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Inferno

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Napoleon Bonaparte’s ambitions for world domination are growing apace, when Captain Sir Thomas Kydd returns to take up command of his ship Tyger, he finds himself called to be part of a great armada on a mission of the utmost urgency. Britain is alone and isolated in Europe. If the kingdom is to thwart a deadly threat she must move very quickly to secure her position with Napoleon Bonaparte’s ambitions for world domination are growing apace, when Captain Sir Thomas Kydd returns to take up command of his ship Tyger, he finds himself called to be part of a great armada on a mission of the utmost urgency. Britain is alone and isolated in Europe. If the kingdom is to thwart a deadly threat she must move very quickly to secure her position with neutral Denmark. A desperate decision is made by the Cabinet. It sends a sea force to the entrance to the Baltic and pressures the Crown Prince of Denmark to turn over the Danish fleet before it falls into the hands of Bonaparte. Unbeknownst to Kydd, his old friend, Renzi, has been called upon to undertake a parallel diplomatic mission to persuade the Danes to give up their fleet for the duration of the war. Renzi and Cecilia, Countess Farndon, are trapped in Copenhagen when everything comes to a terrible conclusion. In the meantime Kydd is lured ashore and captured by the French, but in a strange twist finds himself released to snatch the future king of France from exile. He returns to find a scene of chaos and terror. While attempting Renzi’s rescue, Kydd is witness to the poignant sight, never to be forgotten, of the entire surrendered Danish fleet sailing out of Copenhagen harbor the ships slowly proceeding one by one.


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Napoleon Bonaparte’s ambitions for world domination are growing apace, when Captain Sir Thomas Kydd returns to take up command of his ship Tyger, he finds himself called to be part of a great armada on a mission of the utmost urgency. Britain is alone and isolated in Europe. If the kingdom is to thwart a deadly threat she must move very quickly to secure her position with Napoleon Bonaparte’s ambitions for world domination are growing apace, when Captain Sir Thomas Kydd returns to take up command of his ship Tyger, he finds himself called to be part of a great armada on a mission of the utmost urgency. Britain is alone and isolated in Europe. If the kingdom is to thwart a deadly threat she must move very quickly to secure her position with neutral Denmark. A desperate decision is made by the Cabinet. It sends a sea force to the entrance to the Baltic and pressures the Crown Prince of Denmark to turn over the Danish fleet before it falls into the hands of Bonaparte. Unbeknownst to Kydd, his old friend, Renzi, has been called upon to undertake a parallel diplomatic mission to persuade the Danes to give up their fleet for the duration of the war. Renzi and Cecilia, Countess Farndon, are trapped in Copenhagen when everything comes to a terrible conclusion. In the meantime Kydd is lured ashore and captured by the French, but in a strange twist finds himself released to snatch the future king of France from exile. He returns to find a scene of chaos and terror. While attempting Renzi’s rescue, Kydd is witness to the poignant sight, never to be forgotten, of the entire surrendered Danish fleet sailing out of Copenhagen harbor the ships slowly proceeding one by one.

30 review for Inferno

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark Harrison

    I like this series but not this book. Pretty strange plotting with a pointless treasure hunt in Scotland, skirmishes in Denmark, a little political intrigue and not much sea time. All a bit pointless- adding nothing to the series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Shaw

    The worst Kydd novel I've read so far. Very little sailing expertise, more Royal Army action on land. Extremely boring. The worst Kydd novel I've read so far. Very little sailing expertise, more Royal Army action on land. Extremely boring.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Another fast read of a well researched tale of the Brits and Bonaparte. This time, neutral Denmark gets nailed by a preemptive British strike to seize the Danish Navy ahead of Napoleon who by this time thinks all of "his" Europe is his whore and whatever he wants is his for the taking. I did not know about the seige of Copenhagen. And a neutral country at that. A very controversial move by Great Britain back then and "ballsy." And a wee little side story of an early submarine used to retrieve trea Another fast read of a well researched tale of the Brits and Bonaparte. This time, neutral Denmark gets nailed by a preemptive British strike to seize the Danish Navy ahead of Napoleon who by this time thinks all of "his" Europe is his whore and whatever he wants is his for the taking. I did not know about the seige of Copenhagen. And a neutral country at that. A very controversial move by Great Britain back then and "ballsy." And a wee little side story of an early submarine used to retrieve treasure. I love how Stockwin finds these gems in his research.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Another Kydd adventure, covering a period of history I knew nothing about: 1807 Britain trying to protect her trade route to the Baltic. She wants to take custody of the Danish Fleet for the duration of the war, to keep trade open. Renzi goes to neutral Denmark and then Germany, to Crown Prince Frederick as envoy to head off any war, then the novel describes an amphibious landing of British Army and Navy. Kydd captains the H.M.S. Tyger. Hostilities ensue between Denmark and Britain on both land Another Kydd adventure, covering a period of history I knew nothing about: 1807 Britain trying to protect her trade route to the Baltic. She wants to take custody of the Danish Fleet for the duration of the war, to keep trade open. Renzi goes to neutral Denmark and then Germany, to Crown Prince Frederick as envoy to head off any war, then the novel describes an amphibious landing of British Army and Navy. Kydd captains the H.M.S. Tyger. Hostilities ensue between Denmark and Britain on both land and sea. Interesting description of a young ensign's first taste of battle. The first part, involving Kidd's diving for buried treasure off the coast of Scotland, didn't fit with the rest of the story. Good naval yarn as a whole. I thank LibraryThing for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Simon Brading

    Not the best, there's not enough Kydd in it for me, but extremely interesting nonetheless Not the best, there's not enough Kydd in it for me, but extremely interesting nonetheless

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Thoughts and Impressions After Finishing The Book (Mini Review): After finishing Inferno I immediately understood why this series has been so successful. Julian Stockwin's attention to detail, his life at sea and his generous fountain of historical knowledge, all contribute to the overall feel of this book. The historical and military elements of Inferno kept me interested and invested throughout this book. My main issue with the book was both the structure and the pacing. I found the first act Thoughts and Impressions After Finishing The Book (Mini Review): After finishing Inferno I immediately understood why this series has been so successful. Julian Stockwin's attention to detail, his life at sea and his generous fountain of historical knowledge, all contribute to the overall feel of this book. The historical and military elements of Inferno kept me interested and invested throughout this book. My main issue with the book was both the structure and the pacing. I found the first act - where Kydd finds himself on a treasure hunt in the Scottish Isles - tacked on and didn't set the tone for the book very well. (though it was a good platform for Stockwin to have some fun with his historical knowledge :D) Once this book jumped into the main storyline, I felt most of my concern related to the plot melt away, replaced by enjoyment of solid, comfortable and impressive writing. The 2nd/3rd acts of this book - the confrontation with Denmark and the inevitable war - were worth waiting for. I appreciate the fact that Stockwin ventured out of the comfort zone but he is much more enjoyable when he is crafting great sea/land battles and threading influential historical characters into his detailed plot lines. 8/10

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    A Kydd Sea Adventure with very little Kydd and very little sea adventure.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Clemens Schoonderwoert

    This fascinating sea-faring story is already the 17th volume of the superb and beautiful Thomas Kydd series. The book contains at the beginning three well-drawn maps, and a wonderful list of Dramatis Personae, while at the end you'll find a superb documented Author's Note, a very well explained Glossary, and a Timeline concerning all the Kydd books. What I would like to mention is, is that this tale reminds me for a great part about a book I read some years ago by Bernard Cornwell, a book called S This fascinating sea-faring story is already the 17th volume of the superb and beautiful Thomas Kydd series. The book contains at the beginning three well-drawn maps, and a wonderful list of Dramatis Personae, while at the end you'll find a superb documented Author's Note, a very well explained Glossary, and a Timeline concerning all the Kydd books. What I would like to mention is, is that this tale reminds me for a great part about a book I read some years ago by Bernard Cornwell, a book called Sharpe's Prey, and that book told us much about the same subject as this book does by Julian Stockwin, which is the Siege and Battle for Copenhagen, Denmark. As always the authentic language of the great seas is still present in this book when they are at sea, and thus making this story once again so unique of its own. Before I go to the book itself I prefer to say that the story-telling by the author is of a very good quality, so much so that all his characters, whether they are real or fictional, come all vividly to life within this book. The story is set once more in the year AD 1807, and at this moment Thomas Kydd is the hero of the hour, but when the French army is heading towards Denmark, the last link which is still outside French control and which at this moment is still neutral, and not to forget it controls the straits where the entire Baltic Trade passes, Thomas Kydd, his friend Nicholas Renzi have to come into action. And so Thomas Kydd's great friend, the same Nicholas Renzi now the Lord Farndon, is sent on a desperate diplomatic mission to persuade the Danes to give up their fleet to Britain, but the Danes do not yield, and what will finally follow is a bloody and fiery battle for Copenhagen between Britain and France with these same Danes caught in between. Very much recommended, for this book is "An Impressive Nautical & Battle Tale"!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    Here we are back with the adventures of Sir Thomas Kydd of Tyger. He is in Denmark with the entire British fleet, hoping that his brother-in-law Renzi can convince the Prince Regent to give up their navy to keep them out of the hands of Bonaparte. It fails spectacularly and the destruction of Copenhagen begins. As all the Kydd books there is history woven into the story. And I'm not a big fan of warfare, or military history much of the story is new to me. As horrific it is, it's also fascinating Here we are back with the adventures of Sir Thomas Kydd of Tyger. He is in Denmark with the entire British fleet, hoping that his brother-in-law Renzi can convince the Prince Regent to give up their navy to keep them out of the hands of Bonaparte. It fails spectacularly and the destruction of Copenhagen begins. As all the Kydd books there is history woven into the story. And I'm not a big fan of warfare, or military history much of the story is new to me. As horrific it is, it's also fascinating, I learn something with each book. This book is not any different, however it does cause me to raise an eyebrow when I found out the meaning of "And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air" was quite horrific to say the least. Never having thought of what that poem by Francis Scott Key in 1814 actually meant in terms of the terrible night. Nor during all the years of schooling having any one explain what the lyrics actual meant for those that were there that night. "Inferno" explains why the rockets had a red tail and the bombs burst in mid air. It's a frightening precursor to today's military tactics. It drives home how terrible the bombarding of Copenhagen was and the luck of Francis Scott Key surviving the bombing of Baltimore in 1814. Rocket's red glare - Congreve's Rockets had a red tail or trail upon launching. I couldn't find a distinct reason for this other than they probably were packed with a colored dust that created a red tail in flight. Bomb's bursting in air - these were early concussion bombs. They exploded in mid air and rained shrapnel down on the unsuspecting.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This book tells the story of a lesser known piece of British History from the Napoleonic era. Other than this it has practically nothing going for it and was hardly recognisable as a part of the rest of the Kydd series. As a first the writing has taken a massive shift in style. Tyger had 20 chapters of clever characterisation and plausible plot; Inferno has 105 chapters with dry characters who aren't really involved or in the slightest bit interesting and a series of plot lines which are frankly This book tells the story of a lesser known piece of British History from the Napoleonic era. Other than this it has practically nothing going for it and was hardly recognisable as a part of the rest of the Kydd series. As a first the writing has taken a massive shift in style. Tyger had 20 chapters of clever characterisation and plausible plot; Inferno has 105 chapters with dry characters who aren't really involved or in the slightest bit interesting and a series of plot lines which are frankly fanciful. I sincerely hope Stockwin reverts back to his previous style as I found the structure of this book disruptive and distracting. Secondly in my opinion the role of Renzi has run its course. In the Aubrey/Maturin relationship there was a believable reason for Maturin to exist. As his character developed there was still a solid reason for him to be there. Stockwin clearly stole the idea and whilst it sort of worked early on, it has become more and more stretched so that for me he is now an annoying implausability. I know there is another Kydd book about to be released, hopefully it will be well written and actually feature Kydd like the earlier Stockwin books.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex Lannin

    Another great Kydd novel. I thoroughly enjoy reading books from this series, Julian Stockwin knows how to write a page turner. I enjoyed the previous novel (Tyger) but felt there wasn't enough of Renzi (my favourite character), I'm pleased to confirm that he's back in this novel. I really like the juxtaposition of the different characters and how it all comes together nicely. Plenty of intrigue and action set against a historical backdrop, definitely worth a read. Another great Kydd novel. I thoroughly enjoy reading books from this series, Julian Stockwin knows how to write a page turner. I enjoyed the previous novel (Tyger) but felt there wasn't enough of Renzi (my favourite character), I'm pleased to confirm that he's back in this novel. I really like the juxtaposition of the different characters and how it all comes together nicely. Plenty of intrigue and action set against a historical backdrop, definitely worth a read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    The strength of this book is the telling of Britain's attack on neutral Denmark in the Napoleonic wars. This included a bombardment of civilians (much like the Blitz) that many apparently felt ashamed of. That part of the book is worthwhile and informative. The rest, however, is not up to standard. There is an unnecessary treasure hunt and a fictional account of the real rescue of a king. It lacks the sailing of previous books and goes way off piste. Shame, but not of me, this one, The strength of this book is the telling of Britain's attack on neutral Denmark in the Napoleonic wars. This included a bombardment of civilians (much like the Blitz) that many apparently felt ashamed of. That part of the book is worthwhile and informative. The rest, however, is not up to standard. There is an unnecessary treasure hunt and a fictional account of the real rescue of a king. It lacks the sailing of previous books and goes way off piste. Shame, but not of me, this one,

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    c2016 (4). Another enjoyable outing with the main story not involving our dashing hero. The book opens up with an almost stand alone tale of an outing up to Scotland and whilst riveting, I was left wondering what literary device was being used. It doesn't really matter. I enjoyed the story - just as well written and page-turning as the previous ones and I will continue to read the series. Recommended to the normal crew. c2016 (4). Another enjoyable outing with the main story not involving our dashing hero. The book opens up with an almost stand alone tale of an outing up to Scotland and whilst riveting, I was left wondering what literary device was being used. It doesn't really matter. I enjoyed the story - just as well written and page-turning as the previous ones and I will continue to read the series. Recommended to the normal crew.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Woodland

    A well crafted book that I found engrossing because I love history and the author brought to light a not all that well known part of the Napoleonic war. The link to Captain Kydd was far less than in previous books, but I found that the details of the 'incident' was so engrossing that I didn't notice that Captain Kydd was just a side show. Having been to Copenhagen I was able to visualise many of the places. A well crafted book that I found engrossing because I love history and the author brought to light a not all that well known part of the Napoleonic war. The link to Captain Kydd was far less than in previous books, but I found that the details of the 'incident' was so engrossing that I didn't notice that Captain Kydd was just a side show. Having been to Copenhagen I was able to visualise many of the places.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    This tale of a little known piece of English history has given me a deeper curiosity to know more. The tale doesn't really seem to "fit" the Kydd saga, but it did provide a little "meanwhile" information. It was a bit tedious at times, which made me wonder if it wasn't due to a publisher deadline. It could be taken out of the series without suffering much loss. If you're at the end of your reading on the Napoleonic wars than go ahead. This tale of a little known piece of English history has given me a deeper curiosity to know more. The tale doesn't really seem to "fit" the Kydd saga, but it did provide a little "meanwhile" information. It was a bit tedious at times, which made me wonder if it wasn't due to a publisher deadline. It could be taken out of the series without suffering much loss. If you're at the end of your reading on the Napoleonic wars than go ahead.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shelly Lincoln

    Although well told - and our intrepid Captain Kydd continues to find himself challenged by his assignments, this time to Copenhagen - this episode is far from the strongest in the series. It begs us to suspend our disbelief and buy that the very French Kydd is fighting rescue him from execution to ensure the survival of Louis XVIII. Kydd is almost a secondary character in this book, and the story suffers because of it. Still a good read, just not as strong as others in the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    While this story was another adventure by Mr. Stockwin, I did not care for the may characters that were introduced. For me, it made it a bit confusing and choppy. There was not a lot of action by Sir Thomas. Still a good book though.

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    Out of all the Kydd books this one was the hardest read. It is good in spots but drags in places also. I am some what disappointed after reading all the books of the Kydd series. This book falls short of the all the preceding books in this series’s.

  19. 4 out of 5

    J.P.

    Picking up the series for the first time in a bit, I’m reminded that Stockton is neither Cromwell or O’Brian. Which isn’t a bad thing in and of itself, but I’m consistently wishing for just a bit more even if I can’t say what that more is. 3 1/2 would be a more accurate rating

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Not the typical Kydd story, more a novel with Kydd as a side character

  21. 4 out of 5

    William Howle

    This is the 17th in the Kydd series. I have read all of them and they revolve around some historic British situation. This book is about the British attacking Denmark to keep the Danish fleet from falling into the hands of Napoleon. I was not aware of this, and to some it was considered a war crime as Denmark was a neutral country. I started this series after reading all of Patrick O'Brians books. It was a good choice. You should read these books in order starting with Kydd. This is the 17th in the Kydd series. I have read all of them and they revolve around some historic British situation. This book is about the British attacking Denmark to keep the Danish fleet from falling into the hands of Napoleon. I was not aware of this, and to some it was considered a war crime as Denmark was a neutral country. I started this series after reading all of Patrick O'Brians books. It was a good choice. You should read these books in order starting with Kydd.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Warnes

    A captivating book as always but split into the three situations of Nicholas Renzi, the Danish and Kydd on Tyger. My preference remains with the naval side of the stories although this book would have lacked the context without the others. Enjoyable but not the best in the series. Good plot with the odd twist and nice family connection between red and blue-coats.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Peter Noble

    Well researched and interesting from an historical point of view, but far too little character development that made the earlier books in this series so fun.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brett T

    Julian Stockwin has one of the two or so ongoing nautical fiction series that has had some legs and staying power as he writes of the life and voyages of Sir Thomas Kydd. Kydd began life at sea as a pressed man in 2001's Kydd and has been climbing the ranks of success, wealth and fame for 17 novels to date. Now a respected and well-known captain, Kydd begins Inferno on vacation while his ship HMS Tyger is repaired. But he is soon recalled to duty when His Majesty's government decides it cannot l Julian Stockwin has one of the two or so ongoing nautical fiction series that has had some legs and staying power as he writes of the life and voyages of Sir Thomas Kydd. Kydd began life at sea as a pressed man in 2001's Kydd and has been climbing the ranks of success, wealth and fame for 17 novels to date. Now a respected and well-known captain, Kydd begins Inferno on vacation while his ship HMS Tyger is repaired. But he is soon recalled to duty when His Majesty's government decides it cannot let the navy of Denmark fall into Napoleon's hands, even if that proud nation is unwilling to meekly hand over control of its warships to a foreign power. Kydd's own role in the siege of Copenhagen will also involve a rescue of the exiled King of France, while his friend Renzi Stone and Cecilia, Kydd's sister and Renzi's wife, try to work on the addled King of Denmark to achieve a diplomatic solution. History tells us how well that works out, and Renzi and Cecilia find themselves trapped in the besieged city when it comes under fire from English forces pressuring the king to capitulate. Stockwin spends probably less time with Kydd in Inferno than in any other of the novels so far. While understandable, since the naval role in the siege was mostly blockade and that would leave our hero with little to do, it makes for a scattered entry in the series. Stockwin's elegant language and deft hand at battles on sea and land haven't flagged, but when those tools are employed to relate the stories of a bunch of people who aren't our main cast, then attention can wander. The Battle of Copenhagen happened in 1807, so we're in sight of the climax of the global fight against the Emperor Napoleon and Stockwin himself said he saw the Kydd series as having 20 books. So there are probably three more to help him raise the quality back to former levels, which is more than enough time when the dip is this shallow and that overall quality this good. Original available here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Becky Forbes

    Another in great book in this sea faring series. My only advice is to read the books in the order they were written.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dick

    Just couldn't get into it Just couldn't get into it

  27. 5 out of 5

    Allan J. Jacobs

    Same characters; new situation s I love Kydd, Renzi, and their shooting characters. The stories became somewhat formulaic. The stage is set for a naval encounter, when Kydd's intelligence and character solve and insoluble tactical problem. This book takes the formula out of the navy, making for an interesting plot. It also contains morally ambiguity often missing from this sort of adventure novel. It introduces Ensign Maynard as an engaging and complex chsracter. I hope we see more of him in the Same characters; new situation s I love Kydd, Renzi, and their shooting characters. The stories became somewhat formulaic. The stage is set for a naval encounter, when Kydd's intelligence and character solve and insoluble tactical problem. This book takes the formula out of the navy, making for an interesting plot. It also contains morally ambiguity often missing from this sort of adventure novel. It introduces Ensign Maynard as an engaging and complex chsracter. I hope we see more of him in the future.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bob Cantrell

    This one was a bit different in its dealing more with a land action for the most part. Now Kydd does a role, but it is more a footnote to the main action. Overall the pacing was very good I thought. The story itself was an interesting piece of history. If you like the Kydd stories then I think you will like this one also.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lori Field

    I enjoyed the "diversion" story at the beginning of the book. I liked the Stockwin told the "battle" story from various perspectives. I felt like he skimmed over some important points or skipped some details that might have made the story more complete. I always enjoy the Kydd novels. I enjoyed the "diversion" story at the beginning of the book. I liked the Stockwin told the "battle" story from various perspectives. I felt like he skimmed over some important points or skipped some details that might have made the story more complete. I always enjoy the Kydd novels.

  30. 4 out of 5

    J

    Not your typical Thomas Kydd novel. In fact, Kydd is only in maybe 30% of the book. I've read a few books written around this event in history, and I must say, Mr. Stockwin covers it in much more detail than those others. Had it not been a Kydd novel I would have rated it four stars. Not your typical Thomas Kydd novel. In fact, Kydd is only in maybe 30% of the book. I've read a few books written around this event in history, and I must say, Mr. Stockwin covers it in much more detail than those others. Had it not been a Kydd novel I would have rated it four stars.

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