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New Programmer's Survival Manual: Navigate Your Workplace, Cube Farm, or Startup (Pragmatic Programmers)

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It's your first day on the new job. You've got the programming chops, you're up on the latest tech, you're sitting at your workstation... now what? New Programmer's Survival Manual gives your career the jolt it needs to get going: essential industry skills to help you apply your raw programming talent and make a name for yourself. It's a no-holds-barred look at what really It's your first day on the new job. You've got the programming chops, you're up on the latest tech, you're sitting at your workstation... now what? New Programmer's Survival Manual gives your career the jolt it needs to get going: essential industry skills to help you apply your raw programming talent and make a name for yourself. It's a no-holds-barred look at what really goes on in the office--and how to not only survive, but thrive in your first job and beyond. Programming at industry level requires new skills - you'll build programs that dwarf anything you've done on your own. This book introduces you to practices for working on large-scale, long-lived programs at a professional level of quality. You'll find out how to work efficiently with your current tools, and discover essential new tools. But the tools are only part of the story; you've got to get street-smart too. Succeeding in the corporate working environment requires its own savvy. You'll learn how to navigate the office, work with your teammates, and how to deal with other people outside of your department. You'll understand where you fit into the big picture and how you contribute to the company's success. You'll also get a candid look at the tougher aspects of the job: stress, conflict, and office politics. Finally, programming is a job you can do for the long haul. This book helps you look ahead to the years to come, and your future opportunities--either as a programmer or in another role you grow into. There's nothing quite like the satisfaction of shipping a product and knowing, "I built that." Whether you work on embedded systems or web-based applications, in trendy technologies or legacy systems, this book helps you get from raw skill to an accomplished professional.


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It's your first day on the new job. You've got the programming chops, you're up on the latest tech, you're sitting at your workstation... now what? New Programmer's Survival Manual gives your career the jolt it needs to get going: essential industry skills to help you apply your raw programming talent and make a name for yourself. It's a no-holds-barred look at what really It's your first day on the new job. You've got the programming chops, you're up on the latest tech, you're sitting at your workstation... now what? New Programmer's Survival Manual gives your career the jolt it needs to get going: essential industry skills to help you apply your raw programming talent and make a name for yourself. It's a no-holds-barred look at what really goes on in the office--and how to not only survive, but thrive in your first job and beyond. Programming at industry level requires new skills - you'll build programs that dwarf anything you've done on your own. This book introduces you to practices for working on large-scale, long-lived programs at a professional level of quality. You'll find out how to work efficiently with your current tools, and discover essential new tools. But the tools are only part of the story; you've got to get street-smart too. Succeeding in the corporate working environment requires its own savvy. You'll learn how to navigate the office, work with your teammates, and how to deal with other people outside of your department. You'll understand where you fit into the big picture and how you contribute to the company's success. You'll also get a candid look at the tougher aspects of the job: stress, conflict, and office politics. Finally, programming is a job you can do for the long haul. This book helps you look ahead to the years to come, and your future opportunities--either as a programmer or in another role you grow into. There's nothing quite like the satisfaction of shipping a product and knowing, "I built that." Whether you work on embedded systems or web-based applications, in trendy technologies or legacy systems, this book helps you get from raw skill to an accomplished professional.

30 review for New Programmer's Survival Manual: Navigate Your Workplace, Cube Farm, or Startup (Pragmatic Programmers)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Erik Nilson

    Overall a good book, you will learn few things from it, or at leats it will be a good refresher, although it is not bringing any new ideas, worth reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Kanev

    It is a great book for somebody, who is just getting into the career of programming. The tips are short and essential. It's really easy to understand and start applying. The writing is nice and easy. Since I've been a programmer for years, I didn't learn much from it. However, I had a great time reading it - I even took a highlighter and a pen and started making notes on my copy. It is a great book for somebody, who is just getting into the career of programming. The tips are short and essential. It's really easy to understand and start applying. The writing is nice and easy. Since I've been a programmer for years, I didn't learn much from it. However, I had a great time reading it - I even took a highlighter and a pen and started making notes on my copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Coakley

    I think the first half of the book was a pretty solid overview of what the transition from coding for yourself to coding for your job might be like, such as embracing test-driven development and organizing your code better. I also really liked how the author used different languages throughout the book. The references to other books that go into more detail on each topic is very welcome, and you could use it as a good resource for finding other books; many of the books referenced are considered I think the first half of the book was a pretty solid overview of what the transition from coding for yourself to coding for your job might be like, such as embracing test-driven development and organizing your code better. I also really liked how the author used different languages throughout the book. The references to other books that go into more detail on each topic is very welcome, and you could use it as a good resource for finding other books; many of the books referenced are considered must-reads by most programmers, such as SICP and Mythical Man Month. However, once you get past the programming portion of the book, the rest of it is basically a 101 on working at a company for the first time. If you've ever taken any business or project management courses, worked and office job, or even just read some books on business, most of the information presented in the latter chapters isn't worth reading. I think a leaner revised edition with more on best practices as a beginner would make for a much stronger book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The first section of the book is fantastic; the author touches on a variety of different topics that, while familiar to more experienced programmers, serves as a solid reminder of what it takes to become well rounded. Testing, debugging, automation - though the author doesn't dive very deep into any single concept, I've been given a lot to reflect on. Having said that, the latter sections feel like they've been stuffed with unnecessary content. I can understand and appreciate a discussion on ann The first section of the book is fantastic; the author touches on a variety of different topics that, while familiar to more experienced programmers, serves as a solid reminder of what it takes to become well rounded. Testing, debugging, automation - though the author doesn't dive very deep into any single concept, I've been given a lot to reflect on. Having said that, the latter sections feel like they've been stuffed with unnecessary content. I can understand and appreciate a discussion on annual reviews and pair programming skills, but an entire section on personality types seems a bit beyond the scope of practical advice. The book's a solid read, but you wouldn't miss a lot by skimming through the later sections.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Gaspar

    Interesting book for beginners or if you want to go over various aspects of being a Software Developer in a quick and easy read. The books the author recommends are very good and will lead you to advanced explorations of the discussed topics. As for negatives, the book's advice seems to be especially tailored to programmers building careers in Fortune 500 companies and not so much in smaller companies (Startups and the like). One of the first signs of this (apart from the author's own biography) w Interesting book for beginners or if you want to go over various aspects of being a Software Developer in a quick and easy read. The books the author recommends are very good and will lead you to advanced explorations of the discussed topics. As for negatives, the book's advice seems to be especially tailored to programmers building careers in Fortune 500 companies and not so much in smaller companies (Startups and the like). One of the first signs of this (apart from the author's own biography) was this statement: “... in the waterfall development method that dominates industry: ...”. I'm very likely living on a bubble for having worked in young companies most of my career, but Agile seems much more prevalent in these types of companies.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David

    Plenty of solid advice I wish I'd had a few years ago. Plenty of solid advice I wish I'd had a few years ago.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Evan Wondrasek

    This book, though still in "beta", was a great guide to all the little things you don't know when starting a professional career in software. It covered topics like project management, working with a team, understanding company management, fitting into corporate culture, doing the "right thing" when programming, working with legacy code, testing, code reviews, long-term career goals, surviving the "long haul" of work, and much more. Each "chapter" was broken into Tips, with each tip focusing one This book, though still in "beta", was a great guide to all the little things you don't know when starting a professional career in software. It covered topics like project management, working with a team, understanding company management, fitting into corporate culture, doing the "right thing" when programming, working with legacy code, testing, code reviews, long-term career goals, surviving the "long haul" of work, and much more. Each "chapter" was broken into Tips, with each tip focusing one major item. I had the luxury of doing an internship before I started full-time software engineering, and I can say that the advice presented in this book is very relevant to getting started (especially in a Fortune 500 company). Even being a little over a year into my software engineering career, I felt the book invigorated me and gave me a push to be more organized and work with my team more effectively.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ravi Sinha

    This book might be a good overview of a lot of concepts pertaining to a software professional's job today. It talks about the whole gamut of such a job's peculiarities - from coding to the social aspects, from corporate aspects to health management all the way to the business side of things. There are better books out there though that address a lot of these topics. This book constantly cites those former pieces of work, especially about the programming bits. The treatment of topics related to co This book might be a good overview of a lot of concepts pertaining to a software professional's job today. It talks about the whole gamut of such a job's peculiarities - from coding to the social aspects, from corporate aspects to health management all the way to the business side of things. There are better books out there though that address a lot of these topics. This book constantly cites those former pieces of work, especially about the programming bits. The treatment of topics related to coding might be difficult to grasp for an absolute newbie. I had difficulty concentrating on the topics unrelated to programming addressed in the latter half of the book. Kudos to the author all the same for assembling something so comprehensive. A good, quick read, but not indispensable.

  9. 5 out of 5

    NJ Wong

    This book contains a lot of good tips for a beginning programmer starting out in the industry. As a short book, it can be easily digested. However, as it is short, many of the topics cannot be covered in detail. A reader will need to augment this book with other books that delve into the many topics raised in more depth.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marian

    I really enjoyed this book. It helped me to feel like some of the things I have been experiencing as a new programmer are normal. Some of the topics don't apply to me as I don't work for a software company but I think it was a good read and overall, beneficial. I really enjoyed this book. It helped me to feel like some of the things I have been experiencing as a new programmer are normal. Some of the topics don't apply to me as I don't work for a software company but I think it was a good read and overall, beneficial.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Manuel

    Good references for bibliography.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christophe Addinquy

    Ma note de lecture complète en français ici Ma note de lecture complète en français ici

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam Zerner

    Mostly things you probably know already. Not much information that's actually useful. Mostly things you probably know already. Not much information that's actually useful.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patrik

    This book I should have read at the start of My career. Good list of references to other books worth reading.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Not bad, but at the end of the day, it's more for beginners, and as I've been programming for three years, there's little useful knowledge I've gathered from this book. Not bad, but at the end of the day, it's more for beginners, and as I've been programming for three years, there's little useful knowledge I've gathered from this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eric Hogue

    This book is targeted to new developers. It explains what it's like to develop for a living. From the different roles you can have to who are these other people in your company. This book is targeted to new developers. It explains what it's like to develop for a living. From the different roles you can have to who are these other people in your company.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amit

    As the name suggests, its a must-read book for every new programmer.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yen-Cheng Chou

    Pretty nice advice for entry level engineer.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Lim

    A good read. Like someone who has been around telling you the stuff you learn the hard way.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jun

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karl

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sergey Leschenko

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ville Pulkkinen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nachiketas

  25. 4 out of 5

    Miguel Laginha

  26. 5 out of 5

    ferhat

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben Love

  28. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  29. 5 out of 5

    Janneke

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mojtaba Ebadi

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