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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle conceived the Sherlock Holmes stories to augment his income from an unsuccessful medical practice, and they quickly made him famous. Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular detective.Edward Releigh's reading is utterly convincing and highly entertaining. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle conceived the Sherlock Holmes stories to augment his income from an unsuccessful medical practice, and they quickly made him famous. Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular detective.Edward Releigh's reading is utterly convincing and highly entertaining.


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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle conceived the Sherlock Holmes stories to augment his income from an unsuccessful medical practice, and they quickly made him famous. Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular detective.Edward Releigh's reading is utterly convincing and highly entertaining. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle conceived the Sherlock Holmes stories to augment his income from an unsuccessful medical practice, and they quickly made him famous. Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular detective.Edward Releigh's reading is utterly convincing and highly entertaining.

30 review for Sherlock Holmes: A Scandal in Bohemia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear." I'm gradually making my way through the Sherlock Holmes stories collected in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, which you can download free here at Gutenberg.org. This one is the story of The Woman. To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. ... And ye “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear." I'm gradually making my way through the Sherlock Holmes stories collected in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, which you can download free here at Gutenberg.org. This one is the story of The Woman. To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. ... And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory. A Bohemian nobleman, half-heartedly in disguise (note the highly effective half-mask) until Sherlock, bored, informs him that he knows who he is, hires Sherlock to help him with a scorned woman who has vengeance on her mind, now that he's dumped her (because she's not of the nobility) and plans to marry a nice, straitlaced blueblooded girl. Unfortunately for the guy, she has a picture of them together, along with letters and other evidence of their illicit relationship that will surely ruin his marriage plans. So Sherlock is hired to steal the incriminating photograph. I don't want to say a lot more, because it's short and easily spoiled. It's a pretty straightforward Sherlock Holmes case, made memorable by the woman Sherlock goes up against. Despite his disdain for women generally, he's impressed ... and, to his credit, not at all impressed with the nobleman who left her. There's some great dialogue between the characters, like the nobleman and Sherlock's discussion of why this woman's evidence can't be dismissed as fake, and this interchange between Sherlock and Dr. Watson:"By the way, Doctor, I shall want your co-operation.” “I shall be delighted.” “You don’t mind breaking the law?” “Not in the least.” “Nor running a chance of arrest?” “Not in a good cause.” “Oh, the cause is excellent!” “Then I am your man.” Bonus material: When I Googled to find out what a "cabinet" photograph is, I found this tremendously helpful page on a Stanford Univ. website, explaining not only that term but many others in the story that may not be familiar to modern readers.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    This is one of the the stories where we are first introduced to the only woman whom Sherlock ever recognized as being worthy of his attention; Ms. Irene Adler (aka The Woman). The story itself is told from Dr. Watson’s perspective, which I find to be a rather clever technique as it gives the readers a chance to see Sherlock’s method of reasoning as though they were working alongside him. It's a short story - I read it in under an hour. It's very readable - Conan Doyle has an easy-to-read style w This is one of the the stories where we are first introduced to the only woman whom Sherlock ever recognized as being worthy of his attention; Ms. Irene Adler (aka The Woman). The story itself is told from Dr. Watson’s perspective, which I find to be a rather clever technique as it gives the readers a chance to see Sherlock’s method of reasoning as though they were working alongside him. It's a short story - I read it in under an hour. It's very readable - Conan Doyle has an easy-to-read style which is quite timeless. Holmes and Watson are such famous characters you feel like you know them. The plot here is relatively simple - particularly as there isn't much time for it to unfold - but is nicely written and entertaining. Based on this I'll definitely go for one of the novels. I'd certainly recommend it to anyone looking for a readable classic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Grace (BURTSBOOKS)

    why yes, yes I am counting this towards my reading challenge. if schools gonna take my time I'm making every assignment count why yes, yes I am counting this towards my reading challenge. if schools gonna take my time I'm making every assignment count

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca (whenallotherlightsgoout)

    I enjoyed this venture into the Sherlock stories much better than my original attempt. It was fun to read this particular story, because much of it was used in BBC's Sherlock. It felt almost familiar, yet I didn't really know how it would progress. I enjoyed this venture into the Sherlock stories much better than my original attempt. It was fun to read this particular story, because much of it was used in BBC's Sherlock. It felt almost familiar, yet I didn't really know how it would progress.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul Haspel

    A scandal threatens the Kingdom of Bohemia, and therefore the King himself repairs in some haste to 221-B Baker Street, London NW1, to seek out the help of Sherlock Holmes. And thus unfolds Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “A Scandal in Bohemia” (1891) – the third Sherlock Holmes tale, the first short story in the Holmes canon, and one of the Holmes works that is likely to be of greatest interest to modern readers. Conan Doyle was a physician by training. Accordingly, it is probably no coincidence that w A scandal threatens the Kingdom of Bohemia, and therefore the King himself repairs in some haste to 221-B Baker Street, London NW1, to seek out the help of Sherlock Holmes. And thus unfolds Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “A Scandal in Bohemia” (1891) – the third Sherlock Holmes tale, the first short story in the Holmes canon, and one of the Holmes works that is likely to be of greatest interest to modern readers. Conan Doyle was a physician by training. Accordingly, it is probably no coincidence that when he began crafting his tales of the master-detective Sherlock Holmes, he chose to mediate the experience of Holmes’s investigations through the character of a doctor - one John H. Watson. Dr. Watson is a pleasant, intelligent, and ethical person – a fine companion for the journey – but his relatively conventional outlook and perspectives on life provide plenty of room for him, and us, to be perpetually amazed by Holmes’s astonishing breadth of knowledge and seemingly preternatural ability to find his way toward the solution of a mysterious crime. Before writing “A Scandal in Bohemia,” Conan Doyle had written two Sherlock Holmes novels, A Study in Scarlet (1887) and The Sign of the Four (1890), and the tales had proven immensely and immediately popular. It is therefore interesting that Conan Doyle did not persist with novels, but turned to the opportunity to write shorter stories about the brilliant detective and his loyal physician friend. Part of the pleasure of following Holmes and Watson on their adventures consists in the manner in which Conan Doyle follows a formula that manages not to seek formulaic. We know that Dr. Watson will make his way to 221-B Baker Street, where Holmes will be “buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug, and the fierce energy of his own keen nature” (pp. 2-3). Holmes will make some sudden and startling, and yet casual, demonstration of his own brilliance, and then he will set forth some of his general principles for conducting a deductive investigation – as when he says, near the beginning of this story, that “It is a capital mistake to theorise before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts” (p. 8). Only after the completion of these initial rituals will the details of a new case emerge. What may cause “A Scandal in Bohemia” to stand out from other Sherlock Holmes tales, for contemporary readers, is the character of Irene Adler – a name that will be familiar to moviegoers, because of the zest and energy with which Canadian actress Rachel McAdams portrayed Irene Adler in the Guy Ritchie films Sherlock Holmes (2009) and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (2011). At the core of this story is the manner in which Irene Adler – though always seen at a distance, or at second-hand – emerges as a vividly realized character who, at crucial moments in the story, shows herself to be a worthy opponent for the brilliant Holmes. Watson begins “A Scandal in Bohemia” by saying of Irene Adler that “To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman”, and adds that “In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex”. Watson, who tends to moralize, calls Irene Adler a woman “of dubious and questionable memory”, and insists that Holmes did not love Irene Adler. But he makes clear that, in some way, Irene Adler was special to Holmes – for “there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler” (p. 2). Irene Adler’s credentials, like Holmes’s, are formidable. Reading over her file, from the copious collection of files that Holmes keeps on all potential persons of interest, Holmes reads of Irene Adler’s talents: “Born in New Jersey in the year 1858. Contralto – hum! La Scala, hum! Prima donna, Imperial Opera of Warsaw – yes!” (p. 17) Like Holmes himself, Irene Adler is a bit of a polymath – someone who is good at everything. As mentioned above, Holmes’s client for the case chronicled in “A Scandal in Bohemia” is the King of Bohemia himself. Disguised as a Bohemian count, the king has made his way to 221-B Baker Street because, as the king admits, “Some five years ago, during a lengthy visit to Warsaw, I made the acquaintance of the well-known adventuress, Irene Adler” (p. 17). They exchanged letters, and were even photographed together; but ultimately, the king decided that Irene was not suitable as a marriage partner for a king. Now, the king fears that Irene Adler will thwart his planned marriage to a Scandinavian princess by sending the photograph to the princess’s family. When the king says of Irene Adler that “she has a soul of steel. She has the face of the most beautiful of women, and the mind of the most resolute of men. Rather than I should marry another woman, there are no lengths to which she would not go – none” (p. 19), one senses Holmes’s growing sympathy for Irene, and his increasing disaffection for his royal client. Yet Holmes takes the case, and begins ferreting out clues – using, in the process, his well-known talent for disguise. He learns that Irene Adler, at her villa in the Saint John’s Wood area of northwest London, has been receiving a lawyer named Godfrey Norton. In a flashback, Holmes recounts his surprise at learning, when he followed Irene and Godfrey to the Church of Saint Monica, that the relationship between Irene and Godfrey was not strictly a lawyer-client relationship. Holmes tells Watson that, while he was still disguised as a horse-groom, “I was half-dragged up to the altar, and before I knew where I was found myself mumbling responses which were whispered in my ear, and vouching for things of which I knew nothing, and generally assisting in the secure tying-up of Irene Adler, spinster, to Godfrey Norton, bachelor” (p. 31). In a manner that recalls Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Purloined Letter” (1844), Holmes reasons out where in Irene’s house the photograph is likely to be, and makes plans for its recovery. Employing a group of people, Holmes concocts an elaborate ruse that gets him admitted to Irene’s home. He describes his reasoning to Watson, in a manner that might seem somewhat gender-essentialist today: “When a woman thinks that her house is on fire, her instinct is as once to rush to the thing which she values most. It is a perfectly overpowering impulse….A married woman grabs at her baby; an unmarried one reaches for her jewel-box” (p. 42). Holmes comes to understand that “The photograph is in a recess behind a sliding panel, just above the right bell-pull” (p. 45); and at this point, it seems as though the recovery of the photograph will be a simple and routine undertaking. But Irene Adler has one more move to make in this elaborate game of chess – one that increases the reader’s sympathy and admiration for her, particularly when one reads what she has to say in a letter that she leaves for Holmes. One of my many readings of “A Scandal in Bohemia” took place in the context of a trip to London a few years ago. My wife and I were staying in the Marylebone section of the city, and we made a point of visiting the Sherlock Holmes Museum – at, yes, 221-B Baker Street. The wall tiles at the nearby Baker Street Station of the London Underground are decorated with silhouettes of Holmes wearing his deer-stalker hat and smoking a pipe. Holmes is virtually a living presence in that part of London – evidence of the way in which his adventures have made generations of readers want to travel along with him, just as Dr. Watson originally did. Many of the pleasures of “A Scandal in Bohemia” will be familiar to fans of Conan Doyle’s work, but the presence of the Irene Adler character gives this story something distinctive. As this story concludes, the reader understands why, as Watson observes in a closing remark, whenever Sherlock Holmes “speaks of Irene Adler…it is always under the honourable title of the woman” (p. 53). Truly, “A Scandal in Bohemia” is scandalously entertaining.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    5 Stars. One of the earliest Holmes and one of the most famous of all mystery stories ever written. It's the first entry in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes." My reading came from "Sherlock Holmes The Complete Novels and Stories" from 2020 - that's the lot! It first saw the light of day in "The Strand" in 1891. How often have you had a King visit? Dr. Watson has recently been married and hasn't seen his friend in a while. One evening, while returning from a patient and walking down Baker St., 5 Stars. One of the earliest Holmes and one of the most famous of all mystery stories ever written. It's the first entry in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes." My reading came from "Sherlock Holmes The Complete Novels and Stories" from 2020 - that's the lot! It first saw the light of day in "The Strand" in 1891. How often have you had a King visit? Dr. Watson has recently been married and hasn't seen his friend in a while. One evening, while returning from a patient and walking down Baker St., he feels an urge to visit. Impeccable timing. Holmes has received a strange letter, via the last post of the day. It's writer will visit that evening. Should Watson leave? "Not a bit .. I am lost without my Boswell." Trying to disguise himself, a giant of a man dressed in finery walks in. Within seconds Holmes has analyzed the clues and addressed him as, "Your Majesty." He's the King of Bohemia in Germany. He is about to be married and a previous relationship with the well-known singer, Irene Adler, may jeopardize that. There's a photo, not scandalous by today's standards, he must retrieve. I reveled in Holmes' methods. (December 2020)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    My n-th reading of this evergreen classic took place just yesterday! And that has prompted this review, which is entirely redundant for such a gem. Record suggests that Holmes was practically reborn in this story, after his rather muted debut and follow-up novels. My introduction to Holmes had also taken place through the first episode of the Granada series, where Jeremy Brett had given us an unforgettable performance. Later I had read a superb translation of this story rendered by Subhadrakumar My n-th reading of this evergreen classic took place just yesterday! And that has prompted this review, which is entirely redundant for such a gem. Record suggests that Holmes was practically reborn in this story, after his rather muted debut and follow-up novels. My introduction to Holmes had also taken place through the first episode of the Granada series, where Jeremy Brett had given us an unforgettable performance. Later I had read a superb translation of this story rendered by Subhadrakumar Sen in fortnightly 'Anandamela', lavishly illustrated by Subrata Gangopadhyay. But through all these, I had remembered only 'The Woman.' If you are yet to read this story, then please read it ASAP. Yes, Holmes is there. But there is that person whose intelligence proves again what the BBC Sherlock had marvelously utilised as a tagline for the site maintained by the Dominatrix. Know it, when you are beaten!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cora Tea Party Princess

    5 Words: Perfect length for a cuppa. I quite enjoyed this. Despite the short length it had a fast pace, yet at the same time it was like nothing was missing from the story. It was a quick and very enjoyable read, and with every story I read I want to read the next even more.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hessam Ghaeminejad

    A classic adventurer by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle took me to my childhood where my hero, Sherlock, solved all the problem...now I figured out everyone could lose one day even with that brilliant methods of deduction.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kati

    I've always wanted to read the Sherlock Holmes short stories and this was a great start! It's so much fun to compare the original story to the BBC series or the movie starring Robert Downey junior. And let's be honest: The friendship between Holmes and Watson is irreclaimable. I've always wanted to read the Sherlock Holmes short stories and this was a great start! It's so much fun to compare the original story to the BBC series or the movie starring Robert Downey junior. And let's be honest: The friendship between Holmes and Watson is irreclaimable.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cerys Weston (Library of Cerys)

    ugh, yes, I love this. Sherlock Holmes is amazing and this is the most iconic story ever

  12. 4 out of 5

    Satrina T

    First Sherlock Holmes book I've read, I'll definitely want to read more because I liked the way everything ties together in the end. First Sherlock Holmes book I've read, I'll definitely want to read more because I liked the way everything ties together in the end.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    My first experience of Sherlock Holmes 17 January 2012 This was the first of the Sherlock Holmes stories that I have read, and the third story written by Doyle. There are about 51 short stories and 4 novels so I do not propose on writing a review on each of them. First of all it will make it look like I have read more books on Goodreads than I really have (in the same way if I added every sonnet that I have read as well, though I would like to write commentaries on a number of them) and that it i My first experience of Sherlock Holmes 17 January 2012 This was the first of the Sherlock Holmes stories that I have read, and the third story written by Doyle. There are about 51 short stories and 4 novels so I do not propose on writing a review on each of them. First of all it will make it look like I have read more books on Goodreads than I really have (in the same way if I added every sonnet that I have read as well, though I would like to write commentaries on a number of them) and that it is not truly a book, it is a short story, meant to be read in a single sitting. So, I have decided to read the first of the collection of short stories, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, if only to get a feel on what the stories are actually like. The reason that I wanted to read at least one is that I wanted to see how close Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes was to the original character, and I must admit it is pretty close. In Watson's words: while Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition … So, the scene in the first movie where Holmes is sitting in a darkened room firing a gun at the wall (no doubt whacked out on cocaine) pretty much sums up Doyle's character. I am doubtful whether in the books he ever gets involved in a pit fight (apparently he does), but I have concluded that what we see in Ritchie's movies is the character that Doyle originally created and not the prim and proper conservative character with whom we are all familiar. I would have to suggest that Doyle's Holmes is actually an amoral character. He does not do what he does for any higher purpose (and it is clear that Holmes' logical mind does not allow any spirituality into his universe) nor does it seem that he does it for the money. He does what he does because it is a challenge and it is clear, especially as you read some of the other stories, that he is not adverse to breaking the law to solve one of his mysteries (in fact he is a very deceitful character, as is seen in this story, where he fakes an injury to get inside Adler's house). Now, I was thrilled to discover that the first story has Irene Adler in it. In the movies (at least the first one) Irene Adler is a major character, however it appears that she really only makes one appearance in the stories (as does Moriarty). However, she is referred to elsewhere, namely as the only woman who has ever outwitted Sherlock Holmes. She is clearly a very smart and cunning woman, but unfortunately we do not get too deep into her character or motives in the story, and it is a real shame that Dolye did not attempt to develop her further. Other people have though: Ritchie is one of them, and there is also a series of books in which Irene Adler is the protagonist (if that is the correct word for her character). However, my feeling is that despite many people trying to carry on Doyle's legacy, the only person who truly knows the character of Sherlock Holmes is his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

  14. 4 out of 5

    SheriC (PM)

    I appreciate the intrigue, and that Holmes was actually a little delighted that he was outsmarted (and out-acted) by a woman, but I'm a little puzzled as to why the Grand Duke insists that a woman who has been blackmailing him is a "woman of her word" and won't expose him now. Audiobook, part of the enormous Audible "Sherlock Holmes" compilation of works read by Stephen Fry. I'm slowly working my way through it. I'll be listening to the rest of the short stories in "Adventures of" later. I appreciate the intrigue, and that Holmes was actually a little delighted that he was outsmarted (and out-acted) by a woman, but I'm a little puzzled as to why the Grand Duke insists that a woman who has been blackmailing him is a "woman of her word" and won't expose him now. Audiobook, part of the enormous Audible "Sherlock Holmes" compilation of works read by Stephen Fry. I'm slowly working my way through it. I'll be listening to the rest of the short stories in "Adventures of" later.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Yoak

    Not having read this story in five years, I'm amazed how I remember every detail of it. It's one of my favorite of Holmes. Not having read this story in five years, I'm amazed how I remember every detail of it. It's one of my favorite of Holmes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nostalgia Reader

    2.5 stars, but amusing enough in a few spots to round to 3.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    A scandal in Bohemia is the first short Adventure of Sherlock Holmes. Concerning his employment by the King of the eponymous nation and subsequent entanglement with The Woman. Honestly, and perhaps it's because I've seen the subject matter dealt with twice in the two modern re-tellings (both Cumberbatch and Downey jr), it was a rather underwhelming (ah-ha) affair. I was expecting a clash of wits, a cunning plan, some escalating action. Anything really, but it was a bit of a misfire as far as the A scandal in Bohemia is the first short Adventure of Sherlock Holmes. Concerning his employment by the King of the eponymous nation and subsequent entanglement with The Woman. Honestly, and perhaps it's because I've seen the subject matter dealt with twice in the two modern re-tellings (both Cumberbatch and Downey jr), it was a rather underwhelming (ah-ha) affair. I was expecting a clash of wits, a cunning plan, some escalating action. Anything really, but it was a bit of a misfire as far as the plot goes: Sherlock gets hired, wears a couple of costumes, tips his hand, scares her off, she leaves a snarky note. The end. There is some rather lovely establishment of Holmes' antipathy towards involving himself with the fairer sex, the entire introductory section on the subject of l'amour is a complete joy to read and Holmes is almost universally interesting to read about. It's the material he's given here that lets him down somewhat. As an aside; these books are obviously (what with being over a century old) incredibly regressive with regards to racial and gender equality, but in terms of their surroundings they were pretty open minded. In particular, Watson and Holmes linking arms to stroll away from the scene of their swindle was a delightful shock.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Erica Clou

    The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, #1: A surprise! And a bit feminist.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sierra Collins

    I think I highly prefer Doyle's version of Adler to the one portrayed in the tv series. The tv series is pretty brilliant though. I think I highly prefer Doyle's version of Adler to the one portrayed in the tv series. The tv series is pretty brilliant though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rob Thompson

    Dr. Watson recounts an adventure that started on 20 March 1888. (view spoiler)[While the currently married Watson is paying Holmes a visit, a masked visitor arrives, introducing himself as Count Von Kramm, an agent for a wealthy client. Holmes quickly deduces that the visitor is, in fact, Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel-Felstein and the hereditary King of Bohemia. Realizing Holmes has seen through his guise, the King admits this and tears off his mask. It transpire Dr. Watson recounts an adventure that started on 20 March 1888. (view spoiler)[While the currently married Watson is paying Holmes a visit, a masked visitor arrives, introducing himself as Count Von Kramm, an agent for a wealthy client. Holmes quickly deduces that the visitor is, in fact, Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel-Felstein and the hereditary King of Bohemia. Realizing Holmes has seen through his guise, the King admits this and tears off his mask. It transpires that the King is to become engaged to Clotilde Lothman von Saxe-Meiningen, a young Scandinavian princess. However, five years before the events of the story he had enjoyed a liaison with a "well-known adventuress", the American opera singer Irene Adler, whilst she was prima donna of the Imperial Opera of Warsaw. She has since retired and now lives in London. Fearful that should the strictly principled family of his fiancée learn of this impropriety, the marriage would be called off, he had sought to regain letters and a photograph of Adler and himself together, which he had sent to her during their relationship as a token. The King's agents have tried to recover the photograph through sometimes forceful means, burglary, stealing her luggage, and waylaying her. An offer to pay for the photograph and letters was also refused. With Adler threatening to send them to his future in-laws, which the King presumes is intended to prevent him from marrying any other woman, he makes the incognito visit to Holmes to request his help in locating and obtaining the photograph. The photograph is described to Holmes as a cabinet (5½ by 4 inches) and therefore too bulky for a lady to carry upon her person. As regards expenses, the King says Holmes has carte blanche and gives him £1,000 (£112,200 today[4]), exclaiming "I would give one of the provinces of my kingdom to have that photograph!" Holmes asks Dr. Watson to join him at 221B Baker Street at 3 o'clock the following afternoon. The next morning, Holmes goes to Adler's house, disguised as a drunken out-of-work groom. He discovers from the local stable workers that Adler has a gentleman friend, the barrister Godfrey Norton of the Inner Temple, who calls at least once a day. On this particular day, Norton comes to visit Adler, and soon afterward takes a cab to the Church of St. Monica in Edgware Road. Minutes later, the lady herself gets into her landau, bound for the same place. Holmes follows in a cab and enters a church, where he is unexpectedly asked to be a witness to Norton and Adler's wedding. Curiously, they go their separate ways after the ceremony. Meanwhile, Watson has been waiting for Holmes to arrive, and when Holmes finally does deliver himself back to Baker Street, he starts laughing. Watson is confused and asks what is so funny. Holmes then recounts his tale and comments he thought the situation and position he was in at the wedding was amusing. He also asks whether or not Watson is willing to participate in a scheme to figure out where the picture is hidden in Adler's house. Watson agrees, and Holmes changes into another disguise as a clergyman. The duo departs Baker Street for Adler's house. When Holmes and Watson arrive, a group of jobless men meanders throughout the street. When Adler's coach pulls up, Holmes enacts his plan. A fight breaks out between the men on the street over who gets to help Adler. Holmes rushes into the fight to protect Adler and is seemingly struck and injured. Adler takes him into her sitting room, where Holmes motions for her to have the window opened. As Holmes lifts his hand, Watson recognizes a pre-arranged signal and tosses in a plumber's smoke rocket. While smoke billows out of the building, Watson shouts "FIRE!" and the cry is echoed up and down the street. Holmes slips out of Adler's house and tells Watson what he saw. As Holmes expected, Adler rushed to get her most precious possession at the cry of "fire" – the photograph of herself and the King. Holmes was able to see that the picture was kept in a recess behind a sliding panel just above the right bell pull. He was unable to steal it at that moment, however, because the coachman was watching him. He explains all this to Watson before being bid good-night by a familiar-sounding youth, who promptly manages to get lost in the crowd. The following morning, Holmes explains his findings to the King. When Holmes, Watson, and the King arrive at Adler's house at 8 am, her elderly maidservant sardonically informs them she left the country by the 5.15 train from Charing Cross railway station. Holmes quickly goes to the photograph's hiding spot, finding a photo of Irene Adler in an evening dress and a letter dated midnight and addressed to him. In the letter, Adler tells Holmes he did very well in finding the photograph and taking her in with his disguises. She also reveals that she posed as the youth who bid Holmes good-night. Adler has left England with Norton, "a better man" than the King, adding she will not compromise the King, despite being "cruelly wronged" by him; she had kept the photo only to protect herself from further action he might take. The King exclaims how amazing Adler is ("Would she not have made an admirable queen? Is it not a pity she was not on my level?") Holmes replies Miss Adler is indeed on a much different level from the King (by which he means higher – an implication lost on the King). Thanking Holmes effusively, the King offers a valuable emerald ring from his finger as further reward.[5] Holmes says there is something he values even more highly – the photograph of Adler. Ignoring the handshake proffered by the King, Holmes leaves. He keeps the photograph as a reminder of her cleverness, and of being beaten by a woman's wit. Watson also tells that, since their meeting, Holmes always refers to her by the honorable title of "the woman". (hide spoiler)] All in all a decent tale mostly told in a narrative style. Which, of course, means less character development. But it is interesting that Doyle decided to begin the run of short stories by showing it is possible to outsmart Sherlock Holmes. A great introduction to the consulting detective.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Dillard

    I always enjoy reading Sherlock Holmes stories. This one was okay, but it really didn't feel like much of a mystery at all. It was a fun read but somewhat underwhelming. It was fun to see Sherlock get outwitted for a change, and I suppose this story does provide some insight into his character. I always enjoy reading Sherlock Holmes stories. This one was okay, but it really didn't feel like much of a mystery at all. It was a fun read but somewhat underwhelming. It was fun to see Sherlock get outwitted for a change, and I suppose this story does provide some insight into his character.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tanja

    “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear." 4 stars “You see, but you do not observe. The distinction is clear." 4 stars

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laiba

    5 stars. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s writing is addicting. Holmes is a refreshing character to read and observe his thought process and skills of deduction. His relationship with Watson is admirable: Sherlock: “Doctor, I shall want your cooperation.” Watson: “I shall be delighted.” Sherlock: “You don’t mind breaking the law?” Watson:“Not in the least.” Sherlock: “Not running a chance of arrest?” Watson: “Not in a good cause.” Sherlock: “Oh, the cause is excellent!” Watson: “Then I am your man.” Ugh, look at 5 stars. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s writing is addicting. Holmes is a refreshing character to read and observe his thought process and skills of deduction. His relationship with Watson is admirable: Sherlock: “Doctor, I shall want your cooperation.” Watson: “I shall be delighted.” Sherlock: “You don’t mind breaking the law?” Watson:“Not in the least.” Sherlock: “Not running a chance of arrest?” Watson: “Not in a good cause.” Sherlock: “Oh, the cause is excellent!” Watson: “Then I am your man.” Ugh, look at them. I love them. My only critique - or wish, really - is that the story is way too short. But it wouldn’t be called a ‘short story’ if they weren’t.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Last Tuesday, I had another hour to kill (probably the wrong word) while I was in the hospital waiting for my mom to have her scary heart test. I had read all the magazines I brought, so I pulled out a Kindle and read this version of A Scandal in Bohemia. I had recently watched Sherlock: A Scandal in Belgravia starring the delightfully weird Benedict Cumberbatch, so I wanted to see how one compared to the other. The only line that seemed to date the original was the one about a married woman rea Last Tuesday, I had another hour to kill (probably the wrong word) while I was in the hospital waiting for my mom to have her scary heart test. I had read all the magazines I brought, so I pulled out a Kindle and read this version of A Scandal in Bohemia. I had recently watched Sherlock: A Scandal in Belgravia starring the delightfully weird Benedict Cumberbatch, so I wanted to see how one compared to the other. The only line that seemed to date the original was the one about a married woman reaching for her child in the case of a fire. Wisely, it was changed in the updated version. Still, it was a fun and diverting read. I rather think that I would like to be called "The Woman".

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mahoghani 23

    I love a good mystery writer and Arthur Conan Doyle was one of the greatest. His character Sherlock Holmes was a great investigator or detective and his method of deduction was impeccable. In this story it seems impossible to locate the truth because so many others have failed but the outcome and deception will surprise you. It definitely surprised Sherlock Holmes. Always good to read a short story every now and then.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elijah Okesson

    This story begins with Sherlock and Watson talking. Then, the King of Bohemia comes and asks them to steal a photo of him that is planned to be used as blackmail against his girlfriend. Sherelock and Watson investigate it, and attempt to steal the photo. They fail, and the owner escapes. The kings girlfriend cancels Theo wedding and breaks up with him, so the king is content.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eye of Sauron

    The first of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short stories, "A Scandal in Bohemia" is a reasonably entertaining diversion. The mystery itself is not incredibly noteworthy, but the story is notable for introducing the now-famous character of Irene Adler. And yes, I've begun to publish a series of these public domain short stories in order to make a series of matching covers and metadata on Goodreads! The first of Doyle's Sherlock Holmes short stories, "A Scandal in Bohemia" is a reasonably entertaining diversion. The mystery itself is not incredibly noteworthy, but the story is notable for introducing the now-famous character of Irene Adler. And yes, I've begun to publish a series of these public domain short stories in order to make a series of matching covers and metadata on Goodreads!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lesa Loves Books

    Doyle isn't a dud! And neither is Holmes! A Scandal in Bohemia is engaging and the rapport between Dr. Watson and Sherlock is charming. I'm so delighted with my first foray into the Holmes canon. And just after telling a friend who is reading the Holmes collection that I didn't care for Sherlock. Silly me. Doyle isn't a dud! And neither is Holmes! A Scandal in Bohemia is engaging and the rapport between Dr. Watson and Sherlock is charming. I'm so delighted with my first foray into the Holmes canon. And just after telling a friend who is reading the Holmes collection that I didn't care for Sherlock. Silly me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Čulo

    This is my first Sherlock Holmes story and I liked it although it didn’t really impress me that much. Everything was pretty basic and people have said there are some plot holes. Nothing special but a fun quick read. Plus I really enjoyed the writing style!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    A fun and quick little read. It was nice to see Sherlock get excited about something other than violins, cocaine and crime.

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