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Flumbra: An Icelandic Folktale

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When the dim-witted giantess Flumbra falls in love, her escapades upset all Iceland.


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When the dim-witted giantess Flumbra falls in love, her escapades upset all Iceland.

30 review for Flumbra: An Icelandic Folktale

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    I love it when folk/fairy tales truly reflect their country of origin with settings in deep, dark forests, or villages by the seaside. Flumbra's story is indeed part of Iceland's volatile landscape. It is the tale of two giants in love, and their long distance relationship. Keep in mind that giants cannot be caught out in the sunlight or they will turn to stone, so that makes for some rather tricky booty calls. Brian Pilkington's illustrations are fun, making the giants more silly than fearsome. I love it when folk/fairy tales truly reflect their country of origin with settings in deep, dark forests, or villages by the seaside. Flumbra's story is indeed part of Iceland's volatile landscape. It is the tale of two giants in love, and their long distance relationship. Keep in mind that giants cannot be caught out in the sunlight or they will turn to stone, so that makes for some rather tricky booty calls. Brian Pilkington's illustrations are fun, making the giants more silly than fearsome. Almost everything is played for laughs, and then . . . (view spoiler)[I was not prepared for that sad, sad ending. Sob! (hide spoiler)]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eloise Sunshine

    Tore vanaemade veimevakast võetud stiilis jutustus selgitamaks lastele Islandi loodusnähtusi, miks vulkaan purskab või maa väriseb, ja et tegelikult pole seda vaja karta, need on kõigest trollide armumängud... ;)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Britt Suits

    „Islandi trollilugu“ on väga vahva raamat lastele, mis jutustab erinevatest Islandi loodusnähtustest trollide võtmes. Mulle meeldis ja arvan, et ka lastele võiks meeldida.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    I interloaned a copy of a book by Helgadottir called A Giant Love Story only to discover that it and Flumbra are one and the same. Apparently the title was A Giant Love Story when it was published in English by Vaka-Helgafell, in Iceland, in 2002. Later, when Carolrhoda Books published it in 1986, the title was changed to Flumbra. I'm fond of Icelandic literature because I have a friend who is from Iceland and who has regaled me with some of the traditional children's tales. The story of Flumbra I interloaned a copy of a book by Helgadottir called A Giant Love Story only to discover that it and Flumbra are one and the same. Apparently the title was A Giant Love Story when it was published in English by Vaka-Helgafell, in Iceland, in 2002. Later, when Carolrhoda Books published it in 1986, the title was changed to Flumbra. I'm fond of Icelandic literature because I have a friend who is from Iceland and who has regaled me with some of the traditional children's tales. The story of Flumbra is told within the story of a father talking about giants to his son. I like the way that was done. The story describes how earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic activity are traditionally attributed to giants, and in this case Flumbra and her eight boys. The illustrations depict the giants looking easy-going but rather homely. They are also a bit graphic in a couple of places for a children's book; one picture in particular shows Flumbra with both breasts bared suckling a baby, while one of her boys sits on the steps with no pants on and genitals explosed. As I've noticed in the past, European standards for what can be depicted in children's books seem to be a bit more lax than in American publishing. Nevertheless, I enjoyed this story very much and only wish that Flumbra and the boys could find some way to return to flesh and blood again. Recommended!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bhunter2012

    Folktales are a good way to learn about history and the way people entertained themselves with stories. The father who grows up in the older generation tells his son of his fears and what villagers were afraid of in the old days. The father then puts a sweet twist on things to help his son get over his fears, that are a little more modern.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anshuman Gupta

    It was funny. I liked the characters and their funny names. I learnt that not all giants are cruel.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lily Alice

    I don't like when the giant is turned into stone. I don't like when the giant is turned into stone.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ásrún

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pioup

  10. 4 out of 5

    Oneiriad

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sólborg

  12. 4 out of 5

    benxander

  13. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lukas

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    A unique, heart-warming Icelandic children's tale. The artwork is gorgeous. A unique, heart-warming Icelandic children's tale. The artwork is gorgeous.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hiko Murs

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janita Andrijevskaja

  19. 5 out of 5

    Wan Ting

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hjördís Brynjarsdóttir

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elar

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marineke

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eric Hinkle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karisweetheart

  26. 5 out of 5

    Iphigenia

  27. 4 out of 5

    Calvin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Su

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leanne Ellul

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ksenia Roeder

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