web site hit counter The Whiskey Sea - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Whiskey Sea

Availability: Ready to download

Running rum during Prohibition, she’ll risk her life—and her heart. Motherless and destitute, Frieda Hope is determined to make a better life for herself and her sister, Bea. The girls are taken in by a kindly fisherman named Silver, and Frieda begins to feel at home on the water. When Silver sells his fishing boat to WWI veteran Sam Hicks, thinking Sam would be a fine Running rum during Prohibition, she’ll risk her life—and her heart. Motherless and destitute, Frieda Hope is determined to make a better life for herself and her sister, Bea. The girls are taken in by a kindly fisherman named Silver, and Frieda begins to feel at home on the water. When Silver sells his fishing boat to WWI veteran Sam Hicks, thinking Sam would be a fine husband for Frieda, she’s outraged. But Frieda manages to talk Sam into teaching her to repair boat engines instead, so she has a trade of her own and won’t have to marry.Frieda quickly discovers that a mechanic’s wages won’t support Bea and Silver, and is lured into a money-making team of rumrunners supplying alcohol to New York City speakeasies. Speeding into dangerous waters to transport illegal liquor, Frieda gets swept up in the lucrative, risky work—and swept off her feet by a handsome Ivy Leaguer who’s in it just for fun.As danger mounts and her own feelings threaten to drown her, can Frieda find her way back to solid ground—and to a love that will sustain her?


Compare

Running rum during Prohibition, she’ll risk her life—and her heart. Motherless and destitute, Frieda Hope is determined to make a better life for herself and her sister, Bea. The girls are taken in by a kindly fisherman named Silver, and Frieda begins to feel at home on the water. When Silver sells his fishing boat to WWI veteran Sam Hicks, thinking Sam would be a fine Running rum during Prohibition, she’ll risk her life—and her heart. Motherless and destitute, Frieda Hope is determined to make a better life for herself and her sister, Bea. The girls are taken in by a kindly fisherman named Silver, and Frieda begins to feel at home on the water. When Silver sells his fishing boat to WWI veteran Sam Hicks, thinking Sam would be a fine husband for Frieda, she’s outraged. But Frieda manages to talk Sam into teaching her to repair boat engines instead, so she has a trade of her own and won’t have to marry.Frieda quickly discovers that a mechanic’s wages won’t support Bea and Silver, and is lured into a money-making team of rumrunners supplying alcohol to New York City speakeasies. Speeding into dangerous waters to transport illegal liquor, Frieda gets swept up in the lucrative, risky work—and swept off her feet by a handsome Ivy Leaguer who’s in it just for fun.As danger mounts and her own feelings threaten to drown her, can Frieda find her way back to solid ground—and to a love that will sustain her?

30 review for The Whiskey Sea

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leslie D.

    This was one of those books I did not expect to enjoy nearly as much as I actually *did*--always a very cool thing! This novel drew me in from the beginning, and hooked me like a fish (albeit a happily willing one) caught in a net until the end. The audio version was narrated and produced in great fashion, which added a significantly higher rating from me personally. However, I do think I would have probably highly enjoyed the print version if I had been able to read it that way instead. I do not This was one of those books I did not expect to enjoy nearly as much as I actually *did*--always a very cool thing! This novel drew me in from the beginning, and hooked me like a fish (albeit a happily willing one) caught in a net until the end. The audio version was narrated and produced in great fashion, which added a significantly higher rating from me personally. However, I do think I would have probably highly enjoyed the print version if I had been able to read it that way instead. I do not want to give away too much of the plot here...I picked this one up mainly because of its availability on KindleUnlimited as free with narration (after sampling the audio & reading the book blurb). I will say that it touched my heart and spirit in a way many books have not this year, and I have thought back on it several times since reading it--always a good sign for me! :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fred Shaw

    This is a beautiful story about 2 young girls, one a toddler, living in a fishing village near NYC during prohibition. Orphaned by the death of their prostitute mother, a local fisherman took them in and raised them. Rather than tell you what happened, I will tell you what the story said to me: regardless of your station in life, whether you have everything you want or just what you need, you can find happiness and love right in front of you. It's painful to want what you can't or don't have, bu This is a beautiful story about 2 young girls, one a toddler, living in a fishing village near NYC during prohibition. Orphaned by the death of their prostitute mother, a local fisherman took them in and raised them. Rather than tell you what happened, I will tell you what the story said to me: regardless of your station in life, whether you have everything you want or just what you need, you can find happiness and love right in front of you. It's painful to want what you can't or don't have, but if you could live and enjoy life to the fullest each day knowing tomorrow is not guaranteed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    I gave this book 3 stars because of the writing style and poetic descriptions- the love of the sea and boats (I am in the boating business) and because the authors knowledge of boating and marine engines and the "local" terminology and vocab. BUT here is the downside: at first the lead character was a strong willed female who was stubborn, had dreams and was thinking outside the box about career choices. I respected her. but as the story trailed on..and on..and on.. that character became a whini I gave this book 3 stars because of the writing style and poetic descriptions- the love of the sea and boats (I am in the boating business) and because the authors knowledge of boating and marine engines and the "local" terminology and vocab. BUT here is the downside: at first the lead character was a strong willed female who was stubborn, had dreams and was thinking outside the box about career choices. I respected her. but as the story trailed on..and on..and on.. that character became a whining pitiful sap. I think the story could have taken many other directions but its like the author just gave up on her own story 1/2 through the book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    WhatIReallyRead

    Entitled bitchy special snowflake alert! I'll be honest, I picked this book up because I loved the title and the cover. The premise looked intriguing, too. Alas... We meet Frida when she loses her mother, the town whore who serviced sailors. She and her sister get taken in by a guy who had mercy on them. He's not the father of either of girls, but he gives up his only bed, moving to the settee in the living room for the next fourteen years, gives up all his scarce funds to give them a home and an Entitled bitchy special snowflake alert! I'll be honest, I picked this book up because I loved the title and the cover. The premise looked intriguing, too. Alas... We meet Frida when she loses her mother, the town whore who serviced sailors. She and her sister get taken in by a guy who had mercy on them. He's not the father of either of girls, but he gives up his only bed, moving to the settee in the living room for the next fourteen years, gives up all his scarce funds to give them a home and an education. Is Frida grateful that this stranger dedicated his life to taking care of and making the sisters comfortable? Of course not. She's mad that he hasn't gifted his boat to her, and feels insulted he wants to have a say in her future. This man has saved up for years to give her a chance to get and an education and an honest job. But Frida thinks: No ordinary profession will do and says she wants to work at the docks. In 1920s. She wants to do physical labor, dangerous and harmful for her health, and be alone among dozens of sailors who have previously fucked her mother for money, because she wants to be unusual. Genious! And she's mad at her family for trying to talk her out of it. Does she stop there? No, she starts breaking law, too. Yep, we get reminded time and time again that she is so unusual, so special, everyone notices her, all men want her, etc etc. But she's not like other girls. She wants no man, she wants to be a sailor, no marriages for her! Until she meets the first hot guy on the street. Then she keeps following him around with puppy eyes. And when he kicks her, she licks his boots. Really, the dumbest and most irritating heroine ever! All pompous independence declarations she's made in the first half of the book make her groveling in the second half even more disgusting. For crying out loud, she's afraid to even tell him she loves him, because she knows he'll be mad! She asks a question, he tells her to shut up and give him a back rub. So she shuts up and gives him a back rub, and fears she's "pushed him away" with her attempts at conversation. UGH. With all Frida's phony pride, she had no self-resect, and I can't stand a heroine without self-respect.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Started reading this book to fulfill a challenge. (A book set at sea). Wasn't expecting to love it so much. It caught my attention right away by mentioning that the mother was a whore. My curiosity was peeked and I couldn't let it go until I was done reading it. I love books that make me feel and this book had so much going on. At times I felt hopeful along with the characters, at other times I was sad. I loved that this book takes you on a magical ride you don't want to get off of. Highly recom Started reading this book to fulfill a challenge. (A book set at sea). Wasn't expecting to love it so much. It caught my attention right away by mentioning that the mother was a whore. My curiosity was peeked and I couldn't let it go until I was done reading it. I love books that make me feel and this book had so much going on. At times I felt hopeful along with the characters, at other times I was sad. I loved that this book takes you on a magical ride you don't want to get off of. Highly recommend it!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    It is a special thrill as a reader when you are only a few chapters into a book and you know it will be one of your favorite reads of the year. The Whiskey Sea is one of those special books for me. The book begins with a mysterious image of a woman who is in the water and fears drowning. Then the story moves to 1908, when two young girls are orphaned after the sudden death of their mother. They are taken in by a kindly fisherman, and settle into life in a fishing community in New Jersey. The firs It is a special thrill as a reader when you are only a few chapters into a book and you know it will be one of your favorite reads of the year. The Whiskey Sea is one of those special books for me. The book begins with a mysterious image of a woman who is in the water and fears drowning. Then the story moves to 1908, when two young girls are orphaned after the sudden death of their mother. They are taken in by a kindly fisherman, and settle into life in a fishing community in New Jersey. The first few chapters are leisurely, but the pace picks up dramatically in 1923 when they are young women. The younger sister, Bea, dreams of going off to college and studying literature. The older sister, Frieda, wants to make a good living for her family in her hometown. While she is working as a ship mechanic, she becomes intrigued by the idea of rum running on boats, and takes on this dangerous and risky occupation. As a result she meets a wealthy and enigmatic young man from New York, and her life begins to change. This book is Frieda's story. The storytelling in this book is just so beautiful. I really cared about Frieda, Bea, and their adoptive father, Silver. The characters are so well developed and multi-dimensional. This would be a wonderful movie! I have to mention that Ann Howard Creel also wrote The Magic of Ordinary Days, which was the basis of my all time favorite Hallmark movie. I have it on DVD and have seen it many times. Anyone who loves the book or movie The Magic of Ordinary Days will absolutely adore this book. The descriptions in The Whiskey Sea are vivid and unique. For instance, when Frieda first sees a flotilla of boats running liquor: "A floating liquor establishment out in the middle of the dark ocean, like some kind of magical, mythical circus. It made Frieda think of pirates, mermaids, gods, and sirens of the sea. No one acted the slightest touched with doubt, even with jellyfish, like flowers, floating in the water about the boats and danger from the coast guard boats looming" (pp. 79 - 80). Fans of historical fiction will love The Whiskey Sea. I give it five stars and my highest recommendation.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joy D

    Coming of age historical fiction about rum-running during the Prohibition era in the northeastern United States. When we first meet protagonist Frieda, her mother has died, and she and her sister are taken in by a kindly fisherman. She grows into a young woman determined to build an independent life for herself and take care of her family. She learns to fix engines and challenges the conventional role of women of the day. She is wary of men due to her mother’s past and finds herself in unfamilia Coming of age historical fiction about rum-running during the Prohibition era in the northeastern United States. When we first meet protagonist Frieda, her mother has died, and she and her sister are taken in by a kindly fisherman. She grows into a young woman determined to build an independent life for herself and take care of her family. She learns to fix engines and challenges the conventional role of women of the day. She is wary of men due to her mother’s past and finds herself in unfamiliar territory when she falls in “first love” with a man from a different social background. The author’s writing style is refined and descriptive. I was able to vividly picture life in this small New Jersey coastal town. It is a character-driven novel about a strong-willed young woman, filled with risk-taking, romantic attraction, and, personal growth. I particularly liked the author’s ability to depict struggles with such topics as whether the end justifies the means, the perils of first love, and whom to trust. It occasionally ventures into somewhat maudlin territory, but overall it came across as poignant story of the heaviness of loss, learning from experience, and the ramifications of decisions. I didn’t quite feel transported to the era due to several contemporary figures of speech, but it was close. Recommended to readers that enjoy character-driven stories of personal development. I look forward to reading more from this author. Memorable passages that convey the writing style: “When the bay was furious and churning, those frothing waters pulled the resentment right out of her and fed it to the waves. And when the tides stopped surging and the bay became silver and flat, it was as if some almighty power had smoothed her rough edges while leveling the surface of the sea with big, broad hands. She felt as if she could sail out past the land and lighthouses and float on forever.” “It was the tiny chill in the predawn air, an indication that summer was nearing a close, a sign of change to come. She felt it on her arms—not a breeze but a shift in the air. The long sultry nights were over. Every sunrise and sunset was another little slip toward September, a month that loomed as desolate and unwelcome as sleet.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    KarenK

    I received ARC from netgalley.com. Set during the prohibition era, Frieda and Bea are left orphaned at an early age. Their fathers are unknown and their mother is the town whore. Silver, a kindly fisherman, takes them in and cares for them. As an adult, Frieda goes rum running in an effort to earn money and put Bea through college. I liked the story, showing Frieda able to do what it takes to take care of her family. A solid 3 stars out of 5.

  9. 5 out of 5

    CLM

    Giveaway! During the month of August I will be giving away a copy of this historical novel, about plucky sisters who are determined not to let their deceased mother's reputation prevent them from following their dreams. It is set in (of all places) New Jersey! Please visit my blog to enter: http://perfectretort.blogspot.com/201... Giveaway! During the month of August I will be giving away a copy of this historical novel, about plucky sisters who are determined not to let their deceased mother's reputation prevent them from following their dreams. It is set in (of all places) New Jersey! Please visit my blog to enter: http://perfectretort.blogspot.com/201...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    I read this book to try a new author. According to reader reviews on Amazon, this author writes very unique historical fiction. I enjoyed the story and the writing style. The characters could have been real people. The emotions were real-to-life. I will seek out this author again in the future.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Roesel

    “Could love reawaken an almost-dead man and save two young lives? He wanted that now as he’d never wanted anything before.” THE WHISKEY SEA Time: 1920’s Prohibition in the black waters off New Jersey’s Sandy Hook peninsula: In THE WHISKEY SEA (Lake Union Publishing) by Ann Howard Creel, Frieda’s five and her baby sister, Beatrice, or Bea as they called her, is nearly a year-old when their mother, Della Hope, the town whore dies. Everybody knew of Della and most of the men had relations with her, “Could love reawaken an almost-dead man and save two young lives? He wanted that now as he’d never wanted anything before.” THE WHISKEY SEA Time: 1920’s Prohibition in the black waters off New Jersey’s Sandy Hook peninsula: In THE WHISKEY SEA (Lake Union Publishing) by Ann Howard Creel, Frieda’s five and her baby sister, Beatrice, or Bea as they called her, is nearly a year-old when their mother, Della Hope, the town whore dies. Everybody knew of Della and most of the men had relations with her, but no one wants to step up and take care of her little girls. But Silver, one of the local clammers has a change of heart and decides he isn’t going to let either one of those girls go the way of their mother. He’s going to do the right thing for the first time in his life. Once Frieda graduates from high school, Silver expects her to go to secretary school and get married. She refuses both, expecting to take over his fishing business, not knowing he’s sold the boat to Sam Hicks, who Silver has picked out to be Frieda’s husband. Frieda doesn’t receive the news well, wanting to learn a trade and work on the sea. Sam reluctantly teaches her to become a boat engine mechanic. Soon Silver is sick and in need of a nurse and Bea is old enough for college, and a mechanics paycheck doesn’t cover the bills. She finds out there’s lots of money to be made as a rumrunner, speeding into dangerous water transporting illegal liquor and one of the top boats needs a top mechanic. The job is hers if she’s up for the danger of rough seas, possibly being captured, sent to prison or even killed. Well, Frieda doesn’t get killed as a rumrunner, but she meets Charles, a Princeton/Harvard boy who might as well … I’m not going to give the whole story away. This is a romantic story set in the 1920’s and love is love anytime you put two lovers together. I fell in love with Ann Howard Creel’s writing previously in her novel, WHILE YOU WERE MINE, where in 1940s New York City, we met nurse Gwen Mulligan who cared for an abandoned baby for nearly a year, only to have the parents show up and want her back. Ann is able to create the historical time and place so authentically and beautifully that you automatically fall into the era. I’ve come to fully appreciate her talent for writing fully developed characters that are able to do good, but are real and flawed, as well. “I know you won’t believe this right now, and it might not ever be over, but it will get more bearable.” THE WHISKEY SEA I look forward to her next novel.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    An orphan daughter of the town prostitute, Frieda Hope grew up with a thick skin. Needing to make money to support her sister and adoptive father, Frieda takes a job on a rum-running boat. It's good money, but dangerous. There she meets Charles, a blueblood just looking for a little summer fun. His good looks and charm slowly penetrate the tough walls she has in place around her heart. As the danger of the job escalates, so does the insecurity of Frieda's heart. I listened to the audio version an An orphan daughter of the town prostitute, Frieda Hope grew up with a thick skin. Needing to make money to support her sister and adoptive father, Frieda takes a job on a rum-running boat. It's good money, but dangerous. There she meets Charles, a blueblood just looking for a little summer fun. His good looks and charm slowly penetrate the tough walls she has in place around her heart. As the danger of the job escalates, so does the insecurity of Frieda's heart. I listened to the audio version and I thought it was pretty well done. Frieda's character was well developed, and the rumrunning aspect of the book was interesting. 3.5 stars are probably more accurate. I liked the book, but it didn't wow me; however, I think it has more to do with the type of book that it is. It takes more to impress me with a general novel like this one.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    I've never read a book by Ann Howard Creel, but The Magic of Ordinary Days, the movie based on her book of the same title, is my all time favorite Hallmark movie. I don't want to get too "spoilery" here, but this book, in the sense of relationship dynamics, plays out a lot like TMoOD. The setting was completely different and the time period predates WWII, but it was a pretty good story. I loved that it involved the sea, boats, and Prohibition. That said, Creel isn't one for eewy, gooey romance a I've never read a book by Ann Howard Creel, but The Magic of Ordinary Days, the movie based on her book of the same title, is my all time favorite Hallmark movie. I don't want to get too "spoilery" here, but this book, in the sense of relationship dynamics, plays out a lot like TMoOD. The setting was completely different and the time period predates WWII, but it was a pretty good story. I loved that it involved the sea, boats, and Prohibition. That said, Creel isn't one for eewy, gooey romance at all, but rather the struggles and heartbreak that one faces on the path to love. I'm one of those readers who loves a little over-the-top romance, but this book doesn't have that, and I still loved it. It's really just an underlying theme in a book where the main topics are letting go of bitterness and embracing a steadfast love. I actually liked this a lot more than I thought I would after having read a few spoilers online. If you have enjoyed her books in the past, I'd say you'll probably like this too or if you are new to Creel's books, give this a try! *I receive complimentary books for review from publishers, publicists, and/or authors. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.*

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

    Ugh, this had potential to be a good story. The idea of rum running and prohibition is very interesting, but oh my god, the writing. I am a believer in "show, don't tell" storytelling and all of the EXPLAINING (so. much. explaining.) nearly drove me off a cliff. Ugh, this had potential to be a good story. The idea of rum running and prohibition is very interesting, but oh my god, the writing. I am a believer in "show, don't tell" storytelling and all of the EXPLAINING (so. much. explaining.) nearly drove me off a cliff.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christie

    I think that it was the rum-running aspect of the story that saved this book from being a completely formulaic book, but even with those fun 20s touches, the author was unable to prevent a bit of a shipwreck. Summary complete with SPOILERS SPOILERS! Outcast girl is raised by kind fatherly man who is no relation. However, when she graduates he suddenly sells the boat she thought would become hers to a man called Hicks. It turns out this is to get the money to send her to secretarial school and beca I think that it was the rum-running aspect of the story that saved this book from being a completely formulaic book, but even with those fun 20s touches, the author was unable to prevent a bit of a shipwreck. Summary complete with SPOILERS SPOILERS! Outcast girl is raised by kind fatherly man who is no relation. However, when she graduates he suddenly sells the boat she thought would become hers to a man called Hicks. It turns out this is to get the money to send her to secretarial school and because he has kind of promised her to Hicks as a wife. But she is strong and spunky and says no way, Jose! She dashes off to learn how to fix boat engines from the very man who bought her boat, and who of course is devotedly in love with her despite apparently never having spoken to her before. Then for years she works as a mechanic until she finds that she could be making even bigger money by keeping the engine cool for a rum-runner. Surprise, surprise, the mysterious beautiful young man she once glimpsed from a distance and cannot get out of her mind becomes a crew member too, for kicks. Even bigger surprise, she falls for him, goes all girly for him, goes to speakeasies with him, sleeps with him, etc while noticing that he never says he loves her and gets angry at talk about the future. And of course poor old Hicks is still hanging around like a big sad puppy, somehow comforting her. The whole thing is pretty predictable. Her father figure dies, her sister leaves and gets married, beautiful boy shows over and over just what a jerk he can be and exactly what he wants her for, and then the boat explodes and Mr. Beautiful bails on them all. Our heroine goes back to engine repairs after travelling to NYC to say one weird last goodbye to the guy who cared nothing for her, and of course, suddenly realizes it was Hicks who was perfect for her all along. So everyone is happy (except probably the guy who was so injured in that boat explosion) and that's the end. I would have liked the book better if the heroine (whose name I've already forgotten) had not been so silly. I liked that she was not afraid to get her hands dirty, was in love with the sea, and didn't fear carving out her own path, but she just continually makes stupid choices and ignores the worry of the small handful of people who actually love her. However, stupid choices are part of life for everyone so I am trying to overlook that. I guess I also would have liked the book better if it hadn't been so easy to figure out, pretty much from the first time she spots the guy whose beauty seems to be his only good trait, exactly what the rest of the book will be. And it is. There are no surprises. How disappointing :( I have to say, though, that the author has skill for making you see the setting clearly in your mind's eye. And the suspense on the rum-running trips was palpable. I think the choice of subject matter was a good one, as there aren't so many books written about the people who risked all to provide those who could afford it with illegal booze (at a huge profit). If you love the Roaring 20s I think this is worth reading so long as you don't expect too much.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    The Whiskey Sea isn't a romance, but it is a story about a young woman discovering what love really is. It's Frieda's story, a young woman who seems to be at war with life from even before the time she is orphaned when her mother, who had been making a living by selling herself, dies because of her lifestyle. Frieda is tough, used to guarding herself against the cruelty of her classmates & the rest of society, and fiercely determined that her angelic little sister Bea will have all the best life The Whiskey Sea isn't a romance, but it is a story about a young woman discovering what love really is. It's Frieda's story, a young woman who seems to be at war with life from even before the time she is orphaned when her mother, who had been making a living by selling herself, dies because of her lifestyle. Frieda is tough, used to guarding herself against the cruelty of her classmates & the rest of society, and fiercely determined that her angelic little sister Bea will have all the best life has to offer. She is given a chance at a better life when Silver, a kind man who never frequented her mother's business, takes the girls in & fathers them with love & kindness. The bulk of the story shows whether or not Frieda, who at times jumps from one bad decision to another, ever releases her bitterness & learns to value ordinary, everyday, unexciting kindness & love. For a time she is transformed by a relationship, but it is an unhealthy one & does not inspire good changes within her. I grew frustrated waiting for Freda to come to her senses & reject the man who did not value her. But I couldn't help but think that in "real life" many adults never break away from destructive relationships or purge themselves of the poison of bitterness. I think too many folks in the world pine their lives away longing for people & things that are not real & ignoring the very ones God has put in their pathway who might make their lives truly worth living. So I guess Frieda discovered truths about life way before many others do. Her addiction to the man who is not good for her also reminded me of the power God gives when we allow Him to change our way of thinking, which in turn changes our emotions & helps us love who & what He chooses. This book did not teach all that! But it did reinforce the importance of teaching these eternal truths to our little sisters & our daughters. So I appreciate the author's work in creating these characters. (A few instances of strong/crude language.) I loved Ann Howard Creel's book (and movie) The Magic of Ordinary Days & will definitely read her story While You Were Mine, which is also on Kindle Unlimited. The Audible narrator, Angela Dawe, is one that I will look for again. **Kindle Unlimited

  17. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot.... The Whiskey Sea marks my first experience with author Ann Howard Creel. The premise captured my attention as I’ve not read a lot of Prohibition era literature and saw a degree of promise in the idea of a woman engaging in the transport illegal liquor. Generally speaking, I feel that Creel capitalized on a lot of that promise. Frieda Hope is a thought-provoking protagonist and I liked the authenticity shown in her relationship Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot.... The Whiskey Sea marks my first experience with author Ann Howard Creel. The premise captured my attention as I’ve not read a lot of Prohibition era literature and saw a degree of promise in the idea of a woman engaging in the transport illegal liquor. Generally speaking, I feel that Creel capitalized on a lot of that promise. Frieda Hope is a thought-provoking protagonist and I liked the authenticity shown in her relationships with Silver and Bea. She’s intensely relatable and I liked how easy it was to understand the world as she saw it. I was also impressed with the tangible tension Creel created in the final chapters and I liked how those scene made me realize how invested I’d become in the narrative. That said, I struggled with the pacing and tone of the story. The action was very drawn out and I didn’t feel the content necessitated the extended timeline. Frieda’s tendency to reflect on the morality of her activities as well as her love life allowed a lot of insight to her character, but after a while I found myself wishing Creel hadn’t wasted quite so much ink beating round the bush. When all is said and done, I found The Whiskey Sea somewhat predictable, but I enjoyed the time and I spent with it and look forward to reading more of Creel’s work.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Righettini

    The Whiskey Sea is a fantastic read. Creel plunges you into the world of the 1920s Prohibition era, and the lives of the fishermen turned rum runners: the have-nots who risk their lives to earn a better life for their families, just so the rich can have their nightly cocktails. The protagonist, Frieda Hope, is a scrappy, independent young woman who has had responsibilities shoved on her at way too young an age. Watching her grow as she navigates this tough, hard-scrabble world and ultimately lea The Whiskey Sea is a fantastic read. Creel plunges you into the world of the 1920s Prohibition era, and the lives of the fishermen turned rum runners: the have-nots who risk their lives to earn a better life for their families, just so the rich can have their nightly cocktails. The protagonist, Frieda Hope, is a scrappy, independent young woman who has had responsibilities shoved on her at way too young an age. Watching her grow as she navigates this tough, hard-scrabble world and ultimately learns to cast off her hard shell through the grace of forgiveness is inspiring. All the characters spring to life on the page, and I found myself thinking about them, wondering what they would do next -- that is, when I was able to put it down. A beautifully written, well told story. Highly recommended.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I really enjoyed this book. This is the second book I read from Ann Howard Creel this year, and I loved both books giving them both five stars ( the other book was While You Were Mine) which was excellent IMO as well. The book was fast paced and exciting. There was romance that wasn't all cheesy and cute; it was kind of a sad romance, but fun to read. Also the author gives readers an Education on prohibition era, rum runners, and coastal fishing life in the 1920's. I highly recommend this book I really enjoyed this book. This is the second book I read from Ann Howard Creel this year, and I loved both books giving them both five stars ( the other book was While You Were Mine) which was excellent IMO as well. The book was fast paced and exciting. There was romance that wasn't all cheesy and cute; it was kind of a sad romance, but fun to read. Also the author gives readers an Education on prohibition era, rum runners, and coastal fishing life in the 1920's. I highly recommend this book

  20. 5 out of 5

    Misti

    This was our book club pick for April; we wanted to choose a historical fiction title. Unfortunately I did not enjoy this book. It started out OK with a pretty good headstrong character in an interesting situation. But the focus shifted from the story of a young woman trying to make her fortune bootlegging, to a predictable romance. I was disappointed that the main character changed so much from the tough independent woman that she was to a simpering and naive girl who let a man treat her badly. This was our book club pick for April; we wanted to choose a historical fiction title. Unfortunately I did not enjoy this book. It started out OK with a pretty good headstrong character in an interesting situation. But the focus shifted from the story of a young woman trying to make her fortune bootlegging, to a predictable romance. I was disappointed that the main character changed so much from the tough independent woman that she was to a simpering and naive girl who let a man treat her badly. It was kind of tedious to read also with all the inner dialogue that went on and on. This book just wasn't for me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    I liked it but it wasn't quite what I thought it would be. I thought there would be more about prohibition and rum running but the historical context took a back seat to Freida and her internal conflict. It was more the story of a young woman struggling with adult responsibilities and trying to find both herself and her place in the world. I was a little disappointed because I wanted the rum running to be a bigger part of the story. I liked it but it wasn't quite what I thought it would be. I thought there would be more about prohibition and rum running but the historical context took a back seat to Freida and her internal conflict. It was more the story of a young woman struggling with adult responsibilities and trying to find both herself and her place in the world. I was a little disappointed because I wanted the rum running to be a bigger part of the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lady Blue

    Beautiful story that makes you ask yourself,"What would I have done?" I loved every minute of Frieda's journey. This is more than a love story, but the love element did move me. I also appreciated the historical accuracy and the illumination of life in seashore towns during Prohibition. Highly recommended. Beautiful story that makes you ask yourself,"What would I have done?" I loved every minute of Frieda's journey. This is more than a love story, but the love element did move me. I also appreciated the historical accuracy and the illumination of life in seashore towns during Prohibition. Highly recommended.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Meh....pretty standard historical fiction. Nuff said.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Jenn Ƹ̴Ӂ̴Ʒ Schu

    This was a coming of age romance with a sprinkling of the prohibition era and life among the rum-runners. I enjoyed the segments on what I learned about the rum-runners and will look for non-fiction works on the subject. 3 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sourav Chandidas Ganguly

    Running rum during Prohibition, she’ll risk her life—and her heart.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    "The Whiskey Sea" had my attention from the first few words. This was a story of true love shown in many forms. I wasn't aware of the rum runners of the 1920's. What a scary adventure! Good book "The Whiskey Sea" had my attention from the first few words. This was a story of true love shown in many forms. I wasn't aware of the rum runners of the 1920's. What a scary adventure! Good book

  27. 4 out of 5

    Linda Zagon

    I enjoyed reading "The Whiskey Sea" by Ann Howard Crest. The author's historical perspective of Prohibition was intriguing. This was a time of "rum runners", and transporting illegal liquor. The setting takes place by the sea, where clammers and fishermen and their families live and work. Freida and her sister Bea,(who were orphaned) live with "Silver, a generous soul who has brought them up,as he clams and works on his boat. His wishes are for them to get an education, and skills to work during I enjoyed reading "The Whiskey Sea" by Ann Howard Crest. The author's historical perspective of Prohibition was intriguing. This was a time of "rum runners", and transporting illegal liquor. The setting takes place by the sea, where clammers and fishermen and their families live and work. Freida and her sister Bea,(who were orphaned) live with "Silver, a generous soul who has brought them up,as he clams and works on his boat. His wishes are for them to get an education, and skills to work during this depressing era. The author shows the contrast between the danger of the rum runners at sea,fighting the elements, the coast guard, pirates and mafia, to get the liquor and make money, and the city and island's wealthy clubs and the partying and liquor. I would recommend "The Whiskey Sea" The characters are interesting, and the book deals with loyalty, love, adventure, risk and conflict. Thank you to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for and advanced arc.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    This captivating story takes place during the Prohibition and although it emits a chick lit undercurrent, there is plenty of action to be found. Think of damp costal shores, clamming, rum-running, speakeasies and the dangers of navigating inky waters to escape the Coast Guard. The pages are brimming with vivid descriptions and overall the characters are complex and well developed. An absorbing read fully worthy of 4.5 stars.

  29. 4 out of 5

    EastCoastLady

    The Whiskey Sea is historically detailed, has the feel of an adventure, and features a good love story too. I learned a lot about what went on during Prohibition and the climactic chase scene is one of the best edge of your seat scenes I've read in a long long time. I loved these characters! Tell your friends to buy this book. The Whiskey Sea is historically detailed, has the feel of an adventure, and features a good love story too. I learned a lot about what went on during Prohibition and the climactic chase scene is one of the best edge of your seat scenes I've read in a long long time. I loved these characters! Tell your friends to buy this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    BethAnn BookBumming

    There’s a lot more to this book than meets the eye I was very impressed with the storytelling ability of the author. Every paragraph pulled you in further. Character development is very rich.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.