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The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a 250 year long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work and the way we interact. The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioral shifts and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a 250 year long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work and the way we interact. The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioral shifts and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of the first to score a new Apple Watch or iPhone, the next generation of wearables will be able to predict if we re likely to have a heart attack and recommend a course of action. We watch news of Google s self-driving cars, but don t likely realize this means progressive cities will have to ban human drives in the next decade because us humans are too risky. Following on from the Industrial or Machine Age, the Space Age and the Digital Age, the Augmented Age will be based on four key disruptive themes Artificial Intelligence, Experience Design, Smart Infrastructure, and Health Tech. Historically the previous ages brought significant disruption and changes, but on a net basis jobs were created, wealth was enhanced, and the health and security of society improved. What will the Augmented Age bring? Will robots take our jobs, and AI s subsume us as inferior intelligences, or will this usher in a new age of abundance? Augmented is a book on future history, but more than that, it is a story about how you will live your life in a world that will change more in the next 20 years than it has in the last 250 years. Are you ready to adapt? Because if history proves anything, you don't have much of a choice."


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The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a 250 year long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work and the way we interact. The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioral shifts and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of The Internet and smartphone are just the latest in a 250 year long cycle of disruption that has continuously changed the way we live, the way we work and the way we interact. The coming Augmented Age, however, promises a level of disruption, behavioral shifts and changes that are unparalleled. While consumers today are camping outside of an Apple store waiting to be one of the first to score a new Apple Watch or iPhone, the next generation of wearables will be able to predict if we re likely to have a heart attack and recommend a course of action. We watch news of Google s self-driving cars, but don t likely realize this means progressive cities will have to ban human drives in the next decade because us humans are too risky. Following on from the Industrial or Machine Age, the Space Age and the Digital Age, the Augmented Age will be based on four key disruptive themes Artificial Intelligence, Experience Design, Smart Infrastructure, and Health Tech. Historically the previous ages brought significant disruption and changes, but on a net basis jobs were created, wealth was enhanced, and the health and security of society improved. What will the Augmented Age bring? Will robots take our jobs, and AI s subsume us as inferior intelligences, or will this usher in a new age of abundance? Augmented is a book on future history, but more than that, it is a story about how you will live your life in a world that will change more in the next 20 years than it has in the last 250 years. Are you ready to adapt? Because if history proves anything, you don't have much of a choice."

30 review for Augmented: Life in the Smart Lane

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristjan

    Book with a well-packaged material, however, lacked insights and unique views that I was hoping for this book. If you are generally aware of industry trends and follow latest news then nothing new for you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    Struggled between giving this a 3 or 4 star. It started out with a good overview of the subject material. Provided good historical detail on AI and machine learning. Also, looking at different domains (such as finance, health, and transportation) and how AI is and will continue to revolutionize these areas. Although there was nothing that wasn't found in other books, I think King did a good job packaging this information and had some interesting observations. I just didn't like the ending, espec Struggled between giving this a 3 or 4 star. It started out with a good overview of the subject material. Provided good historical detail on AI and machine learning. Also, looking at different domains (such as finance, health, and transportation) and how AI is and will continue to revolutionize these areas. Although there was nothing that wasn't found in other books, I think King did a good job packaging this information and had some interesting observations. I just didn't like the ending, especially the scenarios of how people will live in this augmented age.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    A limited introduction to AI research, the book quickly devolves into digital utopian evangelism. "Augmented" means an integration into everyday life and bodies which the author believes is the inevitable outcome of technology. Nearly every prediction comes with a time frame of "10 to 15 years." Given that the book was written in 2015, we can see how wrong the author is. 10 million autonomous cars by 2020? Nope. The "gig" economy replacing regular work? So far, no. Perhaps the biggest weakness o A limited introduction to AI research, the book quickly devolves into digital utopian evangelism. "Augmented" means an integration into everyday life and bodies which the author believes is the inevitable outcome of technology. Nearly every prediction comes with a time frame of "10 to 15 years." Given that the book was written in 2015, we can see how wrong the author is. 10 million autonomous cars by 2020? Nope. The "gig" economy replacing regular work? So far, no. Perhaps the biggest weakness of the book is the slight treatment of privacy and security concerns. On privacy, the author concludes that no one will want to opt out and miss all the cool advertising and opportunities available for people who choose 24/7 surveillance by software. On security, not one word.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jerome Moore

    An excellent overview of new and forthcoming changes in technology and their expected social impact. The book is an excellent starting point for those wishing to learn about forthcoming technological changes and their social impact. There are no technical details but is general overview of the technologies. If you want technical details you will need to find specific books on the particular technology you're interested in. An excellent overview of new and forthcoming changes in technology and their expected social impact. The book is an excellent starting point for those wishing to learn about forthcoming technological changes and their social impact. There are no technical details but is general overview of the technologies. If you want technical details you will need to find specific books on the particular technology you're interested in.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Simon Parent

    Synopsis: Future is here, self driving cars, people that enhance themselves in many ways, solar and storage, privacy is dead (but it’s good, lol), blockchain, gig work and Uber, life expectancy, direct carbon capture, etc. Impressions: Meh. All stuff I knew. But his spin is way too much positive, and it contrast a lot with the previous books I listened by Naomi Klein. He seems to think it’s all a good thing, that big corporations can be created with just a logo and an “experience”. Basically, he Synopsis: Future is here, self driving cars, people that enhance themselves in many ways, solar and storage, privacy is dead (but it’s good, lol), blockchain, gig work and Uber, life expectancy, direct carbon capture, etc. Impressions: Meh. All stuff I knew. But his spin is way too much positive, and it contrast a lot with the previous books I listened by Naomi Klein. He seems to think it’s all a good thing, that big corporations can be created with just a logo and an “experience”. Basically, he seems to think we will not have any sort of economic collapse, or that the current system is fine (along with all the regurgitated stuff I read everyday on r/futurology). I really see this book as far too naive. He regularly look a bit down on people who are uncomfortable with sharing their private data, saying how that would stop us from using a lot of services, but it’s no longer about this. It’s about how this data can be used very maliciously by other people, such as the Chinese government that completely control everyone using their own data, or entities that can “hack” an election by disturbing opinions on social media. He constantly ignore the bad, and only focuses on the good (or at least really gloss over the bad). The contrast with the other books I just listened to made me see how naive I sounded when I was just touting amazeballz stuff from r/futurology. Yes, there is many incredible tech here, and coming, and it transforms our societies. But when I read this morning about the dictator of Zimbabwe who shuts down the internet in his country, or China doing horrible stuff, or the ever expanding war on fair use by none other than the FTC, it seems advances will be limited to people who can afford them, and that class is shrinking instead of expanding. When the whole system is geared toward gigging, making services cheap and empty, grinding away every cent wherever possible, no formal education and only apprenticeships, it is all hot air. Stuff still need to be owned by someone. Shared ride service still rely on someone that bought a car. The 3D printer still need to be stocked and bought by someone. Yet, this bottom scraping life locks people in place. It could be great to bottom-grate the economy, especially if it relies on a UBI, but I see that the opportunities for savings, early growth, and stability are heavily diminished. It will create a class of people who inherit money and can keep it more easily, and those that live gig to gig, always on the hunt for a few dollars to survive. And all that is without talking about the cost of the devices that will be required to fuel this future.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ailith Twinning

    future tech talks are interesting, but what is throughly disturbing is that none of these authors, beyond a vague awareness that some desperately poor people might live in Africa, evidence any awareness of life outside SF, LA, or maybe Seattle. they see the world thru the lenses of rich, American, tech workers. they neither know nor care about the basic day to day needs of anyone else. that doesn't just screw those worst off in the world, it screws everyone but the richest 0.1% of the world. that future tech talks are interesting, but what is throughly disturbing is that none of these authors, beyond a vague awareness that some desperately poor people might live in Africa, evidence any awareness of life outside SF, LA, or maybe Seattle. they see the world thru the lenses of rich, American, tech workers. they neither know nor care about the basic day to day needs of anyone else. that doesn't just screw those worst off in the world, it screws everyone but the richest 0.1% of the world. that, and the and the absolutely terrifying bias in favor of corporate (totalitarian) control of every aspect of life. The tech is cool, but if we enter that world with these people in charge, almost all of us are fucked. but hey, your watch will be able to book a first class flight to Singapore for a tech show for you.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This is an interesting look at how technology had and will continue to change the world. The author many times talks about future predictions as of they have already happened. I can see many things mentioned happing in the future, but I would still avoid using the phrase "in the future you will..." over and over This is like reading all of major tech articles over the last 5 years, then summarizing them and putting them into a definite future. It is great of you aren't familiar with where we are This is an interesting look at how technology had and will continue to change the world. The author many times talks about future predictions as of they have already happened. I can see many things mentioned happing in the future, but I would still avoid using the phrase "in the future you will..." over and over This is like reading all of major tech articles over the last 5 years, then summarizing them and putting them into a definite future. It is great of you aren't familiar with where we are currently with technology, but if you keep up with the news, there isn't much for your except for having everything in one convenient book. It was an enjoyable book, but something seemed a little off the whole time, although I can't put my finger on it

  8. 5 out of 5

    Darrell

    Mr. King reviews and expands on several ideas that will potentially change the way we lead our lives. Some of the things that are discussed are concepts like automation, personal assistants, smart cars and smart buildings. All of the areas are potentially life-changing and even though some may come fully to fruition it provides a mind-expanding view of what might happen. This book is very interesting in the way that material is presented and then expanded on. There is a lot to think about and op Mr. King reviews and expands on several ideas that will potentially change the way we lead our lives. Some of the things that are discussed are concepts like automation, personal assistants, smart cars and smart buildings. All of the areas are potentially life-changing and even though some may come fully to fruition it provides a mind-expanding view of what might happen. This book is very interesting in the way that material is presented and then expanded on. There is a lot to think about and opens the mental door to other technology considerations. Highly recommended for those that are interested in the impact of technology.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Prophets are smart people. Their predictions never work unless you employ cherry picking and use the power of hindsight to explain the differences. Yet prophets are in high demand. Brett is a smart guy. He won't be alive 40 years from now when probably the text would look more idiotic than a cheap television science fiction show of the 1960s. And who cares? Money in the bag! Prophets are smart people. Their predictions never work unless you employ cherry picking and use the power of hindsight to explain the differences. Yet prophets are in high demand. Brett is a smart guy. He won't be alive 40 years from now when probably the text would look more idiotic than a cheap television science fiction show of the 1960s. And who cares? Money in the bag!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    The future is full of hope! For those who adapt. The new age of humanity is the Augmented Age. An age characterized by awesomely large amounts of data and sophisticated sensors. One where "artificial intelligence" finally supersedes the limited human brain. Automated cars, gene modification, the internet of things, almost total dependence on digital currency, and AI robotics will change the world forever. Connectivity will change the way businesses are run, social interactions are conducted, and g The future is full of hope! For those who adapt. The new age of humanity is the Augmented Age. An age characterized by awesomely large amounts of data and sophisticated sensors. One where "artificial intelligence" finally supersedes the limited human brain. Automated cars, gene modification, the internet of things, almost total dependence on digital currency, and AI robotics will change the world forever. Connectivity will change the way businesses are run, social interactions are conducted, and government is run; old age will begin to become a forgotten nightmare; many genetic and infectious disease will be eliminated; instead of young men and women wasting thousands upon thousands of dollars upon unhelpful degrees, universities might have to transform into teaching more technical and STEM based subjects. Personal health will also find new grounds of potential as sensors shrink smaller and smaller. Does not the future look bright? Your gasoline run car or even your self-piloted car might become illegal in many parts of the country due to pollution and human error. After all, your self-driving car is extremely safe! It simply wouldn't be worth the risk involved! Speaking of countries, automation of customs might eventually dissolve boundaries between nations. Most personal digital privacy should also be abandoned to insure maximum efficiency for yourself and others. Many of the present economic and political theories of the 19th and 20th century might be too antiquated to do much good. These massive changes are really miniscule and can easily be forgotten for the gain of what these technologies replace. In the face of tradition and technological progress, science should mostly if not always be the first consideration toward a better future. In "Augmented: Life in the Smart Lane," Alex Lightman, JP Rangaswami, and Andy Lark take a look at what the next age of technology holds. From the previous industrial revolutions to discussions about privacy and the rights of conscience artificial intelligence, these three men use their unique technical professions and interests to extrapolate what the future holds for mankind.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I wanted to read this book because I tend to be hesitant of new technology, scared of giving up privacy, and worries about the moral implication new tech brings. This book has an overall positive outlook of the technology coming in the not-so-distant future and gives a great historic overview of past disrupters and technological changes, as well as those hesitant to change. Although it is just a prediction of what could happen in the future, the book is well researched and covers many different I wanted to read this book because I tend to be hesitant of new technology, scared of giving up privacy, and worries about the moral implication new tech brings. This book has an overall positive outlook of the technology coming in the not-so-distant future and gives a great historic overview of past disrupters and technological changes, as well as those hesitant to change. Although it is just a prediction of what could happen in the future, the book is well researched and covers many different fields. This book made me more likely to accept new technology into my life and less afraid of the future Some things, however, are still scary and I think the author is a bit too optimistic about some of the moral questions we will have to face in bio-engineering and reaching the singularity, to give a couple examples. I feel more prepared as we push forward into the next decade, knowing what to look out for as emerging technologies or big changes that may be coming. I felt like this was especially important to read as a parent of young kids, to have an understanding of what world they might be coming of age in, and helping them prepare for success as tech becomes more integrated into our lives. I almost labeled this as a “self improvement” book because if even some of the things discussed in the book become true, we need to educated ourselves and our children differently, invest differently, plan for an extended lifespan, etc. I listened as an audiobook, but I think this would be a great book to have on hand and reference back to. Also, some parts certainly went over my head with details, but overall the author did a good job of making in understandable to everyone and not just tech nerds. I recommend this book, it’s full of great insights of what could be our norm in the next 10 to 20 years. I certainly am rooting for the AI personal assistant!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nilesh

    Augmented is a book about the technologies that are currently being worked on. It provides a good overview of many new products/solutions/concepts that are being "innovated". From AI, genetics, bionics, 3-D printing, robotics, AR, VR, automated cars, solar, batteries, nanotech, cryptos, big data, etc, the way we live is going to be overhauled completely in coming years, and the book does a good job giving a glimpse of what is coming. That said, the book provides little new over and above what on Augmented is a book about the technologies that are currently being worked on. It provides a good overview of many new products/solutions/concepts that are being "innovated". From AI, genetics, bionics, 3-D printing, robotics, AR, VR, automated cars, solar, batteries, nanotech, cryptos, big data, etc, the way we live is going to be overhauled completely in coming years, and the book does a good job giving a glimpse of what is coming. That said, the book provides little new over and above what one might get browsing the net on these technologies or by following the announcements of many new-age companies. Whatever the new world ahead is, it will be soon superseded by something else and then else and else. The book makes no attempt to consider beyond the next product cycle. Even if it briefly mentions problems like imminent job losses, there is no discussion beyond the obvious. There is definitely a lot of good information here for anyone reading the book in 2017/18. However, like a good editorial on a fast-developing current affair, this book is going to be extremely dated in no time.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Teo 2050

    2019.11.09–2019.11.11 Contents King B, Lightman A, Rangaswami JP, & Lark A (2016) (12:23) Augmented - Life in the Smart Lane Acknowledgements Introduction Part I: 250 Years of Disruption 01. The History of Technology Disruption • The Industrial or Machine Age (1800–1945) • • Social Effects of the Machine Age • The Atomic, Jet or Space Age (1945–1975) • • Social Impact of Rockets, Tronics and Nukes? • The Information or Digital Age (1975–2015) • • The Most Efficient Profits in History 02. The Augmented Age • I 2019.11.09–2019.11.11 Contents King B, Lightman A, Rangaswami JP, & Lark A (2016) (12:23) Augmented - Life in the Smart Lane Acknowledgements Introduction Part I: 250 Years of Disruption 01. The History of Technology Disruption • The Industrial or Machine Age (1800–1945) • • Social Effects of the Machine Age • The Atomic, Jet or Space Age (1945–1975) • • Social Impact of Rockets, Tronics and Nukes? • The Information or Digital Age (1975–2015) • • The Most Efficient Profits in History 02. The Augmented Age • It’s Happened Before, It Will Happen Again • How Disruption Is Evident through the Ages • Employment Impact • Gigging, Job-hopping and Cloud-based Employment • When Life Is Augmented 03. When Computers Disappear • Networks and Interwebs • The Evolution of the Interface and Interaction Design • Moving from Screens to Sensors • The Progression from Software to Ubiquitous Computing • From CPU on a Chip to Computers in Everything, Everywhere • Can You Tell You Are Talking to a Computer? • The Turing Test or Not… 04. The Robot Advantage (Contributed by Alex Lightman, Edited by Brett King) • Bridging the Uncanny Valley • The Robot Growth Explosion • • Building a Robot in Your Garage? • Living in a Robot-dominated World • • The Emerging Job Requirement of a Robot Skill Base • • Key Themes: Reasons to be Hopeful • • Key Themes: Reasons to be Concerned • • Amazon Loves Robot Workers • The Robot Will See You Now • • Robotic Nurses • • Robots in Eldercare • • Augmenting Care of our Ageing Populations • Humanoid Robots • Do Robots Need to Look like Humans? (Exclusive Interview with Eliot Mack, founder of Lightcraft Technology) • Why Robots Need Empathy • The Big Questions on our Robot Future Part II: How the Smart World Learns 05. Human 2.0 (By Alex Lightman and Brett King) • From Quantified to Activated Self • • Quantified Fitness • • Quantifying the Role of Sleep • • Quantified Calorie Intake • • Hacking Lifespan • • The Activated Self • • Telomere Length • • Ventilatory Capacity (and VO2 Max) • • Sarcopenia • • Osteopenia • • Neuropenia or Neural Degredation • Rethinking Diagnosis and Augmenting Medicine • • Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip Diagnostics • • Personalised and Precision Medicine • Bioaugmentation • • CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN Gene Editing • • Near-term Applications for Gene Therapy (2020–2030) • • Transgenics and Replacement Organs (2025–2040) • • 3D Bioprinting 06. The Augmented Man • We Can Rebuild Him • • The 3D-printed Bionic Man • • Brain–Machine Interfaces • Sensors, Wearables, Ingestibles and Feedback Loops • Enhancing our Senses • • Augmented Reality, Personal HUDs and Vision Enhancement • • Health, Vital Statistics and Biometrics • • Contextual Decision-making and Optimisation • • Vision Optimisation and Enhancement Capabilities (Longer Term) • • Bionic and Binaural Hearing Enhancements • Living with Augmented and Virtual Reality • • The Reality–Virtuality Continuum • • The Mixed Reality Spectrum • Augmented Intelligence 07. Life Stream, Agents, Avatars and Advisers • Living with your Personal Life Stream • • Agent Avatars at your Command • What Hatsune Miku Teaches Us about Avatars • • Facts about Hatsune Miku • Death of a Salesman • • The Big Data Theory: AIs Will Analyse much more Data • • The Best Advice Is Real Time • • Machines Will Be Better at Learning about You Part III: The Augmented Age 08. Trains, Planes, Automobiles and Houses • Living with Self-driving Cars • Beyond the A380, Flying Cars and Robot Drones • Maglev and the Hyperloop • Home Is Where the Smarts Are 09. Smart Banking, Payments and Money • Always Banking, Never at a Bank • • Mobile Is the Bank Account • Impact on the World’s Financial Ecosystem • • No More Credit Cards • The Role of Money in Augmented Commerce • • Making Money More Efficient • • Why We Need a Blockchain • When Your Self-driving Car Has a Bank Account • • Why the Augmented Age Is really Bad for Banks • • FinTech, HealthTech, Everything Tech 10. Trust and Privacy in an Augmented World (Contributed by JP Rangaswami) • Trust Is Connected • • Notifications and Status Alerts • • Contextual Warnings and Alerts • • Access Tokens • • Presence Signalling • Trust Is Always Social • Trust and Privacy at Odds 11. Augmented Cities with Smart Citizens (By Alex Lightman and Brett King) • Why Do We Live in Cities? • Building truly Smart Cities • • Smart Collaboration: Governments and Citizens Working Together • • Smart Transportation Systems • • Smart Grids and Energy Systems • • Smart Health Care • • Smart Pollution Reduction • • Smart Emergency Response Systems • Augmented Cities • • The Potential for Augmented Reality in Cities • • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Smart Cities • • Will AIs Be the “Smart” behind Smart Cities? 12. The New Era of Engagement (Contributed by Andy Lark, Edited by Brett King) • Augmented Moments • • Augmented Service Delivery (2015–2020) • • Experiences Re-invented and Distributed (2020–2025) • • The World of Instant Products (2025–2040) • Reshaping How We Shop • • Four Technology Forces Reshaping the Future of Retail and Travel • • First: Augmented by the Cloud • • Second: Augmented by Mobile and Wearables • • Third: Augmented by Beacons • • Fourth: Augmented by Sensory Experiences • The Impact of Robots and AI on the Retail Industry • • The Machines Are Watching and Listening Conclusions: Life in the Smart Lane • Living in an Augmented World • • The Gigging Japanophile, Hannah King (Age 25), Circa 2027—Tokyo, Japan • • The Biohacker, Alex Lightman (Chronological Age 68, Biological Age 35), Circa 2030—Santa Monica, California, USA • • The Hackathon Apprentice, Matt King (Age 23), Circa 2026—New York (Lower East Side), USA • • The Social Producer, Rachel Morrissey (Age 37), Circa 2023—Bay Area, California, USA • The Big Predictions • • Employment and Business in the Augmented Age—Winners and Losers • The Roadmap for the Augmented Age About the Author About the Contributors

  14. 5 out of 5

    Roberto Hortal

    A hit and miss attempt at futurism. Some of the ideas and facts may be useful to new explorers of the subject. But the (main) author suffers from a strong case of lack of imagination and critical thinking. As an example (spoiler alert!) think about an example featuring a journalist of the future preparing a story with help from an AI who creates a text version - with no images or supporting video! Even today newspapers publish video and interactive media. Not just inability to predict the future A hit and miss attempt at futurism. Some of the ideas and facts may be useful to new explorers of the subject. But the (main) author suffers from a strong case of lack of imagination and critical thinking. As an example (spoiler alert!) think about an example featuring a journalist of the future preparing a story with help from an AI who creates a text version - with no images or supporting video! Even today newspapers publish video and interactive media. Not just inability to predict the future: inability to observe the present!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

    This was a semi interesting overview of all the different technologies currently being developed that promise to alter and enhance our lives. It was overly optimistic, the author totally blew it and missed the point when it came to bitcoin (he repeated that stupid "blockchain not bitcoin" meme that has produced nothing but wasted resources in nearly a decade). He seemed not to consider any of the fundamental challenges or trade offs we're likely to experience. And of course almost all his predic This was a semi interesting overview of all the different technologies currently being developed that promise to alter and enhance our lives. It was overly optimistic, the author totally blew it and missed the point when it came to bitcoin (he repeated that stupid "blockchain not bitcoin" meme that has produced nothing but wasted resources in nearly a decade). He seemed not to consider any of the fundamental challenges or trade offs we're likely to experience. And of course almost all his predictions are conveniently 20-30 years away.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sean Lynn

    Augmented by Brett King looks at the technology of today (2016 at the of publication), and tries to predict future trends in tech. This was a so-so book for me. King doesn't adequate address security concerns, and as this book was written several years ago, many of the companies he references have had large data breaches, or in the case of Theranos, were proven to be frauds. If I had read this book when it was first published, or if it were not so optimistic, I think I would have enjoyed it much m Augmented by Brett King looks at the technology of today (2016 at the of publication), and tries to predict future trends in tech. This was a so-so book for me. King doesn't adequate address security concerns, and as this book was written several years ago, many of the companies he references have had large data breaches, or in the case of Theranos, were proven to be frauds. If I had read this book when it was first published, or if it were not so optimistic, I think I would have enjoyed it much more.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Naive and nothing new. That pretty much sums it up. Idiotic idealism... no one can possibly use these technologies for ill, we won't bother considering the nasty alternatives, the lack of freedom and choice, you'll all miss out if you don't like it and we do not care. Your socialism 2.0 is just authoritarianism 101 with drones. This book comes off as nothing more than naive much like Ramez Naam's Nexus did. Precisely no deeper thought into the philosophies that surround these concepts has been d Naive and nothing new. That pretty much sums it up. Idiotic idealism... no one can possibly use these technologies for ill, we won't bother considering the nasty alternatives, the lack of freedom and choice, you'll all miss out if you don't like it and we do not care. Your socialism 2.0 is just authoritarianism 101 with drones. This book comes off as nothing more than naive much like Ramez Naam's Nexus did. Precisely no deeper thought into the philosophies that surround these concepts has been done.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Vedel

    Outstanding book. It was well written and very informative. It made me think long and hard about the very real possiblities that our future holds and the trends to pay attention to. As I seek to constantly refocus my attention and refresh my skills to stay relevant, this was a great guidebook of what to look for in our very near future. It made me acutely aware of the many things that are moving from science fiction to reality right before our eyes. I would highly recommend it to any that are tr Outstanding book. It was well written and very informative. It made me think long and hard about the very real possiblities that our future holds and the trends to pay attention to. As I seek to constantly refocus my attention and refresh my skills to stay relevant, this was a great guidebook of what to look for in our very near future. It made me acutely aware of the many things that are moving from science fiction to reality right before our eyes. I would highly recommend it to any that are trying to imagine their place in the emerging future that is NOW.

  19. 5 out of 5

    John

    Looking at the future of tech is an interesting study. Some of the near term predictions are lacking at this point, but most of the ideas expressed by the authors do have merit. I enjoyed some of the essays that were included in the book. I got quite a bit of insight into things to do today in preparation for future developments and gained a perspective on how my generation's views of privacy and community will be subject to change. Looking at the future of tech is an interesting study. Some of the near term predictions are lacking at this point, but most of the ideas expressed by the authors do have merit. I enjoyed some of the essays that were included in the book. I got quite a bit of insight into things to do today in preparation for future developments and gained a perspective on how my generation's views of privacy and community will be subject to change.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Excellent book that paints an incredible portrait for the world in the near future and outlines the changes to medicine, education, manufacturing, entertainment, government and much much more. I highly recommend this for anyone who intends to live in the future.

  21. 5 out of 5

    George Hodgson

    A truly eye opening read. What is interesting is that he sees technology affecting our lifestyle and our health, both in a positive way. Like all futurists he should be viewed with some skepticism though.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Ricks

    This gave a decent overview of where our current technologies could go in the next decades but little else. I had hoped for some analysis, some philosophical speculation, some opinion. As it is, the book is very bland. Probably written for a non-tech focused audience.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Terra

    Fascinating look at the current trajectory of tech and the impacts it will have in our life. I compare it to Physics of the Future but this is a little more accessible without needing to be a science geek.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eliram

    Trivial, superficial analysis of what is already quite obvious about current technological trends. Lots of fluff and repetition. This book can be condensed into a magazine article of a few pages. The excessive amount of times Moor’s law is mentioned is quite annoying.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie ( tte) Martinez Dean

    Fascinating look into our future world

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ken Hamner

    Excellent book covering the innovations on the cusp of changing the way we live in the near future.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Did via audio. Not bad. very optimistic view. Lots of real, current examples. Got a bit long, but overall good. 3.5 stars.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bora

    Good reading for understanding how technology changes everything. Teknolojinin neleri değiştirdiğine dair iyi bir okuma.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Richard Hurst

    A fun read, of visions of the future.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karri Wright

    Fascinating ideas! This book left me curious, thoughtful, and inspired.

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