krattiger

  28. 4 out of 5

    Allen Patterson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Akshay

  30. 4 out of 5

    H. P.

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jeffery

  32. 4 out of 5

    B. Barron

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Gruber

  34. 4 out of 5

    ShamSham

  35. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

  37. 5 out of 5

    Lukas

  38. 4 out of 5

    Abraham Arslan

  39. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Mercer

  40. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Hardisty

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jace

  42. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Alter

  43. 4 out of 5

    Derek Douglas

  44. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Fried

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.