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Hyderabad A GRAPHIC NOVEL (EVERY CITY IS A STORY)

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The History of Hyderabad, a city in the Deccan region of India, spans over 400 years. It is a history rich in myth and legend. A history that ranges from its fabulous diamond mines to its present status as one of the Information Technology hubs of the world. Hyderabad A GRAPHIC NOVEL is part of Every City is a Story, a unique city-centric storytelling initiative. Review: W The History of Hyderabad, a city in the Deccan region of India, spans over 400 years. It is a history rich in myth and legend. A history that ranges from its fabulous diamond mines to its present status as one of the Information Technology hubs of the world. Hyderabad A GRAPHIC NOVEL is part of Every City is a Story, a unique city-centric storytelling initiative. Review: What makes this graphic novel spectacular is the wealth of age and antiquity that Undurti manages to bring to life in a way that is not only modern and exciting, but doesn't lose that weight of time resting on the story; spilling centuries old sand to reveal gems of tales and words that twine together to create the tangled webs of myth, legend, fairytale and brushed-off conversations that build a city of life and love and wonder out of well-trodden streets and statuesque buildings. - Conori Bell-Bhuiyan, Broken Frontiers.


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The History of Hyderabad, a city in the Deccan region of India, spans over 400 years. It is a history rich in myth and legend. A history that ranges from its fabulous diamond mines to its present status as one of the Information Technology hubs of the world. Hyderabad A GRAPHIC NOVEL is part of Every City is a Story, a unique city-centric storytelling initiative. Review: W The History of Hyderabad, a city in the Deccan region of India, spans over 400 years. It is a history rich in myth and legend. A history that ranges from its fabulous diamond mines to its present status as one of the Information Technology hubs of the world. Hyderabad A GRAPHIC NOVEL is part of Every City is a Story, a unique city-centric storytelling initiative. Review: What makes this graphic novel spectacular is the wealth of age and antiquity that Undurti manages to bring to life in a way that is not only modern and exciting, but doesn't lose that weight of time resting on the story; spilling centuries old sand to reveal gems of tales and words that twine together to create the tangled webs of myth, legend, fairytale and brushed-off conversations that build a city of life and love and wonder out of well-trodden streets and statuesque buildings. - Conori Bell-Bhuiyan, Broken Frontiers.

30 review for Hyderabad A GRAPHIC NOVEL (EVERY CITY IS A STORY)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Swaroop Kanti

    "Every City Is A Story." Nice artwork, but directionless concept. The expectation was to read about the city of Hyderabad and life and times, but this was more about... not sure how to describe... about cities, legends, a poet, chess and few other not related topics. "The city speaks. The city speaks to me. I have walked these streets for so long. Their twisting geometries are also the braided labyrinths of my mind."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vikas Singh

    A complete waste of money and time. This is the worst of the graphic novels that i have ever read. The plot has little to do with the title and city of Hyderabad. Downright confusing and boring you end up thinking why did you spend time and effort in going thru the pages.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tisha

    A graphic novel on and from an Indian city. A really good one I enjoyed this year is Hyderabad - A graphic novel by Undurti/ Chattoraj. The cover gives you a clue, which you might appreciate more once you finish reading it. Turn the pages and be lost in a sharp pool of imaginations, ages and move back and forth, exactly like our mind does. Featuring cosmologies of cities, a poet's verses, architectural power games, a city lover wrapped in the love of his city's legends, a dinosaur and an auto ri A graphic novel on and from an Indian city. A really good one I enjoyed this year is Hyderabad - A graphic novel by Undurti/ Chattoraj. The cover gives you a clue, which you might appreciate more once you finish reading it. Turn the pages and be lost in a sharp pool of imaginations, ages and move back and forth, exactly like our mind does. Featuring cosmologies of cities, a poet's verses, architectural power games, a city lover wrapped in the love of his city's legends, a dinosaur and an auto rickshaw wala. A terrific ride through time. I loved so much about it that I'm not going to reveal more. Except that it is a really intelligent one, could be the beginning of a series on Hyderabad and if the language was made just a little more spoken, rather than written, it might reach out to a larger audience I hope/wish. The art is evocative and quite intense. I almost felt like rediscovering the legends/ the stories the book evokes, when I turned the last page. Great love for the city mixes with great curiosity. If the upcoming Bangalore anthology evokes its own self with such vision and drama, I look forward to it. A slim, tall book this and what a great way to feel for a city, a reader may know little or nothing about. Wish someone would put together a town/city series, bringing each alive for what it is, what it was and can be reimagined as. Speaking to you, when we choose to listen. ( Also just when will the increasingly lazy-lazier lit-fests across India wake up to apna graphic narratives man. Or maybe they have a niche in some lit-fests and I don't know about them. I peeped in for exactly an hour and headed straight for the bookshop at the recent Bangalore Literature Festival, don't think I saw any graphic novel sessions in the schedule. Pretty blind I'd say, for a city which has so many folk doing comics and graphic art storytelling) Anyway, more on the super Hyderabad - the Graphic Novel here, from its creators. http://syenagiri.com/graphic-novel.html

  4. 5 out of 5

    Akshay

    The art was too cluttered, the writing too pretentious (in parts), and the story did not connect at all for me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shalini Maiti

    This one fell short in so many ways... And to think that it had a promising premise to start on! From what I gleaned, this is supposed to be one in a series of graphic novels by the author, each spanning the story of a city. As the title would suggest, this one is supposed to be about Hyderabad (or so you would think, until you are robbed of your expectations squat in the middle of the novel). The graphic novel begins at a good pace, telling the story of a PhD student from Osmania University, who This one fell short in so many ways... And to think that it had a promising premise to start on! From what I gleaned, this is supposed to be one in a series of graphic novels by the author, each spanning the story of a city. As the title would suggest, this one is supposed to be about Hyderabad (or so you would think, until you are robbed of your expectations squat in the middle of the novel). The graphic novel begins at a good pace, telling the story of a PhD student from Osmania University, who alights a time traveling auto to go back a few centuries and find his favorite poet, on whose life he's trying to base his thesis. However, quite abruptly it cuts into the story of magic embedded in ancient architecture, and how the layout of cities can affect positive/ negative energies. This architecture bit was a good premise to work on too, but unfortunately it circled back to the story of the planned city of Chandigarh, and how it was built... making one wonder what this story was doing in a book that was supposed to be about Hyderabad!!! The Graphic Novel is speckled with some good bits of poetry and Hyderabadi references, but to the uninitiated these will only seem like flecks of randomness, because there's no explanation given on what they actually mean/ depict. This piece had good potential, and could have even grown to become a cult favorite, had it not been for the disorganized thoughts of the writer, and some bad, bad editing by the publishers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shreela Sen

    3.5 This is not bout Hyderabad's history, Hyderabad features only in about 20-25% of this book, & even though this is about history, it is not in any continuity. It is highly anecdotal. (That is NOT a bad thing .) It also reads hurried, & like a trailer or intro, & THAT is not a good thing ! This graphic novel touches upon many places in various time periods on earth, & also has a conspiracy theory. The main twist of the story will be known to someone who's read "Something Rotten" of the Thursday 3.5 This is not bout Hyderabad's history, Hyderabad features only in about 20-25% of this book, & even though this is about history, it is not in any continuity. It is highly anecdotal. (That is NOT a bad thing .) It also reads hurried, & like a trailer or intro, & THAT is not a good thing ! This graphic novel touches upon many places in various time periods on earth, & also has a conspiracy theory. The main twist of the story will be known to someone who's read "Something Rotten" of the Thursday Next series. It is a passionate visit to many interesting specimens of architectural history/ landmarks of architecture in the past. It does not take any further than the present day. A bit of a spoiler : it is also anti- Pakistan! It is a good read, & a treasure of references to search online for... a lot of food for curiosity. Art is very detailed & engaging, though I cannot comment on accuracy. But it is not Hyderabad, or the History of Hyderabad. & it is a lot of this and that. It's no problem being anecdotal, but a work should come together with a cohesive something.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Preethi

    Seriously, what was this book about, again? With a title like this, it is assumed that this book is about the city, Hyderabad. I picked it up hoping it has immortalized something truly Hyderabadi - the dialect/language, the autos, the places, food or even the street names. What I got is a long rambling on how Chandigarh was built, the basis of the city Islamabad which I think is totally misplaced, a lesser known poet and his escapade. And what was this time machine all about? Super disappointed w Seriously, what was this book about, again? With a title like this, it is assumed that this book is about the city, Hyderabad. I picked it up hoping it has immortalized something truly Hyderabadi - the dialect/language, the autos, the places, food or even the street names. What I got is a long rambling on how Chandigarh was built, the basis of the city Islamabad which I think is totally misplaced, a lesser known poet and his escapade. And what was this time machine all about? Super disappointed with the content. But it must be noted that the drawings are good.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sharanya

    One star just for the awesome graphics ! The story telling was bah ! It was all over the place

  9. 4 out of 5

    Harsimran Khural

    The novel does not meet expectations set by the series title ("Every City is a story"). It's not much of a story, and not enough of it takes place in Hyderabad. There's an entire sequence about Chandigarh and Islamabad which appears unnecessary and out of place. The artwork is good though, and much attempt has been made to lend an air of mystery to the story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ankana

    Amazing art. Mind-blowing concept. Loved the chess piece, followed by the tale of the Tetrarchs. Absolute visual experience that will take you on a trippy ride through time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nallasivan V.

    Smart and witty, if only sometimes far fetched

  12. 4 out of 5

    Vijetha

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adi

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vamsi Varanasi

  15. 5 out of 5

    the.little.did.i.know

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hemant Singh

    What happens when you open a parcel and a gold nugget falls out? A priceless nugget with magical power. And it takes you back in time. Well, I‘d better stop now. The nugget I am talking about is a graphic novel – comics to many – titled Hyderabad (Every city is a story). First. A graphic book about the city of Hyderabad was the last thing I expected. Second. One is not in a position to correctly classify this graphic novel. Is it a book about a person, or a city, or does it have a life of its own What happens when you open a parcel and a gold nugget falls out? A priceless nugget with magical power. And it takes you back in time. Well, I‘d better stop now. The nugget I am talking about is a graphic novel – comics to many – titled Hyderabad (Every city is a story). First. A graphic book about the city of Hyderabad was the last thing I expected. Second. One is not in a position to correctly classify this graphic novel. Is it a book about a person, or a city, or does it have a life of its own? It’s something different. Who says Indians are not creative? And fail to create world-class products. I am holding one right now. The book depicts a sixty-five-million-year journey of this city. In visual mode. Read this book to find out how the writer Jai Undurti and artist Harsho Chattoraj managed it. This book is a perfect tribute to Anant Pai (Yes, the Uncle Pai of “Amar Chitra Katha” fame). I wish he was alive today to see this book. I loved my first Tintin- as a precocious 9-year old new reader. However, it was in the second reading that I found more. And even more in the next. So much so, I can pick up The Seven Crystal Balls today and have a good laugh. I tell this because one gets to find another angle in this graphic novel on second reading. There is one panel that shows a shop named K-3000. It took me back to 80s – the era of the number wars. Some poor fellow used just one alphabet and a single digit to name his shop in Abids. I believe it was D7. And found success. But it was his neighbour who started it. He renamed his shop but utilized a double digit. This game went on until one shop was named S-99999 . Open Deccan Chronicle, all you look at is numbers. On Vividh Bharati, all you heard was numbers. This book is a must-read for not just every Hyderabadi, but all those who like to read graphic novels that are more than just children stories. I am sure everyone will understand the bear episode. I practically doubled up with laughter. However, the book should be slightly tweaked to cater to low intelligence folks like me, without losing the awesome tone, narration and attitude it carries. So saying, I will now put on my Indiana Jones hat and dig into this graphic book. Again. PS: I got so involved in this book that I created my own Hyderabad-centric graphic book. Only in my head, of course. And it had Zamrud cinema and its famous morning-shows, the Musi river and the great flood that almost washed away the city, the poet Chilkan with his down-to-earth shayari, the chota samosa and chai in a saucer at Azizia Cafe, Karachi bakery and its osmania biskut, and, yes, the dinosaur at the Hyderabad zoo.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deepesh Srivastava

  19. 4 out of 5

    Edward Pharr

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sudhakar Unudurti

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mitesh Shah

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ayan Maity

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sukriti

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chaitanya krishnan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Progya

  26. 5 out of 5

    Udit Kulshrestha

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vipin Sirigiri

  28. 4 out of 5

    K M

  29. 5 out of 5

    James Goldberg

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adam

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